Volume 5
September 3-November 14, 1689

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Joseph Redington (editor)

Year published

1868

Pages

65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76

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'Volume 5: September 3-November 14, 1689', Calendar of Treasury Papers, Volume 1: 1556-1696 (1868), pp. 65-76. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=79451 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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September 3–November 14, 1689

1689.
Sept. 3.
1. “Agents” report on the petition of Mr. Baptist May, which prayed that the Receiver General of the aid in the county of Berks might be discharged from what was assessed on the great park of Windsor, so that the petitioner might be relieved from payment; stating that nothing could be done on the first quarterly payment of the present tax, as it was answered for at the receipt of the Exchequer; but recommending their Lordships to write letters to the Comrs for the second quarterly payment on the county of Berks to cause the sum assessed on the said great park to be discharged, and laid on other lands in that county. Dated 3 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“The Receiver (if he have the money in hand) to repay what is assessed on the great park.”
Also, the petition.
3 pages.
Sept. 3. 2. Letter signed Richard Robinson, by direction of the Duke of Bolton, without address, but commencing “My Lord,” stating that the Duke begged the favour of his Lordship to get the enclosed petition of Lord Willm. Pawlet referred to the Judges for their opinion; and he supposed by his Lordship's assistance it might meet with a favourable answer. Dated 3 Sept. 1689.
¾ page.
Sept. 6. 3. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of John Wilmer, late of London, merchant, setting forth that the office of customer of strangers' duties in the port of London had been managed for about fourscore years by the petitioner's family, and praying that he might be appointed; acquainting their Lordships that they had already reported in favour of Mr. Starkey, and that they saw no cause to depart from the same. Dated 6 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Graunted to Mr. Wilmer.”
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Sept. 7. 4. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Ralph Williamson, controller of customs at Newcastle, stating that they had nothing to object to the renewing of his grant which he sought. Dated 7 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Accompanied by the petition, and a previous report of the said Comrs on the same subject, and the previous petition.
4 pages.
Sept. 9. 5. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Engle Verson, setting forth that his “dogger,” called the “Liberty,” of Mazling Sluice, was taken at sea by a French privateer, and the master and two men taken from aboard, leaving but three men and a boy, putting five Frenchmen to conduct her to Dunkirk; but the petitioner's men overcame the five Frenchmen, and came to England for shelter, and having received damage, then lay at the Hope; praying to be allowed to import the fish in the said “dogger;” recommending that he be allowed to enter the same on payment of the duty. Dated 9 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
pages.
Sept. 9. 6. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Edward Haistwell, of London, merchant, praying liberty to export to Holland and Flanders certain hides brought from Ireland; advising that the case deserved the same equitable relief as that of John Lovet, of the 13th ultimo, in which their Lordship's granted an order for transportation. Dated 9 Sept. 1689.
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Sept. 10. 7. Presentment of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, (1,) stating that they had received their Lordships' pleasure that Mr. Fitch should not be pressed for a sum of 1,200l. by him owing to the Customs, in consideration that His Majesty was indebted to him in a considerable sum for the works of Hull; stating further that he was not indebted to the King but by bills of exchange, drawn upon him for value received of the collector of Hull, to the value of about 800l., and that the nature of bills of exchange was such, that the Receiver General could not neglect to press for payment.
(2,) Moving their Lordships to receive the King's pleasure, touching the taking bonds by the officers of customs of ships clearing out of port, viz., not to go to Ireland or France. Dated 10 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“To be transmitted to the Councell.”
In the Minute Book, Vol. I. p. 130, on 25 October 1689 is the following:—“Mr. Watts, Aldermn Duncombe's servt call'd in & orderd to stopp the protesting Mr Fitch's bills, amounting to 850li. in the whole, till further order, & Mr. Fitch being call'd in, was order'd not to draw any more bills upon expectation that the Lds will do the same hereafter.”
2 pages.
Sept. 10. 8. A paper docquetted:—
“Septr. 10th, 1689.
“Mr Herne
Mr Evance Proposall for returning the 30,000l. to Hamburgh.
“For His Matie.”
The proposal was to furnish 129,000 rix dollars (bank money) in Hamburgh, at 5s. 3d. per rix dollar, &c.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
1 page.
Sept. 12. 9. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of William Broughton and Humphrey Simpson, of London, merchants, stating that they saw no cause to encourage such an importation of beaver skins from Antwerp or Bruges, as was desired by the petitioners, it being to the prejudice of the Hudson's Bay Company, who imported the same commodity in an undoubtedly regular course of navigation directly from the place of the growth. Dated 12 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“The Lds agree with the report not to graunt leave to import the bever skinns.”
Accompanied by the petition and reasons offered for the importation of the same.
3 pages.
Sept. 12. 10. Report of the Comrs of Excise to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Thomas Whitehorn, master of the ship “Leonora,” of London, who, whilst engaged on a trading voyage with wine and brandy from France to the Bahama Island called Gordo, was robbed by an English pirate, and put to great straits, and arrived in the channel with four tuns of brandy; advising that he was a fit object of charity, but that they could not abate the duties on the same, except by their Lordships' warrant. Dated 12 Sept. 1689.
Accompanied by the petition, which is also reported on by Wm. Lowndes, and an affidavit.
pages.
Sept. 17. 11. Presentment from the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury in vindication of their method of proceeding, in putting in officers each in his turn; stating that this method had been in use many years in King Charles' time and since, without the inconvenience pretended, and that it was designed to save the time of the Board by allotting a share equally to each Comr, to find out persons fitly qualified to supply the vacancies that happened; but if His Majesty did not approve they would submit to his pleasure. Dated 17 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“The King commands that the Comrs [of] Customs shall not present to places vacant in their turns, but by the majority of the Board, according to His Maties commands at Hampton Court, the 4th Septr 1689. See the Minute of that day.”
In the Minute Book, Vol. I., p. 100, is:—“His Matie was pleased to tell their Lops he had received information that many places in the Custom House were sold, and that the Comrs of the Customs did take their turns in disposing of places vacant, & order'd their Lops to enquire into this matter, and to take the best care to prevent such practices, and that the persons to be presented by the Comrs for places should be agreed upon at that Board by the majority there; and no particular Commissioner to have a nomination by turne, as His Matie had been inform'd they have of late practised.”
2 pages.
Sept. 18. 12. Presentment made by the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury of the draft of a letter proposed (if approved by His Majesty) to be sent to the people of New England for preserving the Act of Navigation, which they had taken the liberty to violate. Dated 18 Sept. 1689.
This letter shows the various restrictions on colonial trade proposed.
4 pages.
Sept. 19 13. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the report made upon the petition of Samuel Wildgos, acquainting their Lordships that Mr. Randolph, the late officer in New England, held the said office by grant, under the Great Seal, at the salary of 100l. per ann., and that there was great occasion that the said office should be immediately supplied. Dated 19 Sept. 1689. Accompanied by the report and the petition.
Minuted:—“To be further considered.”
In the Minute Book, Vol. I., p. 126, on 21 Oct. 1689, is:—“The Comrs of the Customs call'd & being ask'd their opinion touching an officer to be sent to New England to take care to prevent the breach of the Act of Navigation there, and they deliver'd their opinion, that it was necessary for His Maties service that such an officer should be sent thither, and their Lops directed them to re-examin Mr. Wildgos for his fittness to that employmt, & if they do not fynd him capable that they do present some other person that is qualify'd for the same employment.”
The petition states that the office of collector, surveyor, and searcher of customs in New England was void, by reason Mr. Randolph was in prison for his disaffection and confederacy against the Government, and the petitioner sought for the place.
3 pages.
Sept. 19. 14. Memorial of Sir Chr Wren to the Lords of the Treasury, for allowance of 1,000l. for the buildings at Hampton Court, and 500l. for the building at Kensington; praying them to take into consideration the ordinary allowance for the repairs of the King's houses, and for the reasons therein stated, to grant one quarter's allowance, viz., 3,000l., or weekly payments. Dated 19 Sept. 1689.
1 page.
Sept. 20. 15. Letter of Willm. Blathwayt to William Jephson, Esq., directing that 3,000l. should be immediately remitted upon account to Mr. Fielding, at Edinburgh, for the maintenance of the troops on their arrival in Scotland. Dated 20 Sept. 1689.
¾ page.
Sept. 23. 16. Copy of petition of the Hon. Sir Vere Fane, K.B., Thomas Mun and John Farthing, Esqres, to the King, showing that they had heretofore delivered a petition and proposals for an additional improvement of the revenue of excise, viz., 80,000l. per annum, which petition and proposals were by their Lordships delivered to the Comrs of Excise to make their report, to which report the petitioners had given in an answer which justified their charge upon them, proved a surcharge of 160,000l., and upwards, according to their own report, and offered to show that a sum of 1,000l. a week more was converted to other ends [than] their Majesties service. They had learnt that new Comrs were to be forthwith chosen, who offered to advance 100,000l. at 6 per cent. to the King, but the petitioners had offered to declare where the King had 500,000l. and more in good responsible hands, unknown to the King and their Lordships; that there was 100,000l. per ann. employed some way out of the revenue of excise, and it was well if not to assist the enemies of His Majesty's peace and the Protestant interest. They had offered their service to prevent such gross abuses, and had proposed such a management of the excise that the interest of the King and his subjects might be inseparable; entreating the King to give speedy order that their proposals be either accepted or enquired into, and that they might be appointed of the Kings Comrs, or come in as managers, “which is noe new thing.” Dated 23 Sept. 1689.
Further proposals offered by them (seeing their late answer to the report of the late Comrs of Excise had not had the issue they expected) by which they would increase the 80,000l. to 100,000l. without loan or interest, and offering to find 500,000l. or more if desired, due to the King, in good responsible hands, &c. [as in the petition]; adding that if their Lordships had a desire to be privately informed they were ready to do it, or they would act publicly, or they must beg their Lordships' leave to lay these things openly to the world before the King and Parliament, that by their services to the Crown (which were greater than had ever yet been offered by any other persons in that nature) it might appear whether they deserved less encouragement than those who neither did nor could propose anything so considerable.
Also, “Objections offered that the new intended Comrs of Excise may not be alsoe managers, and humbly desired to be answer'd before their comon passes the seale.”
The objections are as to their fitness for the office, and the loss that would arise to the revenue.
3 pages.
Sept. 24. 17. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, upon a memorial of the Principal Comrs for Prizes, touching a parcel of Martinico tobacco, condemned as prize, now in the port of Plymouth; stating they conceived the difference of the duty upon tobacco of English and foreign plantations was, to encourage the product of our own plantations; and in this case the goods might be exported, paying only half the subsidy on tobacco of English plantations. Dated 24 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Accompanied by the memorial referred to.
2 pages.
Sept. 25. 18. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of James Lordes and other Portugal merchants, reciting a former petition wherein they prayed the discharge of the seizure of the ship “Madre d' Deos,” with her lading of oils, and then praying a re-examination of the matter; advising that the attorney might be directed to “non pros.” the information. Dated 25 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
2 pages.
Sept. 25. 19. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Job Dowle, searcher of customs in the port of Gloucester; stating that they had nothing to object to the renewal of his patent, which he craved. Dated 25 Sept. 1689.
Accompanied by the petition and a certificate.
3 pages.
Sept. 28. 20. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of John Gardner of London, merchant, and owner of the ship “Owner's-good-will,” arrived from Barbadoes, praying the discharge of the said ship from seizure under the Navigation Act, for not having three-fourths English mariners; advising that it seemed a case of necessity and entitled to relief. Dated 28 Sept. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Accompanied by the petition and two affidavits.
pages.
Oct. 3. 21. Letter of Thomas Penington to [William] Jephson, Esq., Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, stating that it was 9 o'clock in the evening before the messenger could be despatched, and acquainting him, “by his Lopps order,” that the King had chosen the “reverse enclos'd” [for the farthings ordered by him]. Dated Newmarket, 3 Oct. 1689. Accompanied by the said “reverse,” together with an imprint of the obverse for the said coin, each on parchment.
1 page (quarto).
Oct. 3. 22. Order made by the Committee for the affairs of Ireland for the officers of the customs at Chester, Liverpool, and Highlake, to pay to Capt. Henry Greenhill, one of the officers employed in hiring ships for transporting the army into Ireland, a sum not exceeding 1,000l., viz., for the transport of the Danish troops. Dated 3 Oct. 1689.
½ page.
Oct 7. 23. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Joseph Little, stating that they had nothing to object to the employment of the petitioner as deputy of Mr. A. Price, one of the patent waiters of the port of London. Dated 7 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Mr. Little to be admitted deputy.”
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Oct. 9. 24. “Computation of the pay, subsistence, &c., for the Danish forces for a week.” 9 Oct. [16]89.
1 page.
Oct. 10. 25. “The further peticion of the Honble Sir Vere Fane, Knt of the Bath, Thomas Mun, and John Farthing, Esqres, to the King,” stating that one of the petitioners was informed that the patent for the new Comrs was to pass the seal before the hearing the proposals and objections enclosed; desiring (as he had come on purpose) to be heard, or that the patent might be stopped, &c. Dated on the dorse, Oct. 10th, 89.
¾ page.
Oct. 14. 26. Presentment of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury concerning certain wines shipped at Barcelona in Spain, by John Jolliffe, of London, merchant, which wines would in strictness be forfeited, having been landed in Holland to be re-hooped; laying the case before their Lordships as a matter fit to be relieved. Dated 14 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
1 page.
Oct. 16. 27. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, stating that they had examined Thomas Mason as to his qualifications as a tide surveyor of London, in place of Willm. Cook, dismissed, and that it was very probable he had fitted himself, for the employment; but they had already presented Richard Hurleston for the service, it being one of the standing rules of the Board to advance those who had well deserved in an inferior station, and in confidence of their Lordships' accepting him they had sent one of those distressed Protestants of Ireland whom His Majesty vouchsafed to be mindful of, to supply the said Hurleston's place at Whitby. Dated 16 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to for Mr Hurlestone also.”
In the Minute Book, Vol. I., p. 124, on 17 Oct. 1689, is the following entry:—
“The Board takeing notice of a presentment from the Comrs of the Customs of the 16th inst., touching Richard Hurleston to be a tyde surveyor in the port of London, their Lops doe agree to it; and doe order that the first vacancy that happens, in the sd port, either of land waiter or tyde surveyor, shall be fill'd up with Mr. Thomas Mason, a pretender to the place of tyde surveyor, that Mr ‘Hursleton’ is now admitted to.”
1 page.
Oct. 17. 28. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Nicholas Booker, late searcher of the port of Kingston-upon-Hull, stating that it had been the practice to order the payment of salaries to all persons for the time they served; and they thought it reasonable that the petitioner should enjoy both salary and fees for the time he executed the office. Dated 17 Oct. 1689.
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Oct. 19. 29. Report of Mr. Aaron Smith, relating to a charge made by one Mr. Guest against Mr. MacCartney of favouring the late King James' party in Ireland, and of defrauding their present Majesties of certain moneys received for the customs at Belfast; entirely in favour of the said Mr. MacCartney. Dated 19 Oct. 1689.
Amongst other things he says, “Upon the approach of the Lord Tyrconnel's army to Dromore in the north of Ireland, in March last, Mr. McCartney with many others was forced to leave the kingdom in a great hurry,” &c.
The petition: the true state of the case, and a certificate in his favour.
Minuted:—“The Lds agree to this report.”
4 pages and two ½ pages.
Oct. 22. 30. A paper headed:—“Memorand. for the workes, 22 Oct. 89,” being a memorial [from the Board of Works], stating that the annual reduced allowance for the ordinary repairs of their Majesties houses was 6,000l., for which nothing had been received since Midsummer was 12 months, although more repairs had been done than usual, both at Whitehall and St. James's; the whole charge of which from Dec. [16]88 to Oct. [16]89 amounted to 4,759l. and by means of the great arrear upon the “ordinary,” the credit of the office was very much exhausted; praying for an allowance of 3,000l. at 1,000l. a week, a 1,000l. for the new building at Hampton Court, and 500l. for the works at Kensington.
1 page.
Oct. 23. 31. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of Ann Hutchins for the delivery of certain sword-blades; submitting the consideration of the case to their Lordships as one of compassion, the petitioner's husband being a Dutchman, and by trade a sword-cutler at Rotterdam, having shipped 24 dozen of sword blades to set up in business in England, which blades were thereby forfeited. Dated 23 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Graunted.”
Accompanied by the petition and a certificate.
4 pages.
Oct. 25. 32. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of Francis Spendlove, controller of customs in the port of Yarmouth; stating that they had nothing to object to the renewing of the grant of that office. Dated 25 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Oct. 26. 33. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of Peter Houblon, of London, merchant, owner and freighter of the “Olivebranch” of London; praying liberty to discharge 20 tons of raisins in this port, and to proceed with the rest of the cargo to Amsterdam. Stating they conceived the case was fit for their Lordships' favourable consideration. Dated 26 Oct. 1689.
Minuted:—“Order'd.”
Accompanied by the petition.
2 pages.
Nov. 3. 34. Report of Nicholas Hutchings to the Right Hon. Charles, Earl of Shrewsbury, Principal Secretary of State; touching the seizure of the ship “Two Brothers” on her arrival at Bilboa laden with fish and hides, instead of tobacco. Dated “Bilboa,” 3 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“The Comrs of Customs will take care of this.”
½ page.
Oct. 11 &
Nov. 5.
35. Reports of Sir J. Somers, Solicitor General, and Mr. Aaron Smith on the petition of Mr. Beaufoy, touching concealed lands in the Tower liberties, and the rights of the Crown to certain houses of considerable value (viz., 1,000l. a year and upwards); and also in favour of the continued employment of the said Mr. Beaufoy as attorney for the prosecution of the Crown's rights, and for payment of his claim for costs. Dated 11 Oct. and 5 Nov. 1689.
Also divers papers relating thereto, amongst which one is headed,—
“The tenants and rents upon Little Tower Hill to wch their Majties lay claime,” and
“The tennts & rents att the end of the Minories wth in the Tower libertie, to wch their Majties lay claime.”
In the Minute Book, Vol. I. p. 213, on the 6th of Feb. 1689–90 is the following entry:—
“Order'd that Mr Beaufoy have 100li towards the charge of the suit at law for the houses at Tower Hill.”
8 pages and 4 parts of pages.
Nov. 7. 36. Report of the Comrs of Excise to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Sarah Dodd and Sarah Fletcher, widows, the former of whose goods were seized by the sheriff for a claim of 170l. by the excise on the said Sarah Dodd, she having had that amount from Mr. Frith, collector of excise in Chester, and drawn bills on the said Sarah Fletcher which were not met owing to the rebellion in Ireland; praying that the goods might not be sold: the Comrs state that they could not relinquish the claim, nor accept the security offered. Dated 7 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“The Lds do agree to take off the seizures and accept the security propos'd.”
Accompanied by the petition, two certificates, and a power of attorney.
4 pages and 2 parts of pages.
Nov. 7. 37. Order made by the Committee for the affairs of Ireland to the Lords of the Treasury to furnish Mr. Greenhill, officer of the Navy at Highlake, or Mr. Fielding, in Scotland, with credit to buy up and put on board ship seven days' provisions for the troops in their passage from Scotland to Ireland, also to furnish the officers of the navy then at “Loghrian” [Loch Ryan] with further credit. 7 Nov. 1689.
½ page.
Nov. 8. 38. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, upon the petition of Robert Culliford, controller of the customs in the port of Southampton, stating that they had nothing to object to the renewal of the grant of his office. Dated 8 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Accompanied by the petition and a report of 4 April 1689, on a previous petition (also enclosed) on the same subject.
4 pages.
Nov. 8. 39. Presentment of the Comrs of Excise, addressed to the Lords of the Treasury, stating that they had received complaints from the collectors of excise in several counties, on behalf of the supervisors and gaugers, that they were assessed 12d. in the pound for the full of their salaries, which were paid each month or six weeks; which assessment, if they were forced to pay, in the winter a great number must sell their horses; praying their Lordships' favour. [In the margin is this Minute:—“Lett them pay the tax, and upon a representation to the King the Lds will intercede with His Matie to allow it them upon the next quarterly bill.”] Laying also before their Lordships a list of bills of exchange, drawn on the Comrs for victualling the Navy and the Comrs of the Navy, amounting to 2,333l. 12s. 7d. for money by them received from collectors and other officers of the revenues of excise and hearth money, which bills they had accepted and refused to pay; further laying before their Lordships a list of several sums of money, received by divers Lords and gentlemen in the late revolutions, from various collectors of excise, amounting to 11,376l. 7s. 11¼d., and from the collectors of the hearth money 2,217l. 3s. 3d.; praying directions. Dated 8 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“For the King.”
Accompanied by the said lists of bills, &c.
6 pages and 2 half pages.
Nov. 9. 40. Presentment of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury, seeking that an experiment should be tried in relation to the bounty for seizing wools transported contrary to law; viz., instead of the bounty of one moiety of their Majesties' part of the forfeitures to the seizer, His Majesty should bear the charge of prosecution of all seizures and all offences against the said laws; or else that the proclamation, for giving a moiety of His Majesty's part, might be renewed. Dated 9 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“The Lds do agree to the first way and will order money to be issued out by incidents, for defraying the charge.”
1 page.
Nov. 12. 41. Letter signed ‘Jn. Wood,’ addressed to the Comrs of Customs, enclosing an information of an accident upon the coast at Clay in Norfolk, by which Capt. Von Schilder was driven on shore, he having sailed with the Danish fleet, which consisted of about eight men-of-war and 90 sail of other ships for soldiers, amounting to 6,000 foot and 1,000 horse. Dated 12 Nov. 1689.
Accompanied by the said information.
pages.
Nov. 13. 42. Report to the Lords of the Treasury, on the petition of Thomas Mathewes, gent., “Receiver Genl of the present aid, for the county of Hereford;” in favour of his being allowed 80l. for his extraordinary charges and disbursements. Dated 13 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
The petition referred to and the account of his disbursements. [He claimed 110l. for bringing up 6,500l. in two journeys to the Exchequer; 14 horses and 10 men were employed.]
3 pages.
Nov. 13. 43. Report of the Comrs of Customs to the Lords of the Treasury on the petition and papers of Richard Rickards, of London, merchant, stating that they had examined his case and there appeared divers instances of his fair dealing, which gave great probability of the sincerity of his future intentions; and that they conceived the petitioner might deserve their Lordships' compassion for the time desired for the recovery of his debts, as His Majesty would benefit thereby. Dated 13 Nov. 1689.
Minuted:—“Agreed to.”
Docquetted:—“Report on the petition and papers of Richard Rickards, merchant of London, indebted to the King 934ll 15ss 7dd; recommended by the Comrs of the Customes to have a yrs time allow'd him to get in his debts, in order to satisfy His Maty; with Mr. Wards opinion, that ‘Mr. Richards’ cannot receive or release the debts that are seized to secure what he owes the Crowne.”
Accompanied by the petition and four other papers.
8 pages.
Nov. 13. 44. Copy of letter of the Lords of the Treasury, appointing William Upcott of Truro, in the county of Cornwall, Esq. to be one of the four supervisors of the tin blowing houses in the counties of Cornwall and Devon. Dated 13 Nov. 1689.
2 pages.
[About
Nov. 14.]
45. Petition of Thomas Povey to the King, stating that he had enjoyed the office of Master of Requests, with the fee of 100l. a year, which office had been discontinued by King James; praying that if he might not be restored to the office, yet that he might have the 100l. per ann.
Considered at the Court at Whitehall, on 14 Nov. 1689, and referred by the Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Treasury.
pages.