V. The Achilles
Letters - 1758

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Navy Record Society

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Author

D. Bonner-Smith (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

194-235

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'V. The Achilles: Letters - 1758', The Barrington Papers, volume 1: Publications of the Navy Records Society, vol. 77 (1937), pp. 194-235. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=79642 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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V. The Achilles

By the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Sir Edward Hawke, (fn. 1) Admiral of the Blue, and follow his directions and orders for your further proceedings. Given under our hands the 5th March 1758.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson. Geo. Hay. J. Forbes.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

By Sir Edward Hawke, Kt. of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue, and Commander in Chief of a Squadron of His Majesty's Ships employed and to be employed in the Channel Soundings or else wherever His Majesty's Service shall require.

You are hereby required and directed to use the utmost dispatch in getting His Majesty's Ship under your command fit for sea in every respect. As soon as she shall be ready you are to make the best of your way down Channel, and when you are got the length of Ushant, open the sealed Rendezvous you receive herewith and strictly follow my directions therein for your further proceedings, for which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies off Plymouth 13 March 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Ed Hawke.

By command of the Admiral, J. Hay.

By Henry Harrison, Esq., ViceAdmiral of the Blue, &c.

Sir Edward Hawke having informed me that he will order an Officer to call in the offing for the Ship you command to proceed to sea in his company, for which purpose he will hoist a Jack Flag at his Maintopmast head and fire a Gun;

You are hereby required and directed, notwithstanding former Orders, to keep yourself in constant readiness in the Sound when you get thither, to push out and join him accordingly on his appearance which you may expect every day.

Given under my hand on board the Prince Edward in Hamoze the 25th April 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.H. Harrison.

By Edward Pratten, Esq., Captain of His Majesty's Ship Intrepid.

Pursuant to an Order from Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, Admiral of the Blue and Commander in Chief of His Majesty's Ships and Vessels employed and to be employed in the Channel Soundings and wheresoever His Majesty's Service shall require,

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command and follow all such Orders as you shall receive from me for His Majesty's Service.

Given under my hand at sea this 26th April 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Edwd Pratten.

Additional Signals
1st
If I would have a particular Ship go ahead at such a distance as plainly to discern Signals, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain of that Ship and hoist a Flag striped red, white, and blue at the Maintopgallant mast head.

2nd
If I would have a particular Ship fall astern so as to be able to distinguish Signals, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain of that Ship, and hoist the same Flag at the Mizentopgallant mast head.

3rd
And if I would have any particular Ship speak with a Ship standing into the Squadron, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain of that Ship and hoist the same Flag on the Ensign Staff.
Edwd Pratten.

Additional Signals by Captain Pratten

The Signal for seeing a sail by day:

NEa French JackMizen Peek
NWa Dutch Jack
SEa French JackEnsign Staff
SWa Dutch Jack

Which when I answer by hoisting a French Jack or Ensign on the Ensign Staff, you are to lower as often as you shall see strange Ships.

The Signal for discovering strange Ships in the night:

NEone Lightone under the other at the Mizen Peek.
NWtwo Lights
SEthree Lights
SWfour Lights

Which I will answer by hoisting one Light on the Ensign Staff, which as soon as you observe, you are to burn as many false Fires as you see strange Ships. After which, if I would have you to chace, I will burn two false Fires; and if I would have the Ship that is afterward the nearest to the strange Ships discovered chace with you, I will burn two false Fires more, in a small space of time; and if I myself should discover any strange Ship or Ships and give chace, I will hoist the Signal Lights, to show on what Quarter of the Compass and fire a Gun.

Addition to the 16th Article of Signals by Day
And if I would have all the Ships to chace, I will hoist the Flag for chacing either to windward or to leeward, and a Pendant of the same colour at the Mizen Peek.

XXIII
When I would have any particular Ship to keep at half a mile distance, ahead of the Squadron during the night, carrying a Light in his Stern Lanthorn, I will at sunset put abroad a Pendant for speaking with the Captain of the Ship I would have perform that service, and hoist the Flag for chacing on that Quarter of the Compass on the Flagstaff on the Mizentopgallant mast head.

XXIV
When I would have any particular Ship to make sail to leeward, or astern, to take any Merchant Ship or Tender in Tow and bring her into the Fleet, I will hoist a St George's Ensign at the Mizen Peek and put abroad a Pendant for speaking with the Captain of the Ship I would have perform that service.

Addition by Night
When I would have a Lieutenant from each Ship in the Squadron come on board of me, I will hoist three Lights on the Ensign Staff and fire a Gun.

Fighting Instructions by Night
1st
And for the better knowing each other coming up with or engaging the enemy, every Ship shall carry two Lights of equal height, at the Mizen Peek, and the headmost Ship another in her Stern Lanthorn, but the Light in her Stern Lanthorn shall only be carried whilst she keeps sight of the Chace; and I besides my proper Light will carry one at the Bowsprit End, which I will likewise do when any Ships are ordered, or are by accident ahead of me.

2nd
To draw into a Line of Battle ahead is two Lights in the Maintopmast Shrouds, one above another, with or without a Gun.

3rd
And when in a Line of Battle I would have the headmost Ships tack first, I will shew two Lights, one under the other, at the Bowsprit End, besides the usual Signal for Tacking, and each Ship ahead of me is to repeat it.

An Addition to the ist Article of the Fighting Instructions
And every Ship is strictly to keep the same distance, that those Ships do that are nearest to me, always taking it from the Centre.

13th
As close as possible, and therefore on no account to fire till you shall be within pistol shot.

When I would have the Fireships prime, I will hoist a Dutch Pendant at the Maintopmast head.

Alteration in Additional Signals of the Sailing Instructions by Day
To chace from North to East, a St George's Ensign.

from East to South, a Dutch Ensign.

from South to West, a Red Ensign.

from West to North, a Blue Ensign.

Ships chacing on any Quarter of the Compass to come into the Fleet, the Chacing Flag at the Foretopgallant mast head.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Intrepide off Plymouth Sound the 26 April 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Edwd Pratten.

Private Signals by Day
In case of meeting, the Ship to windward shall haul up their Foresail, and lower the Foretopsail, and clew up the Mizentopsail; the Ship to leeward shall answer with lowering the Maintopsail and Mizentopsail; then the Ship who first made the Signal shall hoist a Blue Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head, and an Union Jack at the Foretopgallant mast head; and the other shall answer it by hoisting a St George's Ensign at the Foretopgallant mast head, and an Union Jack at the Mizentopmast head.

By Night
The Ship to windward shall shew three Lights in a triangle, [diagram] thus, at the Mizen Peek and two Lights of equal height in the Mizen Shrouds; the other shall answer by shewing three Lights in the Fore, and three in the Mizen Shrouds of equal height; then the Ship who made the Signal first, shall burn three false Fires, and the other shall answer by burning two. If within hail, he who hails first shall ask: What Ship's that? the other shall answer: God save the King. The other shall reply: Halifax.

N.B. You are to take particular care not to chace out of sight, but join me always before dark.
E. P.

By Edward Pratten, Esq., Captain of His Majesty's Ship Intrepid.

You are hereby required and directed to land thirty men from His Majesty's Ship under your command to the Raisonable, (fn. 2) for which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand at sea this 30th April 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Saml. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Edwd Pratten.

By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of the Right Hon. Lord Anson, ViceAdmiral of Great Britain and Admiral of the White, and follow his Orders (fn. 3) for your further proceedings.

Given under our hands 13th May 1758.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles at Spithead.Geo. Hay. Thos. Orby Hunter. Gilbert Elliott. Jno Forbes. N. Stanley.

By command of their Lordships, J. Clevland.

Memorandum
The Newark's Station in the Line of Battle is between the Ramillies and the Duc d'Aquitain, and the Union's Station is between the Royal George and the Fouqeux.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at St Helens the 29th May 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of His Lordship, Philip Stephens.

By James Douglas, Esq., Commander of His Majesty's Ship Alcide.

Pursuant to an Order (fn. 4) from the Right Honble. Lord Anson, Vice-Admiral of Great Britain and Admiral of the White; You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command and follow such Orders and Instructions as you shall receive from me from time to time for His Majesty's Service, for which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Alcide at sea the 3rd June 1758.

To the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.James Douglas.

Memo
In case of separation while we are absent from the Fleet, the Rendezvous is to be between six and ten leagues west from Ushant, and not joining me in two days afterwards, you are to proceed to Lord Anson's secret Rendezvous.

Dated on board the Alcide at sea 3rd June 1758.

To the Hon. Saml. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.James Douglas.

Additional Signals by Captain Douglas By Day

1st

The Signal to be made for seeing a Sail in the

Upon seeing a sail.

NEa French Jackat Mizen Peek
NWa Dutch Jack
SEa French Jackat Ensign Staff
SWa Dutch Jack

2nd
A French Jack. A blue Pendant.
Which when I answer by hoisting a French Jack on the Ensign Staff, then he who made the Signal is to lower it as often as he sees strange Ships; but when you are at such a distance, that the Signal at the Mizen Peek and Ensign Staff cannot easily be observed, you are to make the NE and NW Signals at the Foretopgallant mast head, and the SE and SW at the Mizentopmast head, which I will answer by a blue Pendant at the Maintopgallant mast head.

3rd
To give chace.
When I would have any particular Ship or Ships give chace to the windward or leeward or any Quarter of the Compass, I will make the Signals as directed in the General Printed Instructions; and if I would have all the Ships give chace, I will hoist the Chacing Flag in the Mizen Shrouds and a Pendant at the Mizen Peek.

4th
A white flag.
When I would have them give over chace, I will hoist a white Flag on the Flagstaff at the Maintopmast head; and when I would have the Ships on any particular Quarter of the Compass leave off chace, I will hoist the Flag for Chacing on that Quarter of the Compass.

5th & 6th
Coming up with the chace a red Ensign.
If at any time I make the Signal for the Ships to give over chace, and they should find they come up with the Enemy, so as to be able to speak with her, they are to hoist a red Ensign at the Mizen Peek and fire a Gun; but if I should repeat the Signal by firing one or two Guns, they are then notwithstanding to leave off chace and stand to me.

7th
To speak with strange ships.
If at any time a strange Ship should stand into the Squadron, and I would have a particular Ship speak with her, I will make the Signal to speak with the Captain, and hoist a Flag half red and half white at the Ensign Staff.

8th
Discovering the chace to be an enemy. 8:9 a Dutch Ensign.
If any Ship should discover the Chace to be an Enemy, he is to give me notice by hoisting a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Peek and fire two Guns; and if he discover her to be an Enemy, and believe he shall come up with her, without losing company with me, he shall then hoist the Dutch Ensign at the Mizentopmast head and fire two Guns.

9th
To tack in chacing upon a wind.
If in chacing upon a wind I would have any particular Ship to tack, I will make the Signal to speak with the Captain and hoist a Dutch Ensign on the Flagstaff at the Foretopmast head, if the Ship I would have tack is ahead of me; and if astern, I will hoist the same Flag on the Flagstaff at the Mizentopmast head, and fire one Gun if the Signal should not be observed immediately.

10th
To give over chace 10 and 11 a Dutch Ensign.
If I would have the Ships give over chace and join me, I will make the proper Signal for calling them in, which Signal the Ship or Ships between me and the chacing Ships are to be careful and to look out, and to make known to them, by hoisting a Dutch Ensign at the Foretopgallant mast head and fire a Gun; and they are likewise to be careful to repeat all Signals which the chacing Ships make.

11th
Ships in chace discovering the enemy to be of superior force a Dutch Ensign.
If in chace you perceive the Ships you are in chace of to be an Enemy of superior force, you are to hoist a Dutch Flag at the Maintopmast head and fire guns, till they are answered by my firing a Gun.

13th
Ship or ships chacing to alter their course a flag striped blue and white.
If at any time I would have the Ship or Ships in chace alter their course, I will hoist a Flag striped blue and white, at the Mizen Peek; then the Ship or Ships in chace are to answer by hoisting a Common Pendant at the same place; when I will lower or hoist the Signal as many times as I would have them steer Points to windward. If to leeward I will fire a Gun. If in chacing before the wind, it is to be understood without a Gun to starboard, and with a Gun to port.

14th
Chacing out of sight to make themselves known a Dutch flag.
If any Ship shall at any time chace out of sight, she is to make herself known, as soon as she discovers me again, by hoisting a Dutch Flag at the Maintopgallant mast head, which I will answer by hoisting a Dutch Flag at my Foretopgallant mast head.

16th
A particular ship make more sail a flag striped white and blue.
When I would have a particular Ship make more sail, I will put abroad a Pendant for speaking with the Captain, and hoist a Flag striped white and blue at the Maintopmast head.

17th
To close me every evening.
Every night the Ships are constantly to close me, so as to run no hazard of separation; and if I would have them close me sooner, I will make the Signal to call in all Cruizers, which is to be repeated without a Gun by the Ships at a distance from me; if those without them don't take notice of it, and if it is not observed, then they are to fire a Gun; but if any Ships are in chace, an equal number only, the headmost and nearest Ships are to pursue if they discover it to be an Enemy, and have a likelihood of coming up with it, and the rest are to join me as above directed.

18th
To make sail in order to make the land a blue flag.
When I would have any Ships make sail upon any Quarter of the Compass, in order to make the land, I will put abroad the Pendant for speaking with the Captain, and hoist the Signal Flag for Chacing on that Quarter, and a blue Flag at the Foretopmast head; then such Ship is to make sail accordingly, and when she shall have made the land, she is to return to me with her Ensign spread at her Maintopmast head and her Captain is to acquaint me therewith.

19th
A particular ship to take a prize in tow a St George's flag.
When I would have any Ship sail to leeward or astern, to take any Merchant Ship, Tender, or Prize in tow, I will hoist a St George's Flag in the Mizen Shrouds and put abroad the Pendant for speaking with the Captain of the Ship I would have perform that office.

21st
All prizes to come within hail a white flag pierced with blue.
When I would have a particular Ship's Prize come under my stern, I will make that Ship's Signal for speaking with the Captain, and hoist a white Flag pierced with blue at the Ensign Staff; and if I would have all the Prizes come under my stern, I will hoist the same Flag at the Ensign Staff and a Pendant at the Mizen Peek.

22nd
The Squadron to spread in a line ahead a red flag. In a line abreast a white flag pierced with blue.
Whenever the weather will allow the Squadron to spread in a Line ahead, at a league distance, I will hoist a red Flag at the Mizen Peek; if two leagues, a blue Pendant under it; if in a line abreast, at a league distance, a white Flag pierced with blue; if two leagues a red Pendant under it. As soon as observed, I will haul down; and when I would have the Squadron join again, I will hoist a white Flag at the Foretopmast head.

24th
A ship to stay by a prize a blue flag pierced with white. To leave her a Dutch flag.
If in the time of our cruizing, we should happen to have any Prizes in company with us and upon making sail I would have any Ship stay with them, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain, and hoist a blue Flag pierced with white in the Mizen Shrouds; and if I should find it afterwards necessary for him to leave them and follow me, I will hoist a Dutch Flag at the Mizen Peek and fire a Gun, and he is then to join me as fast as possible.

27th
To look out on any quarter of the compass.
When I would have any particular Ship look out on any Quarter of the Compass, though no strange sail to [sic] be in sight, I will [make] the Signal for speaking with the Captain of that Ship, and hoist the Chacing Flag on the Ensign Staff.

28th
To keep on the weather beam, a white flag with a blue cross, and upon the lee beam, a blue flag with a white cross.
When I would have a particular Ship keep upon my weather beam, at such a distance as plainly to discover Signals, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain of that Ship, and hoist a white Flag with a blue Cross, at the Ensign Staff; and if I would have her keep upon the lee beam, a blue Flag with a white Cross, at the same place.

30th
To bring the chace down to me, a blue flag with a white cross.
When I would have the Ship who chaces, bring her Chace down to me, I will hoist a blue Flag with a white Cross at the Foretopmast head.

31st
Weekly accounts a flag half red half white.
When I make the Signal for all Lieutenants of a particular Ship, with the addition of a white and red Flag at the Mizen topmast head, you are then to send your Weekly Accounts on board.

Additional Signals by Night
1st
As it is necessary in cruizing that the Signals should be made with as few Guns as possible, I will in fair weather make them with Lights only, as directed by the General Printed Instructions, excepting the cases following:

2nd
To brace too and lay by.
If when sailing upon a wind I would have the Squadron brace too and lay by, I will shew four Lights of equal height in the fore Shrouds and fire a Gun.

3rd
Sailing large or before the wind, to bring too and lay by.
When sailing large or before the wind, I would have them bring too with their starboard Tacks on board, I will shew four Lights of equal height in the fore Shrouds, and fire one Gun; but if with the larboard Tacks on board, I will shew the same number of Lights of equal height in the Mizen Shrouds, and Fire two Guns.

4th
When I would have the Squadron make sail after laying by, I will hoist one Light at the Mizen Peek, and two Lights on the Ensign Staff, but at a greater distance asunder than when the Signal is made for tacking, so as that the lowermost Light may be of the same distance from the uppermost as from the Light carried in the Storm Lanthorn, and I will at the same time Fire two Guns. Nevertheless if by reason of weather, any of the Ships be at a distance, or I shall on any other account judge it necessary, I will make the Signals as directed by the General Printed Instructions.

5th
If any discovers a strange Ship or Ships, he shall hoist if to the

NEone Light at the Mizen Peek
NWtwo Lightsone under the other at the Mizen Peek
SEthree Lights
SWfour Lights

Upon discovering strange ships.
Which I will answer by hoisting one Light on the Ensign Staff, which as soon as you observe you are to burn as many false fires as you see strange Ships; after which if I would have you chace, I will burn two false fires, and if I would have the Ship that is afterward the nearest to the strange Ships discovered chace with you, I will burn two false fires more in a small space of time afterwards; and if I myself should discover any strange Ship or Ships and give chace, I will hoist the Signal Lights, to shew on what Quarter of the Compass, and fire one Gun.

6th
To give over chace.
When I would have the Ship or Ships give over chace, I will fire two Guns without alteration of Lights, but at a less space of time one from another than when the Signal is made for anchoring.

7th
To tack or wear.
When the Signal is made to tack or wear in the night, every Ship is to hoist a Light in her Mizen Peek, and not to take it in, until he is about on the other Tack.

8th
If you should have occasion to speak with me in the night, you shall shew one Light at each Yard Arm of the Foretopsail yard, and Fire a Gun if you find it necessary.

9th
And for the better knowing each other coming up with or engaging the Enemy, every Ship shall carry two Lights of equal height at the Mizen Peek, and the headmost Ship another in her Stern Lanthorn; it shall only be carried while he keeps sight of the Chace, and I myself besides my proper Lights, will carry one at the Bowsprit End, which I shall likewise do when any Ships are ordered or by accident [are] ahead of me.

Signals in a Fog
1st
To unmoor.
If at any time I should have occasion to unmoor, I will make the Signal by firing three Guns.

2nd
Whereas in the 5th and 6th Articles every Ship is directed to Fire Musketts, beat Drums and ring their Bells, yet for the better avoiding any accident that may happen when sailing upon a wind by a particular Ship being taken in stays, the Ships while on the starboard Tacks shall fire Musketts and beat Drums only, and on the larboard Tacks they are to Fire Musketts and ring Bells only.

3rd
When sailing large or before the wind, to alter the course.
When the Fleet is sailing large or before the wind, and I shall find it proper to alter the course; if to starboard I will fire three Guns, and if to port five; and four minutes after a Gun each half minute, so many Points as shall be altered from the course before steered, so that if one Gun is fired one Point only is altered, to starboard or port.

4th
To alter the course when sailing upon a wind.
When sailing upon a wind, if I should find it proper to pay away large, I will fire seven Guns, and four minutes after a Gun each half minute for so many Points of the Compass as I shall go from the wind.

5th
To wear when sailing upon a wind.
When sailing upon a wind, and I would have the Ships wear, I will fire three Guns: the sternmost and leewardmost are to wear as soon as the Signal is made, and continue the same sail they had on the other Tack.

6th
To wear and lay too on the other tack.
If the Fleet is laying too in a Fog and I think it necessary to wear and lay too on the other Tack, I will fire three Guns, and as soon as I have wore and brought too on the other Tack, three Guns more; both firings will be made to windward.

1st
Falling in with a superior squadron.
And in case of falling in with a superior Squadron in the night, you are to hoist four Lights one above another, where you think I can but [sic, ? best] see them.

2nd
A Dutch Pendant.
In case of falling in with a number of Enemy's Merchant Ships, and you think you shall lose too much time in stopping to send a Boat on board those you first come up with, you are only to make them haul up their sails as soon as they have struck, and hoist a Dutch Pendant at your Mizentopmast head, as a Signal that you have not boarded them, which the next Ship astern is to answer by a Dutch Pendant at the Foretopgallant mast head, and is to take possession of the Prizes so left by you, unless he has a view of coming up with more of them, in which case he is to repeat your Signal to the next Ship astern of him, and so on to the sternmost Ship who is to collect together all the Prizes that are so left.

3rd
A red Ensign.
In case of falling in with any Squadron of Ships and you perceive them to be an Enemy of superior force to the Ships in company, you are to make it known to me by the Signals directed to be made in that case by the nth Article of the Additional Signals by Day; and if you should discover them to be an Enemy and think they may be attacked, you are to make the Signal for being able to come up with them, as directed in the 8th Article; and if upon falling in with a Squadron, you find them to be English Men of War, you are to hoist a red Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head and fire three Guns; all which Signals I will answer by a red Pendant at the Foretopgallant mast head and fire one Gun.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Alcide at sea 3rd June 1758.
James Douglas.

Memorandum
If any Ships in chace should discover the chace to be a Dogger, Galliot or Hoy, or any other small vessel belonging to Neutral Powers, they are not to chace too far from the Fleet as to run any hazard of separation.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at Sea the 8th of June 1758.

To the Honble Capt Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of His Lordship, Philip Stephens.

Additional Fighting Instructions
If upon seeing an Enemy, I should think it necessary to alter the disposition of the Ships in the Line of Battle, and would have any two Ships change Stations with each other, I will make the Signals for speaking with the Captains of such Ships, and hoist a Flag checquered red and blue on the flagstaff at the mizentopmast head.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at sea 9th June 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of the Admiral, Philip Stephens.

Memorandum
In time of Action, the Ships of the White Division are to wear Red Ensigns, the better to distinguish them from the Ships of the Enemy.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at sea the 12th June 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of his Lordship, Philip Stephens.

Memo
The Medway's Station in the line of Battle is between the Fougueux and Duc d'Aquitain and to be included in the Division of the Admiral of the White.

When the Signal is made to form two separate Lines of Battle, the Ramillies is to be placed between the Dunkirk and the Sterling Castle, and the Duc d'Aquitain between the Magnanime and Barfleur, and the Medway is to take her place next to the Fougueux.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Frans. Geary.

By Charles Proby, Esq., Commander of His Majesty's Ship Medway.

Pursuant to an Order (fn. 5) from the Rt Honble George Lord Anson, Vice-Admiral of Great Britain, Admiral of the White, &c.; You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command, and obey all such Orders and directions as you shall from time to time receive from me for His Majesty's Service till further Order. Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Medway at sea July 4th 1758.

To the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.C. Proby.

Captain Proby; Signals

To go on the Starboard Bowa Flag striped red, white and blueat the Ensign Staff.
— upon the Larboard Bowa Flag half blue, half white
To go aheada Flag checquered red and white
— asterna blue Flag

The above, and the Signals to look out on the different Quarters of the Compass (though mentioned as far as Signals can be seen), I would have at the distance of two leagues; and I desire if it should prove foggy or hazey, that the Ships will close me again without any particular Signal, to prevent losing company.

To spread in a Line abreast 3 miles asunder .. a blue Flagat the Maintop-gallant mast head; if 1½ mile only a Pendant under it.
—in a Line ahead 3 miles asunder .. a red Flag
For all Cruizers ..a red Ensign at the Foretopgallant mast head.

Discovering the chace to be an enemy.

If of superior force.
If you discover the Chace to be an Enemy, you are to make it known to me, by a red Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head and one Gun.
If of superior force, the same Signal with three Guns. Either of which I will answer by firing one Gun.

At any time when you are in chace, if you should think it proper to pass one Ship without examining her, to go on in pursuit of others, you will make it known to the next Ship to you, by hoisting a French Jack at the Mizentopgallant mast head, which is to be answered by a Pendant at the Maintopgallant mast head. I would have her examined by the last Ship she may come near, unless I repeat the Signal for Chacing.

To come within hail, a red Flag with a white Cross, at Mizentopgallant mast head.

To form the line parallel.
If I would have the Ships, upon going down to the Enemy, form into a Line parallel with the Enemy's Line, that the whole may come to action as nearly together as is possible, I will hoist a Dutch Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head.

N.B. All Signals will be made without Guns unless absolutely necessary.

Memorandum
The Ships on meeting again, after chacing out of sight, the Ship to windward shall hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head, and a Pendant at the Foretop gallant mast head; the Ship to leeward shall answer by hoisting a blue Ensign at the Maintopgallant mast head.

The Cutter to hoist her Ensign with the Union downwards at her Mast head; to be answered with a Union Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head.

If I should be at such a distance, either by chacing or spreading to look out, as to render it difficult to distinguish Signals made for the discovery of strange Ships at the Ensign Staff or Mizen Peek, I desire you will make the following:

If in theNE an English Jackmaintopgallant mast head
SEa French Jack
SWa Dutch Jack
NWa Broad Pendant

Which I will answer by a blue Pendant at the same place.

To spread in a line N & S one mile distancea blue Flag with a red Crossat the Mizentopgallant mast head
E & W one mile distancea red and white Flag
NW & SE one mile distancea blue and white mast Flag
NE & SW one mile distancea red, white and blue
If only 1/2 a mile distanta Pendant under each Flag.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Medway at sea July 9th 1758.
Chas Proby.

By Captain Peter Denis, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Dorsetshire.

Pursuant to an Order from the Rt Honble George, Lord Anson, Vice-Admiral of Great Britain, Admiral of the White, and Commander in Chief of a Squadron of His Majesty's Ships employed and to be employed in the Channel Soundings &c.; You are hereby required and directed without loss of time to proceed with His Majesty's Ship under your command to Plymouth, taking with you His Majesty's Ship Unicorn (fn. 6) and Hawke Cutter whose Commanders have Orders to put themselves under your Orders.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Dorsetshire at sea the 17th July 1758.

To the Honble Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Pet. Denis.

By command of Capt. Denis, James Price.

By the Honble John Byron, Commander of His Majesty's Ship America.

Pursuant to the directions of the Rt Honble the Lord Anson, Vice-Admiral of Great Britain, Admiral of the White Squadron, &c; You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command, and follow all such Orders and Instructions as you shall from time to time receive from me for His Majesty's Service.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship America in Hamoze, nth August 1758.

To the Hon. Sam1 Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Byron.

By the Hon. John Byron, Commander of His Majesty's Ship America.

In case of separation from the America, which you must take all possible care to avoid, you are to cruize for me during the space of twelve days, sixty leagues W. b S. from Cape Clear; and if we do not join in that time, then you are to proceed off Cape Finisterre, and cruize for the same length of time, with the Cape bearing South fifteen or twenty leagues from you; if we should not then join, you are to cruize six days with Cape Pinas bearing South about ten leagues, after this to proceed off the Isle of Oleron, and cruize six days, with the Island bearing East about ten or twelve leagues, and from this distance within sight of it, and not finding me in that time you are to look into the road of Basque, and get the best information you can of the Enemy's equipment at Rochfort and the parts adjacent and then proceed to join the Fleet according to the enclosed rendezvous.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship America at sea 15th August 1758.

To the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Byron.

Signals by Captain Byron
You are hereby required and directed to follow the General Printed Sailing and Fighting Instructions except such as are altered by the undermentioned regulations, vizt:

1st
Not to wait for the signal from the America to engage.
Every Ship that chaces is not to wait for the Signal from the America to engage, but is to begin when she is at a proper distance, except the Enemy is of equal or superior force to the Ships with me; in that case you are not to venture engaging till my force is collected and then, if no Signal is made for the Line of Battle, every Ship is to take the Ship nearest her own size and engage her as near as possible.

2nd
The Signal to be made for seeing a Sail in the

NE a French Jackat the Mizen Peek
NW a Dutch Jack
SE a French Jackat the Ensign Staff
SW a Dutch Jack

Signals to be made for seeing strange sails.
Which when I answer by hoisting a French Jack or Ensign on the Ensign Staff, you are to lower and hoist as often as you see Ships; but if you imagine you are at too great a distance for the above Signals to be observed, you shall hoist if in the

NE a French Jack at the Mizentopmast head
NW a Dutch Jack
SE a French Jackat the Foretopmast head.
SW a Dutch Jack

Which I will answer by a French Jack at the Mizentopmast head.

3rd
To give chace.
When I would have any Ship chace on either Quarter of the Compass, I will hoist the Signal for seeing a sail on that Quarter with her Pendant.

4th
To give over chace.
Discovering the chace to be an enemy.
When I would have you give over chace, I will hoist a white Flag at the Maintopmast head; but if you should be chacing anything you imagine to be an Enemy, you are to give me notice by hoisting a Dutch Flag at the Mizen Peek and firing two Guns; but if notwithstanding I shall keep the Signal up for calling you in, you are to join me as fast as possible.

5th
To know your opinion of the chace.
If at any time you are in chace and I am desirous of knowing your opinion of what you are in pursuit of, I will hoist an English Jack at the Maintopmast head (with or without a Gun) which you are to answer by an English Jack at the Maintopmast head, if you think she is an English or Neutral vessel; but if you think she is an Enemy, you are to acquaint me by a Pendant (and that the broadest you have) at your Foretopgallant mast head, and if she has the appearance of a large Ship, although not superior to yourself, you are to hoist the Pendant at your Mizentopmast head.

6th
when the chace appears to be of superior force to you.
Whenever the Ship [Sail] or Sails you are in chace of shall appear to you of superior force [to yourself], you are to make the Signal for seeing a Fleet, which is to be repeated by the Ship nearest [to] you.

7th
To spread in a line abreast in a line ahead.
When I would have the Ships spread into a Line abreast at three miles distance, I will hoist an English Jack at the Maintopmast head, but if only a mile and a half, a Pendant over the above Jack; and if in a Line ahead at the same distance, a Dutch Jack at the Maintopmast head; the Signal to be hauled down as soon as observed.

8th
To leave prizes and follow me.
If in time of cruizing we should have any Prizes in company and on making sail I would have any Ship stay by them, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain and hoist a St George's Ensign in the Mizen Shrouds; and if I should afterwards find it necessary for him to leave them and follow me, I will hoist a Dutch Ensign at the Mizen Peek and fire a Gun.

9th
To take the sternmost prize in tow.
If I would have any particular Ship take the sternmost Ship in tow, I will hoist a French Ensign at the Mizentopmast head with the Ship's Signal.

10th
For the prizes to bear down into the America's wake.
When I would have the Prizes to bear down close into the America's wake, I will hoist a St George's Ensign at the Mizentopmast head; this and every other Signal relative to them, to be given to the Persons they are entrusted with.

11th
Upon the weather altering the appearance of ships.
If any Ship should chace out of sight, and the weather should alter the appearance of the Ships so as to make it doubtful who they are, the Ship who first makes the Signal shall hoist a French Jack at her Maintopgallant mast head, which is to be answered by a Dutch Jack at the same place; then the Ship who first made the Signal shall hoist a Pendant at the Mizentopmast head with an English Jack under it.

12th
Parting company and meeting again.
In case of parting company and meeting again, the Ship to windward shall haul up their Mizen and Foresail and hoist a Dutch Jack at the Foretopgallant mast head, the Ship to leeward shall haul up the Mizen and hoist an English Jack at the Mizentopmast head; then the Ship to windward shall let fall her Foresail, haul out the Mizen, haul down the Jack at the Foretopgallant mast head, and hoist a French Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head, and the Ship to leeward shall let fall her Mainsail, haul down the English Jack at the Mizentopmast head and hoist a Dutch Flag at the Mizen Peek.

13th
A particular ship to speak a strange ship.
If at any time a strange Ship should stand towards us, and I would have a particular Ship speak with her, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain and hoist an English Jack on the Ensign Staff.

14th
A particular ship to chace on either quarter of the compass when nothing is seen.
If I would have a particular Ship chace on any Quarter of the Compass, although nothing is seen, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain, and hoist the proper Chacing Flag with a Pendant over it; then that Ship is to make sail to the distance of about five or six miles from the America.

15th
For a ship to go between the America and the ship in chace, to direct her back.
When any Ship is in chace and I would have another Ship go between her and the America in order to keep sight of her and direct her back, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain and hoist a red Pendant at the Maintopgallant mast head.

16th
Upon discovering a number of the enemy's ships under convoy of ships of force.
If at any time in chacing you discover a number of Ships of the Enemy under the convoy of Ships of force, you will make me acquainted with it by hoisting a Dutch Ensign at your Foretopgallant mast head, which I will answer by a Pendant at the same place; then you are to lower and hoist it as often as you judge there are Ships of the Line, and for the number of Frigates the same Signal at the Mizentopmast head, which I will answer by a Pendant at the same place.

17th
Not to board prizes.
In case of falling in with a number of the Enemy's Merchant Ships, and you think you shall lose too much time by stopping to send a Boat on board those you first come up with, you are only to make them haul up their sails, as soon as they have struck, and hoist an English Jack at the Maintopgallant mast head and continue to fire Guns until you are answered by one Gun from the Ship next astern of you, who is to take possession of them.

18th
For a ship ahead or astern to tack t'other way.
If I would have any particular Ship that is ahead of me tack and stand the other way, I will make the Signal for speaking with the Captain, and hoist a Dutch Jack at the Foretopgallant mast head, but if astern I will hoist it at the Mizentopmast head, and fire a Gun if the Signal is not observed immediately.

19th
For all the ships to give chace.
If at any time I would have all the Ships give chace, I will hoist the Signal for the Quarter of the Compass, and a red Pendant at the Mizen Peek, which I will haul down as soon as I find it observed.

20th
To bear down into my wake. To come within hail
If I would have the Ships bear down into my wake, I will hoist a blue Ensign at the Mizen Peek; and if I would have a particular Ship to come within hail, the same Signal with that for her Captain.

21st
Weekly accounts.
The Signal for Weekly Accounts will be a French Ensign at the Mizen Peek with a Pendant over it.

By Night
1st
If anyone discovers a strange Sail or Sails he shall hoist if in the

Discovering strange sails.

NEoneLightsone under the other at the Mizen Peek at some distance from each other
NWtwo
SEthree
SWfour

To chace.

which I will answer by hoisting one Light on the Ensign Staff; then you are to burn as many false fires as you shall see strange sails. After which, if I would have you chace, I will burn two false fires, and if I would have the Ship that is afterwards the nearest to the Sails discovered chace with you, I will burn two false fires more in a small space of time after; and if I myself discover any strange sails and give chace, I will hoist the Signal Lights to shew on what Quarter of the Compass and fire one Gun.

2nd
Leave off chace.
When I would have the Ships give over chace, I will fire two Guns without alteration of Lights, but a less space of time one from the other than when the Signal is made for anchoring.

3rd
Losing company and meeting again.
When any of the Ships lose company and meet again, the Ship to windward shall shew three Lights in a triangle, at the Mizen Peek, and three Lights one above the other in the Mizen Shrouds; the Ship to leeward shall shew three lights of equal height in the Fore Shrouds and three, one above the other in the Main Shrouds; then the Ship to windward shall take in her Lights and burn [two false fires and the Ship to leeward shall take in her Light and burn] (fn. 7) one false fire. If within hail, he who hails first shall ask What Ship is that? and he who is hailed shall answer Great Britain; then he who hailed first shall reply King George, and he who was hailed first shall answer God preserve.

4th
To speak with ships ahead with ships astern.
If at any time in the night I would speak with the Ships ahead of me, I will shew three Lights in a triangle at the Bowsprit end; and with the Ships astern of me, I will shew one Light in the Mizen Top, and one at each arm of the Cross Jack Yard; then all the Ships ahead or astern of me are to continue coming to me, till such time as I take in the Signal.

5th
Having occasion to speak with the Commodore.
If any of the Ships should have occasion to speak with me in the night, he shall [shew] a Light at each arm of the Foretopsail Yard.

In a Fog
Fire muskets and beat drums. Fire muskets and ring bells.
Whereas in the 5th and 6th Articles of the General Printed Instructions every private Ship is directed to fire Muskets, beat their Drums, and ring their Bells, yet for the better avoiding any accident that may happen (by a particular Ship being taken in stays) the Ships while on their starboard Tacks shall fire Muskets and beat their Drums only, and while on their larboard Tacks fire Muskets and ring their Bells only.

Fighting Instructions by Night
1st
For the better knowing each other coming up with or engaging the Enemy, every Ship shall carry two Lights of equal height at the Mizen Peek, and the headmost Ship another in her Stern Lanthorn, but the Light in the Stern Lanthorn shall only be carried whilst she keeps sight of the Chace; and I myself (besides my proper Lights) will carry one at my Bowsprit End, which I will do when any Ships are ordered or are by accident ahead of me.

On coming up with or engaging the enemy.

2nd
To draw into a line of battle ahead.
The Signal to draw into a Line of Battle ahead in the night is two Lights in the Maintopmast Shrouds, one above the other, with or without a Gun.

3rd
For the headmost ships to tack first.

And when in a Line of Battle I would have the headmost Ship tack first, I will shew two Lights, one under the other, at the Bowsprit End, besides the usual Signal for tacking.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship America in Hamoze nth August 1758.

To the Hon. Saml. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Byron.

Memorandum
America at sea 3rd Sept. 1758.
If I should at any time require you to sail ahead of me, I will hoist a Flag (striped red, white and blue) at the Foretopgallant mast head; or if astern, at the Mizen topmast head; and then you are to keep at such distance, as Signals may be well observed.

To the Hon. Saml. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Byron.

By George, Lord Anson, ViceAdmiral of Great Britain, Admiral of the White, and Commander in Chief of a Squadron of Ships employed and to be employed in the Channel Soundings, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Charles Saunders Esq., RearAdmiral of the White, and follow such Orders and directions as you shall receive from him for your further proceedings.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George off Plymouth Sound 17 September 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of his Lordship, Philip Stephens.

By the Hon. Jno Byron, Commander of His Majesty's Ship America.

You are hereby required and directed to proceed to Plymouth with His Majesty's Ship under your command, taking the Teresa, a French prize, (fn. 8) under your care, and as soon as you have seen her safe into that Port, you are to endeavour to join me according to the enclosed Rendezvous, unless Orders to the contrary from your Superior Officer.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship America at sea this 20th September 1758.

To the Honble Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.J. Byron.

By Charles Saunders, Esq., RearAdmiral of the White Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under my command and follow all such Orders and directions as you shall from time to time receive from me for His Majesty's Service, for which this shall be your Order.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies in Hamoze the 28th September 1758.

To Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Charles Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

Signals
When I would speak with the Captain of any of the Ships or Vessels undermentioned, I will put abroad a Pendant as against that Ship or Vessel's Name; If with a Lieutenant, the same signal and a Weft in the Ensign; and for a Boat without an Officer, the Weft will be only hoisted half Staff up.

Red.White.Blue.Yellow.Place where.
UnionLenoxIntrepideTamarMainForemast head
AIcideDukeWarspiteProserpineFore
BarfleurHampshireDevonshireVesuviusMizen
MagnanimeDuke of AquitainWindsorStarboardsMaintopsail Yard Arm
MedwayShrewsburyAmericaLarboard
AchillesChichesterRoyal GeorgeStarboardForetopsail Yard Arm
Sterling CastleLowestoftNewarkLarboard
LizardCoventryWinchesterStarboardMizen topsail Yard Arm
UnicornSouthamptonRamilliesLarboard
NeptuneVestalThamesStarboardMainyard Arm
FalklandVenusEmeraldLarboard
HussarActœonStarboard Foreyard Arm

For all other Signals I refer you to the General Printed Sailing and Fighting Instructions, and to the Additional Signals you received from Lord Anson.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies in Hamoze 30th September 1758.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Chas. Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

Additional Fighting Instructions (fn. 9)

Whereas it may often be necessary for Ships in a Line of Battle to regulate themselves by bearing on some particular point of the Compass from each other, without having any regard to their being ahead or abreast of one another,

You are therefore hereby required and directed strictly to observe the following Instructions, vizt:

When the Signal is made for the Squadron to draw into a Line of Battle at any particular distance and I would have them keep North and South of each other, I will hoist a red Flag with a white Cross on the Flagstaff at the Mizentopmast head, and fire a Gun.

When I would have them keep East and West of each other, I will hoist a blue and white Flag at the Mizentopmast head, and fire a Gun.

When I would have them bear from each other on any of the Points in the NE and SW Quarters, I will hoist a red Flag with a white Cross in the Mizentopmast Shrouds, to shew the Quarters of the Compass and for the intermediate Points, I will hoist on the Flagstaff on the Mizentopmast head when they are to bear:

N b E & S b W one Common Pendant

NNE & SSW two Common Pendants

NE b N & SW b S three Common Pendants

NE & SW a Dutch Jack

And I will hoist under the Dutch Jack when I would have them bear

NE b E & SW b Wone Common Pendantand fire a Gun with each Signal
ENE & WSWtwo Common Pendants
E b N & W b Sthree Common Pendants

When I would have them bear from each other on any of the Points in the NW and SE Quarters, I will hoist a blue and white Flag in the Mizentopmast Shrouds to shew the Quarters of the Compass, and distinguish the intermediate Points they are to form on, from the No and So in the same manner as in the NE and SW Quarters.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at sea 7th July 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of his Lordship, Philip Stephens.

Do Instructions
If when sailing in a Line of Battle on any particular Point of the Compass, I should think proper to alter my Course, I will make my intention known by the following Instructions, vizt:

If I would alter my course to starboard, I will hoist a Spanish Flag on the Flagstaff at the Foretopmast head and fire a Gun. If to port, I will hoist a Flag striped blue and white at the same place and fire a Gun. And after this Signal has been repeated, I will fire one Gun for every Point of the Compass that I alter my Course. Then every Ship in the Line is to alter his Course immediately, without waiting for the number of Guns being repeated.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at sea the 6th August 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of His Lordship, P. Stephens.

Memorandum
Royal George at sea 6 August 1756.
The Signal for Ships to change Stations with each other in the Line of Battle will be made for the future on the Flagstaff at the Maintopmast head instead of the Mizentopmast head.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

Additional Fighting Instructions
If upon coming to action with the Enemy, I should think proper to haul down the Signal for the Line of Battle, every Ship in the Fleet is then to use his utmost endeavours, to take or destroy such Ships of the Enemy, as they may be opposed to, by engaging them as close as possible, and pursuing them if they are driven out of their Line, without having any regard to the situation which was prescribed to themselves by the Line of Battle, before the Signal was hauled down.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Royal George at sea the 30th August 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Anson.

By command of his Lordship, Philip Stephens.

By Charles Saunders, Esq., RearAdmiral of the White Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet, &c.

In pursuance to an Order from the Right Hon. the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty of the 11th instant,

You are hereby most strictly required and directed during the present War, not only to refrain from molesting or obstructing the Trade and Navigation of any Spanish Vessels, but also from stopping and detaining them, unless loaded with such goods as are declared contraband by Treaty, for which this shall be your Order. Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Shrewsbury at sea 22nd October 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Chas. Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

Line of Battle
The Achilles to lead with the Starboard and Sterling Castle with the Larboard Tacks on board.

Frigates.Rates.Ships.Commanders.Guns.Men.Division.
4AchillesHon. Capt. Barrington60420
4MedwayCapt. Proby60420
3ShrewsburyPalliser74600
3MagnanimePorter74700
3NewarkHolbourne80680
2UnionCornish90750Charles (Charles Saunders, Esq.) Rear-Admiral of the White &c.
2RamilhesCharles Saunders, Esq.90780
Capt. Taylor
1Royal GeorgeHood100880
3WarspiteBentley74600
3DorsetshireDenis70520
3ChichesterWillett70520
3Sterling CastleEverritt64480

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea this nth November 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Chas Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

By Charles Saunders, Esq., RearAdmiral of the White Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet, &c.

You are hereby required and directed to put yourself under the command of Captain Denis, (fn. 10) Commander of His Majesty's Ship Dorsetshire, and proceed with him on a cruize between the latitudes of 42° 00' and 46° 00', from twenty to fifty leagues to the westward of Cape Finisterre, using your best endeavours to take or destroy such of the Enemy's Ships as you may meet with, and giving due protection to the Trade of His Majesty's Subjects that may fall in your way;

You are to continue upon this Station so long as the Provisions and Water of your Ship will hold out (unless you should fall in with any of our homeward-bound East India Ships, in which case you are immediately to see them in safety to the Downs) and then proceed to Plymouth, where on your arrival, you are to prepare your Ship for the Dock, and use your best diligence in getting her cleaned and refitted for Channel Service; and so soon as she shall be ready for the sea, you are immediately to proceed with her and join me agreeable to my place of rendezvous; for which this shall be your Order. Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Ramillies at sea 13th November 1758.

To the Hon. Captain Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Chas. Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

By Charles Saunders, Esq., RearAdmiral of the White Squadron of His Majesty's Fleet.

Having (fn. 11) received from Mr Clevland, Secretary of the Admiralty, a copy of Signals to be observed by India Ships (soon expected home) and any of His Majesty's Ships upon meeting; I herewith send you a copy of them, which you are hereby required and directed to pay a due regard to.

Dated on board His Majesty's Ship Shrewsbury at sea October 16, 1758.

To the Hon. Capt. Barrington of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Charles Saunders.

By command of the Admiral, John Waller.

By Captain Peter Denis, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Dorsetshire.

You are hereby required and directed without loss of time to proceed with His Majesty's Ship under your command to Plymouth, and there put in execution such Orders as you may have received from Rear-Admiral Saunders.

Given under my hand on board His Majesty's Ship Dorsetshire at sea 4th of December 1758.

To the Hon. Samuel Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles.Peter Denis.

Footnotes

1 Hawke sent Barrington Orders, dated March 1st, 1758, from the Ramillies at Spithead, to complete and hold himself in constant readiness for sea.
2 An Admiralty announcement in the London Gazette dated May 13th, 1758, states: 'On the 29th, about Three o'clock in the Afternoon, Capt. Pratten seeing a Sail to the S.W. made a Signal for the Dorsetshire, of 70 Guns, and 520 Men, commanded by Captain Denis, to give Chace; and soon after observing the Chace to be a large Ship, dispatched the Achilles, of 60 Guns, commanded by the Honourable Captain Barrington, also after her, and then followed with the rest of the Squadron. About Seven o'Clock the Dorsetshire came up with the Chace, which proved to be the Raisonable, a French Ship of War of 64 Guns, and 630 Men, and Capt. Denis began to engage her very closely, and they continued warmly engaged till about Nine o'Clock, when the Enemy's Ship, commanded by the Prince de Mombazon, Chevalier de Rohan, struck, having suffered greatly in her Hull, and had 61 Men killed, and 100 wounded. She was going from l'Orient to Brest, a new Ship, not above four or five Months off the Stocks. The Dorsetshire's Masts, Yards, and Sails, were greatly shattered. She had 15 Men killed, and 21 wounded, in the Action; and one of the Wounded is since dead.'
3 An Order from Anson of the same date and to the same effect accompanied this.
4 Anson's Order of the same date to Barrington accompanies this.
5 Anson's Order of the same date to Barrington accompanies this.
6 Commanded by Captain Thomas Graves.
7 Omitted by copyist, but inserted in Byron's of March 25th and Tune 17th, 1760.
8 On October 6th, 1758, Rear-Admiral Saunders wrote to the Secretary of the Admiralty from Plymouth Sound, ' that the Hon. Captain Barrington, Commander of His Majesty's Ship Achilles, arrived here this night and has brought in with him a French Prize from Martinico bound to Havre de Grace, burthen one hundred and eighty tuns, laden with coffee, cotton and sugar, which he took on the 20th of September; and acquaints me that he left the America in the latitude of 49: 20 and 180 leagues to the westward of the Lizard.' (P.R.O., Ad. I, 90.)
9 Endorsed: Not received till the 7th of October 1758.
10 November 14th, 1758, Captain Peter Denis's Order to Barrington to put himself under Denis's command; his Pendant Signals for the two Ships; and a Memorandum that ' for all Additional Signals, I refer you to those you have already received from the Rt. Hon. the Lord Anson.'
11 Marginal note: Appeared the 13th November 1758.