Minute Book
July 1677

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Institute of Historical Research

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William A. Shaw (editor)

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1911

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'Minute Book: July 1677', Calendar of Treasury Books, Volume 5: 1676-1679 (1911), pp. 462-468. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=80616 Date accessed: 27 August 2014.


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Contents

July 1677

July 2. Monday, at 4 in the afternoon. The business of the old Farmers [of the Revenue] of Ireland [is to be heard this day] and Visct. Ranelagh and Cyrell Wych are to attend with the said Farmers.
Mr. Moor and the four King's waiters of Bristol port are to attend [this day] for a final end of that business, the Customs Commissioners being [to be] present.
The business of the arrear of rent due from the Company [for the Customs of] Londonderry before 1665 is to be considered this day, Visct. Ranelagh being [to be] present.
[Day Book, p. 129.]
July 2. Sir Samuel Morland to be paid half upon his pension.
The Earl of Oxford to be paid half a year in full.
Mr. Dryden to have another 100l. per an. added to his 200l. per an. as Poet Laureat.
[Treasury Minute Book V. p. 301.]
July 2.
Treasury Chambers.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Duke of Ormonde, Visct. Ranelagh. Attending : Sir Cyrell Wych, Sir Cha. Harbord.
The old Farmers [of the revenue] of Ireland are called in. They acquaint Treasurer Danby that they hear a letter is procuring to assign the balance of their account to Sir James Shaen, et al. They further say that upon [the] publishing of the Lord Lieutenant's late order their collectors stopped payment of their money and went out of town without paying anything.
Visct. Ranelagh says there is no stop put to the collection of their arrears, but that tis [the receipts are] meant to be detained in their commissioners' hands, and not [to be] issued to them [the Farmers] till their balance be cleared.
The Farmers answer [that] the King has good security both in England and Ireland. Mr. Alderman Breedon says they have a legal interest in their arrears, that they have assigned them, and that therefore they cannot be diverted.
Visct. Ranelagh moves that the Farmers would propose some way of accompting. He further says that the Lord Lieutenant does not pretend to stop [the payment to the old Farmers of the receipts of the arrears to the extent of] more than the balance [due from said old Farmers to the King] and when that is raised the rest shall be paid to them, and he says, though the King has good security in England, he has none other in Ireland than those arrears, and the Exchequer process in Ireland will not reach the security in England.
The Farmers withdraw : after which being again called in, the letter which the old Farmers first mentioned is read to them and a proposal is made for the old Farmers to lend the 13,000l. therein mentioned and intended to be borrowed of the present Farmers.
They say they are ready to do it upon good security, but they will not trust the present Farmers.
They are asked whether they will lend it upon the same security as the present Farmers are to have.
They answer they will not trust the present Farmers, but desire a speedy hearing of their business, which they will submit to Treasurer Danby, and will pay whatsoever shall be found justly due upon their accounts within ten days after.
Treasurer Danby directs them to distinguish their several demands and claims and to deliver in a paper thereof forthwith, which must be referred to the Attorney General. And his Lordship directs that they come prepared on Wednesday week next for a hearing, and the Attorney General [to be present] at the same time, and then his Lordship will see the nature of their several demands and consider how he may determine the same, without interfering with the Lord Lieutenant's authority.
[Treasury Minute Book V. pp. 301-2.]
July 4. Wednesday, in the forenoon. Mr. Moor and the four King's waiters of Bristol port are to attend [on this day] for a final end of that business, the Commissioners of the Customs being to be present (erased).
The goldsmiths to be heard [this day] upon their objections to the schedule of moneys supposed to be due from them to the King's Receivers, as made up by Mr. Fillingham. The [said] Receivers, viz., Mr. Guyn, Mr. Jenkins, Mr. Browne, etc., are to be summoned [to be then present] with Mr. Fillingham.
Mr. Worryll's pretensions for satisfaction for a house at Greenwich [is to be considered this day].
Mris. Croxton's petition touching the invention of weaving Point de Venize [is to be considered this day].
Sir Fra. Leak's patent for some land at Gravesend fort and his caveat against passing — patent [are to be considered this day].
[Day Book, p. 129.]
July 11. Wednesday. The business relating to the defalcations of the old Farmers [of the revenue] of Ireland [is to be considered this day].
[Ibid, p. 130.]
July 17. Treasurer Danby directs that such persons and their assigns who by Sir Robert Howard's certificate appear to have lent money into the Exchequer or to the public offices for his Majesty's service, shall have their accompts stated by the Auditor, in order to pass patents for their satisfaction as the bankers had.
The Managers of the Excise are to be repaid the 13,800l. (advance [money paid by them] for the [Excise] farms of Wales and the four Northern counties) out of the two last quarters of their farm.
Mrs. Skelton to be paid her interest out of the privy seal dormant till her tallies become payable.
Lady Tuke's arrears for her lodging money are to be placed [charged] upon some good [realisable fund or item owing to the King from some accomptant or receiver as an] arrear.
Capt. Barnard Phillipps' petition is to be put upon the King's papers. [Postea]. The King directs he shall be satisfied.
The Attorney General to be desired to speak with the Judges of Assize for the Northern Circuit touching the business of the Hearthmoney and smiths' forges, etc.
[Treasury Minute Book V. pp. 302-3.]
July 18. Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Slingsby [to attend my Lord Treasurer this day] touching the business of the Mint and Coinage money.
The old Farmers [of the revenue] of Ireland [are to be heard this day] touching their defalcations "the Lords to be desired to be present and Mr. Attorney General also."
Mr. Moore's business against the four King's waiters at Bristol is to be then heard.
The goldsmiths' exceptions to Mr. Fillingham's list of money due or pretended to be due to Receivers [are to be then also heard].
The business of the Four and a Half per cent. Duty of the Barbados [is to be then also considered].
Mr. Worrell [is to be then also heard on his petition] for satisfaction for his house at Greenwich.
The Earl of Arlington's caveat against Mr. Pretiman's privy seal [for installing the debt due to the King from said Pretiman as Receiver of First Fruits] and the state of that case between his Lordship and the Gentlemen Pensioners [is to be then considered ; the said Pensioners having orders overdue and charged on said First Fruits].
Mr. Staples to attend on [this day] about returning the extract of the Courts of the Honor of Windsor.
[Day Book, p. 130.]
July 19. Present : Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, Duke of Ormonde, Visct. Ranelagh, Attorney General.
The old Farmers of [the Revenue of] Ireland [are called in and] by Mr. Sawyer, their Counsel, made these following demands of allowances :
(1) 8,792l. for the quit rents of Visct. Dillon's estate, discharged by his Majesty's letters patent. Resolved upon debate : that they should be allowed no more than what the Exchequer of Ireland adjudged them, viz., 3,826l. 8s. 2½d. or thereabouts.
(2) 2,804l. for Robert Marshall's lands respited [for] three years. Resolved : the proportion of the allowance to be left to the judgment of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland who has already issued a commission of inquiry in order thereunto.
(3) 3,739l. 4s. 6d. for four years of the said Robert Marshall's lands since the respites were discharged. Resolved : [that] this demand be wholly disallowed, as it was by the Court of Exchequer in Ireland.
(4) 4,692l. 6s. 2¼d. for three years' arrears of Crown rents discovered by the Farmers, according to a covenant in their patent. Resolved : [that] when they [the Farmers] are [legally] adjudged discoverers [of such rents] they shall have the benefit of the covenant : and if any part of the said arrears have been paid into the Treasury [in Ireland] they shall there be repaid them and the Lord Chancellor conceives that whatsoever Visct. Ranelagh has received of arrears of rent so discovered, according to the covenant, he [is] to make good to the Farmers.
(5) 4,023l. 5s. 0d. for rents of lands in the King's hand. Resolved : this demand to be utterly disallowed, as it was by the Court of Exchequer in Ireland.
(6) 816l. 10s. 0d. for lands alienated by the Duke of York for less than half the value. Resolved : no more to be allowed them than what the Court of Exchequer in Ireland has already allowed them on this demand.
(7) 630l. for [Hearthmoney duty due for] hearths of the King's houses, castles, etc. Resolved : this demand to be disallowed, as it was by the Court of Exchequer in Ireland.
(8) 3,000l. for repairs and building Custom Houses, according to a covenant [in their patent of farm]. Resolved : [that] they shall be allowed (besides what the Court of Exchequer has already allowed them) 241l. laid out by them for the building an Excha[nge], and 49l. 2s. 11d. for building a Custom House at Baltimore : making together 290l. 2s. 11d.
(9) For the salary of five Commissioners acting for the farm for the year ended 2 Dec., 1676. Resolved : [that] this demand be disallowed, there being no covenant nor reason for it.
(10) For arrears of rent of barren lands to be reduced. Resolved : the proportion of allowance for this demand to be left to the judgment of the Lord Lieutenant who will ascertain the same when the reducement is settled.
(11) For losses by the Excise during the scarcity of corn in Ireland in 1674 and part of 1675, and for mortality. Resolved : this demand having been formerly debated (his Majesty being present) and then over-ruled, that no allowance be made upon it.
(12) For loss of about 10,000l. on the Hearthmoney during the first two years [of their farm]. Resolved : this demand having been formerly debated (his Majesty being present) and then over-ruled that no allowance be made on it.
(13) For losses by the Act prohibiting the unlading of Plantation goods in Ireland. Resolved : that the debate of this be adjourned till another day, and in the mean time Visct. Ranelagh and the Attorney General are directed to make a computation thereof.
Eodem die.
The Contractors of the Hearthmoney exhibit a complaint against Mr. Pierrepont, a Justice of the Peace, co. Notts, for clapping up their officer Johnson [in prison] for collecting the duty upon forges. The Attorney General advises a petition to be drawn to the King in Council to be [thence] referred to the Justices of Assize to examine the matter on a petition to be preferred to them by the said Johnson. The Contractors' [said] petition to the King in Council is to be presented next Friday with their affidavit that the contents are true, and that the Justices had notices of the points [concerning the liability of smiths' forges to pay Hearthmoney, etc.] lately adjudged in the King's Bench, if it were so.
[Treasury Minute Book V. pp. 304-6.]
July 20. Friday. The business of the Four and a Half per cent. Duty [is to be considered this day].
Mr. Moore and the four King's waiters of Bristol are to be heard [this day].
The goldsmiths' exceptions to Mr. Fillingham's list of money due to the King's Receivers [are to be heard this day].
The Earl of Arlington's caveat to the passing of Mr. Pretiman's privy seal [is to be considered this day].
The caveat of the four undersearchers of London against Mr. Done's grant [is to be considered this day].
Mr. Worrell's business for compensation for his house at Greenwich [is to be considered this day].
[Day Book, p. 130.]
July 23.
Wallingford. House.
The Grooms and Gentlemen of the Bedchamber are to be paid their pensions [in] full : by his Majesty's directions.
A letter to be written [to the Auditor of the Receipt] for issuing 4,000l. of Coinage money upon Mr. Slingsby's order for the Mint.
Mr. Hough, King's waiter, is to be paid his arrear of 156l. upon his salary of 52l. per an.
Sir Ralph Delaval's proposal [is] to be [put] on the papers for the King.
As also Sir Charles Wheler's petition about discoveries in Ireland.
Mr. Nicholls, the witness against Browne [is] by his Majesty's order to have 300l. paid him and a caveat is to be entered that Browne's fine be not granted [as a gift from the King to anybody].
Sir John Howell's pension of 400l. per an. is to be paid in full by his Majesty's direction.
[Ordered that] coals, lead, stockings, etc., carried to Tangier [are] to pay customs.
The Earl of St[r]afford [is ordered] to be paid his creation money for the Earl of Danby's time [of acting as Lord Treasurer] being four years. The Earl of Peterborough's creation money to be paid for the same time.
Sir John Trevor's fee as a King's Counsel [is ordered] to be paid.
The Countess of Lichfield's [petition] for [a grant of] one life [interest] in the [office of the] Custos Brevium is to be paid on the King's papers.
Capt. Barnett Phillips [is ordered] to be paid his arrears of the 4s. a day granted him for quitting the Dutch service on the King's proclamation.
[Treasury Minute Book V. pp. 303-4.]
July 27. Friday, at 10 in the morning The exceptions taken by the goldsmiths to Mr. Fillingham's list of money due from some of the goldsmiths to the King's Receivers [are to be heard this day].
The Earl of Arlington's caveat to the passing of Mr. Prettiman's privy seal for estalling of said Prettiman's debt [is to be considered this day].
The caveat put in by the five undersearchers of London port against the passing of a grant to Mr. Done and others of the place of head-searcher there upon surrender of Mr. Long [is to be considered this day].
Mr. Worrell's pretension for satisfaction for his house at Greenwich [is to be considered this day].
Mr. Mosten's petition and [the] report [thereon are to be considered this day].
[Day Book, p. 131.]
July 28. Saturday. The old Farmers of [the revenue of] Ireland are to attend [this day] about 4 in the afternoon about their defalcations and the Lord Chancellor, Visct. Ranelagh and the Attorney General are desired to attend.
[Ibid.]
July 28. Present : Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, Duke of Ormonde, Visct. Ranelagh, Attorney and Solicitor General.
The old Farmers of [the Revenue of] Ireland are called in and heard as to their losses on the Plantation Act. Several mediums [or averages as a means] of measuring the said losses are proposed, but upon debate, it is Resolved : allowance to be given them in a lump, and then further Resolved : that they shall be allowed 10,000l. sterling in consideration of their losses by the said Act and all other demands relating to the Customs during their Farm. The Attorney General is to draw a warrant to allow this 10,000l.
Eodem die.
The Law [Duty] Farmers are called in. The Solicitor General exhibits a complaint against the Six Clerks' Office where the under clerks defraud the King of the duty [and] offering as an expedient [to prevent such fraud] that some person may be substituted by the Law Duty Farmers to sit in the said Office as an officer or cheque to receive the duty. The Lord Chancellor advises that the Farmers draw a form of such an order as they desire, and attend the Attorney General therein.
[Treasury Minute Book V. pp. 306-7.]
July 30. Mr. Tregeagle and Mr. Saunders, mayor of Truro [are to attend this day] to be heard about the tin.
[Day Book, p. 131.]
July 30.
Treasury Chambers.
Present : Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, Duke of Ormonde, Visct. Ranelagh.
The proposal of A. B. (altered to H. G.) is read for clearing the arrears of the army in Ireland : and Mr. Bridges being called in owns the proposal on behalf of himself and partners, and undertakes to advance 36,565l. for the said service, and to lodge the money in the Exchequer in Ireland by the 29 Sept. next, provided he may be repaid his advance in 18 months by 18 equal proportions out of the 20,000l. payable monthly by the present Farmers [of the Revenue of Ireland]. Their Lordships desire him to name his partners for this undertaking. He names Major Huntingdon and Mr. Dawsonne. [Ordered upon debate] the Attorney General to have the proposal and the undertakers to attend him at 9 to-morrow morning, and then the Attorney General to prepare a letter in haec verba, if they desire, to pass the Great Seal of Ireland [or alternatively] if they will [desire it to pass] the Great Seal of England then to prepare a warrant with the necessary covenants.
[Treasury Minute Book V. p. 307.]