Journal, August 1720
Journal Book W

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1925

Pages

191-204

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'Journal, August 1720: Journal Book W', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 4: November 1718 - December 1722 (1925), pp. 191-204. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81460 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Journal, August 1720

August 2. Present:— Earl of Westmorland, Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Mr. Attorney General.

Messrs.

Hayles and Jacks.

Court of Judicature.

Gibraltar.

Representation.

Mr. Attorney General attending, as desired, their Lordships had some discourse with him on the subject of the petition of Mr. William Hayles, Mr. William Jacks &c., about erecting a Court of Judicature at Gibraltar; and their Lordships proposing in consideration of the few inhabitants there, and the charge of maintaining courts after the manner practised in this kingdom and His Majesty's Plantations in America, that the Judge Advocate of the Garrison at Gibraltar, or his deputy for the time being, should be authorised upon any dispute to call to his assistance two merchants, disinterested persons, by whose advice he should decide between the parties, from whose judgment an appeal might lie to the Governor; and in cases of considerable value, another appeal to His Majesty as the last resort; Mr. Attorney concurred with their Lordships' sentiments in relation to such a Court; and the draught of a representation to their Excellencies the Lords Justices upon the said petition was prepared and signed.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Account.

Ships cleared.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs, of the 29th July past, was read, with an account of the number of ships cleared from England, specifying from what ports, their tonnage, British and foreign &c., from Christmas, 1714, to Christmas, 1717, as also two abstracts of the like accounts for the years 1718 and 1719.

Barbadoes.

Letter from Mr. Gordon.

Bills of Indictment.

Copies denied.

A letter from the Rev. Mr. Gordon of Barbadoes, complaining that whereas several Bills of Indictment have been preferred and found against him and his friends in that Island, his attornies were denied copies thereof, unless they would pay exorbitant fees for the same, and praying copies of such of those proceedings as have been transmitted to this office, was read; whereupon directions were given for looking out and laying before the Board what proceedings have been lately received from Barbadoes relating to the said Mr. Gordon.

New York.

Palatines' case petition.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter.

Summoned.

The case of the Palatines, at New York, whose petition is mentioned in the Minutes of the 21st of the last month, was read; as likewise a letter from Brigadier Hunter, late Governor of that province, dated the 26th of the same month, on the subject of the said petition; whereupon ordered that Brigadier Hunter be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with him on this day seven—night at eleven of the clock in the morning, and that the petitioners have notice to attend at the same time.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Wescomb.

South Sea Company.

Colonel Stanhope's instructions.

Madrid.

A letter from Mr. Wescomb, Secretary to the South Sea Company, dated the 19th of July, 1720, in answer to a letter writ him the 9th of June foregoing, for what the company might have to offer as instructions for Colonel Stanhope, His Majesty's Minister in Spain, was read.

Letters to Weavers' Company, London &c.

State of trade.

Ordered that letters be writ to the Master and Wardens of the Weavers' Company of London and Canterbury and to the Mayor of Norwich, to desire to be informed by them of the present state of their trade, particularly whether there be any and what alteration, since their last application to this Board.

August 3. Present:— Earl of Westmorland, Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham.

Plantations General.

Miscellanies.

Nova Scotia.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

State of the Plantations.

Two new rooms.

Representation.

French fishing.

Soldiers from Placentia to Annapolis Royal.

Letter to Mr. Delafaye.

Letter to Lord Chamberlain.

A letter from Mr. Delafaye, Secretary to their Excellencies the Lords Justices, dated yesterday, in relation to the state of His Majesty's plantations, which this Board was directed to prepare—to an additional building of two rooms for the use of this office, and signifying their Excellencies' orders upon the late representation of this Board concerning the French fishing on the Coast of Nova Scotia beyond the limits prescribed by the Treaty of Utrecht, and about removing three companies of soldiers from Placentia to Annapolis Royal was read; whereupon directions were given for preparing a letter to Mr. Delafaye in answer to the first part of his said letter, and another to His Grace the Lord Chamberlain, concerning the additional rooms wanted for this office.

Massachusets.

Letters and Papers from Colonel Shute.

The several letters undermentioned from Colonel Shute, His Majesty's Governor of the Province of the Massachusets Bay &c., were read, and the papers, therein respectively referred to, were laid before the Board, viz.:—
A letter from Colonel Shute, dated the 19th of August, 1719.
List of Ships entered inwards at Boston, from 29th July, 1718, to 16th July, 1719.
List of Ships cleared outwards at Boston, from 17th July, 1718, to 16th July, 1719.
An account of the ordnance, ammunition and other Stores of War, expended at His Majesty's Castle William, from 24th June, 1718, to 24th June, 1719.
An account of the ordnance, ammunition and other Stores of War belonging to His Majesty's Castle William at Boston in New England, June 24th, 1719.
Account of powder expended at Fort William and Mary at New Castle in New Hampshire, from 20th October, 1717, to 22nd April, 1719, and of Stores remaining there 15th July, 1719.
The collector's accounts of Imports into New Hampshire, from Midsummer, 1718, to Midsummer, 1719.
The collector's account of Exports from New Hampshire, from Midsummer, 1718, to Midsummer, 1719.

Letter from Colonel Shute.

Revenue accounts.

Captives at Canada.

A letter from Colonel Shute, dated 9th of September, 1719, with the undermentioned accounts of the Revenue in the Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire, and relating to some captives whom the French at Canada refuse to release.
Account of the Revenues and disbursements of the Massachusets Bay, and
New Hampshire.
Account of the Revenue and disbursements in New Hampshire.

A letter from Colonel Shute to the Secretary of this Board, dated the 26th of October last.

Letter from Colonel Shute.

A letter from Colonel Shute to the Board, dated 7th December, 1719.

Another letter from him to the Secretary of this Board, dated the 17th of February, 1719/20, with the undermentioned answers to queries and relating to his instructions about printing.
Answer to queries.
Answer to several Queries relating to the state of the Massachusets Bay.

Letter from Colonel Shute.

Power to negative Speakers.

A letter from Colonel Shute to the Board, dated the 1st of June, 1720, with several papers relating to the Governors' power of disallowing Speakers of Assembly.

Representation.

Captives at Canada.

Whereupon their Lordships agreed to reconsider the said letters and papers, in the meantime directions were given for preparing the draught of a representation to their Excellencies the Lords Justices, upon what Colonel Shute writes in his said letters of the 9th of September and 7th of December, 1719, relating to the captives at Canada, whom the French refuse to release.

August 4. Present:— Earl of Westmorland, Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Plantations General.

Letter to Mr. Delafaye.

State of the Plantations.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Delafaye, as directed yesterday to be prepared, in answer to that part of his letter of the 2nd instant, which relates to a representation of the state of His Majesty's plantations in America, was agreed, transcribed and signed.

Massachusets.

Representation.

Colonel Shute's letters.

Captives at Canada.

The draught of a representation, which was likewise yesterday directed to be prepared, to their Excellencies the Lords Justices, upon Colonel Shute's letters relating to the captives at Canada, whom the French refuse to release, was agreed, transcribed and signed.

Governor's power to disallow a Speaker.

Their Lordships then taking into further consideration the letter from Colonel Shute of the 1st of June, 1720, which was read at the last meeting, with several papers relating to the power of the Governor of the Massachusets Bay to disallow a Speaker chosen by the Assembly of that province; directions were given for preparing a letter to Mr. Attorney General for his opinion thereupon.

Miscellanies.

Letter to Lord Chamberlain.

Additional rooms.

The draught of a letter, ordered at the last meeting to be prepared, to His Grace the Duke of Newcastle, Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty's Household, relating to some additional rooms, which are wanted for this office, was agreed, transcribed and signed.

New Hampshire.

Letters from Mr. Armstrong.

Incroachments.

Waste lands.

Woods.

Two letters from Mr. Armstrong, dated in New Hampshire, one the 20th of October, 1719, the other the 17th of February, 1719/20, relating to the incroachments made by the inhabitants upon the waste lands and timber, and to the preservation of His Majesty's Woods there, were read.

Letter from Mr. Burchet.

Mr. Wentworth.

Mr. Bridger.

Abuses in the Woods.

Representation.

A letter from Mr. Burchet, Secretary to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated 22nd of the last month, together with the inclosed copies of a letter from Mr. Wentworth, Lieutenant Governor of New Hampshire, and of another from Mr. Bridger, both relating to abuses committed in the Woods of New England, were read; whereupon directions were given for preparing the draught of a representation to the Lords Justices, relating to the necessity of sending a person to take care of the said Woods, and the setting apart certain tracts of land, whereon the Woods should be entirely reserved to His Majesty.

New Hampshire.

Letter from Colonel Shute.

Minutes.

A letter from Colonel Shute, Governor of New Hampshire, dated the 24th of December last, was read, and the undermentioned Minutes of Council and Assembly of that Province, received with the said letter, were laid before the Board, viz.:—
Council.
Minutes of Council in New Hampshire, from 17th October, 1716, to 30th April, 1719.
Assembly.
Minutes of Assembly in New Hampshire, from 10th January, 1716/17, to 18th August, 1719.

Letter from Colonel Shute.

Answer to queries.

Another letter from Colonel Shute, dated the 1st of June, 1720, with answers to several queries, relating to the province of New Hampshire, was read; and the said answers laid before the Board.

Maryland.

Colonel Hart.

Mr. Dummer summoned.

Ordered that Colonel Hart, late Governor of Maryland, and Mr. Dummer, agent for the province of Massachusets Bay, be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with them on Tuesday morning next.

New York.

New Jersey.

Maryland.

August 9. Present:— Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

Virginia.

Massachusets.

Brigadier Hunter, Colonel Hart, Colonel Blakiston, Mr. Dummer.

Queries for their answers.

Brigadier Hunter, late Governor of New York and New Jersey, Colonel Hart, late Governor of Maryland, Colonel Blakiston, Agent for Virginia, and Mr. Dummer, Agent for the Massachusets Bay, attending, several queries, relating to the state of those colonies, were read; and copies ordered to be sent to them for their answers with relation to the respective colonies for which these gentlemen are or have been concerned.

Maryland.

Colonel Hart's memorial.

Minutes of Council.

In the meantime Colonel Hart presented to their Lordships a memorial, in answer to several queries already received from this Board, which was read; and the proceedings of the Council of Maryland, of the 28th April last, were laid by him before their Lordships, as likewise a printed book of the laws of Maryland, from the year 1692 to 1718, and those printed in 1719.

New York.

Brigadier Hunter.

Trade to Canada.

Brigardier Hunter on this occasion observed, in relation to the trade of New York, that in one year there have been carried from that province to the French at Canada about £20,000 worth of the manufactures of Great Britain as Strouds, Duffles and such coarse goods, as are proper for the Indians, without which trade the French could not well subsist nor supply their Indians with proper goods, the French manufactures being not so well esteemed by the Indians, as the English goods, besides the very dangerous navigation of the River of Canada, which prevents any great trade from France to those parts.

New York.

Petition and case of the Palatines.

Their Lordships taking into further consideration the petition of John Conrad Weiser and William Scheef, in behalf of themselves and other Palatines at New York, as also the case of the said Palatines, mentioned in the Minutes of the 2nd inst., the said petition and case were read in presence of Brigadier Hunter, who being asked several questions thereupon, he said, that he had settled the Palatines on a very good tract of land on the frontiers near Hudson's river, but that Weiser, who is a very seditious and turbulent man, and a great ringleader, came at the head of about 40 families of the Palatines, who, notwithstanding an order and proclamation against it, took possession by force of certain lands, called Schories, which had been granted to others. That the said Weiser came also with 3 or 400 Palatines in arms to a place where he, the Governor, was, with intention to insult him; and that he was forced to abscond, till he could get some of the regular troops, by whom he disarmed the said Palatines. That the said Weiser was the occasion of bringing down some Indians of the 5 Nations against the Grantees of the said lands, whom Brigadier Hunter said, he had persuaded in compassion to the women and children among the said Palatines to come to agreement with them for those lands, whereby the said Palatines were to have them ten years for nothing, and after the expiration of that time, to pay a small rent, not much more, (as he believes), than the Quit Rent to the Crown, and about two thirds of the said Palatines acquiesed in that Agreement, disowned the petitioner Weiser, and desired to be rid of him. That the Palatines, who were settled on Hudsons River, did not desire to remove, but some of them were influenced by the said Weiser so to do; and that no industrious man can starve at New York. Brigadier Hunter further acquainted their Lordships that several allegations in the paper now read, intituled, The case of the Palatines and other Germans in the province of New York, are not true, particularly as to the number of them at first sent over to New York, the land, utensils and money pretended to be promised to them; and for more certainty as to what was engaged for to the said Palatines, he referred to the contract made with them in England, and which was translated into High Dutch for their better understanding the same, before they signed it. That the assertion that the remainder of the Palatines joined the 50 families settled in Schorie is utterly false. That the said lands called Schorie were part of the grants resumed to the Crown some years ago, and the Indians reclaiming them, was at the instance of the said Weiser, though without any just pretence; he, the said Brigadier Hunter, thought it proper to make them easy, and by presents to them obtained a formal resignation, and afterwards granted them to particular persons, who applied for the same, reserving 2s. 6d. per 100 acres Quit Rent; that if the said Palatines have purchased any lands of the Indians without a licence from the Government of New York, the same is contrary to the laws of that Province.

Nova Scotia.

Pennsylvania.

Carolina.

Queries to Colonel Vetch.

Joshua Gee.

Joseph Boon.

The gentlemen above mentioned being withdrawn, ordered that the foresaid queries, relating to the plantations. mutatis mutandis, be sent to Colonel Vetch in relation to the state of Nova Scotia, Mr. Joshua Gee for Pennsylvania, and Mr. Joseph Boon for Carolina.

August 11. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

New York.

Plantations General.

Representation.

Additional instructions.

Governor's Acts.

Bills of Credit.

A representation wherewith to lay before their Excellencies the Lords Justices the draughts of additional instructions to His Majesty's several Governors in America, relating to them passing Acts of Assembly whereby Bills of Credit may be struck or issued, or any money paid to the said Governors or Members of the Councils or Assemblies there, was signed.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Martyn.

Ledger 1718.

1719.

Ordered that the Secretary write to Mr. Martin, Inspector General of the Imports and Exports, to desire him to send to this office the copy of his Leidger for the year 1718, if the same be ready, and to know of him whether such progress be made in the copy of that for the year 1719, so that the Board may receive it before the next session of parliament.

August 15. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

Carolina.

Order of Council.

Government provisionally in the Crown.

Commission and instructions.

Commission.

Mr. Boon summoned.

An Order of the Council of the 11th inst., for taking the Government of Carolina provisionally into the hands of the Crown, and requiring this Board to prepare a Commission and Instructions for a Government to be appointed by His Majesty over that province, was read, whereupon the draught of a commission for that purpose being laid before their Lordships, a progress was made in the consideration thereof, and ordered that Mr. Boon be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with him to-morrow morning.

Nova Scotia.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

A letter from Mr. Delafaye, of the 9th inst., was read, transmitting to the Board, by order of the Lords Justices,
A letter from Colonel Phillips, Governor of His Majesty's Province of Nova Scotia, dated the 26th of May last, with
Several papers relating to the said Governor's proceeding with the French inhabitants of the said province, as also
New York.
Horace Walpole's memorial.
Assembly.
Revenue.
Copy of a memorial from Mr. Horace Walpole, Auditor of the Plantations, to the Lords of the Treasury, relating to the conduct of the Assembly of New York, in regard to the Revenue of that Government; and the officers appointed by His Majesty for receiving and auditing the same, and further
Trade.
Letter from Mr. Pulteney to Mr. Secretary Craggs.
French India Company.
Trade to Africa.
The copy of a letter from Mr. Pulteney, one of His Majesty's Commissaries in France, to Mr. Secretary Craggs of the 10th inst., N.S., concerning a late grant to the India Company in France of an exclusive trade to Africa, and the proceedings of the French against British ships under colour of that grant, together with the copy of the Charter and of an Edict to which that letter refers.

Letter to Brigadier Hunter.

And the said letters being laid before their Lordships, the copies of Mr. Walpole's memorial and of Mr. Pulteney's letter were likewise read; whereupon ordered that Mr. Secretary write to Brigadier Hunter, late Governor of New York, to know the present state of His Majesty's Revenues in that province.

Letters to Mr. Joseph Travers &c.

Seizures.

Edict.

French India Company.

Further ordered that letters be writ to Mr. Joseph Travers, Mr. Richard Harris, and Mr. Humphrey Morrice, to know whether they have heard of any seizures being made on the Foot of the Edict and grant abovementioned to the French India Company, and to signify the Board's desire of speaking with those gentlemen, on Thursday morning next, concerning this matter.

Letter to Mr. Lynn.

African Company.

Ordered likewise that a letter be writ to Mr. Lynn, Secretary to the Royal African Company, to acquaint them that this Board desire to speak with some of the said Company, on Friday morning next.

August 16. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

Carolina.

Commission of a Governor.

Representation.

The draught of a Commission for a Governor to be appointed by His Majesty over the province of Carolina, as mentioned in the Minutes of the last meeting, was agreed, and a representation, wherewith to lay the same before their Excellencies the Lords Justices, was drawn up and signed.

Mr. Boon.

Colonel Barnwell.

Fortifications.

Mr. Joseph Boon, agent for Carolina, attending, as desired, and bringing with him Colonel Barnwell, who said he left that province in March last; they were asked several questions relating to the situation, government, strength &c., both of that part which is called North Carolina, and that which is known by the name of South Carolina; whereupon they said, though the Lords Proprietors have but one charter for Carolina in general, comprehending both the North and South parts, yet the said Lords Proprietors had found it necessary to divide those parts into two distinct governments, which are now independent of each other in all respects; having different Assemblies, Laws and Courts of Justice, and but little communication with each other, except that when the people of North Carolina have been in danger from the Indians, they have been supported from South Carolina; but that the Lords Proprietors have sometimes constituted their Governor of South Carolina Governor in Chief of the whole, with power to appoint a deputy Governor for North Carolina. That there is the same original foundation of Government in both provinces; and that though they were strangers as to any complaint against the Government of North Carolina, yet, if His Majesty should resume the Government of Carolina, they were of opinion it must be of the whole. That the major part of North Carolina belonged to Virginia before the second grant of Carolina to the Lords Proprietors, and is now only separated from Virginia by a River, whereas there is a vast uninhabited wood between North and South Carolina, the seat of Government of the one being about 400 miles from the other; so that if hereafter it should not be thought proper to continue North Carolina a separate Government, they thought it might easiest be united with Virginia. As to the fortifications in Carolina, they said Charlestown was, since the late alarm of an invasion from the Spaniards, pretty well fortified all around at the expence of the inhabitants. That at Savannah Town, about 140 miles up into the country from Charlestown, and to which there is water carriage, there is a garrison of 40 men who are paid by the Indian traders, and another garrison at a place called Congerese. That the French make incroachments on our frontiers, having lately seized a settlement which the English were possessed of. That the method of the French is to build forts on their frontiers, which it would be our interest to do likewise, not only to preserve our trade with the Indians and their dependance upon us, but to preserve our boundaries. That the French particularly pretend a right to the River May and that therefore it would be more immediately necessary for us to prossess ourselves of the mouth of that River. That the people of Carolina have now the trade with the Cherikee Indians in the mountains, whose nearest town is at 280 miles distance from Charlestown. That they have a garrison at Port Royal, which is 150 miles from the Spanish settlement at St. Augustine. That as to the French Settlement near the mouth of the River Mississippi, deserters from them report that 4000 men have already been sent thither from France.

Carolina.

Their Lordships then desired Mr. Boon to communicate to Colonel Barnwell the queries lately sent him concerning Carolina, and that they would both give their answers thereto with what else they might have to offer in relation to that province, which they promised accordingly.

Mr. Boon.

Mr. Boon having left with their Lordships the 5 papers undermentioned relating to the province of Carolina, the same were read, viz.:—
Papers.
Abstract of a letter to Mr. Boon, dated in Carolina, the 24th June, 1720.
Copy of a petition of the inhabitants of South Carolina to His Majesty.
Copy of a letter from the Commons' House of Assembly to Governor Moore.
Copy of an Act for the better supporting of the Public credit of Carolina.
Copy of an Act for supporting the Government of Carolina under Governor Moore, or any succeeding Governor.

New England.

Letter to Mr. Gordon.

Trade with foreign plantations.

Horses.

Ordered that a letter be writ to the Reverend Mr. Gordon, sometime since arrived from Barbadoes, to desire he will give the Board what information he can of the trade carried on between New England and any foreign plantations, particularly to the French and Dutch settlement in horses: what returns they receive and the consequences of such trade.

August 18. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

New York.

Brigadier Hunter.

Horace Walpole's memorial.

Assembly.

Revenue.

Brigadier Hunter, late Governor of New York, attending, as desired, the copy of Mr. Horace Walpole's memorial to the Lords of the Treasury relating to the proceedings of the Assembly of that province with regard to the Revenue there, and the officers appointed for receiving and auditing the accounts thereof, as mentioned in the Minutes of the 15th inst., was again read; whereupon he acquainted their Lordships that the case was justly represented by Mr. Walpole, and several questions being asked the Brigadier on the subject of the memorial, he further said, that the late great debt of the province of New York had been greatly encreased by misapplications of the money raised by former Assemblies. That as to the 10th per day, mentioned in Mr. Walpole's memorial, as applied by the Assembly of New York to their own use, there is a law there, which has been confirmed by the Crown, whereby the Assembly men have a salary assigned them, but that the method of raising it as usual by a county levy was found more inconvenient than by a public tax, and that the sum applied by the said Assembly to themselves, was in lieu of the county levy, to which they had a right. That he had often recommended His Majesty's Receiver to the said Assembly, and that he might have some allowance settled upon him, but could not prevail. That the Quit Rents of New York, which may amount to about £600 sterling per annum, and what duties are raised there, by virtue of Acts of Parliament made here, is all the money that comes into the hands of His Majesty's Receiver, no part of cither of which is applied to the support of that Government.

Brigadier Hunter added, that he had not suffered the Assembly of New York to make any applications in their late Acts for raising money, but had verbally ingaged and given his word to several of their members, that the money should be punctually issued according to such resolves as the Assembly should make for the disposal thereof; and he produced to their Lordships and left for their perusal, a book shewing the method of issuing the Revenue and auditing their accounts.

Trade.

Messrs. Morrice and others.

French seizures.

Coast of Africa.

Travers' memorial.

Late French Edict.

Mr. Merriweather and others.

Mr. Harris.

Private Stipulation.

Mr. Humphrey Morrice, Mr. Richard Harris, Mr. Travers, Mr. John Merry weather, Mr. Marmaduke Pain and others, attending, as desired, in relation to the seizures and incroachments made by the French on the trade and effects of His Majesty's subjects on the Coast of Africa, Mr. Travers presented a memorial to the Board, with copies of two petitions delivered sometime since to their Excellencies the Lords Justices, from himself and brother, relating to three of their ships seized by the French on the said Coast, which memorial was read; and their Lordships enquiring what other losses His Majesty's subjects may have sustained from the French since the late Edict of the French King, referred to in Mr. Pulteney's letter of the 10th inst., N.S., which was read the 15th of this month O.S., (and is the same as that received with Mr. Delafaye's letter of the 11th inst., now read). Mr. John Merrieweather acquainted their Lordships that he was concerned in the ship Amazon, which he hears is lately taken, and is in expectation of the particulars, which when received, he promised to lay before their Lordships; and Mr. Marmaduke Pain, who said he was taken in the Betty Gally, between Portadally and Gambia, promised to bring their Lordships a memorial thereof. Mr. Richard Harris then observed to their Lordships that the English had originally all the trade on the Coast of Africa before the French had any commerce there; but that in King James the 2nd's time there was a private stipulation or agreement made between the English Royal African Company and the French Senegal Company, though without the intervention or authority of the Government of either nation, by which agreement the English consented not to go with their ships into the River Senegal, as the French on their part agreed, not to come into the River Gambia. That by the said agreement all the Coast of Africa was left free to both nations. And these gentlemen being desired to give the Board their thoughts in writing on the subject of the late French Edicts concerning the trade to Africa, they promised to do it, if their Lordships would please to let them have copies or extracts of the said Edicts, which were thereupon ordered them.

Barbadoes.

Mr. Gordon. Copies.

Proceedings against him.

Mr. Gordon of Barbadoes attending, and praying copies of several bills of indictment and other proceedings against him at that Island, their Lordships were pleased to direct him copies, as desired. And

New England.

Letter from Mr. Gordon.

Trade with the French and Dutch Plantations.

Mr. Worsam.

French sugars to New York and Holland.

Detrimental.

A letter from the said Mr. Gordon, dated yesterday, relating to the trade carried on from New England and other His Majesty's Colonies on the Continent of America, to the French and Dutch Plantations, being read; their Lordships had some discourse with him on the subject of the said letter; Whereupon Mr. Gordon acquainting the Board, that Mr. Worsam, mentioned in his said letter, would be ready to attend them with such calculations as he has made of the French sugars imported into New York; their Lordships appointed to speak with them both on Tuesday morning next. In the meantime Mr. Gordon further observed to the Board, that there are great quantities of French sugars carried publickly from our plantations to Holland, to prevent which we have yet no law, and by that means the European markets are supplied with foreign commodities to the great discouragement of the British plantations, and to the detriment of the trade of Great Britain in general.

August 19. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

African Company.

Ships taken by the French.

Edicts.

Senegal India Companies.

Some members of the Royal African Company attending, as desired, they acquainted the Board, that they have as yet no accounts of any of their ships being lately taken by the French on the Coast of Africa; and as to the Edicts lately passed in France concerning the Senegal and India Companies in that kingdom, they desired copies or extracts of such Edicts, upon which they promised to give their Lordships their sentiments in writing in a short time; whereupon ordered that a copy of the French letters patents published at Paris in 1696, relating to the Senegal Company, and also a copy of the 5th Art. of the Edict, published likewise there in July last, for granting all the privileges of the Senegal Company to the India Company, be sent to the gentlemen above mentioned.

Carolina.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

Report.

Safety of Carolina.

A letter from Mr. Delafaye, dated yesterday, signifying their Excellencies the Lords Justices' directions that this Board give all possible dispatch to their report of what is further necessary to be done for the safety of Carolina, was read; and their Lordships made a progress in the consideration of that matter.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Crosse.

Losses.

His letter to be acknowledged.

A letter from Mr. John Crosse junior, Consul at the Canaries, dated at Teneriff, the 25th June, 1720, relating to his sufferings and losses by the Spaniards and to his expenses in maintaing British prisoners, being brought to the Board by his brother, the said letter was read; and he being called in, their Lordships acquainted him that as to the losses abovementioned, the case would be recommended with others to His Majesty's Minister in Spain. And in relation to his disbursement for prisoners, it would be proper for him to apply to the Treasury. Directions were given on this occasion for the Secretary's acknowledging the receipt of Mr. Crosse's letters.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Account of Wool.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs signifying, (in answer to that writ him yesterday), that directions are given to the proper officer for preparing the account of wool, as desired, was read.

Letter to Mr. Martyn.

Valuations of Imports and Exports.

Ordered that Mr. Martyn, Inspector General of the imports and exports, be acquainted that this Board desire in writing the best account he can give, in what manner the valuations of all goods imported and exported, were at first adjusted and settled; and whether, upon his entry into the office of Inspector General, those valuations were received and corrected by the principal traders to each place.

Letter to African Company.

Agreement with French Senegal Company.

Ordered that a letter be writ to desire of the Royal African Company that this Board may have a copy of the Agreement or Stipulation, which their Lordships are informed was made between the said Company and the French Senegal Company in the reign of King James the 2nd, relating to their commerce in Africa.

Nova Scotia.

Letter from Colonel Philips.

Mr. Delafaye's letter.

Papers.

Colonel Gardner summoned.

A letter from Colonel Philips, Governor of Nova Scotia, to Mr. Secretary Craggs, dated the 26th of May last, which was received with Mr. Delafaye's letter, mentioned in the Minutes of the 15th inst., was read, together with the several papers therein referred to, and their Lordships made a progress in the consideration thereof and agreed to proceed again therein at the first opportunity. In the meantime, ordered that Colonel Gardner, who solicits the affairs of Colonel Philips, be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with him on Tuesday morning next.

August 23. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Plantations General.

Mr. Gordon.

Letter from Mr. Worsam.

Mr. Gordon of Barbadoes, attending, according to his appointment, he communicated to the Board a letter to himself from Mr. Worsam, whom he mentioned to their Lordships the 18th inst., as also
Memorandum.
These papers and accounts were returned to Mr. Gordon.
The copy of a case of a ship carrying logwood from the British plantations to foreign parts in Europe, and of Mr. Attorney General Northey's opinion thereupon.
Accounts of imports at New York from several of His Majesty's other plantations of divers commodities, from Christmas, 1715, to Christmas, 1716, of imports there from foreign plantations, of goods of the growth and manufacture thereof, and of exports thence, viz. from New York to Great Britain and other His Majesty's Dominions, of enumerated commodities of the growth and manufacture of English and foreign plantations, from Christmas, 1714, to Christmas, 1715, with a calculation what the Crown of Great Britain has lost in the last mentioned year by not laying the same duties on foreign sugars &c., as on those imported from the British plantations.

All the forementioned accounts and calculations computed and made by the said Mr. Worsam, which were severally read, together with his letter; and their Lordships, among other discourse with Mr. Gordon on the subject of Mr. Worsam's letter, inquiring particularly what proportion of the sugars of Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands might be wasted in the voyage to this kingdom, he said, the Barbadoes clayed sugars lost about 8 per cent., and those from the Leeward Islands and other coarser sugars, about 25 per cent.

Carolina.

Mr. Boon and Mr. Barnwell's answer to Queries.

Mr. Joseph Boon and Colonel Barnwell attending, they presented to the Board their answers to the several queries lately sent them concerning Carolina, as also three other papers undermentioned, viz:—

Papers.

An Account of the proper places fit for garrisons in Carolina and the absolute necessity of doing the same speedily.

Account of the distances from Charlestown to several settlements and rivers in Carolina and between each other.

Description of Pensacola, Mobile and Mississippi River.

Maderas.

Indian trade.

White people.

Colonel Barnwell.

Alatamaha River.

All which were severally read; and their Lordships having some discourse with Mr. Boon and Colonel Barnwell in relation to the said province, they said among other things, (the substance whereof is contained in the said papers), that as to the trade from the Maderas, Carolina might take thence annually from 230 to 250 pipes of wine. That the trade for skins is decreased by reason of the late wars with the Indians, and French incrachments. That as to the management of the Indian trade, the colonies of Virginia and Carolina pursued their separate interest with them, the traders of one colony depreciating and lessening the other to the Indians and even supplying their Indian enemies with arms. That one reason of the decrease of white people in Carolina, is that the land office, as it is called there, is shut up, and that the Lords Proprietors have required all new purchases to be made with them here in Great Britain; and Colonel Barnwell observed that the River Alatamaha is called by the French River May.

Naval officer's accounts.

Their Lordships then taking into consideration the want of the Naval Officer's Account for Carolina, ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse for a copy thereof for three years last past.

August 25. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Barbadoes.

Mr. Lowther.

Mr. Secretary Craggs' letter.

Eldest councillor.

Samuel Cox

suspended.

Mr. Lowther, His Majesty's Governor of Barbadoes, being lately arrived from thence, and waiting on their Lordships, they had some discourse with him, in relation to the state of that Island, and communicated to him the copy of Mr. Secretary Craggs' letter which was writ to him the 11th of June last, requiring him, the said Mr. Lowther, exactly to follow his instructions in leaving the administration of the Government of Barbadoes with the eldest councillor, who should be, at the time of his absence, residing in the Island, and that he should on no pretence whatsoever exclude Samuel Cox, Esq., from the said administration; upon which Mr. Lowther acquainted the Board, that Mr. Cox had been suspended some time ago, for reasons set forth in the Minutes of Council, and that Mr. Secretary Craggs' said letter had not come to his hands when he left Barbadoes.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Pulteney.

Regulation.

Arret.

Bank Bills.

A letter from Mr. Pulteney, one of His Majesty's Commissaries in France, to the Secretary of this Board, dated the 17th of August, 1720, N.S., was read; and the printed regulation published at Paris the 23rd July foregoing, relating to the commerce of foreigners with the French Colonies, together with an Arret published likewise at Paris the 15th of August last, relating to Bank Bills, both inclosed in the said letter, were laid before the Board.

Carolina.

Governor's Instructions.

Their Lordships then made a progress in considering a draught of Instructions for a Governor of Carolina, and agreed to proceed again therein at the next meeting.

August 26. Present:–Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke.

Miscellanies.

Letter from Mr. Tilson.

Mr. West.

Attorney and Solicitor General.

Fees.

Indicidents:—Office.

Answer.

A letter from Mr. Tilson, by order of the Lords of the Treasury, dated the 17th inst., signifying their Lordships' intention since the appointment of Mr. West, one of His Majesty's Counsel at law, to attend the service of the Commission for Trade, that as often as this Board may have occasion for the opinion of His Majesty's Attorney or Solicitor General, the fees for the same be paid or placed to the account of incident charges of this office, was read; and directions given for preparing an answer to the said letter.

Carolina.

Governor's Instructions.

Their Lordships then made a further progress in considering the draught of Instructions for a Governor of Carolina, and agreed the draught of an advertisement to be inserted in the following terms in the next Gazette.
Trade.
Advertisement.
Gazette.
Exportation of Wool.
"His Majesty, in pursuance of an address of the House of Commons, presented last session of Parliament, having commanded the Right Honble. the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to consider of and propose some effectual method for preventing the exportation of wool into foreign parts, in order to be laid before His Majesty and both Houses of Parliament next Sessions; the said Lords Commissioners, having the same under consideration, do hereby give notice that they have appointed every Thursday during the month of September, to receive proposals from, and discourse with, any persons concerning the same at their office in the Cockpit in Whitehall."

August 27. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Bladen.

Carolina.

Nova Scotia.

Governor's Instructions.

Representation.

Their Lordships made a further progress in considering the draught of Instructions for a Governor of Carolina, and agreed the draught of a representation wherewith to lay the same before their Excellencies the Lords Justices, and relating particularly to the state and defence of the Provinces of Carolina and Nova Scotia.

August 30. Present:—Earl of Westmorland, Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen.

Carolina.

Nova Scotia.

Governor's Instructions.

Acts of Trade.

Representation.

State and Defence.

The draught of Instructions for a Governor of Carolina was agreed, and being transcribed with the usual instructions, which particularly relate to the Acts of Trade and Navigation, a representation was signed, wherewith to lay the same before their Excellencies the Lords Justices, and concerning the state and defence of the Provinces of Carolina and Nova Scotia.

Miscellanies.

Letter to Mr. Tilson.

Fees.

Attorney and Solicitor General's report.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Tilson, ordered the 26th inst., to be prepared, in answer to his of the 17th, by order of the Lords of the Treasury, relating to the payment of fees to His Majesty's Attorney and Solicitor General for the opinions or reports this Board may have occasion to desire of them, was agreed and ordered to be sent.

New York.

Mr. Long.

Weiser's petition.

Proofs.

By persons here.

Mr. Jeremy Long attending, in behalf of John Conrade Weiser and other Palatines at New York, whose petition for some land to settle upon in that province, is mentioned in the Minutes of the 21st of last month; their Lordships enquiring of him what proofs the petitioners had to support their allegations, he answered, that he was informed they had several persons in this kingdom ready to attest the truth of what they alleged, if their Lordships would please to summon them, whereupon the said Long was directed to bring a list of such persons, as the petitioners desire to be summoned.

New Jersey.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter.

Act.

Support of Government.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter, Governor of New Jersey, to Mr. Popple, dated the 28th of May, 1719, transmitting An Act passed at Perth Amboy in 1718, entituled, An Act for the support of the Government of His Majesty's province of New Jersey, for two years, to commence from 23rd September last past, and to end 23rd September, 1720, was read.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter to the Board, dated 27th of May, 1719, transmitting public papers of that province, was read.
Papers.
Printed copy of an Act passed at Perth Amboy in 1718, entitled, An Act for the support of the Government of His Majesty's province of New Jersey, for two years, to commence from 23rd September last past, and to end the 23rd September, 1720.
Minutes of Council and Assembly, from 13th January, 1718/19, to the 28th March following.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter.

Letter from Brigadier Hunter, to the Secretary, dated the 6th of June, 1719, transmitting Minutes of Assembly at New Jersey in 1718, was read.
Minutes.
Assembly.
Minutes of Assembly, from 8th April, 1718, to 28th March, 1719.