Journal, November 1720
Journal Book W

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1925

Pages

221-235

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'Journal, November 1720: Journal Book W', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 4: November 1718 - December 1722 (1925), pp. 221-235. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81463 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Journal, November 1720

November 1. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Letter from Commissioners of Excise.

Duties on Calicoes and Linnens.

A letter from the Commissioners of the Excise, dated the 27th of the last month, together with an account of the gross and neat produce of the duties on calicoes and linnens printed, painted, stained or dyed, from Midsummer, 1719, to Midsummer, 1720, were read.

Letter from Colonel Kane, Minorca.

Spanish Consul.

A letter from Colonel Kane, Lieutenant Governor of Minorca, dated at Mahon, the 19th September, 1720, relating to the inconveniences of a Spanish Consul being permitted to reside in that Island, was read; whereupon their Lordships agreed to reconsider the same at another opportunity.

Letter from Mr. Burchet.

Expence of ships against running of Wool.

A letter from Mr. Burchet, Secretary to the Lords of the Admiralty, dated 29th September, 1720, in answer to one writ him, relating to the expence of the ships and vessels imployed in preventing the running of wool, &c., was read.

Proposals.

Mr. Gardner summoned.

Their Lordships then proceeded in the consideration of the remaining proposals before them for preventing the exportation of wool from this kingdom and Ireland, into foreign parts, viz:—
The proposals of Mr. Gardner, Mr. Power, Mr. Thwaits, Captain John Edwards, Messrs. Goddard and Doughty, and Mr. James Gordon. All which their Lordships agreed to reconsider at another opportunity, with other papers on the same subject; and in the meantime ordered that the said Mr. Gardner' be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with him on Thursday morning next.

New York.

Scheef's petition.

Palatines.

Copies to the Governor.

A petition of William Scheef, in behalf of himself and the Germans, commonly called Palatines, dwelling in Schorie in New York, was read; whereupon ordered that copies of the said petition and other papers received from Mr. Long and John Conrad Weiser, in relation to the said Palatines, be transmitted to Mr. Burnet, Governor of New York, and that he be desired to inform himself of, and acquaint this Board with, the true state of the several settlements of the Palatines in his Government, and endeavour to settle those among them who behave themselves with dutiful submission to His Majesty's authority, and are destitute of means of subsistence, upon such convenient lands as are not already disposed of, and the said Long, attending in behalf of the petition, he was acquainted with the substance of what the Board had agreed in this matter.

Trade.

Memorial from Mr. Tidmas.

English Artificers in France.

A memorial from William Tidmas, relating to several English artificers being decoyed into France, and praying to be recommended for employment in the Excise, whereby he may have an opportunity to discover them, was read; whereupon ordered that the said Tidmas be acquainted, it will be proper for him, as their Lordships advised him the 23rd of September last, to apply to a Secretary of State and endeavour to have such persons apprehended and prosecuted according to Law, as he can prove to be concerned in those evil practices.

November 2. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Portugal.

Their Lordships took into consideration the undermentioned papers, relating to the British Trade to Portugal, which were severally read, viz.:—

Letter from Mr. Poyntz.

Representation.

Edict.

A letter from Mr. Poyntz, Consul General at Lisbon, dated the 10th of January, 1719, N.S., transmitting a duplicate of a representation of the Factory to His Majesty's Envoy there; as also a printed copy of the King of Portugal's Edict.

Letter from Mr. Burnet.

Consul.

Griecances.

A letter from Mr. Burnet, Consul General at Lisbon, dated the 19th October, 1719, N.S., relating to grievances on the British trade there.

Letter from Mr. Secretary Craggs.

Copy of Mr. Burnet's Representation.

Factory.

Abuses.

A letter from Mr. Secretary Craggs, of 30th November, 1719, with a copy of a letter from Mr. Burnet, Consul at Lisbon, and an extract of a representation of the Factory, relating to some abuses in their trade, for the opinion of the Board thereupon.

Mr. Poyntz.

Petition.

Bill in Parliament.

Duty on British trade.

Charge Factory.

Foreigners.

Abstract.

Lisbon representation in July, 1715.

Dutch.

Irish.

Dutch Houses.

And Mr. Poyntz, late Consul at Lisbon, and one of the merchants trading to Portugal, attending, as desired, their Lordships had some discourse with them on the subject of their petition to His Majesty, for a Bill to be brought into Parliament, to regulate and settle a duty equally on the British trade in Portugal, for defraying the public charge of the Factories there, as mentioned in the Minutes of the 26th of the last month; and they were particularly asked, if they had anything further to offer on that subject than what is contained in the said petition, and how the case is in this respect with other foreigners in Portugal, whereupon they presented to the Board an abstract of a paragraph of a representation of the state of the British trade in Portugal, transmitted by the Consul General and British Factory of Lisbon, to His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State, and to this Board, in July, 1715, which was read. And as to other foreigners in Portugal, they said, the Dutch now practise the same method as proposed by the petition now before their Lordships, by collecting the duty on the Bills of Lading, and that there is the like usage at Cadiz. They added, that the Irish, who are settled in Portugal at present, pay no contribution at all towards the public charges of the British Factory. And in further relation to the trade to Portugal. Mr. Poyntz observed that one half of the British goods carried to that kingdom are consigned to Dutch houses; and that the Dutch carry no British goods from Holland.

These gentlemen being withdrawn, their Lordships agreed to reconsider the said papers at another opportunity.

Barbadoes.

Memorial from Mr. Gordon against 2 Acts.

With Mr. West.

A memorial from the Rev. Mr. Gordon, of Barbadoes, against 2 Acts of that Island, the one for depriving him of his living there &c.; the other, for the better regulating the power of Vestries &c., was read; and Mr. Gordon attending, was acquainted that the said Acts were at present with Mr. West, one of His Majesty's Counsel at Law, and that so soon as the same should be returned, the Board would consider them, and direct notice to be given him thereof.

Jamaica.

Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes.

Papers.

Their Lordships then proceeded to consider the several letters undermentioned from Sir Nicholas Lawes, His Majesty's Governor of Jamaica, which were read; and the papers, therein respectively referred to, were laid before the Board, viz.:—
A letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes, Governor of Jamaica, dated 30th July, 1719, with
Copy of a letter from the Marquess de Chateaumorant, Governor of Petit Guavas, to the Governor of Jamaica, relating to a Spanish fleet in the West Indies, dated the 31st July, 1719, N.S.
Affidavit of John Johnson, relating to a fleet of Spanish men of war, in the West Indies.
The Receiver General's account of His Majesty's fortifications, to the 25th March, 1719.
The Receiver General's account to the 25th March, 1719.

Three letters from Sir Nicholas Lawes, Governor of Jamaica, to the Board, dated 6th December, 1719, marked A. B. and C.
Copy of an order from Sir Nicholas Lawes, to the several Custos's. of the Island, to return lists of all the inhabitants, &c., in the respective parishes and precincts.
Sir Nicholas Lawes's speech to the Council and Assembly of Jamaica on the 20th October, 1719.
Assembly's address to Sir Nicholas Lawes. of 29th October, 1719, with his answer.
Copy of an address from the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to His Majesty.
Copy of a letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes to Mr. Delafaye, about His Majesty's Storehouses at Kingston.
Naval Officer's lists of ships and vessels entered and cleared at Kingston and Port Royal respectively, (each quarter distinct), from Midsummer, 1718, to Midsummer, 1719.
Account current of His Majesty's Revenue at Jamaica, the 29th September, 1719.
Account of His Majesty's fortifications at Jamaica, the 29th September, 1719.

A letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes. dated 2nd February, 1719/20, to the Board.
Copy of An Act for the relief of such persons as have suffered by piracies at sea, or on the shore, by any of His Majesty's subjects of this Island, together with a copy of the amendments made thereto by the Council.
Copy of the Bill for appointing an agent in Great Britain, &c.
Copy of the Act to repeal the condemnation of the sloop Nuestra Senora de Belin, otherwise called the sloop Kensington, together with a copy of the amendments made by the Council.
Copy of Samuel Lobdelle's deposition, relating to several Spanish men of war he saw in the West Indies.
Minutes of Council of War, held in Jamaica, in June and July, 1719,

Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes.
Minutes of Council, from 16th December, 1718, to 26th August, 1719.
Papers.
Naval Officer's account of exports from Jamaica, and of negroes imported, from Midsummer, to Christmas, 1719.
Naval Officer's account of imports, from Midsummer, to Christmas, 1719.
List of all ships and vessels that belong to Jamaica, certified by the Naval Officer, 25th January, 17 19/20.
Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes, Governor of Jamaica, to the Board, dated the 31st March, 1720.
The Governor of Jamaica's reasons for passing six Acts in the year 1719.
Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes, Governor of Jamaica, to the Board, dated the 20th June, 1720.
Sir Nicholas Lawes's speech to the Council and Assembly of Jamaica, June the 16th, 1720.
Assembly of Jamaica's address to Sir Nicholas Lawes, the 17th June, 1720.
Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes. Governor of Jamaica, dated 24th August, 1720.
Sir Nicholas Lawes's speech to the Assembly, 24th June, 1720, with the Assembly's address.
Ditto of 28th June, 1720.
Ditto of 8th July, 1720.
Copy of the proposals sent to the inhabitants of Anguilla, by Captain Jones, Commander of the sloop Resolution.
Copy of the Articles of Agreement made between Sir Nicholas Lawes and Jeremy, King of the Musquittos.
Receiver General's Account at Lady Day, 1720.
Minutes of Council, from 12th April, to 27th July, 1720.
Ditto of Council in Assembly, from 15th of June, to 9th July, 1720.
Ditto of Assembly, from 15th June, to 9th July, 1720.
Naval Officer's lists, inward and outward, from 25th December, 1719. to 25th June, 1720.

Answer.

Extract

to Mr. Delafaye.

Whereupon some directions were given for preparing the draught of an answer to the said several letters; and in the meantime ordered that an extract of the last mentioned letter, viz.: of the 24th of August, relating to the depredations committed by the Spaniards upon His Majesty's subjects, since the cessation of arms, and in the last peace, be prepared to be sent to Mr. Delafaye. and laid before their Excellencies the Lords Justices.

November 3. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Mr. Gardner.

Proposal.

Exportation of Wool.

Scheme.

Method.

Memorial.

Mr. Gardner attending, as desired, their Lordships had some discourse with him, relating to his proposal mentioned in the Minutes of the 1st inst., for preventing the exportation of wool; and he being desired to explain himself thereupon, he said, the scheme would require a particular care and management, the discovery whereof might defeat the intent. That he had projected several things which had been put in practice and proved of public service, without any gratification or advantage to himself, and therefore declined discovering the particular methods intended by his proposals to be used, unless he might have some reasonable benefit thereby. Whereupon being acquainted that the Board could only recommend such persons, whose proposals or schemes for the public service might deserve it, of which no judgment could be made without a discovery of the whole; he said, that the undertaking to prevent the exportation of wool, according to his scheme, requires a society of men of substance to support the great charge, that they should have occasion for a particular sort of vessels with oars not now in use. That a number of persons must be imployed, some publicly and others in a private manner, for informations on or near the coasts from whence wool is usually transported. That it might on some occasions be fit for the undertakers in this affair, to buy up quantities of wool in the place most suspected for running it. Upon all which their Lordships making some queries to him, as to the security for the due execution of so great a trust, as would seem to be necessary to be reposed in such undertakers and their officers; and also concerning their ability and the manner of raising their stock, which they desired might be explained; Mr. Gardner promised to let their Lordships have a more particular memorial on this subject.

Miscellanies.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

Against the Plague.

Sir Edward Gould.

Williams and Jamineau summoned.

A letter from Mr. Delafaye, Secretary to the Lords Justices, dated the 1st inst., recommending it to this Board, to consider what may be proper to be further enacted by Parliament, for preventing the Plague or other infectious distempers, was read; whereupon ordered that Sir Edward Gould be desired to let this Board know in writing on Tuesday next, as particularly as he can, what methods are taken at Leghorn for that purpose; and that Messrs. Williams and Jamineau be desired to do the same for Venice, and Mr. Porten the like for Messina.

Jamaica.

Representation.

Depredations.

Cutting Logwood.

Campeachy.

A representation to the Lords Justices, with an extract of Sir Nicholas Lawes's letter of the 24th August last, mentioned in yesterday's Minutes, relating to depredations committed by the Spaniards in those parts, since the suspension of arms, and concerning His Majesty's subjects cutting logwood in the Bay of Compeachy, was signed.

Newfoundland.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

Copy of Colonel Gledhill's Forces.

Proclamations removing the people.

Depredations by pirates.

A letter from Mr. Delafaye, dated the 1st inst., referring to the Board, by order of the Lords Justices, the copy of a letter from Colonel Gledhill, Lieutenant Governor of Placentia, in Newfoundland, relating to the disposition of the forces there; two proclamations sent by Colonel Philips for removing the people at Newfoundland; and to depredations committed by the pirates, was read, together with the said copy of a letter, which their Lordships agreed to reconsider at another opportunity.

November 4. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Portugal.

Representation.

Duty.

Charges.

British Factories.

The draught of a representation, upon the petition of the merchants trading to Portugal, relating to a duty to be settled on the trade thither, for defraying the public charges of the British Factories in that kingdom, as mentioned in the Minutes of the 26th October, and 2nd inst., was agreed, transcribed and signed.

Carolina.

Memorial from Mr. Boon &c.

Extract of a letter.

British vessels seized.

Arms and Stores of War.

Captain Hildersly.

Colonel Rhet.

Letter to Mr. Burchet.

Memorial and extract.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Representation.

A memorial from Mr. Boon and Colonel Barnwell, together with the extract of a letter from Carolina, relating to the seizure of several British vessels by the Spaniards of St. Augustine, on the coast of Florida, and to the said Spaniards being furnished with arms and stores of war by Captain Hildersly, of His Majesty's ship Flambrough, in concert with Colonel William Rhet, Surveyor of the Customs, at Charlestown in Carolina, for goods in return, not reported to the Custom House there, were read; whereupon directions were given for preparing a letter to Mr. Burchet, wherewith to transmit to him a copy of so much of the said memorial and extract as relates to Captain Hildersly, to be laid before the Lords of the Admiralty; as likewise another letter to Mr. Carkesse, for transmitting to him a copy of so much thereof as relates to Colonel Rhet, to be laid before the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs, and the draught of a representation for laying a copy of the whole before the Lords Justices, for their Excellencies directions therein.

November 8. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Miscellanies.

Letter from Mr. Jones.

Infectious distempers.

Smuggling.

A letter from Mr. Timothy Jones, dated at Canterbury, the 3rd inst., about preventing infectious distempers and the smuggling trade on the coast, was read.

Letter from Sir Edward Gould.

Quarantine.

Leghorn.

A letter from Sir Edward Gould, together with a memorial relating to the method of performing quarantine and preventing infectious distempers at Leghorn, was read.

Letter from Mr. Porten.

Memorial.

Plague.

Messina.

Mr. Porten.

Other ports.

Bills of Health.

A letter from Mr. James Porten, dated this day, together with a memorial relating to the methods used at Messina, to prevent the plague and other infectious distempers, were likewise read; and the said Mr. Porten attending, their Lordships had some discourse with him on that subject. And being particularly asked concerning the usage in other parts of Sicily, and ships coming to Messina from the said other ports of that kingdom, he said, the practice was the same in all ports there, with respect to Bills of Health and performing quarantine, and that ships or boats going only from port to port there, are obliged, where they arrive, to produce Bills of Health.

Williams and Jamineau.

Memorial.

Magistracy for Health.

Venice.

Mr. Williams and Mr. Jamineau attending, Mr. Williams presented to the Board a memorial giving account of the Magistracy for Health at Venice, and of their proceedings as to quarantine for ships crews, goods and passengers by sea, which was read; and Mr. Jamineau acquainted their Lordships that he had nothing more to say on that subject than what was contained in Mr. Williams' said memorial.

Trade

Venice.

Letter from Mr. Delafaye.

Memorial, Signior Fiorelli.

Dispute.

Visiting our ships.

Malamaco..

Mr. Williams and Jamincan.

Reason of that Decree of the Senate.

Mr. Williams.

Fiorelli's proposals.

Answer.

Their Lordships then taking into consideration the letter from Mr. Delafaye of the 14th September last, referring to the Board, by order of the Lords Justices, the translation of a memorial from Signior Fiorelli, Secretary from the Republic of Venice, proposing, that to accommodate the dispute about our ships being visited at Venice, they should be obliged to stop in some particular in the port of Malamoco, and should not be visited; but that the boats, which carry the goods from the ships to the town, may be visited, the said letter was read in presence of Mr. Williams and Mr. Jamineau; and they were asked whether they had any objection to the proposition abovementioned; whereupon they answered that they had no objection to it, provided their goods were not detained. And they added that they had proposed the same thing to the Venetians some time ago. Mr. Williams on this occasion further acquainted the Board, that at present such British Masters or Commanders, who, without opposition, admit their vessels to be visited by the Venetians' officers, are very civilly used and upon a small present, (it may be of liquor, fish, or such like of the ships stores), the officer retires, there being very seldom any goods on board British vessels, which are prohibited there. That the occasion of the Decree made by that Senate for visiting all ships and vessels coming to that port, was the Neopolitans and others under the Domion of the Emperor, running goods into the city in open day, under the protection of the Imperial Ambassador, contrary to the laws of the Republic; to remedy which, the Senate could not well decree against any particular nation, though the Venetians always show a particular respect to the British banner; their Lordships then desired Mr. Williams to consult with other gentlemen trading to Venice, on Signor Fiorelli's said proposas, which the Secretary was ordered to transmit to them, desiring their answer in writing.

Miscellanies.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Commissioners of the Customs.

Quarantine effectual.

Ordered that the Secretary write to Mr. Carkesse, to acquaint him that this Board desire the favour of discoursing with two or three of the Commissioners of the Customs, on Thursday morning next, in relation to the making the quarantine in this kingdom more effectual.

Trade.

Order of Council.

East India Company's exports.

An order of Council of the 25th of the last month, referring to the Board an account of the East India Company's exports from Michaelmas, 1719, to Michaelmas, 1720, was read; and their Lordships agreed to compare the said account with those of former years.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Papers relating to Wool.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, dated 7th inst., inclosing the undermentioned papers relating to wool, was read; and the said papers laid before the Board, viz.:—
A copy of the clause intended for an Act of Parliament, in relation to the exportation of wool.
An account of wool and yarn, imported from Ireland, from Christmas, 1714, to Christmas, 1719, prepared by the Inspector General of Imports and Exports.
An abstract of the account of wool, inwards and outwards from port to port in Great Britain, for the same time, with the manner how the accounts are transmitted and compared.
An abstract of the account of wool from Ireland, taken from the Register kept here, for the same time, and in what manner the same is kept, transmitted and compared.

Trade.

Mr. West summoned.

Ordered that Mr. West, one of His Majesty's Counsel at Law, be acquainted that this Board desire to speak with him to-morrow morning.

November 9. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Ashe.

Jamaica.

Letter from Sir Nicholas Lawes.

Answer.

Their Lordships took again into consideration the late letters from Sir Nicholas Lawes, Governor of Jamaica, and gave some further directions for preparing the draught of an answer thereto.

Letter to Mr. Charles Stanhope.

King's proportion of seizures.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Charles Stanhope, to desire this Board may be informed what directions the Lords of the Treasury have given in relation to His Majesty's proportion of seizures at Jamaica, concerning which the Secretary of this Board wrote to him the 8th July, 1719.

November 10. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Miscellanies.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Quarantine.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, (in answer to that writ him the 8th inst.), signifying that the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs have under consideration the quarantine to be performed in this Kingdom, and that when they have digested the same, which they hope will be sometime next week, they will give this Board notice thereof, and wait on the Board as their Lordships shall appoint, was read.

Trade.

Mr. Ingram, &c.

Charge carriage of Wool.

Exeter.

Carriage by Sea.

Custom House Officers, Rye.

Fraudulent practice.

Irish wool.

Mr. Ingram and Mr. Ashurst attending, Mr. Ingram presented to the Board a computation of the charge of the carriage of wool between several places in England, which was read; and they, being called in, were asked, upon observation that there is no mention made in the said computation of the charge of carrying wool from London to Exeter, or elsewhere by sea, what that charge might be, to which they answered, that they did not yet know, but would enquire, and give the Board an account. In further discourse on this subject, Mr. Ashurst observed, that the carriage of wool by sea gave great opportunities to run the same into France, and said, that there had been frauds committed by entering wool with the Officers of the Customs at Rye for Exeter, or other ports in the west of England, and carrying the wool directly to France; the package whereof preserving the same marks and numbers, was again clandestinely filled on our coast with the like quantity of wool, and carried to the port to which the first parcel was pretended to be sent. As to Irish wool, they said, that from the ports to which it is restrained to be brought into this kingdom, the carriage of it to other places is all by land, and not from the said ports to any other by sea.

Mr. West.

Charge in prosecutions.

Forfeited wool.

Mr. Ingram and Mr. Ashurst being withdrawn, and Mr. West, one of His Majesty's Counsel at Law, attending, their Lordships had some discourse with him, relating to the great charge in prosecutions for forfeited wool.

Statute 20th Hen. VI.

Cap. 5.

Letter to Mr. West.

Their Lordships then desired Mr. West's opinion whether the Statute of 20th of Henry the 6th, cap. 5th, wherein is a clause relating to the Custom House Officers being concerned in trade and shipping, be now in force, and after some discourse with him thereupon, directions were given for preparing a letter to him for his answer thereto in writing.

November 11. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Memorial from Mr. Gardner.

Proposals.

Wool.

A memorial from Mr. Gardner, containing his further proposals for preventing the exportation of wool, was read.

Plantations General.

Representation.

General state of the Plantations.

Their Lordships made a progress in considering the draught of a representation, relating to the general state of His Majesty's Plantations in America.

Trade.

Letter to Mr. Woolley.

East India Company.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Woolley, Secretary to the East India Company, to desire they will lay before the Board, as soon as possible, what they have further to offer concerning the East India trade.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Seizures and prosecutions.

Wool run.

Ordered that a letter be writ to Mr. Carkesse, Secretary to the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs, to desire the proper officer may have orders to lay before this Board an account, for the three last years, of the seizures and prosecutions for wool intended to be run out of this kingdom.

November 15. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Mr. Oxenford.

Imports, Exports.

Excess.

Germany.

Hamburgh.

Woollen manufactures.

Mr. Oxenford, from the office of the Inspector General of the Imports and Exports, attending, presented to the Board an account of the imports and exports compared with the excess of each country, from Christmas, 1717, to Christmas, 1718, which was read; and Mr. Oxenford being asked whether the valuations of the exports to Germany are taken from such separate accounts as to distinguish the value of the exports to Hamburgh, Bremen and other places; he said, that such distinction might be made, though with difficulty and expence of time. That as to Hamburgh in particular, he believed three fourths of our whole annual export of woollen manufactures to Germany, was to that city.

Nevis.

Messrs. Coope and Truman.

Debentures delivered.

Mr. Richard Coope and Mr. Thomas Truman attending, and their powers of attorney from the persons claiming under two of the sufferers of the French invasion of Nevis, being examined at the Board, the two debentures Nos. 577 and 666 were delivered to the said Coope and Truman.

Newfoundland.

Letter from Colonel Gledhill.

Colonel Gledhill.

Hemp.

A letter from Colonel Gledhill, Commander of the garrison at Placentia in Newfoundland, dated there the 27th of September last, proposing to raise hemp there, was read.

Trade.

East India Company.

Progress.

Representation.

Their Lordships then took again into consideration the answer of the East India Company, to the letters lately writ them concerning their trade, and made some progress in the draught of a representation thereupon.

Barbadoes.

Acts.

to Mr. West.

Act

20 Henry VI. Cap. 5.

Custom House Officers.

Ordered that the 12 Acts, passed in Barbadoes in May last, be sent to Mr. West, one of His Majesty's Counsel at Law, for his opinion thereupon in point of Law, and that he be pressed for his answer to the Secretary's letter of the 11th inst., relating to the Act of the 20th of King Henry the Sixth, Cap. 5., which prohibits officers of the Customs being traders, &c.

November 16. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Pelham.

Trade.

Venice.

Letter from Messrs. Williams &c.

Fiorelli's proposal.

Dispute.

Visiting British ships.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs.

A letter from Messrs. Williams, Jamineau and Rigby, dated this day, in answer to what the Secretary writ them the 10th inst., by order of the Board, upon a proposal from Signor Fiorelli, the Venetian Secretary, to accommodate the dispute about British ships being visited at Venice, was read; whereupon the draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs, in answer to that from him of the 21st November last, referring to this Board several papers from Mr. Burges, His Majesty's minister at Venice, and likewise upon the letter from Mr. Delafaye, dated 14th September last, all upon the same subject, was agreed and ordered to be transcribed.

Letter from Mr. Woolley.

East India Company.

Papers.

A letter from Mr. Woolley, Secretary to the East India Company, dated yesterday, in answer to one writ him the 12th inst., was read; as likewise the enclosed papers undermentioned, viz:—
Reasons humbly offered by the East India Company against a law proposed to prevent the wearing and using calicoes, painted, stained or dyed, in England for the benefit of the weavers.
A list of several weighable, bulky and coarser sorts of goods heretofore imported from the East Indies, which have either not at all or but rarely, or in small parcels, been of late imported by the East India Company, by reason of the great duties laid upon them.
Account of ships sent out to the East Indies under foreign commissions with English and Irish officers, &c.

Whereupon their Lordships agreed to consider further of the said letter and papers the first opportunity.

Carolina.

Mr. Boon.

Extracts.

English vessels seized.

Letter to Mr. Craggs.

Mr. Boon having communicated to the Board, two extracts of letters from Carolina, relating to the Spaniards at St. Augustine having seized several of His Majesty's subjects since the cessation of arms, the same were read and ordered to be transcribed, to be enclosed to Mr. Secretary Craggs, for His Majesty's directions thereupon.

November 17. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen.

Trade.

Account of Wool and Yarn.

An account of the wool and yarn imported from Ireland, from Christmas, 1698, to Christmas, 1714, being received from the office of the Inspector General of the Imports and Exports, the same was read.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs.

Our ships visited, Venice.

A letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs, as agreed at the last meeting, in relation to British ships being visited at Venice, was signed.

Carolina.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs.

Ships seized at St. Augustine.

Captain Hildersly.

Colonel Rhet.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs, upon a memorial and extracts of letters received from Mr. Boon and Colonel Barnwell, relating to several seizures made by the Spaniards at St. Augustine, of British ships, &c., since the suspension of arms, as also concerning some transactions, wherein Captain Hildersly, of, His Majesty's ship Flamborough, and Colonel Rhett, Collector of the Customs at Carolina, have been concerned, was agreed and signed.

Letters to Mr. Burchet and Mr. Carkesse.

The draughts of letters from the Secretary of this Board, to Mr. Burchet and Mr. Carkesse, inclosing to the former, extracts of such parts of the said memorial &c. as relate to Captain Hildersly; and to the latter, extracts of such other parts as relate to Colonel Rhett, for the respective information and directions of the Lords of the Admiralty and Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs, were agreed and ordered to be sent.

Trade.

Extracts.

East India Company's answer.

Wear of calicoes.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Carkesse, together with extracts of the East India Company's answer, received from Mr. Woolley, their Secretary, with his letter of 16th September last, relating to the wear of painted, stained or dyed calicoes and the difficulties in their trade, for the sentiments of the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs thereupon, was agreed and ordered to be sent.

Representation.

Exportation of Wool.

Their Lordships took into consideration the draught of a representation about preventing the exportation of wool and made a progress therein.

Ingram and Ashurst summoned.

Ordered that Mr. Ingram and Mr. Ashurst be acquainted that the Board desire to speak with them to-morrow morning.

November 18. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Ingram and Ashurst.

Memorial.

Charges carrying goods Coastwise.

Mr. Ingram and Mr. Ashurst attending, presented to the Board a memorial relating to the charge of carrying goods coastwise and by land to several parts of England, which was read.

Trade.

Exchequer charges condemnation of wool.

The said Mr. Ashurst also laid before the Board, an account of the Exchequer charges for condemnation of wool and other goods, and for trying a cause and bringing it to execution.

Mr. Ingram.

Wool. Yorkshire.

Land carriage.

Mr. Ashurst.

Sea carriage.

Rye to Exeter.

Prosecutions paid by the Crown.

Informer.

Their Lordships then making several further charges of the said Mr. Ingram and Ashurst, concerning wool, particularly the carriage of it, and seizures and prosecutions for running of wool; Mr. Ingram observed, that as to the wool which is carried into Yorkshire and other northern counties from London, ready sorted, the clothiers would rather have it by land carriage, as he had formerly mentioned, than risque the damages by sea. That as for the wool of the growth of that and some of the neighbouring counties, what the clothiers buy there, is in the fleeces, which they sort themselves, and dispose of the coarser part only, which may not be fit for their use; and Mr. Ashurst declared his opinion, that it would prejudice no branch of our woollen manufactures, if the carriage of wool by sea were intirely prohibited, except from the port of Rye to Exeter. That in Kent and Sussex, where he said he had served 18 years under the late Captain Baker, solicitor to the Treasury, who had officers under him, and a particular allowance for preventing the Owling trade, all prosecutions for wool and other goods were carried on, during the said Captain Baker's time, intirely at the charge of the Crown. That as to the wool intended to be run, any person might seize it and have it carried to the next Custom House, where the officer immediately procured a writ of appraisement and proceeded to condemnation. Though as to other goods, the officers of the Crown only could seize; but in both those cases, the Common Informer, so far from any deduction out of his moiety, had the same or greater incouragement than the Officers, which latter used to allow the Informer, when his name was concealed, as generally it was, twenty shillings for each pack of wool discovered or seized. That when any servant or assistant to the runners of wool was discovered or suspected to inform against them, such servant or other person, as they were often more or less in debt, were immediately arrested and sent to prison. And Mr. Ashurst said he particularly knew of a man, who having discovered a parcel of wool, was upon a slight occasion committed and so strenously prosecuted as to be burnt in the hand. That formerly the Officers of the Customs and others were at liberty to employ their own solicitors, but at present are, in effect, obliged to imploy a person or some concerned for him, who make all prosecutions very expensive. Mr. Ashurst added that between the two last terms, there have been forty informations entered at the Exchequer.

Trade.

Letter from Lord Provost of Edinburgh.

Fishery.

Copartnership.

A letter from the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, dated the 10th inst., relating to the Fishery on the coast of North Britain, intended to be carried on by a co-partnership there, was read.

Letter from Mr. Thompson.

Officer, Wool.

Dublin.

Remonstrance.

Letter.

Certificate.

A letter from Mr. Josiah Thompson, late Officer for preventing the running of wool at Dublin, the 5th inst., as also his case, with a printed paper called A remonstrance to the Commons of Great Britain and a letter to the clothiers; as also a certificate in his behalf, were read.

Representation.

Running of wool.

Their Lordships then made a further progress in considering the draught of a representation, about preventing the running of wool, from this kingdom and Ireland.

November 22. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Miscellanies.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Quarantine.

Sir John Stanley.

Report to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor General.

Sheds and Houses.

Isle of Grain.

Man of War.

Penalties.

Degree of Force.

Act 9 Anne.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, dated the 18th inst., concerning some of the Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs coming to this Board, in relation to the quarantine to be performed by ships from foreign parts, in order to prevent infectious distempers, was read; and the Secretary having, upon receipt of the said letter, acquainted Mr. Carkesse, that their Lordships were to meet this morning; Sir John Stanley, one of the said Commissioners, came to the Board, and let them know that the late Lords Justices having required the Commissioners of the Customs to consider of and transmit to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor General, what they had to offer to be further provided by Parliament to prevent the spreading of the plague, or any other infectious distemper; the said Commissioners had accordingly transmitted their thoughts to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor, and would send their Lordships a copy of that report. That the said Commissioners have caused sheds and houses to be built on the Isle of Grain, for such persons as are obliged to perform quarantine, &c.; and that there was a man of war near the Island, to command merchant ships thither and to see the said quarantine duly performed. Their Lordships then discoursing with Sir John Stanley, concerning the penalties now by law for contumacy in persons under quarantine or coming from foreign parts, infected or suspicious of being so, particularly as to the degree of force, to be used for keeping suspected ships and persons out of the kingdom, Sir John acquainted the Board that the Commissioners of the Customs conceived the word Force, mentioned in the Act of the 9th of Queen Anne, relating to the quarantine, impowered the Government to use the utmost force, if necessary.

Pennsylvania.

Mr. Gee.

Agreement between the Queen and Mr. Penn for the Government.

Sir John Stanley being withdrawn, and Mr. Joshua Gee attending, their Lordships inquired of him, in what state the agreement, which was proposed and partly executed, between Her late Majesty and Mr. Penn, for the Government of Pennsylvania, is at present, Mr. Gee desired a few days to prepare a state of that matter, and promised to bring the same to the Board in writing.

November 23. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Mr. Coxeter.

Two papers.

Advantages.

Calicoes.

Scheme for imploying weavers &c.

General reasonings.

Mr. Coxeter.

Mr. Wrighton.

Mr. Coxeter attending, presented to the Board, in behalf of Wrighton and Mr. Hurst, two papers; the one entitled "A short state of the advantages which will arise by manufacturing of calicoes in Great Britain," the other "A short scheme for effectually imploying the weavers and others the manufacturers of this kingdom, encouraging His Majesty's plantations and raising the sum of two millions and a half sterling"; which papers were both read; and it being observed that they contained general reasonings without any particular proposals; Mr. Coxeter said, the intention of the persons abovementioned, who are concerned in the manufactures of cotton, was to endeavour to obtain some incouragement for those manufactures here, and a prohibition of other calicoes; but as to the particulars desired by them, he referred himself to the said Mr. Wrighton now in London, whom he promised to send to their Lordships, with what further he had to offer on this subject.

Memorial.

Sir Thomas Brand.

Woollen manufacture.

Exportation of wool.

A memorial from Sir Thomas Brand and other gentlemen, relating to a copartnership for carrying on the woollen manufactures of this kingdom, and preventing the exportation of wool, was read.

November 24. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Trade.

Letter from Mr. Carkesse.

Orders.

Treasury.

Extract.

East India Company's Answer.

Letter to Mr. Lowndes.

A letter from Mr. Carkesse, dated yesterday, signifying that the Commissioners of the Customs think it necessary to have orders from the Lords of the Treasury, before they give an opinion upon the extract of the East India Company's answer or memorial, which was transmitted the 17th inst. to Mr. Carkesse, was read; and the draught of a letter to Mr. Lowndes, desiring him to move the Lords of the Treasury for their Lordships' directions in this affair, was agreed, and ordered to be sent.

Letter to Mr. Carkesse.

Wool.

Shipped in Scotland.

Upon further consideration of Mr. Carkesse's letter of the 7th inst., with an inclosed account of wool shipped coastwise, the draught of a letter to him, in order to his explaining part of the said letter relating to wool shipped in Scotland, was agreed and ordered to be sent.

Sir Thomas Brand &c.

Copartnership.

Woollen manufactures.

Sir Thomas Brand and some other gentlemen attending, their memorial, mentioned in yesterday's Minutes, relating to a copartnership for carrying on the woollen manufactures of this kingdom and preventing the exportation of wool, was again read; and their Lordships, among other discourse with them, inquiring what they particularly proposed or desired, which they apprehend they may not by law at present do; they said, they proposed to have a joint stock transferable, though not exclusive of others, and hoped, by the countenance of parliament, to make and vend most sorts of woollen goods 10 per cent, cheaper than at present; whereupon they were acquainted that the Board would be ready to receive and consider any proposals they should think fit to offer on that subject.

Carolina.

Memorial from Mr. Boon and Colonel Barnwell.

A memorial from Mr. Boon and Colonel Barnwell, relating to the situation, bounds and produce of North Carolina, as desired from them, was read.

Plantations General.

Representation.

General State Plantations.

Their Lordships then proceeded in the further consideration of the draught of a representation, relating to the general state of His Majesty's plantations on the continent of America.

Pennsylvania.

Letter to Colonel Hart.

Queries.

And ordered that a letter be writ to Colonel Hart, with the like queries, with respect to the states of Pennsylvania, as were lately sent him concerning the province of Maryland.

November 29. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Bladen, Mr. Ashe.

Plantations General.

Maryland.

Colonel Hart.

Letter from him.

Extract.

French.

Spanish silver mines.

Strength.

Indian Nations.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs.

Colonel Hart, late Governor of Maryland, attending, his letter of yesterday, with an extract of one from Mr. Dixon, collector of the Customs for the district of Potamack in that Province, dated 28th August last, relating to the French possessing themselves of some of the Spanish silver mines in America and to their strength in those parts by the accession of several Indian nations to their interest, was read; whereupon ordered that the draught of a letter be prepared, wherewith to transmit to Mr. Secretary Craggs a Copy of the said extract.

Strength of the French.

Forts.

Moville.

300 guns.

Colonel Spotswood.

Two forts.

Maintains in one 50 Indian Boys at School.

Pennsylvania.

Quakers will not defend themselves against an enemy.

Queries.

Colonel Hurt.

In the meantime, their Lordships entering into discourse with Colonel Hart, relating to several matters which concern the plantations; he said, as to the strength of the French on the continent of America, that he was credibly informed, they had erected 25 forts on the rivers and lakes between Mississippi and Quebec, for the security of their passage. That to the southward, Moville is the place of their greatest strength, they having a fort there with three hundred guns. That the Indians are numerous on the back of Virginia, among whom Colonel Spotswood, the present Lieutenant Governor, has erected two forts, which have for the most part 40 or 50 persons in arms. That at one of the said forts, Colonel Spotswood maintains, at his own charge, 50 Indian boys at school, the better to cultivate an interest and friendship with those Indians. That he knows of no other forts in Virginia, but that the Lieutenant Governor has a very good magazine of small arms. That several inconveniences arise as to the Indians, from the emulation there is between some provinces concerning the trade with them, but that they are easy to be treated and managed by doing them justice. In relation to Pennsylvania, he said, the people of that province keep a good correspondence with their neighbouring Indians, but the inhabitants, being about two third parts of them Quakers, are not to be depended upon for their own defence against any enemy, they have been tried by an alarm made for that purpose, whilst Colonel Evans was Governor of that Province. Colonel Hart, being then asked concerning the queries lately sent him in relation to the said province of Pennsylvania, he said, he was not yet prepared to give their Lordships his answer to them, but promised to do it in a few days.

Mr. Gee.

Case of Mr. Penn, and Mortagagees.

Colonel Hart being withdrawn, and Mr. Joshua Gee attending, presented to the Board a printed paper intituled The Case of William Penn, Esq., and of Joshua Gee and others, his mortagagees, of Pennsylvania, wherein is set forth the state of the agreement, treated of for surrendering the Government of that Province, and the said paper was read.

After which their Lordships had some discourse with Mr. Gee, in relation to the trade of the West Indies, and he promised to send their Lordships a treatise which he had writ on that subject.

November 30. Present:—Mr. Chetwynd, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Ashe.

Plantations General.

Maryland.

Letter to Mr. Secretary Craggs.

French.

Spanish silver mines.

The draught of a letter, ordered yesterday to be prepared, for inclosing to Mr. Secretary Craggs a copy of the extract of a letter communicated to the Board by Colonel Hart, late Governor of Maryland, relating to the French possessing themselves of some of the Spanish silver mines in America, and to the strength of the French there, was agreed, transcribed and signed.