Journal, June 1751
Volume 59

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

202-215

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'Journal, June 1751: Volume 59', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 9: January 1750 - December 1753 (1932), pp. 202-215. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81844 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Journal, June 1751

Tuesday, June 4. Present:—Mr. Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

North Carolina.

The Secretary having acquainted the Board that Mr. McCulloch had given notice of his being ready to be heard in support of his complaints against Mr. Johnston, Governor of North Carolina, whenever their lordships should appoint a day for that purpose, their lordships agreed upon Wednesday sen'night the 12th inst. for taking this affair into consideration, and ordered the Secretary to desire the attendance of Mr. McCulloch, and also of Mr. Abercromby, agent for the Governor, on that day.

Trade.

Africa.

Ordered, that the Secretary do write to the principal merchants of the City of London trading to Tunis, and also to Lieutenant Spendelow, to desire their attendance at the Board on Thursday next upon the subject of the proposal made by the Bey of Tunis for ceding to his Majesty the Island of Tabarka lying upon that coast.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Aldworth to Mr. Hill, dated the 3rd of June, 1751, inclosing for the information of this Board the following paper:—
Extract of a letter from Mr. Villettes to his Grace the Duke of Bedford, dated Bern, 29th May, n.s., 1751, inclosing a list of the persons, whom Messrs. Pasquier and Robert have engaged for Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Dick, merchant at Rotterdam, dated the 1st of June, n.s., 1751, to Mr. Hill, relating to the people brought down to Rotterdam by Monsieur du Pasquier from Switzerland.

Read a letter from Mr. John Dick to Mr. Hill, dated at Rotterdam, the 4th of June, n.s., 1751, desiring that the captains of the ships he sends out with foreign protestants may be furnished with charts of the sea coast of Nova Scotia, and letters of recommendation to the Governor of Newfoundland in case they should meet with him in their passage.

There being no charts in this office of the sea coast of Nova Scotia, which may be safely trusted to, their lordships directed the Secretary to write to Mr. Dick's agent at Gosport to desire he would upon the arrival of the ships there acquaint the captains therewith.

Ordered, that the Secretary do write letters of recommendation for the said captains to be delivered to Captain Drake, Governor of Newfoundland, in case they should meet with him in their voyage.

Thursday, June 6. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane.

Miscellanies.

The Secretary laid before the Board an account of the incidental charges of this Office from Michaelmas to Christmas, 1750, amounting in the whole to £332 7s. 0d.; and a letter to the Lords of the Treasury, desiring payment thereof and of the salaries due to the Secretary and under officers in the service of this Board for the same time, was agreed to and signed.

Trade.

Africa.

Tunis.

Mr. Franco, a merchant trading to Barbary, and Mr. Spendelow, Lieutenant to Commodore Keppel, attending, their lordships pursuant to the preceding minutes, took into consideration a letter from his Grace the Duke of Bedford, referring a letter from the Bey of Tunis and other papers, relative to a proposal made by the said Bey for ceding to his Majesty the Island of Tabarka lying upon that coast.

Mr. Spendelow informed their lordships, that he had never been at the Island of Tabarka, but apprehended that it lay about a mile and half from the Main, and, if settled, would be of great advantage, being a convenient place for the coral fishery.

Mr. Franco informed the Board, that Tabarka was a small island lying near the coast of Tunis, formerly possessed by the Genoese; that the French were in possession of another small island contiguous to it, called le Bastion; that there wás also another island in the neighbourhood called Gallotta possessed by the Tunisians, who some time ago did for one year permit the traders of Leghorn to fish there for coral; that while Tabarka was in the hands of the Genoese, the coral fishery there was exclusively vested in one Lomellini, a noble family of Genoa, to whom the Italian merchants applied for such quantities of coral as they wanted, which was sent from thence to Leghorn to be manufactured, and that the profits of this fishery amounted to £20,000 or £30,000 per annum.

That as to the utility of the proposal, if the Crown of Great Britain was in possession of Tabarka, they might sell the liberty of fishing for coral to the Genoese or any other persons, until the English should have acquired the art of fishing it for themselves; that it would likewise be attended with advantages on account of the trade which might be carried on with the Main for oil, wax, hides, corn and cattle, commodities which although no immediate traffick could be had for them with England, might be carried by the English to other markets in the Mediterranean and elsewhere.

That it was also worth while to consider the great importance of the English being in possession of this Island, in case the Island of Corsica should ever fall into the hands of our rivals in trade, which from the situation and circumstances of that Island must be an incident that would greatly affect our trade in the Mediterranean, more particularly with Leghorn.

Trade.

Africa.

Tunis.

That every advantage, however, which could possibly arise from a possession of this Island, would be rendered fruitless, unless, at the same time we contracted with the Tunisians for the Island; it was stipulated also by treaty, that we should be put upon the same advantageous footing in point of duties and trade as the French.

That there was another difficulty attending this measure, which was, that as the French settlement is so near, it might give rise to disputes betwixt the Crowns of Great Britain and France concerning the limits of the coral fishery belonging to each Crown.

Their lordships then desired Mr. Franco to get such further information as he could with respect to this affair, and to attend the Board again on Thursday next, the 13th instant.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. John Dick to Mr. Hill, dated at Rotterdam, the 11th of June, n.s., 1751, acquainting him that the Gale is now ready to sail.

The Secretary laid before the Board the two following papers received from Monsieur Robert, who attended Monsieur du Pasquier into Switzerland to assist him in his scheme for introducing a number of Swiss protestants labouring men into Nova Scotia:—
An account of the sums taken up and disbursed by Monsieur Robert in obtaining foreign protestants in Switzerland for Nova Scotia.
List of protestants labouring men procured in Switzerland and embarqued at Rotterdam for Nova Scotia.

Ordered, that the account of Mr. Robert's expenses be referred to Mr. Kilby, who is to examine the same and make his report thereupon.

Friday, June 7. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Herbert, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. John Dick to Mr. Hill, dated at Rotterdam, the 15th of June, n.s., 1751, acquainting him that the Gale, having 214 foreign protestants on board, is sailed for Novia Scotia, and inclosing:—
List of the passengers with their names, age and professions, on board the Gale, Thomas Casson, master, from Rotterdam to Halifax in Nova Scotia the 12th of June, n.s., 1751.
Account of money due to Mr. Dick from the foreign protestants transported to Nova Scotia on board the Gale, Thomas Casson, master.
Copy of a letter from Mr. John Dick to Governor Cornwallis, and of one to his Secretary, both dated at Rotterdam; the 4th of June, n.s., 1751.

Ordered, that Mr. Sedgwick, one of the clerks, do go down immediately to Portsmouth to inspect the said ship and the condition and circumstances of the people on board, in what manner they are accommodated, and how supplied with provisions; and that Mr. Pownall do furnish him with a proper letter to Mr. Dick's agent at Gosport.

Ordered, that the Secretary do write an answer to the several letters received from Mr. Dick since his last letter to him.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Kilby to Mr. Pownall, dated the 25th of May, 1751, containing his observations made on board the Speedwell, bound for Nova Scotia from Rotterdam with foreign protestants.

Plantations General.

Santa Lucia.

Their lordships took into consideration a letter from the Duke of Bedford mentioned in the minutes of the 13th of March last, referring to this Board a memorial of the French Commissaries relating to the Island of Santa Lucia, and also a memorial of the English Commissaries in answer thereto, together with a letter from Mr. Aldworth to the Secretary mentioned in the minutes of the 19th of April last, referring the proofs of the French claim to the said Island and other papers relative thereto, and made some progress therein.

Monday, June 10. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

Plantations General.

Santa Lucia.

Their lordships resumed the consideration of the papers relative to the Crown's right to the Island of Santa Lucia, and after some time spent therein ordered the draught of a new memorial in answer to that of the French Commissaries to be prepared.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Sedgwick reported to their lordships that he had, in obedience to their commands, attended by Mr. Robert, been at Portsmouth, and had visited the ship Gale bound to Nova Scotia with foreign protestants, and found the said ship in good condition, the people well satisfied and contented with their accommodation, and furnished with a sufficient supply of provisions and other necessaries.

Read a memorial of Monsieur du Pasquier containing seven articles of complaint against Mr. Robert relative to the execution of the trust conferred upon him by the Board, and inclosing:—
Liste des noms et les personnes engagees par Monsieur du Pasquier pour la Nouvelle Ecosse.

Their lordships upon consideration of the said memorial were unanimously of opinion that the charges therein contained against Mr. Robert were untrue, malicious and frivolous.

Wednesday, June 12. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

North Carolina.

Mr. McCulloch and Mr. Abercromby attending, as appointed by the minutes of Tuesday the 4th instant, were called in, and the following papers were read.
Memorial of Mr. Henry McCulloch to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, complaining of several hardships and injustices done to him by the Governor and other officers of the province of North Carolina.
Letter from the Secretary to Mr. Johnston, Governor of North Carolina, dated the 14th of July, 1749, inclosing a copy of the above-mentioned memorial, and containing their lordships' orders concerning the method to be observed in taking and interchanging proofs and depositions.
The answer of Gabriel Johnston, Esquire, Governor of North Carolina, to Mr. McCulloch's said memorial of complaint.
Mr. McCulloch then desired leave to read a paper intituled:—
Mr. McCulloch's reply to the answer given by Governor Johnston to the several articles of complaint contained in Mr. McCulloch's memorial,
which, when read, he presented to the Board; the parties were desired to withdraw, and to attend again on Friday morning next, the 14th instant.

Thursday, June 13. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane.

Trade.

Tunis.

Mr. Franco attending again as desired, acquainted their lordships that he had not been able to obtain any further information with respect to the affairs of the Island of Tabarka amongst the merchants trading to Barbary; but had brought with him Mr. Goatley, who had been commander of several ships trading thither, and who could give their lordships full information with respect to the circumstances and situation of this Island.

The said Captain Goatley being called in, informed their lordships, that he had been at Tabarka from Tunis, but was never on shore himself; that there is no port for large ships, which lye in an open road about a mile and a half from the Island, which is very unsafe when the wind blows from the west and north-west, but is however, good anchoring ground; that small vessels may lie safe near the Island in ten or twelve foot water; and that one of the times he was there he saw forty or fifty Neapolitan barks fishing for coral under the protection of two feluccas.

That the Island is about two miles and a half in circumference, is of whitish clay soil without any herbage or any other thing growing upon it; that it was in the possession of the Tunisians, who had two small towns; and that he saw the ruins of a castle, formerly belonging to the Genoese; that its inhabitants are wholly subsisted from the Main; and that the Genoese, when in possession, had a magazine erected on the opposite shore; and that one great advantage they made of it was that of a granary.

That if this Island was fortified, and a garrison there, it would be of great use in time of war as a protection to our ships; and that magazines might be erected to supply our fleets and garrisons at Gibraltar and Mahon, but that it would be always in the power of the Tunisians to dispossess us.

Mr. Franco agreed in opinion with Captain Goatley, that it would be of great advantage to have magazines erected here, but urged the necessity of having at the same time a fort and storehouses on the opposite shore; he likewise said that since he last attended their lordships he had been informed that le Bastion was not an island, but a French settlement upon the Main; and therefore departed from his opinion as to the probability of any disputes arising with the French as to the limits of the coral fishery of either Crown, more especially as he could not find that the Genoese, when in possession of the Island, had ever any dispute with them; he observed, however, that it would be proper if we made any agreement with the Bey, that we should also have the liberty of fishing coral at Gallotta Island.

Trade.

Tunis.

Mr. Franco being asked if he could form any opinion what might be a reasonable price to allow for this Island, said he could not; but that whatever it might be thought proper to give, he should advise the agreement being made for current dollars of Tunis.

Mr. Franco and Captain Goatley being withdrawn, their lordships ordered the draught of a report to his Grace the Duke of Bedford upon this affair to be prepared.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Kilby attending, acquainted their lordships, that he had received bills drawn upon him by Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the amount of six thousand pounds and upwards, of which no advice had been sent to this Board, and therefore, as he was forbid by a resolution of this Board to pay the same without such advice, desired the Board's directions thereupon.

The aforesaid resolution of the Board being read, their lordships ordered the draught of a letter thereupon to Colonel Cornwallis to be prepared.

Pennsylvania.

Read a letter from Mr. Hamilton, Lieutenant-Governor of Pennsylvania, dated the 8th of February, 1750–1, (in answer to the Board's letter, dated the 19th of July, 1750) relating to the limits and boundaries of that province, and the designs and encroachments of the French in North America; and transmitting:—
Copy of a letter from Monsieur Celeron to Mr. Hamilton, Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania, dated the 16th of August, 1749.
Copy of the superscription on a leaden plate lately got from the French, being a pretended claim of theirs to lands near the River Ohio, bearing date the 29th of July, 1749.
Map of the province of Pennsylvania.

Ordered that the said letter and papers be copied to be transmitted to his Grace the Duke of Bedford, and that the draught of a letter to his Grace therewith be prepared.

Friday, June 14. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Gould, agent to Colonel Cornwallis's regiment in Nova Scotia, dated the 14th June, 1751, desiring payment of several sums of money advanced by him on the account of the said regiment out of the money granted by Parliament for the settlement of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Kilby attending, their lordships had some discourse with him upon the subject of the said letter.

Ordered that Mr. Kilby do pay to Mr. Gould such sums for which bills have been drawn upon him by Colonel Cornwallis to replace the four pence stopped out of the men's pay for provisions, and whereof advice has been sent to the Board.

The draught of a letter to Colonel Cornwallis having been prepared, pursuant to the preceding day's minutes, was laid before the Board, agreed to, transcribed and signed.

North Carolina.

Mr. McCulloch and Mr. Abercromby attending, as desired by the minutes of Wednesday last, their lordships proceeded to hear what Mr. McCulloch had to offer in support of his complaints against Governor Johnston; and the following papers, being part of the bundle of proofs and depositions taken in North Carolina by Mr. McCulloch's agents, pursuant to the Board's orders transmitted under the hand of the Governor, and seal of the province, and lodged in this Office by Mr. McCulloch, were read, viz.:—
The interrogatories and deposition of John Wynd of Bertie County, of Nathaniel Cooper, Deputy Secretary, of John Campbell of Bertie County, merchant, of Alexander McCulloch, Deputy Auditor, of the Reverend Mr. James Mair, and of Nathaniel Rice, Secretary of North Carolina.

Mr. McCulloch then produced three patents for land that had been signed blank by the Governor, and filled up afterwards; and the following papers were read, viz.:—
The Act to ascertain officers' fees, passed in North Carolina in 1715 or 1716.
Declaration of Nathaniel Rice, shewing that the minutes of Council relating to Mr. McCulloch's memorial were not truly entered.
Mr. McCulloch's commission, interrogatories and deposition of Dr. Houssan, being part of the above-mentioned bundle under the seal of the province.

Mr. McCulloch, being asked what proof he could produce of the Governor's having granted injunctions in the manner set forth in his memorial of complaint, answered, that as his agents had not been able to obtain the Governor's summons for the appearance of any one evidence, he had no proof of that fact to produce, but referred to that part of the Governor's answer, relating to this matter, which was accordingly read.

Ordered that Mr. McCulloch do produce such letters from his agents in North Carolina, as may prove they could not obtain the Governor's summons for evidences in the memorialist's behalf.

Mr. McCulloch further observed to their lordships, that the minutes of Council of those times, in which these affairs were transacted, (which would have been of great service to him on this occasion) had not been transmitted to this Office, which he conceived to have been purposely omitted.

It being late, the parties were ordered to attend again next Tuesday morning at eleven o'clock, when their lordships will hear the proofs of that part of Mr. McCulloch's memorial, which relates to the obstructions he met with in the execution of his commission, and the abuses in the management of the quit rents and grants of land.

Ordered that Mr. Pownall do wait on the Right Honourable Horatio Walpole, and desire the favour of his attendance at the Board on Tuesday next.

Tuesday, June 18. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Fane.

North Carolina.

Mr. Pownall acquainted their lordships, that pursuant to their directions, he had waited upon Mr. Walpole to desire his attendance at the Board this day upon the subject of Mr. McCulloch's complaints against Mr. Johnston, Governor of North Carolina, relating to the obstructions he has met with in the execution of his office, and that Mr. Walpole had desired that this affair might be postponed until to-morrow; whereupon their lordships agreed that the further consideration of this affair should be put off till to-morrow.

Georgia.

Their lordships took into consideration the Order of Council referring the petition of the Trustees of Georgia, mentioned in the minutes of the 23rd of May last; and ordered the Secretary to write to the said Trustees to desire their attendance at the Board on Thursday sen'night, the 27th instant, upon the subject of the said petition.

Read a letter from Mr. Martyn, Secretary to the Trustees for establishing the Colony of Georgia, dated the 28th of March, 1751, inclosing the return made by the said Trustees to the observations of this Board on the draught of a bill prepared by the said Trustees relating to the importation and regulation of slaves.

Resolved, that the said letter and paper inclosed be taken into consideration on Thursday sen'night, the 27th instant.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Dick, dated June 22nd, 1751, n.s., inclosing:—
Certificate of the people on board the Gale, concerning the goodness of their provisions, dated Rotterdam, the 3rd of June, n.s., 1751.

Trade.

Minorca.

Read a letter from General Blakeney, Lieutenant-Governor of Minorca, dated at Port Mahon, the 25th of May, 1751, in answer to one from the Secretary of this Board, dated 15th January last, relating to Mr. Williams's petition for a licence for establishing a coral and tunny fishery on the coasts of that Island.

Resolved, that the said letter be taken into consideration, when the paper therein referred to shall be received.

Leeward Islands.

Read a letter from Lieutenant-General Fleming, Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands, to the Board, dated at Antigua, the 10th of April, 1751, relating to the present state of affairs in his government, and transmitting:—
Governor Payne's letter relating to order for 300 pistoles for Monsieur de la Vaux, dated April 5th, 1751, at St. Christopher's.
Letter from Colonel Losack, Speaker of the Assembly from 1742 to this time, to Lieutenant-General Fleming, dated at St. Christopher's, April 5th, 1751.
Extracts of the minutes of Council of St. Christopher's between the 15th of May, 1741, and the 21st of June, 1742, relating to Monsieur de la Vaux.
Minutes of the Council of Nevis, relating to the repeal of the Act against Papists, between the 20th of December, 1750, and the 21st of March, 1750–1.
An Act to repeal an Act intituled, An Act to prevent Papists and reputed Papists from settling in Nevis, etc. Passed the Council of Nevis in December, 1750.
An Act to raise a levy or poll tax upon the slaves, and to tax the houses in the town of Plymouth and parts adjacent in the Island of Montserrat. Passed the 6th of April, 1751.

Ordered that the Secretary do transmit a copy of the firstmentioned Act to his Majesty's Attorney General, as also a copy of the Act proposed to be repealed, for their opinion as to the expediency and propriety thereof.

Ordered that the Secretary do send the last-mentioned Act to Mr. Lamb for his opinion thereupon in point of law.

Wednesday, June 19. Present:—Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Fane.

North Carolina.

The Right Honourable Horatio Walpole, Esquire, attending, their lordships took into consideration the memorial of Mr. McCulloch complaining of Mr. Johnston; and after some time spent therein agreed further to consider of this affair at another opportunity.

Tuesday, June 25. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Fane.

Nova Scotia.

Read the following letters and papers lately received from Mr. Dick:—
Letter from Mr. John Dick to Mr. Hill, dated at Rotterdam, the 29th of June, n.s., 1751.
Certificate of the provisions on board the Murdoch, dated Rotterdam, the 24th June, 1751, n.s.
Copy of a letter from Mr. John Dick to Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated Rotterdam, June 23rd, n.s., 1751, as also, translation of Mr. John Van Altenheim's letter to Mr. John Dick, dated Aix la Chapelle, June 8th, 1751.
Return of one hundred families of German protestants on board the Murdoch, Robert Hamilton, master, bound from Rotterdam to Halifax in Nova Scotia, dated Rotterdam, June 25th, n.s., 1751.
List of passengers on board the Murdoch, Robert Hamilton, master, bound from Rotterdam to Halifax in Nova Scotia 19th June, 1751, with an account of money due to Mr. Dick from the said passengers.
Letter from Mr. John Dick to Mr. Hill, dated at Rotterdam, July 2nd, n.s., 1751.
Certificate of the provisions on board the Pearl, Thomas Francis, master, dated at Rotterdam July 2nd, n.s., 1751.
Copy of a letter from Mr. John Dick to Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated at Rotterdam, the 2nd of July, n.s., 1751.
Return of eighty-five families on board the Pearl, Thomas Francis, master, bound on a voyage from Rotterdam to Halifax in Nova Scotia, dated at Rotterdam, 2nd July, 1751.
List of passengers on board the Pearl, Thomas Francis, master, bound from Rotterdam to Halifax in Nova Scotia, 30th June, 1751, with an account of money due to Mr. Dick from the said passengers.

Plantations General.

Ordered, that the Secretary do transmit printed copies of the Act passed in this sessions of Parliament to regulate and restrain paper bills of credit in his Majesty's colonies or plantations of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, the Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire in America, and to prevent the same being legal tenders in payment of money, to the respective governors of the said colonies and plantations for their information and government in the several matters therein contained.

Thursday, June 27. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Townshend.

Georgia.

The Trustees for the colony of Georgia attending, as desired, with Mr. Martyn, their Secretary, and Mr. Verelst, their accomptant, their lordships took into consideration the Order of Council referring to this Board the petition of the said Trustees to his Majesty, relative to the future government of that colony, and the said Order of reference was read.

The Trustees then desired leave to lay before the Board such letters and other papers as they had to produce as evidence to their lordships of the present state and condition of this colony with respect to the number of its inhabitants, government, trade, etc.

Mr. Martyn, their Secretary, accordingly laid before the Board a list of the numbers of the inhabitants in Georgia at Midsummer, 1749, taken from the return then made, and received by the Trustees, 30th December following, and of the numbers sent by the Trustees since Midsummer, 1749, amounting in the whole to 1,735 whites and 349 blacks.

Letter from the magistrates to the Secretary to the Trustees, dated in July, 1750, by which it appears that the number of whites and blacks in the colony was much the same as in the preceding year.

And in order to shew that the number of people was likely to increase, Mr. Martyn laid before the Board a paper entituled, a journal of the affairs of the colony, by which it appeared, that application had been lately made for grants of land by some foreigners of property in Germany, who were desirous of settling in Georgia.

Mr. Martyn then laid before the Board a letter from Mr. Cadogan, commander of a fort in Georgia, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, dated April the 10th, 1750, in which he represents the colony to be in a flourishing way, and the inhabitants daily increasing, and incloses a memorial of the inhabitants to the Trustees, by which it appears, that they had subscribed for building a church, and desired a minister of the Church of England might be sent to them.

The Trustees here acquainted their lordships, that the church had been built, and that they had procured a missionary to be sent to the colony by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, as also a pulpit cloth and other things desired by the inhabitants in their memorial.

Georgia.

Mr. Martyn also produced a letter from Mr. Cadogan to the Trustees, dated the 12th of March last, returning thanks for what they had done in the affair.

In order to shew that the trade of the colony was in an increasing and flourishing way, the Secretary laid before the Board several letters from persons in the colony, by which it appeared that five ships had loaded in that colony in the year 1750; that some of the principal inhabitants had made considerable quantities of indigo, which sold at a better price than French indigo; that in particular Mr. Habershaw, an eminent merchant in the colony, had insured 1,750 pounds sterling on goods upon his own account the last year; it likewise appeared, that a yard had been made for building of ships, for which the cedar wood of the country was a proper material.

Mr. Martyn then laid before the Board several letters and papers, by which it appeared, that the Trustees had been careful to encourage the growth and manufacture of raw silk; that to this end they at the first settlement sent over proper books to direct the settlers in this manufacture, and also machines for winding the silk; that, in order the better to promote this manufacture, large bounties and other great encouragement had been agreed upon and allowed by the Trustees; that they had employed a person to get the best information he could in France and other countries in this manufacture, and had sent him to Georgia as inspector and director of the silk works; that a filature for winding of silk and other publick works proper for carrying on the manufacture had been erected, and very considerable quantities of raw silk had been manufactured.

Mr. Martyn also laid before the Board a representation of the Assembly of Georgia to the Trustees, in which they represent the silk manufacture to be in a flourishing condition, and that if further promoted by a bounty from Parliament for a determinate number of years, would probably be crowned with success equal to the warmest wishes.

Their lordships then desired the Trustees to lay before them some account of the form and constitution of the government of the said colony and the expence of their establishments; whereupon they acquainted them, that the government of the colony was vested in a president and court of assistants, which answers to the councils in other colonies; that for the administration of justice a court had been erected, consisting of three bailiffs appointed by the Trustees; that besides the court of justice, there was an officer called a conservador, appointed for every settlement consisting of ten families; that an Assembly had been chosen the last year, whereof one was chosen for every settlement consisting of ten families, but the greater settlements sent two, and Savannah four.

Georgia.

Mr. Martyn then laid before the Board the following estimate of the certain expences in Georgia for the year 1751:—

£s.d.
Estimate of the certain expences in Georgia for the year 1751, as delivered to the Lord Commissioners for Trade, etc.1,036100
To be paid for the silk this year, as appears by a letter from the Secretary in Georgia50000
For erecting a filature at Savannah, rewards for people learning the art of reeling and other expences10000
To be appropriated for the purchase of presents to be given to the Indians on their giving up to the Trustees three islands, and other lands contiguous to Savannah, which were reserved for the Indians' hunting, by treaties made with them in the years 1733 and 173940000
For repairs of the light house reported to be necessary by persons appointed to inspect it10000
(fn. 1) Incidental expenses by the last year's account amounted to £357 5s. 0d. to be reserved therefore as necessary for this30000
For the subsisting the detachments doing duty in Georgia30434
Estimate of the certain expences in England55000
£3,290134

Whereupon the Trustees observed, that they did not lay this before the Board as an expence necessary for the future establishment of the colony, but only the expence of the present year; and being asked their opinion as to the possibility of the inhabitants bearing the necessary expences of government by taxes upon themselves, they declared it as their opinion that in their present circumstances they could not bear any burthen of that sort.

The Trustees then laid before the Board two representations of the Assembly of Georgia, one relating to the quit rents, and proposing a reduction, and the other to the great inconvenience, which would attend a junction of the Colony of South Carolina; whereupon the Trustees observed,

Georgia.

That as the Assembly of the Province of Georgia have set forth in this representation, that the annexing of this province to South Carolina will soon reduce it to the same desolate condition, in which the southern parts of South Carolina were before the establishment of Georgia, they thought it their duty, in behalf of the people, to represent the same to the Board; and as the Assembly have given, as one reason for this, the great distance they are from Charles Town, and consequently the hazards and intolerable expence, and inconveniences of attending so remote a seat of government as representatives, and a seat of justice as jurymen or clients; the Trustees think it incumbent on them to state, that the nearest part of Georgia is at least eighty miles by land, and a hundred miles by water from Charles Town; that the travellers by land have many rivers to cross, and the roads through the southern parts of Carolina are in the winter almost impassable; and the passage by water is over sounds, which in winter are very dangerous, and boats must be hired at a great expence for this passage; that many of the inhabitants of Georgia in the southern parts are above a hundred and seventy miles by land, and above two hundred miles by water from Charles Town.

Another objection is the jealousy which some of the Charles Town merchants have of the town of Savannah becoming, from the superior fitness of its situation, the great mart for the Indian trade, to prevent which they will distress the present inhabitants of Georgia by all the means in their power, and particularly by reviving old claims to large tracts of land, which they never did cultivate, and which the Indians would never suffer them to cultivate. By getting these they must dispossess great numbers of inhabitants of lands, which they have been long in possession of, and have cultivated under his Majesty's charter, and this will consequently expose the inhabitants of South Carolina to another Indian war for the same reasons that province was involved in one in the year 1718, when the Indians laid South Carolina in a manner waste with fire and sword.

That it was needless to observe, that annexing the colony is absolutely repugnant to his Majesty's charter, which does expressly declare, that it shall be a separate and independent province, and that the inhabitants shall not be subject to the laws of South Carolina.

That as the Trustees' power of governing the colony will expire on the 9th of June, 1753, but their trust for granting the lands is to remain in them and their successors (to be chosen by them) for ever, and as these two powers being unconnected and independent of each other may be attended with many unforeseen difficulties, the Trustees are ready to accommodate the administration with a surrender of their trust, on such terms as they think themselves obliged, in behalf of the people, to stipulate for, which terms they are ready to offer to his Majesty's Council.

That as they ought not to surrender their trust but on such conditions only, as will secure to the inhabitants of Georgia those rights and privileges, which were promised them at their first going thither; they hope, if such surrender is not accepted of, that for the security of their large property in the lands as Trustees, they shall be allowed the alternative, viz., of recommending to his Majesty the persons to be employed in the government in Georgia.

The Trustees, with Mr. Martyn, their Secretary, and Mr. Verelst their Accomptant, being withdrawn, their lordships agreed to consider of this affair at another opportunity.

Plantations General.

Ordered, that the Secretary do transmit printed copies of the three following laws passed in the last session of Parliament, viz.:—
An Act for continuing several laws therein mentioned, relating to the premiums upon the importation of masts, yards and bowsprits, tar, pitch and turpentine, to British made sail-cloth and the duty payable on foreign sail-cloth; and to the allowance upon the exportation of British made gunpowder.
An Act to regulate and restrain paper bills of credit in his Majesty's colonies or plantations of Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, the Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire in America; and to prevent the same being legal tenders in payment of money.
An Act for the encouraging the making of pot ashes and pearl ashes in the British plantations in America, to the governors of the respective colonies and plantations in America for their information and government in the several matters therein contained.

North Carolina.

Mr. McCulloch and Mr. Abercromby attending upon the complaints of Mr. McCulloch against Mr. Johnston, Governor of North Carolina, Mr. McCulloch in obedience to their lordships' directions laid before the Board a letter from Benjamin Hill, his agent in North Carolina, dated the 23rd of July, 1750, in order to shew that he could not obtain the Governor's summons for evidence in his behalf; which letter having been read and authenticated by the declaration of a person who affirmed the same to be the hand-writing of Benjamin Hill, both parties requested their lordships that the further consideration of this affair might be postponed for a further time, which was acquiesced in by their lordships, and the further consideration thereof was accordingly put off till another opportunity.

Footnotes

1 In this article is included the whole expence of sending any settlers to Georgia.