Journal, January 1752
Volume 60

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

247-264

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'Journal, January 1752: Volume 60', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 9: January 1750 - December 1753 (1932), pp. 247-264. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=81850 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Journal, January 1752

January 1751–2.

Tuesday, January 7. Present:—The Earl of Halifax, Mr. John Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Francis Fane.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. John Dick, merchant of Rotterdam, with whom their lordships engaged the last year for the transportation of foreign protestants to His Majesty's province of Acadia or Nova Scotia, attending, was called in; and he acquainted their lordships that having received a letter from Mr. Pownall informing him that the Board, for reasons contained in the said letter, did not think it expedient for his Majesty's service that any further number of foreign protestants should be sent to the said province of Nova Scotia this year, and having before the receipt of the said letter taken measures for engaging a number of the said foreign protestants for this service, he thought it his duty to attend their lordships and lay before them an account thereof.

Mr. Dick then informed their lordships that by letters from the several agents he has in different parts of Germany and Switzerland, it appears that they have already engaged with about 1,000 persons: that some of them have disposed of their property and effects, with intent to come down into Holland: that should he now break off his engagements with them, it would so disgust them and have such an effect, as might make it difficult to obtain settlers for this colony when it might be thought proper to revive the measure; that it would also expose him to difficulties, as he should forfeit his bond to the States General, whereby he is obliged to transport all such as shall come down into Holland upon his account; that he would use his utmost endeavours to put off as many as he could; but hoped their lordships would give him leave to send at least one ship with such as he should be under a necessity of performing his engagements to, which he hoped would not exceed 3 or 400: as to the rest he did not doubt but their lordships would make him such recompense for his trouble and expence as they should think proper and reasonable.

Mr. Dick further acquainted their lordships that he was sensible that the sending over foreign protestants to Nova Scotia was attended with great expence; that as to the allowance of provisions for twelve months which made up a considerable part of it, he was of opinion that the daily allowance of provisions was more than sufficient, and that he would engage that it would be more acceptable as well to those he has already sent as those he shall send for the future to be allowed 3d. per person per day in money and supply themselves, which would not only be cheaper to the publick but more beneficial by occasioning a better market.

Mr. Dick being asked if he had any account from his correspondents in Nova Scotia that the foreign protestants were employed in the publick works he said he had not any such account.

Their lordships then acquainted Mr. Dick that they would consider of his proposals, and he was ordered to attend again to-morrow.

Their lordships took into consideration the draught of the estimate of the expence of supporting and maintaining the province of Acadia or Nova Scotia for the year 1752, mentioned in the minutes of the 19th of December last, and ordered that an article be added thereto for an allowance of £1 1s. 0d. to each of 500 foreign protestants in alleviation of their freight.

Wednesday, January 8. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Dick attending pursuant to yesterday's minutes, was called in and their lordships acquainted him that having considered of his proposal they were willing to. engage with him for the transportation of a number of foreign protestants to Nova Scotia this year, not exceeding 500, upon the same terms as those he engaged upon the last year; which being accepted by Mr. Dick, it was recommended to him to endeavour to procure such as might be most usefull in the colony and to take care that there were as few women and children amongst them as possible.

Mr. Dick then withdrew.

New Jersey.

The Secretary acquainted their lordships that he was desired by Mr. Partridge, agent for this province of New Jersey, to move their lordships for leave to have copies out of their office of the following papers, viz.:—
Memorial of the Proprietors of the province of East New Jersey 1799 (fn. 1) (sic).
Opinion and answer thereto.
Memorial of the Proprietors of East New Jersey in reply.
Remonstrance and petition of East New Jersey to his Majesty, 1700.
Surrender of the said province to the Crown.
Petition of the Proprietors of New Jersey to his Majesty in 1701.
Memorial of the Proprietors of, containing proposals of surrender in 1701.
Representation of the Board of Trade on the proposals for the surrender, 1701.

Ordered that copies of the said papers be made and delivered to Mr. Partridge.

Nova Scotia.

Read the following letters and papers lately received from the Hon. Edward Cornwallis, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, viz.:—
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated at Halifax, the 3rd of November, 1751, relating to the present state of that colony.
Estimate of the expences for the forts at Chignecto, Minas and Pisequid for the year 1752.
List of bills drawn by Governor Cornwallis on Christopher Kilby in September and October, 1751.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis to the Board, dated at Halifax, the 31st of October, 1751, relating to a demand made by the owners of the sloop Cornwallis, and inclosing:—
Memorial for the owners of the sloop Cornwallis to his Excellency, the Governor, in October, 1751.
Treasurer's disbursements for the months of September and October, 1751.
Paymaster of the Works disbursements for the same time.
Naval officer's entries and clearance from Lady Day, 1751, to Michaelmas following.
Thirteen letters from Governor Cornwallis to the Board, dated in September, 1751, giving advice of his having drawn upon Mr. Kilby for several sums of money for the service of the colony.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, dated Halifax, the 28th September, 1751, acquainting the Board that he had drawn upon Mr. Kilby for the sum of £70 sterling in favour of Malachi Salter and desiring the Board's order for payment thereof.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 18th November, 1751, inclosing another without date, acquainting the Board that he has suspended Mr. Little, commissary of provisions, and appointed Mr. Saul to officiate in his place.
Letter from Colonel Cornwallis to the Board, without date, relating to the behaviour of Mr. Joshua Mauger, agent victualler to the Navy, upon his having ordered his warehouses to be searched upon information of illicit goods being lodged therein, and inclosing:—
The petition of Joshua Mauger to his Excellency Governor Cornwallis.
Letter from Mr. Mauger to Governor Cornwallis, relating to the searching of his storehouse by the Marshall of the Court of Vice Admiralty.
Copy of Governor Cornwallis' warrant to the Judge of the Admiralty directing him to cause the sloop Sally and the contraband goods imported in her to be seized, and the return of the officer who made such seized in November, 1751.

Order that an extract of so much of Governor Cornwallis' letter, dated the 3rd of November, as relates to the information he has received concerning the proceedings and design of the French in Nova Scotia to be transmitted to the Earl of Holdernesse, and that the draught of a letter to his Lordship thereupon be prepared.

Ordered that a copy of the list of bills transmitted with the Governor's letter of the 3rd of November and also copies of the several above-mentioned letters of advice be delivered to Mr. Kilby.

Ordered that the Secretary do transmit a copy of Governor Cornwallis' letter, which relates to the conduct of the agent victualler and also copies of the papers therewith received to the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to be laid before them for their directions thereupon.

Resolved that the memorial of the owners of the sloop Cornwallis be taken into consideration, when the account referred to in the Governor's letter shall have been received.

Read a letter from Mr. Malachi Salter, dated at Boston, the 14th of October, 1751, inclosing a letter of advice from Governor Cornwallis, dated at Halifax, the 14th of August, 1751, for the payment of a protested bill of exchange and desiring their lordships will give directions to Mr. Kilby for the payment of the same.

Read a letter from Mr. Scrope, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, dated the 18th of December, 1751, inclosing a memorial from this Board of ordnance and account of money paid in their office for the new settlement in Nova Scotia, amounting to £2,425 18s. 2d.

Ordered that the said sum of £2,425 18s. 2d. be placed in the account of the exceedings of the last year for the service of Nova Scotia.

Read a memorial from Mr. Alderman Baker to the Board, relating to provisions with which he has supplyed the king's stores in Nova Scotia for the use of the settlers, and to the bills which he expects will be drawn upon him for such supplies.

Read a memorial from Mr. Alderman Baker praying the Board's directions for payment of a bill of exchange drawn by Governor Cornwallis on Chauncy Townshend, Esquire, for £2,250 sterling for bread delivered for the service of Nova Scotia.

Ordered that the Secretary do write to Mr. Alderman Baker to desire his attendance at the Board on Tuesday next, the 14th instant, and that Mr. Chauncy Townshend be desired to attend at the same time.

The Secretary laid before the Board the following papers:—
State of Mr. Dick's account with this Board for the transportation of foreign protestants to Nova Scotia.

Ordered that Mr. Kilby do accept a bill drawn upon by Mr. Dick for the ballance of the said account payable the 23rd of March next.

Thursday, January 9. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse, inclosing the extract of one from Mr. Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, relating to the proceedings of the French in that province having been prepared pursuant to yesterday's minutes, was laid before the Board, agreed to, and ordered to be transcribed.

Read a letter from Benjamen Green, Esquire, Judge of his Majesty's Court of Vice Admiralty for the province of Nova Scotia, to the Secretary of this Board, dated at Halifax, the 5th of February, 1750–1, transmitting:—
Copy of papers relating to the schooner Catharine informed against by Captain John Rous, Commander of the sloop Albany, for having traded at Louisbourg, &c.

Ordered that the Secretary do transmit copies of the abovementioned letters and papers to the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty with those ordered to be transmitted to him by yesterday's minutes.

Friday, January 10. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Trade.

Africa.

Read a letter from the committee of the Royal African Company to the Board, dated December, 1751, in answer to a letter from Mr. Pownall, containing observations upon several articles of expence arising in the execution of their trust stated in their accounts laid before the Board.

Mr. Hollier, Secretary to the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa, attending, was called in and he laid before their lordships the following paper:—
Distribution of the £800 granted by Parliament for the charges of the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa.

Their lordships then acquainted Mr. Hollier that as it appeared by the above-mentioned letter from the Committee that the articles of charge mentioned in Mr. Pownall's letter to them were not permanent expenses, they had no objection to their being placed in the account of the disposition of the money granted by Parliament for the support of the forts and settlements upon the coast of Africa, but that their lordships recommend to the Committee for the future to confine all expences relative to that Trust to the £800 allowed by Parliament for that service.

Mr. Hollier then laid before their lordships the following paper:—
Copy of a letter from the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa to their chief agents at Gambia.

The said paper having been read their lordships acquainted Mr. Hollier that they approved thereof.

Tuesday, January 14. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Chauncy Townshend, contractor for supplying the settlers, and Mr. Baker, contractor for supplying the troops in Nova Scotia with provisions, attending pursuant to the minutes of the 8th instant, were called in; and Mr. Baker's memorials, mentioned in the said minutes, having been read, Mr. Townshend was desired to give his reasons for refusing to pay the bill drawn upon him by the Governor for bread and flour supplyed the settlers by Mr. Baker's agent pursuant to the Governor's directions.

Whereupon Mr. Townshend acquainted their lordships that he did not apprehend the Governor was justified in drawing this bill upon him, as he had at that time exceeded the quantity of bread which by his contract he was obliged to supply by 184,113 lb.: that by the terms of his contract he was obliged to send out six months' provisions in the spring, three months on or before the 1st August and the other three months in the ensuing spring; that he accordingly shipped provisions for six months before the 1st of May which arrived there in June; that he sent out another ship with provisions in June, and ordered the remainder to be shipped from Philadelphia; but his people there having failed him he shipped part of his bread there and part here in October; that he had received no account of its arrival, and that the ship which went from hence in June, did not arrive till the 6th of November, which was six days after the date of the Governor's bill; that upon a computation drawn from the quantity of provisions supplyed by him upon his three contracts, the quantity in store on the 22nd of August to serve till the arrival of the supply which should have gone out in August was as follows, viz.:—

Bread over 184,113 lb.
Flour short 269,665 lb.
Beef over 12,021 lb.
Pork over 37,469 lb.
Butter over 14,370 lb.
Vinegar over 475 gallons.
Oatmeal over 250 bushells.
Rum over 410 gallons.
Molasses over 1,846 gallons.
Pease short 247 bushells.

Mr. Alderman Baker then laid before the Board a certificate signed by Governor Cornwallis, dated the 1st of November last, setting forth that the contractor having neglected to furnish a supply of provisions and finding there was no bread and flour in Store, he had to prevent the inconveniency arising from the want of said species of provisions, bought of Mr. Thomas Saul 224,000 lb. of bread at the rate of 22/6 per cwt. and drawn a bill upon Mr. Townshend for it. Mr. Baker likewise laid before the Board a stock of what provisions were wanting on account of Mr. Townshend's contract on the 22nd of August, signed by Mr. Townshend's agent and certified to be a true copy by Governor Cornwallis, by which state it appeared that the quantity of each species of provisions deficient were the same as those mentioned by Mr. Baker in his memorial of the 26th of November last to have been supplied the settlers by Mr. Saul.

It appearing from the above-mentioned certificates and by the bill drawn by the Governor upon Mr. Townshend, which was produced by Mr. Baker, that the quantity of bread therein mentioned was sold at 22/6, it was observed to Mr. Baker that this appeared to be a very exorbitant price: that it was near 80 per cent. dearer than the price at which Mr. Townshend supplyed the settlers upon his contract which at a computation was about 14/- per hundred and about 7/6 per cwt. more than Mr. Baker furnished bread to the troops, that according to good information bread might be delivered at Halifax at 11/- per cwt. and therefore there could be no pretence for such a price.

Whereupon Mr. Baker observed that he could not say anything as to the price; that was a transaction of Mr. Saul's in which he had no concern; that he gave Mr. Saul credit in consequence of which the bills were drawn upon him from New York where the provisions were bought; that he was certain no bread was imported from New York since the year 1745 at the price of 11/per cwt.; that the sudden demand of Mr. Saul's had greatly raised the market; that the price of provisions was very fluctuating and uncertain and depended upon a variety of circumstances; that if it would be any satisfaction he would give the most exact account he could what these provisions cost.

Mr. Townshend then acquainted their lordships that he bought bread at Philadelphia at the time when the market was raised by Mr. Saul's demand at about 7/10 sterling per cwt. and that it stood him in about 11/- or 11/6 delivered at Halifax.

Mr. Baker and Mr. Townshend being withdrawn, their lordships agreed further to consider of this affair on Thursday, the 16th instant.

Trade.

Africa.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse inclosing extracts and copies of several letters and papers laid before the Board by the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 22nd of November last, was laid before the Board and ordered to be transcribed.

Bermuda.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse, inclosing the copy of one from Mr. Popple, Governor of Bermuda, to the Secretary transmitting two protests of the masters of vessels relating to some violences offered them by the Spaniards at Turk's Island, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 9th of October last, was agreed to, transcribed and signed.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse inclosing the extract of one from Mr. Cornwallis, Governor of Nova Scotia, having been transcribed pursuant to the minutes of the 9th inst., was laid before the Board and signed.

Minorca.

The draught of a representation to his Majesty upon the petition of Charles Williams of the Island of Minorca praying for letters patents of licence to fish for tunny fish and coral upon the coasts of that Island, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 26th of November, was laid before the Board, agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.

Leeward Islands.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Fleming, Lieutenant-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Leeward Islands relating to the Bill for repealing the Act of 1701 against papists having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 18th of December last, was agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.

Wednesday, January 15. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Chauncy Townshend attending, was called in and he acquainted their lordships that as he was not prepared yesterday to lay before the Board so exact and particular a state of his case as might be necessary, he had since prepared a more particular state thereof in writing which he hoped their lordships would accept of in addition to and explanation of what he offered to their consideration yesterday; he then delivered in a paper which was read and is as follows, viz.:—
A state of Mr. Townshend's provision contracts for the settlers at Nova Scotia in order to see whether he ought to pay Governor Cornwallis's bill of 1st November, 1751, to William Baker, Esquire, for £2,250 for 224,000 lb. bread, which he has drawn in consequence of orders he gave to Mr. Saul, Mr. Baker's agent, on the 22nd August, 1751.

It is necessary for an exact state of this account to take in all his three contracts viz., 3,000 persons for 12 months, 1,500 for six months and 2,500 for 12 months; but of the last contract six months only could be expected to be delivered on the 22nd August, 1751; as three months thereof was only to be shipt by the 1st August, 1751, and another three months the next Spring, neither of which was by his contract expected to be delivered by him the 22nd August, 1751; taking therefore the whole of his two first contracts and half of his last, it at that time stood thus, (which appears by the Governor's certificates produced to the Board and are ready still to be produced) that he had delivered more than required in the following species, the quantities specified against each particular species, viz.:—

Bread 184,113 lb.
Beef 12,021
Pork 37,469
Butter 14,370
Vinegar 475 gallons
Oatmeal 244 bushells
Molasses 1,846 gallons
Rum 410 do.

And short the following quantities:—

Flour 289,650 lb.
Pease 247 bushells.

From which it appears, that there was considerably over in every species except flour and pease; and yet notwithstanding the Governor gives Mr. Saul a certificate that he had received (as he says) a letter from Mr. Townshend's correspondents at Philadelphia that they would not ship the bread and flour ordered, and therefore directs Mr. Saul to provide not only the trifling deficiency as above, taking the overplus of bread from what is short in flour, but also the remaining part of the three months to be shipt by the 1st August; for the supply of which Mr. Townshend had taken the following measures. He shipt from Ireland on the 28th June, 1751, (as appears by the bills of loading) the beef, pork and butter, and ordered from Boston to be down in the fall the rum, molasses and vinegar; and on the 22nd February, 1750–1, wrote to Philadelphia for the bread and flour to be sent down in all July. To which letter he never received any answer, and therefore concluded those species had been sent, till the latter end of August, when he was acquainted by an extract of a letter of theirs to another person, that it was dubious whether they would send it or not, for reasons they gave that were false. In this situation, that no misfortune might happen to the settlement for the want thereof, he immediately purchased and sent from hence the greatest part of the bread, flour and pease (tho' at a loss to himself of 50 per cent. by reason of their being bought here instead of Philadelphia, and were shipt on the 30th September, 1751, (as appears by the bills of loading) which is only two months after the time he was to ship it, by the express words of his contract. The remainder of the bread and flour he ordered from Philadelphia from another correspondent, and he has received advice of its' being shipt and has accepted the bills drawn on him for the cost. When these bills were all arrived his account would stand for the year 1751, as delivered in to the Board, viz.:—

Sundry species over.
Bread & flour 53,764
Pork 99,245
Butter 15,297½
Pease 5,420 pints.
Oatmeal 7,521 do.

N.B.—4 lb. pork is equal to 7 lb. of beef.

Sundry species short.
Beef 45,606½

Part of which was delivered and the rest was delivering in fresh beef.

Vinegar 541½ gallons.
Rum 1,621½ do.
Molasses 185 do.

These three articles were ready to be delivered by B. Gerrish out of his stores when wanted.

That this being the state of his contracts, it was evident the Governor had no right to give the orders he did to Mr. Saul on the 22nd August, 1751, and that consequently Mr. Townshend is not liable to pay the bill of £2,250 and more especially as it is drawn for bread of which he had then delivered more than the quantity required, even for the three months that was to be shipt the 1st August, 1751.
That the only thing that can come under consideration is shipping the bread, flour and pease two months after the time expressed in his contract, occasioned as herein before-mentioned. That the words of his contract were:—

"To be shipt before 1st August that they may arrive to supply the winter months" and as the three months to go the next spring could not be supposed to arrive before the 1st May, 1752, he had consequently the strongest reason to believe that the three months to go in the Fall could not be wanted before the 1st February, 1752, and therefore could never imagine they could be in necessity the 1st November before; for, if they were really then in want, they will only have from him three months provisions to serve six months and consequently they will have occasion for three months provisions more than his contract in order to carry them up to the 1st May, 1752.
The Governor is pleased to certify that Levy and Franks of Philadelphia would not send the bread and flour unless he would engage to see it paid for; why then would not he as well engage to see them paid for the cost thereof after the rate of 11/- or 12/- per cent. as to engage to Mr. Saul at 22/6, if he thought Mr. Townshend had taken no measures to supply his contract.

Leeward Islands.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Fleming, Lieutenant-Governor of the Leeward Islands, having been transcribed pursuant to yesterday's minutes, was signed.

Trade.

Africa.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse inclosing copies and extracts of the letters and papers laid before the Board by the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa having been transcribed pursuant to the preceding days minutes, was laid before the Board and signed.

Thursday, January 16. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Their lordships pursuant to the minutes of the 14th instant, took into consideration the state of the case of the bill drawn by Governor Cornwallis upon Mr. Chauncy Townshend for bread supplyed the settlers in Nova Scotia by Mr. Saul, Mr. Baker's agent, and the Secretary acquainted the Board that he was desired by Mr. Townshend to inform their lordships that the bills mentioned by Levy & Franks to be protested that were drawn by Mr. Powell was the occasion as they say in the letter the Governor sent of not complying with his orders: that these bills were not accepted by him at that time because they were drawn by order of the Government for account of six months provisions for 1,500 persons for which he had no manner of contract nor any sort of concern therein; and that he applyed to this Board and to the Treasury to complain that his credit would suffer thereby, and praying either that they would make a fixed contract with him and pay him the money, or that they would pay those bills and not suffer his credit to be sported with, the altercation of which took up two months before agreed on a price and two months more before he received the money, and that if it had been his own affair he should not have accepted those bills without invoice or bill of loading, he having drawn for the money in order to purchase what the Governor ordered.

Their lordships, upon consideration of this affair, ordered the Secretary to write to Mr. Alderman Baker and Mr. Chauncy Townshend to desire their attendance at the Board to-morrow morning at twelve o'clock.

Trade.

Africa.

Read a letter from the Earl of Holdernesse, one of his Majesty's Secretaries of State, dated the 15th January, 1752, referring to the consideration of the Board the following paper:—
Memorial of the Committee of the Company of Merchants trading to Africa to the King's most excellent Majesty concerning a fort at Anamaboe, dated the 6th of November, 1751.

Resolved that the said letter and memorial be taken into consideration on Tuesday next, and that the Secretary do write to the Committee of the Company of Merchants trading to Africa, to desire their attendance on that day.

Leeward Islands.

The Secretary acquainted the Board that Mr. Paris had desired him to move their lordships for leave to have copies out of this office of the following papers, viz.:—
An Act passed at Antigua in 1704 for holding a Court of Chancery, etc.
Copy of the Order of Council, disallowing the said Act.
General Act of all the Leeward Islands declaring the said Act to be in force.

Ordered that Mr. Paris have leave to have copies of the said papers.

Minorca.

The draught of a representation to his Majesty upon the petition of Charles Williams of Mahon, merchant, relating to the gathering coral and taking tunny fish upon the coasts of the island of Minorca, having been transcribed pursuant to the minutes of the 14th instant, was laid before the Board and signed.

Friday, January 17. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Alderman Baker and Mr. Chauncy Townshend attending pursuant to the preceding day's minutes, were called in; and after some conversation had with them relative to the exorbitant price at which it appeared the bread drawn for by Governor Cornwallis was sold, Mr. Alderman Baker acquainted their lordships that he was ready to accept any sum of money that it might be thought reasonable for Mr. Townshend to pay him which would be considered as so much paid in honour of the drawer of the bill and that he would write to Mr. Saul whatever their lordships should think proper; whereupon Mr. Townshend acquainted their lordships that he did not think for the reasons he had already given that he was obliged to pay any part of this bill; that on a supposition he was to pay for this bread purchased of Mr. Baker, the whole amount of what would then be delivered is 1,002,347 lb. and by his three contracts he was to send only 487,500: that the five sloops that carryed down this identical bread to Nova Scotia carryed down flour of which 'tis certain he was short, tho' over in bread.

Both parties then withdrew and their lordships ordered the draught of a letter to the Lords of the Treasury upon this affair to be prepared.

New York.

Read the following letters and papers received from Mr. Clinton, Governor of New York, viz.:—
Letter from Mr. Clinton, Governor of New York, to the Board, dated the 17th July, 1751, relating to Indian Affairs.
Letter from Mr. Clinton, dated the 29th August, 1751, intreating the Board's favourable recommendation of Brandt Schyler and John Chambers, Esquires, to his Majesty, that they may be appointed of the Council of New York in the room of two that have been suspended by him, and inclosing the following paper:—
Copies of letter from Colonel Johnson, Lieutenant Lindesay, Commissary of Oswego, and Mr. Stoddart, a trader there, giving an account of the designs of the French of Canada. Dated July, 1751.

Letter from Mr. Clinton to the Board, dated the 30th August, 1751, transmitting:—
Copy of Governor Clinton's letter of the Governor of Canada, dated the 12th June, 1751.
Copy of a letter from Monsieur la Jonquière, Governor of Canada, to the Governor of New York, dated the 10th of August, 1751.

Governor Clinton's notes on the Governor of Canada his letter to him, dated 10th August, 1751.
Extracts from the register of Indian affairs in Albany.
Letter from Mr. Clinton to the Board dated the 1st of October, 1751, transmitting:—
The present state of the Indian affairs with the British and French colonies in North America with some observations thereon for securing the fidelity of the Indians to the Crown of Great Britain.
Letter from Mr. Clinton to the Board, dated the 5th of November, 1751, transmitting the following papers, viz.:—
Letter to the Governor of New York from the Governor of Pennsylvania respecting the boundaries of that Government.
Copy of the report of a committee of the Council of New York on a letter from Governor Hamilton respecting the boundaries of Pennsylvania government.

Order that copies be made of Mr. Clinton's letters of the 17th July and 30th of August and of the papers therewith transmitted and also copies of the letter from Colonel Johnson, Lieutenant Lindesay and Mr. Stoddart to Mr. Clinton to be transmitted to the Earl of Holdernesse and that the draught of a letter to his Lordship inclosing the same be prepared.

The draught of a representation to his Majesty proposing that John Chambers, Esquire, may be appointed of the Council in New York in the room of Stephen Bayard, removed into another province, having been prepared, was agreed to, transcribed and signed.

Bahamas.

The Secretary laid before the Board the following paper, viz.:—
Case of Capt. Ring, complaining of Mr. Tinker, Governor of the Bahama Islands, for violent and arbitrary proceedings against him.

The Secretary having acquainted the Board that he was desired by Mr. Tinker to move their lordships for a copy of the complaint, a copy thereof was ordered to be made and delivered to Mr. Tinker.

Monday, January 20. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Their lordships took into consideration the several letters and papers which have been received from Governor Cornwallis since the Board's letter to him, dated the 22nd of March, 1750–1, and made some progress therein.

Tuesday, January 21. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Their lordships resumed the consideration of Governor Cornwallis's letters and ordered the draught of a letter to him to be prepared.

Ordered that an extract of so much of Mr. Cornwallis's letter of the 3rd of November last as relates to the ships of war upon that station be transmitted by the Secretary to the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to be laid before that Board.

Trade.

Africa.

Mr. Bowden for London, Nathaniel Basnell for Liverpool, Abraham James Hilhous for Bristol.

The Committee of Merchants trading to Africa attending pursuant to the minutes of the 16th instant, they were called in and the letter from the Earl of Holdernesse and also the memorial of the said Company to his Majesty, relating to the building a fort at Anamaboe, having been read, they acquainted the Board that they apprehended that the building a fort at Anamaboe at this conjuncture would be a means of preserving the rights of the nation and securing and protecting the trade of his Majesty's subjects upon the Gold Coast; that as John Corrantee was now very old they apprehended his view in proposing the building a fort was to secure to his family his riches and possessions, and that if his offer was not accepted, there was reason to believe he might apply to the French or some other Power; that if we neglected this opportunity we might never have another, as John Corrantee would probably resent a refusal of his offer; being asked if they had ever heard of any former application for building a fort here, they said they never had, and that the old African Company deserted the fort we had formerly here. They further acquainted their lordships that the best sort of negroes are to be got at that place, which they considered as a key to the whole trade of the Gold Coast; that most of the Fanteen trade was removed from Cape Coast to Anamaboe and if the French should get possession of it, we should not be able to carry on any trade at Cape Coast Castle; that as to the plan and design of building the fort, Mr. Knowles upon consulting with persons best acquainted with the situation of the place was of opinion it would not be proper to build it upon the foundation of the old one, but to remove it a little nearer the sea, the old one being at too great a distance; that they have constantly paid ground rent for the ground whereon the old fort stood and some lands about it, and that they apprehend this would extend to the ground whereon they proposed to build the new fort; that they apprehended they could build there as cheap, if not cheaper than in England, for although they should be obliged to send out bricks and timber, yet that would be no great expence, and would be counterballanced by the great saving upon labour, which they apprehended would not be very chargeable more especially as Corrantee had made offers of so great assistance; being asked if the expence of building this fort might not be defrayed out of the £10,000 granted by Parliament for the support of the forts and protection of the trade, they said they apprehended it could not, as Mr. Roberts had not only expended all the goods sent out with him but also run them in debt £3,000, and they could not say how far the goods now sent out would answer that debt: that if only £2,000 was granted for the present they would begin upon the work and were willing to take the money as the work went on.

The Committee being withdrawn their lordships after consideration of this affair ordered the draught of a report thereupon to the Earl of Holdernesse to be prepared.

Wednesday, January 22. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin.

Trade.

Africa.

Their lordships being informed that Mr. Hollier, Secretary to the Committee of the Company of Merchants trading to Africa, was attending with Mr. Crichton, who had been chief agent to the old African Company at Cape Coast Castle, they were called in, and Mr. Crichton being asked if he could give the Board any information relative to the ground rent paid by the Company at Anamaboe, he acquainted their lordships that it appeared by an entry in the journals of the old Company, a copy of which entry he produced, that they paid 12 akis being about £3 per month to the Bratfro and Corranteens of Fanteen for ground rent and water custom at Anamaboe and the two adjacent towns of Aggah and Anashan, which had been paid ever since the English had any fort there; that he apprehended the payment of the ground rent gave the English a right of building a fort in any part of the town of Anamaboe: that the water custom was for the priviledge and freedom of the road and use of the water. Mr. Crichton being asked as to his opinion as to the properest spot for building a fort upon, he said that the spot where the old fort was built was in his opinion the most proper being near the water side and secured from any danger from the sea by the surf which is always very great there, so that few shot from a ship can take place; that the building a new one upon the old foundation would however be attended with inconvenience as he was informed that the tank or cistern for the reception of water which is absolutely necessary in all forts there, was so foul as to be incapable of being cleansed so as to be made use of again.

Nova Scotia.

Read a letter from Mr. Chauncy Townshend, contractor for supplying the settlers in Nova Scotia with provisions, dated the 22nd January, 1752, containing proposals with respect to the payment of the bill drawn upon him by Governor Cornwallis for £2,250 for 224,000 cwt. of bread and inclosing:—
Extract of a letter from B. Gerrish to Chauncy Townshend, dated Halifax, 4th December, 1751.
Copy of B. Gerrish's letter to Governor Cornwallis, dated 22nd November, 1751.
Copy of B. Gerrish's letter to Governor Cornwallis, 26th November, 1751.
Bill of parcells from Mr. Saul to Mr. Charles Morris, 1st October, 1751.
Affidavit of Samuel Shipton, William Brown, Jacob Hurd.
Affidavit of Daniel Stratford and Thomas Thomas.
A state of Mr. Baker's bread from 29th March, 1751, to 24th November, 1751.

Ordered that copies of the above-mentioned letter and papers be annexed to the letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury ordered to be prepared by the minutes of the 17th instant.

Mr. Dick attending, was called in and he presented to the Board the following paper:—
Memorial of Mr. John Dick of Rotterdam, merchant, dated the 22nd of January, 1752, praying that he may be allowed £600 for his extra charges in the service and £400 for his extra trouble or that he may be at liberty to send 1,000 persons to Nova Scotia, this year and be allowed only the £400.

Resolved that Mr. Dick's memorial be taken into consideration to-morrow morning.

Thursday, January 23. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Lord Dupplin, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

Nova Scotia.

Their lordships pursuant to yesterday's minutes took into consideration Mr. Dick's memorial mentioned therein; and Mr. Dick attending was called in and being asked what he had to offer to the Board in support of the allegations of his said memorial he represented to their lordships, that although the sending over 500 persons would be hoped in some degree [to] save the credit of the colony and render his difficulties the less, yet as those he had engaged with according to the accounts from his different agents greatly exceeded that number, one agent only having engaged 1,200, and as they would never be permitted to settle in their own country again he must be at great expence in bribing their Heads or Leaders, and turning over as many of them as he could into the hands of other merchants who transport foreign protestants to America: that he believed these expences would be so great that very little of the £1,000, if their lordships should allow it to him, would be left after they were defrayed: that his zeal to perform this service with credit and to their lordships' satisfaction had induced him to lay aside all other business whatever and that he should be a considerable loser by the commerce he had entered into and established in America consequential to this; that as to the profit arising upon sending foreign protestants to Nova Scotia he should be glad if it amounted to 15/- per head.

That if their lordships allowed him to send over 1,000 this year he would endeavour to reduce the price of labour from 1/6 to 1/-, which would create a saving to the publick of upwards of £1,600; or otherwise if they chose rather to allow him the £1,000 he would be satisfied with the payment of it in twelve months.

Nova Scotia.

Mr. Dick being withdrawn their lordships upon consideration of his proposal came to a resolution that the following alternatives should be proposed to him, viz.:—

That upon condition Mr. Dick can reduce the price of labour from 1/6 to 1/- he shall in that case be allowed to send over 1,000 foreign protestants to Nova Scotia this year, or

That if he sent over only 500 he should be allowed £1,000 for the extraordinary trouble and expence he may have been at in this service payable at the expiration of twelve months from the date of the acceptance of his draught upon their lordships' agent.

That the Board for the reasons alledged by Mr. Dick in his memorial and divers other weighty considerations do recommend to him to use his endeavours to carry the former proposition into execution, in which case they do agree that in consideration of his zeal for the publick service, and oeconomy, and the great expence he must be at in carrying this service into execution he shall be allowed £400 upon the embarkation of the settlers.

Mr. Dick being called in, the following propositions were read to him, upon which he requested of their lordships that he might have a copy of them, to the end that he might consider thereof upon his arrival in Holland and give their lordships an answer as soon as possible.

Mr. Dick being withdrawn their lordships ordered the Secretary to give him a copy of the foregoing resolutions.

Wednesday, January 29. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Townshend, Mr. Oswald.

Miscellanies.

A Commission under the Great Seal bearing date the 6th of January, 1752, appointing George Dunk, Earl of Halifax, John Pitt, James Grenville, Esquire, Thomas Hay, commonly Lord Viscount Dupplin, Francis Fane, Charles Townshend, Andrew Stone and James Oswald, Esquires, Commissioners for promoting the trade of this kingdom and inspecting and improving the plantations in America and elsewhere was opened and read.

New York.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse inclosing copies and extracts of several letters and papers lately received from Mr. Clinton relating to the attempts of the French to withdraw the Indians of the Five Nations from their attachment to the British interest and other unjustifiable proceedings having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 17th instant, was laid before the Board, agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.

Trade.

Africa.

The draught of a report to the Earl of Holdernesse upon the memorial presented to his Majesty by the Committee of Merchants trading to Africa relating to the building a fort at Anamaboe, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 21st instant, was laid before the Board.

Resolved that this report be taken into consideration on Friday next and that the Secretary do write to Admiral Knowles to desire his attendance on the Board that day.

Nova Scotia.

The draught of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the dispute between William Baker and Chauncy Townshend, Esquires, contractors for supplying the troops and settlers in Nova Scotia with provisions with respect to a bill drawn by Governor Cornwallis upon Mr. Townshend for bread supplyed the settlers by Mr. Baker's agent, having been prepared pursuant to the minutes of the 17th instant, was laid before the Board.

Resolved that the said draught of a letter be taken into further consideration on Fryday next.

Ordered that the draught of a report to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the contracts for victualling the troops and settlers in Nova Scotia be prepared.

Friday, January 31. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Grenville, Mr. Fane, Mr. Townshend.

New York.

The draught of a letter to the Earl of Holdernesse with copies and extracts of several letters and papers lately received from Mr. Clinton, Governor of New York, having been transcribed pursuant to the preceding minutes, was laid before the Board and signed.

Trade.

Africa.

Admiral Knowles attending, as desired, was called in and being asked whether if it should be thought adviseable to build a new fort at Anamaboe upon the coast of Africa, the ground whereon the old fort stood was a proper situation or whether it might be adviseable to build it upon some other spot, he acquainted their lordships that he never was ashore at that place; that he had lain sometime in the Road and from what he could observe from his ship he was of opinion the ground whereon the old fort stood was the most proper as it commands the channell and was not within gunshot of the fort which the Dutch have at that place: that the old fort stood in a valley shut in on the landside by hills and that if the new fort should be built upon the side of those hills it should be very expensive, as on one side the wells must be very high: that as to the foulness of the tank or cistern, if it was well cleaned and lined with bricks, it might be used again.

Admiral Knowles being withdrawn, their lordships took into consideration the draught of a report to the Earl of Holdernesse upon the memorial of the Committee of the Company of Merchants trading to Africa, agreed thereto and ordered it to be transcribed.

Nova Scotia.

Their lordships made a further progress in the consideration of the letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury upon the state of the dispute between Mr. Alderman Baker and Mr. Chauncy Townshend.

Agreed to take the said letter into further consideration on Monday next.

Barbados.

Read a letter from Mr. Grenville, Governor of Barbados, to the Board, dated the 7th of November, 1751, containing a further account of his transactions with the Governor of Martinique, relative to the evacuation of the Neutral Islands and inclosing:—
Copy of Monsieur de Bompar's letter to Governor Grenville, dated the 17th of October, N.S., 1751.
Copy of Governor Grenville's letter to Monsieur de Bompar, dated November 2nd, O.S., 1751.

Ordered that copies be made of the above-mentioned letters to be transmitted to the Earl of Holdernesse, one of his Majesty's principal Secretaries of State and that the draught of a letter to his Lordship thereupon be prepared.

Footnotes

1 presumably 1699.