Minute Book
November 1703

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Institute of Historical Research

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William A. Shaw (editor)

Year published

1936

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82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92

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'Minute Book: November 1703', Calendar of Treasury Books, Volume 18: 1703 (1936), pp. 82-92. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=84297 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

November 1703

November 1.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Earl of Montagu [Master of the Great Wardrobe] is called in. My Lord [Treasurer discourses him and informs him that he] intends that as money comes in from arrears of taxes a part shall go towards the debt of the Wardrobe : [to wit] 5000l. to be paid on account of services done and to be done in her Majesty's time.
Write to the Customs Commissioners that in passing the Duke of Marlborough's goods care be taken to do them no prejudice.
Desire the Attorney and Solicitor General to be here on Friday and Mr. Borret to attend then with his paper of [Crown Law] causes : and Judith Nezereau's report is to be read then.
[My Lord orders the issue of] 300l. to Signor Verrio in full for [his painting] of the Great Staircase at Windsor ; according to the report of Sir Christopher Wren and John Ball.
[The draft of the] letter [to the Customs] for bringing up the Duke of Marlborough's goods is read and approved.
Desire Mr. Godolphin and Mr. Travers to hasten their report concerning the tin and to bring it hither the first morning after it is ready. Ibid., p. 140.
November 2, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : ut supra.
Lord Halifax [the Auditor of the Receipt] attends as also Mr. [John] Pelham the Deputy Remembrancer. (He brings the last Imprest Roll ended 18 June last) and Mr. [Gabriel] Armiger [one of the eight attornies of the Queen's Remembrancer's Office]. My Lord Treasurer delivers the Roll to Mr. Armiger for the Remembrancer to the end the public service might not suffer.
Mr. Godolphin and Mr. Travers are called in and their report about the tin is read. My Lord approves the method proposed of furnishing the money for buying the tin and lending to the tinners : and care is to be taken for avoiding occasions of drawing any great sum at one time : and [my Lord orders] that 1000l. be furnished by the 1st December and 39000l. by Xmas according to the report. My Lord is clear it will be better to employ officers for the Queen than to make a contract at a certain rate either here or in the country. [My Lord further decides] that there be four persons, to wit one for Devon and 3 for Cornwall (whereof two to be a quorum) who shall be agents for managing the affairs of the tin contracts on the Queen's behalf. [My Lord further orders] that there be a Register of loans [on the security of tin] as is proposed in the report and that the Attorney General be advised with concerning the security.
[My Lord orders] Mr. Killegrew to have 50l.
[Send word] to Mr. Blathwait and Mr. Pauncefoot to be here to-morrow morning.
[Send word] to the Customs Commissioners (if not summoned already) that they are to attend to-morrow afternoon at the hearing concerning the port of Falmouth.
Desire Mr. Ward to be here to-morrow morning.
[My Lord] ordered that the sum of 25421l. 9s. 8d. on Mr. Foxe's memorial, to clear the subject Troops forming part of the 40,000 men in the Low Countries, to wit, to the 24 August 1703 (including 190l. 10s. 0d. for Major General Windham) is to be paid out of the Coal Duties tallies in Mr. Foxe's hands. Ibid., p. 141.
November 3, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : ut supra.
Mr. Jodrel, Mr. Walker and the [Queen's] printers are called in. My Lord recommends it to them to moderate their bills.
[My Lord decides that] Mr. Andrew Quick is to be the Agent for managing the tin affairs in Devon ; and Mr. Scobel, Mr. Enys and Mr. Calker to be the same in Cornwall : each at a salary of 250l. per an. They are to act as receiver of the money from the Exchequer and to apply same to pay for the tin and to lend &c. all as per the contract. Prepare a privy seal for my Lord [to countersign] for the appointment of these officers.
[Send word] to Mr. Whitfeild to be here on Friday morning about clearings for the Marine Regiments.
[My Lord further orders] 4169l. 15s. 1½d. to be paid out of the moneys in Sir Thomas Littleton's hands for wages for subsistence according to his [Littleton's] memorial of this day's date.
[Send word to] the Principal Commissioners of Prizes and Capt. Wyvel to attend on Friday morning. Ibid., p. 142.
November 3 afternoon. Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Customs Commissioners [are called in, together with] Mr. Pendarvis et al, and Mr. Killigrew and the Attorney General.
My Lord will hear both sides by counsel this day week in the afternoon [concerning the ports of Falmouth, Penryn, Truro and Helford].
[Send word] to the [Navy] Victuallers to be here on Friday morning about Col. Quarry's bills.
[My Lord orders] Mr. Morice to have a copy of the Treaty with Portugal.
[My Lord ordered the issue of] 7244l. 2s. 8d. to Mr. Fox on his order for Alliances on his memorial of this day's date : to be issued out of loans in the Exchequer : and is intended to subsist the Portugal Forces (except 2 Regiments last ordered) to the 24th Decr. next.
Desire Mr. Blathwait to certify whether any of the horses to be bought in Portugal are to be charged to the account of the troops.
[Send word] to Mr. Blathwait, Mr. Fox and Mr. Morris to be here on Friday morning.
[My Lord orders the Queen's] printers to have 2000l. in part of what is due since the Queen's accession to the Crown. Treasury Minute Book XIV, p. 142.
November 4, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer.
[My Lord orders the issue of] 2000l. to Mr. William Methwyn on the 23rd inst upon his brother's bills for so much paid by him by her Majesty's order in Portugal. Ibid., p. 143.
November 5, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Attorney and Solicitor General and Mr. Borret [attend]. My Lord Treasurer reads Mr. Borret's paper of [outstanding Crown law] causes and gives direction thereupon severally.
My Lord Treasurer will hear counsel for Lord Berkeley this day week upon his pretensions to the goods of James Smith. Desire the Attorney and Solicitor General to be here then and request Lord Berkeley in the meantime to send some person with his [deed or title of] grant to the Attorney and Solicitor General under which he claims the goods.
Write to the Lords Commissioners of Trade to desire that when they have any doubts in points of law that they send to Mr. Borret to attend the Attorney or Solicitor General [on the same].
In all cases of difficulty or moment the officers of the revenue are to advise with the Attorney and Solicitor General before they commence prosecution.
[Send word] to Mr. Baker to transmit a paper of all his causes.
[Write] to the Navy Commissioners that Capt. Wyvel claims a greater share in the capture of Vigo (where his ship was actually engaged) than is due to ships that only assisted and were not engaged. [Therefore] my Lord desires them to certify whether there be any custom of the Navy to distinguish ships actually engaged from [ships only] assisting, in [reference to] distributions of this kind.
Write the same [letter] to Dr. [George] Brampston [of Doctors Commons, official to the Archdeacons of Middlesex and London] and desire him to send a speedy answer.
[The Principal] Commissioners of Prizes are called in. They say they have no objection against paying by estimation three fourths of what is due to the ships at Vigo whose lists are duly returned provided they have authority for so doing.
Direct the Commissioners of Prizes to attend the Prince's Council [of the Admiralty] for a list of the ships taken at Vigo [which list is to be] signed by them.
Mr. Blathwayte will send a paper of the sum [required] to pay for two thirds of the 2000 horse which are to be bought in Portugal distinguishing the Officers' horses from the soldiers'.
And thereupon [my Lord orders the Exchequer to] issue the said sum to Mr. Fox for that service out of loans on the Land Tax in the Exchequer ; and 600l. for Contingencies ; and 144l. to pay a Contingent warrant for saddles &c. for the additional men of Lord Raby's Regiment ; and 91l. 10s. 0d. for the Commissary of the Provisions for 2 months' pay to himself and 2 men ; and 180l. for the General Officers to clear them from the 16 December to the 24th December next.
[Send word] to Mr. Whitfield desiring him to take such care that the [Marine] Regiments in his [care of] pay may be mustered and accounts made of their clearings this year as the last.
On Tuesday week in the morning my Lord will consider the report of the present Victuallers of the Navy concerning Mr. Papillon et al, late Victuallers thereof. [Send word] to the Navy Commissioners, Mr. Dodington, the present Victuallers, Mr. Papillon and the Auditors of Imprests to be here then.
Ordered that out of the money in the hands of Sir Thomas Littleton (received from the Land Tax) the sum of 46000l. be applied to pay the Navy Yards to the last day of March 1703.
[My Lord orders] James Stanliffe to be paid 150l. out of secret service money, clear of all [fees and] charges. Ibid., pp. 144-5.
November 8, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : ut supra.
Sir Joseph Tredenham and Mr. Duncombe are called in. They will call again to-morrow morning about the [army] clothing.
[Send word] to Mr. Brewer to be here to-morrow morning. Also to the Commissioners of the Transports.
[Send word] to Sir Henry Furnese, Sir Stephen Evance, Sir James Bateman, Mr. Brooks, Mr. Henkel and Mr. Milner that on Friday afternoon my Lord will receive sealed proposals for remitting 40,000l. to Lisbon by bills at 30 days' sight with 6 days of grace and for 20000l. to be payable there at sight. Ibid., p. 146.
November 9, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : ut supra.
[Send word] to Sir Jeffery Jefferys and Mr. Thrale to be here to-morrow morning.
[My Lord orders the issue of] 750l. to the Earl of Nottingham and 500l. to Sir Charles Hedges for secret service.
[Likewise] 2000l. to the Queen's printers.
[Likewise] 936l. 9s. 4d. for the Invalids : to be issued out of loans on the Land Tax.
His Grace the Duke of Marlborough comes in.
Mr. How is called in and the Comptrollers of the [Accounts of the] Army.
His Grace offers an instruction concerning the clothing which is amended and agreed to in these words viz.
that the Comptrollers [of Army Accounts] do receive from the several Colonels of the Army a state of the offreckonings and clothing of their respective Regiments to the 1st March next ; that hereafter all contracts for clothing be entered with them [the said Comptrollers] and that they take care that such contracts for the whole clothing and half mounting do not exceed 2 years' offreckonings ; and the Paymasters [of the Forces are] not to allow or comply with such contract or assignments but what shall be first entered and certified by them : and that no clothing be paid for [or] allowed but such as the Comptrollers shall find agreeable in goodness to the patterns, [which are] to be first approved by the General [Colonel] and certified by him under his hand and seal to the said Comptrollers. Treasury Minute Book XIV, p. 147.
November 12, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer.
His Grace the Duke of Marlborough comes in. Mr. How comes in and Mr. Blathwait is called in.
Send to the Auditors [of Imprests] to know if my Lord Ranelagh has sent in his accounts for the years 1701 and 1702.
Several [army] estimates are read and considered.
Memorandum. Mr. Blathwait is to take care that an account be made up of the horses in Holland and Ireland left by the soldiers going to Portugal.
On Wednesday next at 10 o'clock his Grace [the Duke of Marlborough] will be here again with Mr. Blathwait, Mr. How, Mr. Fox and Mr. Cardonel.
Send to the Governors of the [Chelsea] Hospital to be here then ; and also Mr. Crawford, the Commissary of the Musters.
Sir Jeffery Jefferys and Mr. Thrale are called in. [My Lord Treasurer discoursed them and] ordered that out of the subsistence money in the hands of Mr. How the sum of 1166l. 15s. 0¾d. be paid to Mr. Thrale for Sir Jeffery Jefferys on account of the subsistence of the four Independent Companies at New York ; for which [the payment of which subsistence the said Jefferys] is to produce vouchers [muster rolls &c.] in due form and give security to Mr. Thrale for that purpose. Ibid., p. 148.
Eodem die afternoon. Present : Lord Treasurer.
[My Lord orders the issue to William Lowndes of] 497l. 4s. 8d. for secret service : to be issued out of the Aulnage money.
Send for an account of the revenues of the Duchy [of Cornwall] as it now stands.
Lord Berkeley is called in with Mr. Dod, his Counsel, together with the Attorney and Solicitor General. The patent upon which the said Lord claims the goods of Mr. James Smith having been perused by the Attorney and Solicitor General they say the patent doth plainly carry [a title to] all the goods and chattels of felons forfeited for felony or flight within the Hundred of Berkeley. It bears date 25 July, 14 Jac [James I, anno 1616].
The Customs Commissioners are called in together with the gentlemen concerned for the port of Penryn and their counsel as also Mr. Killigrew with counsel for Sir Peter Killigrew. The report of the 13th Sept. 1700 from the Customs Commissioners concerning Falmouth, Penryn, Truro and Helford is read.
Sir Thomas Powys, Counsel for Penryn, says that about 1676 there was a commission for setting out those ports on which several gentlemen met but Sir Peter Killigrew did not like their proceeding and soon after procured the limits of Falmouth port to be set out, so [or on such terms] that the ancient towns must bring all their goods to his quay and [he, Sir Peter] has made it almost impossible for ships to load or unload at the ancient ports : [further Sir Thomas says that] his [Killigrew's] quay is inconvenient, ships cannot come safely to it and he [therefore] desires a new commission [to set out the port]. As to length of time he says grievances are not presently felt and there must be some time before gentlemen will stir for redress.
The Solicitor General, of the same side, says the second commission was executed by Mr. Osborne et al without consideration of the gentlemen of the country and that the Queen's revenue and the interest of the country [county] will be advantaged by what is [now] desired. There is no conveniency to carry goods from Sir Peter's quay but on men's backs. In 1700 it was resolved that a new commission should issue. Sir Peter desired that his counsel might be heard first so that Sir Peter should make his objections and my Lord is of opinion that the objections should come on his part [of the case].
Mr. Phips, of counsel for the town of Helford says that if merchants can be eased it will increase trade and they [of Helford] have as good right as Falmouth and [he therefore] desires to have a quay at Helford.
The Attorney General, of counsel for Sir Peter Killigrew says that there was an Act to enable Sir Peter to make a quay and landing place at Falmouth : that Falmouth is most convenient place for trade ; that no ships of burthen can go above half a mile by water [beyond Falmouth] only lighters and the like ; that it is impracticable to have officers at every town for landing goods at Falmouth. He objects against the petitioners of Penryn as attorneys, blacksmiths &c. Where old places become unuseful [as lawful quays for landing goods] there is a power in the Crown to appoint new [quays within the limits of a port]. They speak of no alteration of rivers or the like [in order] to have a new commission [for setting out the port]. He says about 1675 or 1676 there was a commission directed to all the officers and others ; and 'twas settled after many hearings before the then Lord Treasurer. Afterwards there was a new application to the Treasury Lords in May 1679 : all the towns were heard by counsel and by order of Council what was done by the Commission was confirmed : but if there were errors in the proceedings they might apply to the Court of the Exchequer. They acquiesced until 1700 and when they thought all matters forgot they came again ; and the present Commissioners of Customs have not altered their opinions : and in case of a new Commission [for setting out the port] they would not (he thinks) desire that several places should be made [lawful quays merely to make facilities] to run goods.
Mr. Ettrick, of counsel for Falmouth, doubts the power of issuing a new Commission : if there were any alterations of streams or Falmouth were become unfit, or if there be any [of the] reasons mentioned in the Act of 14 Car. II c. 11 it would be another matter : but Falmouth is still as convenient as it was : Penryn is two miles from Falmouth. Where are [there to be found] 2 Custom Houses so near [to each other]? What comes to Penryn must be in boats and lighters, [and so easily] subject to frauds. But [at Falmouth] there is no need of carrying on men's backs. The river is there and there must be something secret in this matter for the difference is not great between one mile and two on a river. Unshipping of goods before entry may be of ill consequence. This matter hath had solemn determination.
Mr. Dod says that Falmouth has always had the reputation of one of the best ports of the Kingdom. [It is] inconvenient to have 4 Custom Houses in 8 miles. [If they be set up] ships must pass by Falmouth where there are all conveniences to go to places where there are none. He shows how small the Customs of Penryn have usually been. An Act of 14 Car. II c. 11 to issue Commissions : an Act to encourage Sir Peter [Killigrew] to build [quays]. In 1671 a report from Falmouth. In 1676 a Commission duly executed. Afterwards all affirmed [confirmed] by Charles II in Council. And if there were corruption or irregularity [the complainants are at liberty to] go to the Exchequer [Court]. Sir Peter hath laid out a great sum. People have settled at Falmouth. Sir Peter never recommended one officer there. In the other towns they have always been applying for [appointments of] officers : and he hopes he [his client Sir Peter] shall not be disturbed now but be continued in his possession.
[My Lord Treasurer] read the report of the Customs Commissioners of date the 11th Dec. 1671 : likewise the order of Council of 16 May 1679 and 23 May 1679 and the petition of Sir Peter Killigrew relating thereunto.
My Lord Treasurer takes advice that the order of Council only dismisses the petition of the towns.
Counsel for Falmouth says that the order of Council directed them only to go to the Exchequer Court ; which by implication tied up the hands of the Lords of the Treasury.
Sir Thomas Powys says the case is now reduced to the single interest of Sir Peter Killigrew. There is no doubt of the power to issue a new commission, though it [the limits of the port of Falmouth] had been settled in 1676. The Act of Frauds [lays it down that] as often as there is occasion alterations be made from time to time. The Exchequer [Court] might examine matters of law but not facts. There have been contests ever since. We pray, says he, only a fair enquiry. If it be as they say your Lordship will take care that a new Commission [for setting out the port] shall be duly executed. There are express words in Sir Peter's Act that it should not prejudice Penrin or Truro. [The port of] Falmouth is but newly grown up. The others are ancient towns of trade. Ships of 100 tons may come up to the towns of Truro and Penrin. If what is desired is not prejudicial to the Crown or prejudicial to any right which Sir Peter has by his Act we hope not to be denied, but that the thing may be enquired into.
The Solicitor General [argues and] clears my Lord Treasurer's power [in this case] as a matter of law and says that the determination of the Privy Council was against Sir Peter Killigrew not for him, when the [petitions of the] towns were before the Treasury. Sir Peter applied to the Council Board and he [that is his petition] was dismissed : and several gentlemen [of the county] are ready if thought fit to give my Lord an account of the inconveniencies the country lies under.
Mr. Phips moves again that there may be a quay at Helford.
The Attorney General says that he cannot say that issuing a new Commission will clash with the law but it may [? be issued and act] with discretion.
My Lord [says he] will advise further with the Customs Commissioners whether this will be for the advantage of trade in general or of the revenue of the Customs.
They all withdraw except the Customs Commissioners. My Lord Treasurer directs them to consider and give him their opinion whether giving some further liberties to Penryn, Truro and Helford (although it might occasion greater charge of offices) will not increase the trade and be an advantage to the revenue.
The Navy Commissioners are called in. [My Lord discourses them and orders Secretary Lowndes to] write to the Commissioners of Sick and Wounded to send an account of the whole expense under their care, since the last war, distinguishing the charge of the prisoners of war from the charge of the sick and wounded. And direct them to send a copy of their instructions.
[Send word] to the Navy Victuallers to be here on Monday morning.
The proposition of Sir Henry Furnese and James Milner to furnish bills at Lisbon [in return] for present money : to wit for 40,000l. at 30 days' sight and 20000l. at sight at 6s. 2½d. per milree is approved. Treasury Minute Book XIV, pp. 148-151.
November 15, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer.
[My Lord Treasurer orders] Mr. Henry Scobel to be Receiver and Paymaster of the moneys which are to be appointed for buying tin in the counties of Cornwall and Devon for the Queen's use and for other services relating thereunto.
[Send word] to Sir Henry Furnese to be here to-morrow morning about furnishing 83333⅓ dollars [pieces of Eight] in Portugal.
Memorandum. "To speak concerning the musters when the Duke of Marlborough comes."
Send to the Agents for Taxes for a fresh account of what is standing out on the Land Tax and Subsidies of 1702 and in whose hands.
Send to the Commissioners of Sick and Wounded to be here tomorrow morning. Ibid., p. 152.
November 16, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The [draft of the] letter concerning Sir Jeffery Jefferys is read and approved.
Petitions are read [and my Lord's decisions and replies are endorsed thereon].
The Navy Commissioners, the Auditors of Imprests, the present Victuallers of the Navy and Mr. Papillon are here. The report of the Victuallers concerning the late Victualling accounts is read. Send this report to the Navy Commissioners to consider the difficulties therein represented and to propose their opinion for remedy of the same, and particularly on those heads that tend to the dispatch of the late [Navy] Treasurer's account.
[Send word] to the Commissioners of Prizes to be here to-morrow morning.
[My Lord directs the issue of] 10000l. for the Navy Victuallers for bills of exchange, Necessary Money, Short Allowance Money and Contingencies : to be issued out of the money in Sir Thomas Littleton's hands on the Land Tax [anno 1703].
[Likewise] 10000l. out of the same for Sick and Wounded, three fifths thereof to be charged to the head of Wages and two fifths to the head of Victualling.
[Send word] to Auditor Harley to be here on Friday morning about my Lord's [Godolphin's] Imprest roll [as formerly Master of the Robes to Charles II].
Send to the Attorney and Solicitor General to be here on Friday morning about Mr. Bertie's account.
Sir Henry Furnese will forthwith give bills to Mr. Fox to complete two thirds for the Queen's part of 500,000 pieces of Eight for the King of Portugal for his preparations ; to wit 83333⅓ dollars at the rate of 6s. 2½d, per milrei. And my Lord Treasurer will cause payment for the said bills to be made here by the 24th December next.
[My Lord Treasurer orders the issue to the Paymaster of the Forces of] 14266l. 18s. 6d. to clear the subject Troops forming part of the 40,000 men in Holland, to wit for 2 months ended 24 Oct. 1703 : to be paid out of funds as follows viz.
£ s. d.
out of Coal tallies in Mr. Foxe's hands 3351 10 5
out of arrears of Customs due [or ending] at Xmas 1699 at the Exchequer 307 5 0
out of the 25 per cent. on French goods 246 5 10½
out of the surplus of the Duties on Salt and Stamp Duties at Michaelmas 1703 7971 18 10
out of penalties levied on maltsters 860 3 3
out of loans on the Coals Duties 1005 4 11¾
out of loans on the sixth 4s. Aid 523 10
£14266 18 6
Treasury Minute Book XIV, p. 153.
November 17, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Principal Commissioners of Prizes are [called in]. They receive [from ny Lord] the draft of the order of Council concerning the Vigo booty and will return it with their opinion.
The Duke of Marlborough comes in with Mr. How and Mr. Blathwait.
[My Lord Treasurer doth] appoint the Governors of the Hospital et al to attend on Friday morning at 9 of the clock.
[Send word] to Sir Christopher Wren to be here on Friday morning.
Lady Milbank and Dr. Brady are to be heard on Monday afternoon. Ibid., p. 154.
November 19, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer.
[My Lord orders the issue to the] Earl of Limerick of 300l. for secret service.
My Lord ordered the issue of 30055l. 16s. 9¾d. on Mr. How's memorial [of this day] for the Guards and Garrisons : to be issued out of Subsidy tallies in his hands : and he is to be impowered to borrow money on them at 4 per cent.
And [my Lord Treasurer orders the Exchequer to] issue 816l. 19s. 7d. to him [Mr. How] (out of loans in the Exchequer) for subsistence to Lord Lucas's Regiment ; and 739l. 17s. 7d. for clearings to same.
Desire Mr. Clerk to be here on Monday morning about the musters of the Marines.
[My Lord orders] Mr. Speke to have 100l. and to be told that he must not [further] trouble the [Treasury] Office. Ibid., p. 155.
November 21, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
[My Lord orders] John Mountstephens to be the third in the Commission for the tin in Cornwall.
Desire the Navy Commissioners and Mr. Crawford to be here to-morrow afternoon about the musters of the Marine Regiments.
Direct the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Auditor of the Receipt and Mr. Lowndes to consider of such accounts as are proper to be rendered by the [four] Tellers [of the Receipt], and of the examination and disposition of their vouchers, and to report their opinions to my Lord.
The Attorney and Solicitor General come in and [inform my Lord that they] are of opinion that the Auditor of the Receipt, upon examining the vouchers in the Exchequer is to charge Mr. Bertie with interest in accordance with the Act : and if Mr. Bertie have just cause [per contra for the discharge of or] to be allowed such interest by reason that it was assigned over with the principal by sufficient authority, then he will be regularly discharged thereof on his own account. Ibid., p. 156.
November 22, forenoon. Present : ut supra.
The hearing between Dr. Brady and Lady Milbanck is to be on the 8th December next in the forenoon. Ibid., p. 157.
November 24. Present : ut supra.
[Send word] to the Commissioners of the Victualling to be here on Friday morning about Col. Quarrey's bills.
The Navy Commissioners [attend as also] Mr. Clerk and Mr. Crawford [and they tell my Lord that] Mr. Clerk will move the Prince [as Lord High Admiral] for an instruction that from henceforth the signing officers of the ships on which marine soldiers do serve shall send from time to time to the Commissary's Office the lists of the Marines [on board] attested by all the signing officers who send the like lists to the Navy Office.
The Duke of Marlborough comes in. The report for Lord Portmore's [the report from Mr. Fox and Mr. Blathwaite on the Earl of Portmore's memorial concerning the respits on his] Regiment is read and approved and Mr. Blathwait is to prepare a warrant.
Col. Seymour is called in. He is to lay before my Lords an account of the losses which the Marine Regiments have sustained and what is saved this year by respits. Ibid., p. 158.
November 26, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer.
[My Lord orders the Exchequer to] pay to the Earl of Clarendon out of secret service money 1500l. forthwith by way of advance for the said Earl's pension of 1500l per an. ; it being to enable him to pay part of the mortgage which Mr. Stracy hath on an estate of his Lordship.
[My Lord orders that] 3516l. 18s. 11d. which is to be brought into the Exchequer out of prize money is to be issued to the Treasurer of the Navy for the Victuallers ; [which sum is intended] to pay a bill of [drawn by] Col. Quarry for victuals furnished in the West Indies and to be reckoned as part of the proportion [voted for the Victualling] for the year 1703. Treasury Minute Book XIV, p. 159.
November 29, forenoon.
Treasury Chambers. Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
[Send word] to the Commissioners of Prizes to be here to-morrow morning about prizes carried into Jersey and Guernsey.
[My Lord directs the Exchequer] to issue 4000l. to Mr. Scobel out of Civil List money ; upon his order for buying tin, &c.
Desire the Attorney General to be here on Friday morning to advise upon a certificate, returned into the Exchequer, of frauds committed there in relation to former taxes.
[Send word] to the Agents for Taxes to be here on Friday morning and afternoon. Likewise to the Commissioners of Excise and Commissioners of Customs to be here then.
[Send word] to the Commissioners of Stamp Duties and the Accountant [of the said Duties] to be here this day week in the afternoon about the accounts to be rendered of those Duties.
[Send word] to the Officers of the Ordnance and the Commissioners of Prizes to be here this day week in the forenoon about the prize guns.
Send word to the Postmasters [General] to be here to-morrow morning. Ibid., p. 160.
Eodem die, afternoon. Present : Lord Treasurer.
Petitions are read [and my Lord's answers thereto are minuted and endorsed on them]. Ibid.
November 30.
Treasury Chambers, Cockpit.
Present : Lord Treasurer, Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Principal Commissioners of Prizes are called in. They say they have had no account of prizes at Jersey or Guernsey, where they have two Agents.
Send the memorial of the Ordnance concerning the [prize] guns to the Commissioners of Prizes [with a request to them] to report the matter of fact and their opinion thereon.
My Lord recommends it to the Commissioners of Prizes to look into all the unnecessary charges upon the prizes and to represent to my Lords [Lord Treasurer thereon].
The Postmasters [General attend]. Reports [concerning the Post Office] are read and [my Lord endorses thereon his] answers on them.
Signify to the Postmasters General that my Lord Treasurer intends that Mr. Vanderpool have the 100l. a year above the 20l. a year ; my Lord considering that he has had that allowance for several years and not being willing at this time to discourage him. Ibid., p. 161.