Simancas
December 1602

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Martin A. S. Hume (editor)

Year published

1899

Pages

717-718

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'Simancas: December 1602', Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 4: 1587-1603 (1899), pp. 717-718. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=87273 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Contents

December 1602

5 Dec.
Estado, 840.
731. Report of the Council of State to Philip III. on the letters from Father Creswell.
In accordance with your Majesty's orders, the Council has considered the papers sent by Father Creswell on the 28th November. He points out the great age of the queen of England, and the advisability of your Majesty's taking the country before a male heir with new connections and friends succeeds. He recommends that as many galleys as possible should be sent to Flanders, to transport all the troops that can be got together to England when the Queen dies, so that your Majesty will be ready to succour the Catholics. He recommends that stores, etc. should at once be collected, under cover of war with the Turk, and that the Spanish fleet should be mustered in Italy, foreign ships being freighted. He says as there are many claimants to the crown, with varying chances, if they be supported by your Majesty ; and the question should be well deliberated in time in all its bearings, and the eligibility of the various candidates considered ; so that in any eventuality the Catholics may know whom to support.
The Council is of opinion that Father Cresswell should be thanked for reminding your Majesty of the papers he sent last year, but it is difficult to know what to say about them, as they recommend the taking up of the English enterprise, and things here are in such a condition as to make this impossible. The Council has already given its opinion on the question of the succession.
Count de Olivares on this occasion repeated his former remark, namely, that as the bringing forward of the Infanta and the Archduke now offered so many difficulties, it would be best to support the Catholic English claimant most in favour with the party there, so as to oppose the King of Scots.