Venice
July 1618, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1909

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266-279

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'Venice: July 1618, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 266-279. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88680 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Contents

July 1618

July 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano
Gen. da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
450. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On my return from Curzola on the morning of the 14th inst. I found that some 200 of the English soldiers, of those who recently arrived on the seven ships, had landed near Sabionesso, a Ragusan place. The colonel of these troops and the captain of that particular company arrived at the same place in a galley on hearing that these men had mutinied. The men refused to return to the ships unless their pay was increased. I considered this matter to be of so grave importance, chiefly on the grounds of example, and because any sign of weakness on my part, among troops of so many different nations paid differently would be dangerous. The colonel and captain informed me that in spite of all their efforts they had no hopes of moving these men from their determination. Before taking further steps, I myself asked the men to embark. They refused upon the same pretence of increased pay, and they turned their muskets with lighted matches upon the sergeant major whom I had sent to them, preparing to use force. I at once landed a considerable number of Italian troops and others whom I thought the most loyal, who occupied the strongest positions. At the same time I brought the galleys to bear upon them, and in the sight of all the fleet, including their own ships and countrymen, forced them to surrender, without the slightest promise of favour or pardon; but they were to lay down all their arms, including their swords, and embark. I divided them out among the fleet, ten in a ship. After a short trial I picked out the most guilty among the mutineers, the lieutenant, the sergeant, two corporals and four soldiers, and had them all hanged at the yardarm this morning in the sight of the whole fleet.
I hope that my decisive action and this punishment will not only dissipate the vain pretensions of the other English, including the officers, but will put fear in the hearts of all the other troops, and produce a good effect elsewhere when it becomes known.
One of the eight English was a Catholic, and he and two others with the help of my chaplain were prepared for death in a Catholic manner.
The galley by Monte dell Angelo, the 16th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano
Gen. da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
451. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have arranged for some nobles here to command the seven English ships, and they have already gone on board.
I must again ask your Serenity to supply the fleet with biscuits, which we have nearly run out of, and also with money, as the 100,000 ducats which we are expecting are already due for wages, and if a mutiny breaks out for this cause it will be difficult to stop it.
The galley by Monte dell'Angelo, the 16th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 17. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Savoia. Venetian Archives.452. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I told his Highness what your Serenity told me about keeping the troops. He sent a messenger at once to the Count of Mansfeld, to stop him, remarking that this would not only prove advantageous to Italy but would alse encourage the princes of Germany in the matter of Bohemia.
I also told him what I was instructed about the league. He replied quietly saying that he did not doubt the solemn promise of the republic, which was as good as a signature.
Turin, the 17th July, 1618.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
453. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It was a false report that the States and I also received about the voyage of the ships, because they remained quite a while at Falmouth, staying until the 5th ult. But his Excellency told me yesterday that letters from Lisbon related that they had been sighted on the other side of the Strait.
The Hague, the 17th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
454. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
While the Secretary of the Ambassador Carleton was travelling to London, he received the reply of Terver and returned to the Hague to have it from his Excellency. The book about which the king of Great Britain complains is simply a translation from English into Latin by that preacher of Terver (fn. 1) . The excuse he offers, which may be supported by the magistrates and his Excellency in reply to his Majesty, is that he did not expect to give offence since the king said nothing about the book when it appeared in English. The king complains, however, of the use of his name. The book will be suppressed but they will take no further proceedings against the author. With this the secretary has returned to England, and his Excellency believes that the king will be satisfied with what has been done. The secretary also takes with him the letters about the synod.
The Hague, the 17th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
455. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The other day the Dutch ambassador had audience of the king, to whom he announced the intention of his Masters to convoke a national synod for next October in the hope of devising some good remedy for the religious disputes now rife among them. His Majesty commended the expedient, advising them once for all to put a stop to similar debates which could have no good results and could only foment division, with risk of yet worse consequences. In the course of the conversation the ambassador gave it to be understood that the States of Holland were not a little disturbed by the negotiations in progress here, for the marriage of the Prince to the daughter of the Catholic king, being apprehensive that if realised, it might somewhat diminish the affection and courteous protection ever shown by his Majesty towards their interests. They were therefore very anxious to know the state of the case in order that they likewise might regulate their own affairs and such negotiations as it will behove them to undertake on the expiration of the truce with Spain. The king assured him that nothing whatever had been settled hitherto, giving his word that ere doing so he would acquaint the United Provinces, although in any case they were never to have any fear of his failing them, be the cause or reason what it may (Il Re lo assicurò che sin hora non vi era cosa alcuna conclusa et prima del farlo le promise in sua parola di darne conto alli Signori Stati, ma in ogni caso non dovevano gia'mai haver alcun dubbio ch'egli fosse per mancarle per qual si voglia rispetto o causa).
The Catholic ambassador has not yet departed although he took leave so long ago, and he is now going to have another audience of the king because he has heard that Sir Thomas Bromley (Brunle), an English gentleman, the same who some months ago armed that ship which was detained in Zeeland at the suit of the Secretary Suriano, on suspicion of its going to the Viceroy at Naples has captured a number of Spanish vessels in the Indies. The gentleman in question is now here, having left his ship in Zeeland, and he positively denies having been buccaneering anywhere, though many entertain strong suspicions to the contrary.
The troubles in Germany are not regretted here as it is hoped that they may at least retard the election as king of the Romans of Ferdinand, and that in the meantime the efforts of the Count Palatine to exclude him may gain strength.
The merchants of the East India Company have asked the king for his men of war, which are now lying idle, doing nothing and detcriorating daily, promising him that they shall be at his service whenever required, and to renew them by building one every year. The affair is now before the Council and it is thought that they will at least be accommodated with one half. (Questi mercanti della compagnia dell'Indie hanno fatto dimanda a Sua Maestà delle sue navi da guerra, che hora restando inutili non s'adoprano, et senza valersene vanno di giorno in giorno deteriorando, promettendole che ad ogni beneplacito suo se ne potra valere, et di rinovarle con fabricarne ogn 'anno una; e hora il negotio al Consiglio et credesi saranno almeno per la metà compiacuti.)
I have received the full account sent me by your Serenity concerning the affair of Count Piero for my guidance in case anything should be said to me on the subject.
London, the 19th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Cl. VII.
Cod. MCXXII.
Bibl. di
S. Marco.
456. ANGLIPOTRIDA.
With much reason has the German Ocean been likened by some to the great father Abraham. I will content myself with some comparisons. In the matter of antiquity Abraham must yield the palm to the Ocean. Should Abraham boast his nobility, the Ocean also is grand and free. As regards length of days, the one grew old and is at rest, but the other never loses strength. Abraham's offspring was certainly numerous, but is vastly exceeded by that of the Ocean. In wealth Abraham might be called a pauper, while the Ocean abounds with the most copious treasures. If the one was frequently victorious, the other has never known defeat. But in spite of these qualities of the Ocean, yet in this most surprising island of England he is frequently taxed with insolence by reason of his misconduct. He never permits a year, a month or a day to pass without coming with his dense mists to obscure the sun, to the detriment of many who are not accustomed to similar freaks, and yet more of the lovely ladies here, who, although they do not avail themselves of his rays to dry their heands, for they use the comb and sprinkle their hair with Cyprus powder, yet might perhaps be glad of him to relieve somewhat their fair complexions, or for the better enjoyment on bright days of their innumerable tastes. They care for little else but pastime and sports, varied delights (varietà di lascive) and mummeries. They lead a happy life without inconvenience of any sort, either from excessive heat, entailing loss of appetite, or from extreme cold; for it is perpetual spring here so long as the wind does not blow. They are exempt from all venomous animals; one never hears the croaking of frogs nor too much chirping of the crickets flies are only seen rarely, nor is one subjected to the insolent importunity of fleas, there being none at all save by accident. But what matters yet more is that bugs are utterly outlawed. One never hears that buzzing insect the mosquito, nor yet his much bigger relation whose birthplace is among the reeds and marshes and whose sting would slay Sampsons. Oh, rare felicity of this kingdom.
Any woman soever, however noble, even if she be married, fails not to have her valentine, and the men also have their valentines. The revel changes annually thus. On St. Valentine's eve they place in two ballot boxes sundry tickets whereon are inscribed the names of the men and women of the company, each of whom draws a ticket in turn. Those thus coupled by chance unite together much more closely than if their love were loyal; they banquet together and exchange presents, each preserving the ticket which for some days the man wears in his hat and the woman in her bosom. They even have their names engraved in gold, the invariable rule being that the Valentine do kiss his lady whenever he meets her. Nor may this appear strange to your lordships, for the like style prevails at the court also without excepting the king, the prince and the queen, whose hand alone is generally kissed. Were it lawful for me to consign to paper certain other peculiarities which are usual among the middle and lower classes, I should astound you.
I have already written about the dress and costume of the women here, but as it seems to me that I did not do so thoroughly, I will in this very opportune place add a few words on the subject, especially as his Excellency broached this topic to-day at dinner. They are so variously adjusted and dress so well and lasciviously as to defy exaggeration; all ranks and conditions of persons being at liberty to invent new caprices. Thus some wear on their heads worked bands with fine lace which, falling over the forehead, form what our Venetian dames term `the mushrooms' on the temples. Others wear a large piece of work above the ear, so that they look as if they bore the wings of Mercury's head gear; others wear hats of various shapes; others a very small top-knot. Some wear a moderate sized silk kerchief surmounted by a bit of crape planted in such a shape that it looks precisely like a woman's breast. Others have black velvet hoods turned over from the back of the neck to the forehead. Others wear embroidered caps, covering the whole head, whilst others, in conclusion, wear their auburn hair uncovered and curled all over, up to the very plait of the tresses, on which they place a chaplet of silk and gold, wearing moreover the plume on the head, sometimes upright, sometimes at the back of the head and sometimes even transverse.
It would be impossible for me to speak scientifically about their clothes by reason of the variety of their texture, cut and colour. I have already mentioned that some lay their bosoms bare whilst others cover them. Some carry in their hands feather fans, others nothing; but all wear very costly gloves. This fashion of gloves is so universal that even the porters wear them very ostentatiously; going about dressed in good cloth with a linen over garment and with their sacks over their shoulders they look like so many standard bearers.
I must now go back to the country, for we went lately to Hampton Court, a place which also belongs to the king. It is the largest and most magnificent which we have hitherto seen, both from its variety of buildings and from the extent of its gardens, orchards and parks, which are all surrounded by a good and strong wall. It is adorned with every convenience and luxury that can be desired. Henry VIII. enjoyed it very frequently and has left there no ordinary memorial of himself, namely a quantity of furniture, some most splendid arras of silk and gold and others of the finest cloth, with most beautiful designs, sacred, profane and mythological. He was very fond of inhabiting a chamber called the Paradise, and justly so, for it is decorated with very noble pictures and superb tapestries. In the daïs one sees inserted over the embroidery a number of precious stones of great value and especially some good rubies and excellent diamonds, with a multitude of large pearls. According to what we were told, this very chamber witnessed the first loves of King Henry and Anna Boleyn, and lucky would it be for them if at this present in the other world they were as much at their ease and luxuriously off.
On our return we went to see another very ancient place called Richmond, built of yore and often occupied by Henry VII, who, moreover, chose to end his days there, as of late did Queen Elizabeth, who fell sick at the place. The present prince of Wales comes to Richmond very often, as his dead brother used. In this same place his Majesty is now rearing with extraordinary care and attention the race of pheasants. They are placed in a small orchard beneath the palace windows with a few cherry and plum trees, the grass being allowed to grow as pasture for the birds. This little fruitery is divided into six or eight compartments with wooden partitions, each containing a cock and five hens. They all have the tip of one of their wings clipped to prevent them from flying away, the site not being roofed in. Among them some are pied red and all the rest white, very handsome to look at. For their food they give them a certain quantity of small peas and plenty of water. They make them go into their huts every night to roost. The hens lay their eggs in the grass, and they are carefully collected and placed in due time under clucking hens, who hatch them. Last month we saw eighty chicks already hatched under several brood hens, being reared in coops with two partitions, the hen being in the one and the food of the young pheasants in the other, to which they have access at pleasure. The food consists of ants' eggs; clean water is placed for them in shallow pans.
We went the other day to see a palace belonging to the earl of Exeter (fn. 2) in an extremely delightful situation, with its park, gardens, fountains, covered walks, very lofty hedges like a wall, all of white thorn, and a marvellous orchard surrounded by a wall, the size of the one at Piazzola, with sundry walks laid out at right angles, recreating the eye vastly. The greater part of them are kept free from grass at a heavy expense. At the extremity of the wall there are bowers with seats like balconies. In one place with a southern aspect there is a low vineyard, very fine, the vines supported by poles, but I am of opinion that this year, owing to the very cold summer, it will yield but verjuice, although the master expects to obtain excellent wine. The place is really most delicious in every respect, so much so that the king himself determined to visit it, the day before yesterday, for his pleasure, accompanied by the whole court, when the earl gave a most sumptuous banquet, and as the court is always followed by a swarm of vagrants, besides the kitchens in ordinary for his Majesty and the royal attendants, there were eaten smoking hot from the spit in the quadrangle two huge oxen, three or four calves and thirty four wethers. I do not mention the beer because in this country that flows incessantly.
London, the 19th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
457. GIROLAMO SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A note is circulating here of the fleets now about in Europe, based on various information. I enclose it for those who may be curious to see it.
Rome, the 21st July, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
458. NUMBER OF SHIPS NOW IN THE MEDITERRANEAN.
At Denia in Spain, 7 galleys with Don Melchior Borgia; good new ships with 1,000 Spaniards.
At Marseilles, 20 sailing ships and 12 galleys with 1,500 French and 204 pieces of ordnance.
At Naples, 25 galleons and 24 galleys, with 15,000 troops of divers nations and 805 pieces of bronze.
In Sicily, five high decked ships, with 12 galleys carrying 3,000 men and 140 pieces of ordnance.
At Malta, 2 galleons, with four well armed galleys.
The Venetians, 24 ships, 6 galeasses, 60 galleys, with 9,500 foot and 550 pieces of bronze.
The Dutch come to help the Venetians, 18 sailing ships with 300 foot and 120 pieces.
Turks in the Archipelago, 15 square ships and 80 galleys with 9,000 men and 500 pieces.
Morescoes of Africa, 100 sailing ships with 6,000 Moors and 600 pieces of all kinds.
The French are arming against pirates and Turks and alarm Genoa. The Neapolitans, for an undertaking in Africa, are alarming all, and will return at length to Brindisi to oppose the Turks and defend the Ragusans.
The Venetians are determined to maintain their ancient jurisdiction in the Gulf and stop all who will not pay the toll.
The Turks are thinking of their own defence; the Moors propose to leave the Strait, to lie in wait for the fleet of the Catholic.
Papal galleys—Florentina galleys—Savoyard galleys—Genoese galleys—Bizerta.
[Italian.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
459. ANTONIO MARIA VINCENTI, Venetian Secretary at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The departure of Don Pedro of Toledo arouses hopes of peace in every one and there is universal satisfaction over it. The ambassador della Cueva seems very disgusted at being sent to Flanders, as it is well known to be for his mortification. They also say that Vives will be removed from Genoa and sent to England. There is a rumour that the duke of Ossuna will be recalled to Spain, but this does not seem to be verified, though it is hoped it will happen soon. These things show how favourably his Majesty is disposed towards peace.
Milan, the 21st July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Constantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
460. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have been to see the Mufti. Among other things he spoke of the great naval preparations of the Spaniards. He said that the twenty ships ought by now to have arrived, partly Dutch and partly English, armed at all points and carrying more troops than they needed. He had been very pleased to hear of this. He asked me if the bertons were large or small and if they carried anything. I said they were large and carried gunpowder, biscuits and other munitions of war, which had already been distributed throughout the fleet.
Dalli Vigne di Pera, the 22nd July, 1618.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Constantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
461. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador is trying to make his Court believe that the Turks are very anxious for the friendship of his king. He obtained a letter under the last Caimecan, confirmed by the present, although with some difficulty, which is to be presented in France by a Chiaus, who is about to leave for Marseilles. I enclose a translation of this letter, which I was at great pains to obtain.
The English ambassador has been to see the Pasha, asking for leave to depart He said he would leave a lieutenant in his place, such being the command of his king. The Pasha replied: I did not expect this from you. You have been here seven years and now in the time of my governorship you propose to depart. The ambassador answered: If you wish to detain me by force, I am in your hands, and in that case I shall be excused with my king. The Pasha said: I will not use force but I am persuaded that you, as the representative of your king, and I of mine, ought between us to find some way of continuing the peace. The ambassador replied. This does not affect the peace since a lieutenant remains here in conformity with my king's orders. The Pasha retorted, If you have orders why did they not send letters to the Sultan? The ambassador answered, Our council, which rules with prudence, would not remind his Majesty of a letter for fear, if he wrote, of recalling to his mind the letter which he wrote last year, which was brought here post by a gentleman and delivered into the Sultan's own hands, and to which no reply was ever sent. That is the reason why his Majesty did not write. The Pasha said, We will not speak of the past. There is a remedy for everything. That was the time of Sultan Achmet, now it is Sultan Osman; then there was one Pasha, now there is another. If you wish, we will get our king to write one letter and yours will write also that peace may be maintained, since there is a remedy for everything. Wrong has been done to a merchant of yours, referring to the affair of the archenda; a means will be found of repairing it. The ambassador replied, That is not the only wrong; there are many others, such as the impost of anchorage at Aleppo, the custom on money, the carazo at Constantinople, and what is worst of all, they have laid hands on the ambassadors themselves, issuing public proclamations that they may not leave their quarters or ride out. The Pasha replied, A plague on the one who did that. In the future you shall not have cause to complain of anything. I cannot settle this matter without consulting the Sultan and other members of the Government. I will give you a reply in two or three days, but I advise you to try and find a way to establish peace and not to destroy it. After several more exchanges the ambassador took leave and departed. He told me that when some days ago he told the Mufti of his departure, that official exclaimed with astonishment, Why the French ambassador, who has experienced what you are aware of, wishes to stay here and you want to go away. What reason have you for leaving? He replied: None other than my king's command.
The rumours here of joint naval preparations of Spain, England and Holland, for an attack on Barbary have caused great searchings of heart among the Government here and they do not at all want any of the diplomatists to depart, or if they do go, to leave a successor who will give them assurance that their masters will not make trouble anywhere, under the pretext of pirates or of anything else.
In this connection I must inform your Serenity that a letter arrived two days ago from the Captain Pasha saying that the Christians had a considerable fleet abroad and asking for as many galleys as could be sent, and that the ten or twelve galleys destined for the Black Sea may be sent to join the fleet.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 22nd July, 1618.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
462. Translation of imperial letter sent to the king of France.
Peace will be observed between our subjects. But our subjects of Barbary have committed some wrong actions; they have however promised to reform. Your Majesty is making preparations against Barbary. But that is a Mussulman county in our dominions. We do not believe that you will commit this wrong upon the hereditary peace between us. In the past our subjects of Barbary have been most obedient, but now through the relations with your nation, England and Flanders a fresh leaven has been introduced which renders them less obedient than heretofore. But this should not involve the rupture of our friendship. We have written to preserve this, and we will bridle the excesses of those insolent men.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
463. To the Captain General at Sea.
With regard to the English ships, you will abide by the contracts, and we have the same remark to make about the pretensions of the colonel. You will act with tact and gain time. The steps taken by you against the chiefs of the mutiny were very proper and will serve to show that every man must behave himself. By such punishments and by good treatment we are sure that you will best uphold our interests.
With regard to the hire of the English ships, the abstracts sent by the Ambassador Contarini on the 31st May do not specify where they are to be paid; if they desire it here you will oblige them and then we shall not pay them. They ought, in your opinion, to be paid in current money. You will write to tell us what you arrange with them.
Of the gentlemen placed on the English galleons, you have done well to select efficient and suitable persons, but you must make sure that they will not occasion confusion or scandal.
Ayes122.
Noes2.
Neutral9.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
464. To the ambassador at the Imperial Court and the like to the other Courts.
The duke of Feria, sent to be governor of Milan, has already started, so Don Pedro has abandoned all his preparations and is only getting ready to leave. The Catholic king has also recalled the Marquis of Bedmar, who has left to act as ambassador in Flanders. In his stead his Majesty has chosen Don Luis Bravo. Orders have been sent to the duke of Ossuna to abstain from his alarming preparations, but he continues to revolve fresh projects against us.
The German negotiations have been practically completed by our commissioners, from whom we have just received letters announcing the restitution of the places in Dalmatia. The same will soon be done in Istria and Friuli, so that nothing else will remain to be done by our republic.
In Lombardy and Piedmont matters are well arranged, the French ambassadors having already returned home, well satisfied with the duke of Savoy, and the duke of Feria is said to be bringing strict orders in favour of peace. All this is for information.
Ayes146.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano Gen.
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
465. PIERO BARBARIGO, Venetian Captain General at Sea to the DOGE and SENATE.
This fleet is so powerful that it is equal to resisting any attempt of the enemy even without the Dutch ships which we are expecting, or the English ones which have arrived. Experience shows that for the defence of the Gulf, a smaller fleet, with less foreign ships and with men well disposed to your Serenity would serve equally well and perhaps much better. This force is made up of many barbarous nations, who are coming to us in such numbers, and I do not know whether they tend more to the defence of our liberty or the dispersal of our money. It has, so to speak, puzzled the brains of all of us, so that we cannot be sure whether these powerful forces will really serve your Serenity. Every time that anything happens that they do not like, they show a reluctance to obey orders. I have already noted an indication of restiveness among them, which naturally serves to increase our anxieties. From this your Excellencies may judge whether the arrival of the Flemish ships will increase the danger, as such men, being assembled in such numbers may easily claim to be ruled according to their fancy. I have discussed this question several times and I am forced to think that the gathering of such a number of bertons of this character in our Gulf may possibly do us more harm than good. At the same time it would serve your Serenity and annoy your enemies to keep a strong squadron of our ships cruising outside the mouth of the Gulf.
The galley in the port of Rovigno, the 29th July, 1618.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi
Venetian
Archives.
466. The Secretary of the English ambassador came into the Cabinet and presented the following memorial, saying that the ambassador was sick at Padua and could not come himself.
Most Serene Prince.
But for my indisposition I should have come in person, firstly to express my regret that a representative of your Serenity should have been insulted by any Englishman, and secondly to complain of the extreme violence shown by Sig. Piero Barbarigo against the subjects of a king who deserves so well of the republic. A similar case, quite fresh in the memory, was treated with far more leniency. I will not say that there was any particular feeling against our nation, although they have been very badly treated ever since they arrived in the Gulf. I will only say that if the General Barbarigo did not reckon English blood so cheaply and changed the punishment to the galleys at least, it would be in the interests of the republic and cause less rejoicing to her adversaries. I will say more to your Serenity when God wills. What has been done is irrevocable and registered in the book of fate. I only beseech your Serenity to treat the better those who remain and to discount the excessive rigour of your minister by your own graciousness, lending favourable ear to the request made by my secretary Gregorio de'Monti on behalf of Colonel Peyton and others.
From Padua.
Your Serenity's most devoted servant,
HENRY WOTTON. (fn. 3)
After the memorial had been read the doge replied: The ambassador knows how armies and fleets are managed. We know the prudence and goodness of our general and we are certain that he did not act without mature deliberation and with the best reasons, not from any private animosity, as he has a great regard for the English, but for the sake of discipline, and as fathers punish their dearly loved children so a few have been punished to correct many. The disposition towards the English is as good as it can possibly be.
The Secretary then presented another paper.
Request of the ambassador for Sir Henry Peyton and the English in his company.
That the representative of the republic at sea be instructed to allow the soldiers to buy some refreshments on land with their own money.
That the sick, who are numerous and increasing in numbers, after a toilsome voyage and the lack of due provision, may be landed at some island of the Signory in the Gulf or sent to the Lazaretto for some days; otherwise they may die.
That some special care may be had of the gentles, of whom there are about seventy in the colonel's company alone, who are worth twenty times as much as those of low birth (che vagliono vinti volte tanti di sangue basso).
That his Serenity assign a salary to Colonel Peyton proportionate to his merits. He has special claims because he gave up everything that he had in the Low Countries to come and serve the republic with entire devotion.
After the letter had been read the doge and several of the Savii declared that they had written that the utmost consideration should be shown towards the English soldiers.
The Secretary promised to inform the ambassador. He added, As a good subject of your Serenity and not as secretary, I may say that some English captains of the fleet have arrived in the city and have gone to Padua. They speak of this affair with great bitterness.
The doge said that they ought to listen to the other side and not form their judgment upon one only.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
467. In the Council of Ten.
That leave be granted to Dionisio Contarini to receive the English ambassador in his house at Arlesegna for four days.
Ayes15.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Consiglio
di X.
Processi
Criminali.
Venetian
Archives.
468. In the Council of Ten.
Whether you are of opinion that for the things uttered and read, the prisoner Antonio Foscarini be proceeded against.
Ayes7.
Noes8.
Neutral0.
Carried in the negative, and he remains absolved.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Consiglio
di X.
Processi
Criminali.
Venetian
Archives.
469. In the Council of Ten.
Whether you are of opinion that for the things uttered and read, the prisoner Giulio Muscorno be proceeded against.
Ayes9.
Noes6.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Consiglio
di X.
Processi
Criminali.
Venetian
Archives.
470. That he be sent to Palma to be confined in that fortress for two consecutive years. If he do not go, he shall be outlawed for ten consecutive years. Should he break bounds and be captured, he shall be brought to this city and confined in a dark dungeon for six months and then return to his original place of confinement, to remain there for ten years, with a reward to his captor or slayer of 600 lire from his goods.
Ayes6.
Noes7.
That he be confined in a dark prison for two years, with banishment for ten years, with banishment for ten years if he escape.
Ayes7.Second voteAyes 6.
Noes2.Noes 2.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
471. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The two Dutch brothers Vernati recently presented a memorial to his Excellency begging for their release. His Excellency tore up the memorial and sent to have them removed from the prison of S. Giacomo to the castle dell'Occo. The whole city knows that his Excellency wishes them to declare that they were sent from Venice to assassinate him.
Naples, the 31st July, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
472. Note of the companies of infantry, Spanish, Italian and other nations, now in this city.
Companies.Soldiers.
Spanish companies at Naples322689
Spanish companies in garrison161765
Spanish companies for naval service81178
Spanish companies in garrison at Toscana, Gaeta, Pescara72000
Companies of divers nations in Naples5596
Italian companies in the land of Labour111709
ditto ditto2152
Companies of Camillo di Monte3587
Companies of Walloons in the Basilicata242098
Companies of French2306
Companies of Scotch in the land of Labour1104
Company of divers nations in the land of Labour146
Total112 companies13320 men
Details from the above list.
Companies of divers nations in Naples:
Juan Dias de Aux223Germansoldiers
Don Roberto Lombardo59Irish"
Don Thomas Tablot144Irish"
Fra Juan Grasse Monteron92French"
Luigi de Villa Mezana78French"
Total596men.
Scottish infantry quartered in the land of Labour.
Don Daniel Macdonel104 men, at Sta. Maria de Capua.
Erman Vuipart46 men, at Fundi.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
473. NOTE OF SHIPS BEING ARMED AT NAPLES.
La Capitana of his Excellency,burthencarra400
The old capitana""250
I'Admirante Dolisti""400
La Martelosea, Ragusan carrack""400
I'admirante Vechia""200
Ship of il Vais""250
Caratin S. Ambroso""250
Caratin S. Perla""350
Diamond,English""150
Flemish bought by his Excellency Sanson""200
Flemish bought by his Excellency Mauritio""200
Flemish bought by his Excellency Tiger""150
Ship il Carmine, English, bought by his Excellency""150
Urca, imperial, bought by H.E.""400
Flemish urchetta of H.E.""150
il Patachio, French ship""100
The new great galleon""600
Nicolo Ruschi, Ragusan carrack""400
berton of Pietro Giulian, going to Constantinople""250
Urca of Nansaudismissed.
Urca, Raton Lion d'oro
Urca pescadora.
Note that a carro is reckoned at two tons (botte).
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Gerson Bucerus.
2 Burghley in the parish of Stamford St. Martin, co. Northampton.
3 The original text of this letter is printed in Mr. Pearsall Smith's Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, ii, page 153.