Venice
October 1618

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

328-343

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'Venice: October 1618', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 328-343. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88685 Date accessed: 27 August 2014.


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October 1618

Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
552. To the Ambassador in England.
The States General through our resident have asked us to declare what are the ports in the Gulf forbidden to ships by our laws. We send you a copy of our reply so that you may use it in England if similar circumstances arise, in order to procure the increase of trade which is so important to public and private interests, in such manner as may seem best to your prudence and for our service. We must add that we have never heard a word about the eighth ship sent by you for our service either from the Captain General at Sea or any other; this is in order that you may send us whatever news comes to you about it.
Ayes76.
Noes1.
Neutral18.
The letter to the Hague as it stands except the paragraphs about the conspiracy and the affairs of the Gulf and except the letter to England.
Ayes18.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
553. To the Secretary Surian at the Hague.
You will proceed delicately in the matter of the requests made to renew the edicts touching trade in the Gulf. You will say that our interests demand the diversion of trade from Goro as much as possible and that all ships should, whenever possible, come to this city. You will add that the laws of the republic are well known, forbidding trade with certain ports and places near this city. The taking of salt to Goro has always been forbidden, but the same cargo may be brought to Venice. This is more convenient for ships and merchants, and in fact better for every one. You will speak thus to whoever addresses you on the matter and especially to Prince Maurice, promising every advantage to those who come to trade in this city.
Ayes76.
Noes1.
Neutral18.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Diliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
554. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to this and other courts.
Send copy of a communication of Council of Ten of the 26th ult. This is not for speaking about but to serve as information and as a guide in making replies when asked anything.
Ayes92.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
555. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Through the notice given me by your Serenity of the coming hither of the English chaplain, I succeeded, at the cost of some labour and exertion, in discovering him and making him appear before me that I might elicit the instructions given to him by Sir Henry Wotton, touching the complaints about the punishment of the mutineers in the fleet so as to enable me to act as I might consider needful in the matter. I gathered from him that he was charged with two letters from the Ambassador Wotton, one addressed to the archbishop of Canterbury and the other to the king's Secretary, giving account of what took place in the fleet, to the great scorn of the English nation, and referring himself for the rest to the verbal statement of the chaplain, who is, moreover, bearer of a deed signed by a number of soldiers, who swear that the ringleaders who were punished had nothing to do with the mutiny. In the course of conversation he told me that he had come away because he was hindered in the exercise of his ministry, adding many gross mis-statements which are repeated in the ambassador's narrative. In short I found him ill impressed and determined to give an indifferent account. I understood, and he himself owned to some one here, that he made his escape by stealth from the fleet, for fear of being punished for having distributed certain little books, which it may be supposed were of somewhat bad quality. Having gathered as much as seemed necessary to me I told him that I marvelled greatly to hear him tell such lies, which he would have to prove, as I intended to make a statement to his Majesty and the Lords of the Council the very reverse of his. I recommended him to ponder the matter well and consider his own individual peril, and after plying him on this point, I proceeded to enquire what benefit he anticipated from these statements of his, which could only be prejudicial to the interests of the Colonel, as I should be compelled entirely to withhold all such favour as I might have shown to him, and to acquaint your Serenity with his unbecoming complaints. Thereupon, after repeating sundry statements several times, he promised of his own accord that he would do nothing further without first coming to me again, and with this he departed. (fn. 1)
I heard subsequently that he sent the letters by another person, to avoid the necessity for making any verbal statement, and then went into the country immediately, impelled possibly by fear of imprisonment, as he is aware that a number of persons to whom he owes considerable sums are in quest of him, and so far as I can learn hitherto, it seems that the archbishop of Canterbury rather blames the Colonel and the misconduct of the soldiers instead of approving the complaints of the ambassador. I hope that when the affair has been narrated his Majesty himself and the others also may do the like, and that the matter may drop of itself without it being necessary to take any other steps. Nevertheless I shall keep on the look out, to represent the reasons for what was done and expose the falsehoods to which it gave rise, should I perceive any necessity for doing so.
London, the 5th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
556. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Last week a Dominican friar, chaplain of the late Spanish ambassador, arrived here, with credentials as resident for the King of Spain, until he send another minister. The reason for this is that as the Secretary and Interpreter are not on good terms, the business of the embassy would have suffered in their hands. The coming of this friar has again revived the hopes of those who are anxious for the Spanish marriage, as it is known that he had been commissioned to negotiate it conjointly with the ambassador. In corroboration of this certain merchants have in like manner received notice from their correspondents in Madrid to be prepared with a considerable sum of money to meet the demands of the Duke of Pastrana, who is on the eve of departing to be ambassador extraordinary at this court, the king bestowing upon him a gift of 50,000 crowns over there in addition to heavy appointments. Here, on the other hand, his Majesty is said to have desired Sir [John] Digby to keep himself in readiness to leave for Spain at a moment's notice.
Owing to the arrival of two ships from the Indies, his Majesty's anger against the Dutch has considerably increased, as he is now informed that besides attacking and capturing a vessel belonging to the English Company, which was freighted with a valuable cargo, they also, as a mark of additional contempt, after riddling the English colours with arquebus shot, trailed them astern of their own vessels, in order to disparage this nation in the eyes of the natives.
Disputes have also taken place in Greenland about the whale fishery, and although the English were out the first this year to take up their position, the Dutch came up in greater force and compelled them to withdraw. In these seas also, on similar accounts, the misunderstandings are incessant, and off the coast of Scotland, where the English claim the right of fishery and are in some degree able to enforce it, the Dutch at this present not only refuse to contribute anything, but even prevent the English themselves from fishing there. The government here is studying the means of obtaining compensation, but has hitherto merely determined to make a census of all the foreigners in the kingdom, for the sake of distinguishing the Flemish subjects of the archduke from those of the States, the two nations being very often confounded according to the interests of various parties (fn. 2) . If unable to do anything else the English mean to render the properties and securities of the Dutch responsible for the damage inflicted by their countrymen. Commissioners, however, are expected from Holland to discuss these differences and endeavour if possible to effect a junction upon the trade in the Indies.
His Majesty has received intelligence from Lisbon that thirty galleons excellently armed, well manned and fully prepared for action, were on the point of sailing for Barbary. From the Court of the Catholic king he has in like manner been acquainted with the order forwarded to the Duke of Ossuna for him also to send the galleons and such other forces as are held by him in readiness, for the purpose of attacking the pirates and proceeding moreover on some expedition should the opportunity present itself.
The French Secretary in person was summoned by the Lords of the Council, who reproached him with having taken part in the attempt made to effect the escape of Sir Walter Raleigh. They told him that in this country such misdemeaneour was considered high treason, and that nothing but the consideration of his public character prevented the king from taking such other steps against him as the crime deserved. The Secretary denied all knowledge of the business and said that if the interpreter, who is a prisoner in the Tower, had made a contrary statement, it was perhaps owing to his confusion at seeing himself arrested in so violent a manner. The Secretary has forwarded an account of the affair to France by a second courier.
In conformity with the course adopted by him at other places the agent here of the Duke of Savoy has received divers instructions from his Highness, in contradiction of such reports as might possibly circulate here, of his having formed any scheme or intention to surprise Geneva.
London, the 5th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
557. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to the other Courts and to the Generals.
The Viceroy of Naples does not discontinue his machinations against us. The junction of four royal galleys with his fleet at Messina does not seem in harmony with the ostensible orders from Spain. We do not know what to think, but we have done our part. At Milan the dismissal of troops has been suspended. They pretend it is because of our forces, but this is an empty pretext. The commotions in the Grisons continue. The Most Christian King has been asked to remove the Ambassador Gueffier. They try to attribute the origin of the trouble to us, although our interests are best served by peace there.
Ayes102.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
558. To the Captain General at Sea.
At the earliest opportunity we will send you a copy of the contract made in England with Colonel Peyton (Piton). From that kingdom eight armed ships have started for our service. Seven have already arrived; of the eighth we have no news; let us know if you hear anything about it.
Ayes112.
Noes1.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
559. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to the other Courts and to the Proveditori General.
Although there have been reports that the galleys of Naples were to proceed to Spanish waters against pirates yet there is no sign of this happening and Ossuna seems rather to be thinking of fresh levies. We have thanked the Catholic king for recalling the Marquis of Bedmar and he has replied courteously, while he is said to have upbraided the marquis. But we are doubtful about Naples, for although the Spanish ministers have sent orders to Ossuna to make restitution, there is no indication of his complying, indeed matters have become worse. The reduction of the cavalry of Milan is more apparent than real, and yet what we have done, the disarmament of Savoy and the amnesty granted by Mantua are all inducements for peace.
Ayes105.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
560. To the Captain General at Sea.
In accordance with the information sent by you we have settled the question of the salary of the colonel of the English soldiers at 200 ducats a month, to begin from the time mentioned in his contract. You will tell him that this is the largest amount given by the republic to her colonels, and it is a sign of our esteem of his worth. As a further testimony we send him a gold chain worth 300 crowns. You will settle with the officers on the most advantageous terms you may. As regards any change of payment you will tell the colonel that any alteration would upset our agreements with levies of other nations. We are exemplary in keeping our promises to soldiers.
We have heard that you have allowed Ensign Herbert to return to the fleet. The favour is opportune as the English ambassador has proffered many requests for him.
That the secretary of the English ambassador be summoned to the Cabinet and informed of the favour extended to the said Ensign out of regard for the ambassador's intercession, and of the salary granted to Colonel Peyton and the grant of a gold chain to him as a sign of honour.
Ayes87.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
That this chain of 300 crowns be sent to the Colonel.
Ayes29.
Noes0. In the Cabinet.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
561. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Pasha gave me the enclosed letter. A similar one has been written to the ambassadors resident here. I think that their writing in this manner comes from some ill feeling towards the republic. However I will answer the Vizier, telling him the reason why your Serenity is maintaining so large a fleet while at the same time I shall complain of the damage inflicted upon your shipping by the Barbary pirates.
Pera di Constantinople, the 10th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
562. Letter of Chalil Pasha, the Grand Vizier, from Persia to the Bailo of Venice.
There has long existed a friendly commercial relation between the Porte and Venice, but now disputes have broken out between you and the people of Algiers. The friendship between the Porte and Venice is the most sincere of all the others and has existed for so long that it ought to be maintained for ever, and it should not be broken upon such a slight pretext of hostility. We hope then you will use your utmost endeavours to prevent such a calamity. We expect to return to the Porte in a few months when we hope to be able to give you satisfaction in all your wishes. We have also sent a protest to the men of Algiers that we shall never be parties to anything which may prejudice such an intimate friendship.
Given in the country of Omet.
[Italian.]
Oct. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
563. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French secretary has been twice summoned before the Council. Before going thither he announced his claim to be treated with the same forms as are observed at the Court of the Most Christian king towards the English resident there; that is to say that the Lords of the Council were to stand uncovered like himself. Six of them, therefore, being appointed to hear him, conferred with him in the form he required. Much altercation then passed between the parties, as the Lords accused him and complained of his having aided the attempted escape of Sir Walter Raleigh in order to get him over to France, it being said that Raleigh wanted to go there to lay some plot to the detriment of this kingdom. Two days later the secretary endeavoured to see the king at Hampton Court (Antocurt) but when he demanded audience his Majesty sent word that he would not listen to him and that he was never again to appear in his presence, adding that he might write to his king that any other person would be welcome, but that for himself, his Majesty did not mean any longer to acknowledge him as the minister of the French crown. The secretary wrote off to France immediately, but will not stir until recalled.
The disagreements between these two crowns augment daily, nor is there any doubt but that they are fomented by those who hope for profit from this discord. The more the king inclines towards the Spanish alliance, the more visible is his alienation from France. Yesterday, when conversing with one of the ministers, I clearly perceived how dissatisfied they are with the French, and I see they resent the entry into the cabinet of Cardinal Rochefoucauld (Rosciafoco) being of opinion that as a churchman he will always be opposed to them in whatever concerns the interests of this kingdom. (fn. 3)
There has arrived here a certain individual who is said to be a dependent of Barnevelt and he has implored the king to intercede with the States for his release, promising to acquaint him with very important secrets concerning matters highly prejudicial to his Majesty; but as yet it has not been possible to learn anything further.
The Spaniards here circulate a report that the Marquis Spinola has received orders from Spain to march his troops into the territories of the Count Palatine, should he stir in aid of the states of Bohemia.
Since the first instructions received by the agent of Savoy concerning the affair of Geneva, he has further been specially commissioned to go to his Majesty and exculpate the duke entirely from the charge, representing it as devised by his enemies to discredit him with this crown, and his other friends; declaring that the accusation is false, and that so far from making any attempt on Geneva, his Highness never even thought of such a thing.
The Marquis of Buckingham, whose favour with the king increases daily, his Majesty showering upon him every possible mark of honour and greatness, besides the concession of supreme authority has at length obtained the grade of Lord High Admiral, as the successor of the octogenarian earl of Nottingham. (fn. 4) This is not generally approved of by the nobility of the Court, as they consider that many had a better claim to this office, on the score of service and ancient deserts.
Although convinced that your Serenity will by this time have ordered the payment of the English ships, I am nevertheless constantly molested by the parties concerned, who complain loudly, declaring that the delay subjects them to great loss. So in consequence of their repeated demands I cannot do less than again request your Serenity to satisfy them.
Sig. Marc' Antonio Ottobon, son of Sig. Marco, whom your Excellencies have appointed as my secretary, arrived here yesterday with all speed and equal good-will, to labour with me in your service in the embassy in Spain. From his abilities and parts and from his father's example I trust that he will render himself a useful minister to your Serenity and deserving of your favour. He consigned to me my commission and credentials for his Catholic Majesty, and on the arrival of the Most Illustrious Donato, I shall forthwith proceed to comply with them.
London, the 12th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
564. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English agent told me that he had approached Verua to get him to induce the Cardinal to dissuade the French king from harassing the Bernese and from moving against those of the religion, as this would be to the king's own advantage as tending to the quiet of the kingdom and his Highness would avoid the odium that would be created, as any such action of the king would be attributed to him and to the representations of the Cardinal as an ecclesiastic, to the great prejudice of this house with its friends. He adduced other reasons which I need not write. Verua promised to do this and that his Highness would put it in the instructions.
Turin, the 15th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Consiglio
de' x.
Parti
Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
565. In the Council of Ten.
That a secretary of this Council communicate the following matters to the Savii of the Cabinet, after requiring the oath of secrecy upon the missals and taking down the name of each one and also to the Senate if fitting, so that they may have full knowledge of the treason meditated against this republic in Naples, Milan and this city.
About the beginning of last March one Gabriel Moncassino arrived in this city from Languedoc, and tried to obtain employment as a soldier, offering to raise a company of 300 French musketeers. A few days later Captain Jacques Pierre arrived here. They met in the church of S. Marco. Jacques Pierre endeavoured to persuade Moncassino to take part in a plot to seize Venice. Jacques Pierre said he had asked for money from the Spanish ambassador to engage soldiers beyond the forty or fifty who were here, and the ambassador's promises far surpassed what he asked for. He said the Venetians only cared for eating and sleeping and a disturbance in the piazza would create such fear that he would carry out his plans with 300 musketeers. Ossuna would be ready to help outside and Captain Langlad would set fire to the Arsenal. At the sight of a naked sword the Venetians would all run away. Langlad said that when they took the city they would find a prisoner who was so rich that he could give them enough money to pay 10,000 men for three years. The Duke of Ossuna only desired the city, and would leave the mint to those who carried out the plot. In order to inspire greater confidence in the Venetians, Jacques Pierre had told them that a certain Captain Visconto Milanese had proposed to the Duke of Ossuna that he should come with ten barques of light draught, to take the Mint and burn the Arsenal; and it is true that such barques were made at Naples and put under the command of Captain Alio, (fn. 5) an Englishman. Such were the proposals of Jacques Pierre.
The most serene Nicolo Donato also received particulars of a plot to seize Venice concocted by the Duke of Ossuna with some other captains.
Later on the plot was communicated through Moncassin to Captain Baldissera Juven, who disclosed the whole affair to Sig. Marco Bollani, and Moncassin afterwards gave all the particulars to the Inquisitors of State, including the plotting which took place in the house of the Spanish ambassador, in which Robert Bruillardo, a Burgundian, an intimate of the ambassador took a prominent part. This Robert tried to corrupt the Dutch troops, when they mutined at Lazaretto. Jacques Pierre also had a hand in this.
At Naples the Duke of Ossuna proposed to carry out his coup in the winter. Four galleys, ostensibly with merchandise, but full of soldiers, were to come and wait at Malamocco; they would there await light boats, in which they would go to seize the piazza of S. Marco, the Arsenal and other posts; they would capture the doge and leading men, while Ossuna would bring a fleet to aid the carrying out of the design.
These matters were discussed at Naples last January. There was also a plot against Crema.
The Council of Ten decreed the execution of Captain Jacques Pierre, Langlad and Rossetti in foreign parts, and of Nicolo Renaldi, the brothers Boleo, Gioan Berardo and Gioan Zarniero in this city, releasing Captain Baldissera Juven, his wife and four others, all Frenchmen. Some others remain in prison and others again are beyond our reach, and a proclamation should be issued against them. (fn. 6)
Ayes16.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Capitano Gen.
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
566. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to the other Courts.
With respect to the recent conspiracy we send you copies of all the matters communicated to us by the Council of Ten. Those whose aim is to cover up their own actions have spread abroad the idea that there is no foundation for what is only too certain from the confessions of the accused. These full instructions will enable you to establish the real facts of the case and the need for our decision. You will, however, only act if provoked, to remove a wrong impression, retaining always that prudent reserve which we enjoin upon all our representatives.
That authority be given to remove certain things from the copies, which do not change the substantial facts, but might greatly prejudice our service.
That the following be added to the courts of Rome, France, England, Savoy and the States:
We do not direct you to perform any special office with the pope upon the above matters, but only to supply the information when provoked.
Ayes93.
Noes1.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
567. To the Captain General at Sea.
Among the numerous ships in our pay, some must be defective and rather a hindrance than a help. As winter is approaching, we can effect some saving. We direct you to take consultation what you can dispense with, without endangering the public safety, and what you will keep. We shall await your letters before deciding what steps to take.
Ayes36.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
568. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Baron Dohna, a German, has arrived here as envoy of the Princes of Germany to his Highness, to ask help for the Bohemians. The duke has welcomed him and meets him frequently. The English agent has been to see me. He spends most of his time with the baron. He told me many things of the state of their affairs. The sum of his argument was to press hard for help for the Bohemians. First he showed me letters of the Palatine, son in law of his king, which serve as credentials for the baron dated on the 6th inst. I believe the baron is to go to other princes and especially to England, to ask for a declaration and help for the Bohemians from the king there. The agent is also to leave in a few days, and they are to be at Court at the same time, so I think that this is the chief reason for his journey, of which I wrote in my last. He told me that he alone had sent to the Bohemians the succour of Mansfeld's troops, without the knowledge of his king. In this he had considered the service of all those who wished to see the Spaniards mortified. He was all right now, because his Majesty had written with his own hand approving of this action, promising that he will help the Bohemians and declare for them. But the matter does not seem very mature. He assured me that the Bohemians were doing very well, confirming what his Highness had said. They need nothing but money; they will choose a Catholic king and will govern themselves as a free state. He repeated his representations and persuasion to me for help from your Serenity in some secret way. I approved of the undertaking as worthy of the influence and greatness of his sovereign, to whom the glory properly belonged, and in this way I evaded the question. I discovered, however, that the duke has paid Mansfeld's troops hitherto and will do so for the whole of the present month. He makes these payments secretly under the name of the English agent, although they care little whether the Spaniards know or not. If matters go further they hope not only that England will declare himself as he has virtually done already, but the king of France also, especially if the marriage alliance is effected.
Turin, the 23rd October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
569. To the Ambassador in England.
We are entirely satisfied with what you, Contarini, have done to divert the person sent with letters from the Ambassador Wotton here from making unfavourable representations about the English who were put to death in the fleet. The information which we send you upon the matter will serve at any rate to vindicate the real facts of the case, the just reasons for the sentence and the bad example set by those who were punished, and when the ministers understand what really took place, the way will be easier for you.
The accounts of the English ships arrived on the 27th ult; without them it was impossible to pay the advances, but they have been paid down at once, as you will perceive by the enclosed copies, and this happened long before the arrival of your letters. There is no account for the seventh ship because it was entirely paid up. You will inform Burlamacchi of this, and we will at once give orders for the reimbursement. If there be any delay, there is no fear, as the republic will keep her promises.
We have no news of the ship, of which you write that you do not know its whereabouts.
This is for information.
Ayes98.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
570. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Upon the close examination made for the purpose of passing sentence upon Sir Walter Raleigh, he confessed spontaneously that when he departed hence for the West Indies, some of the leading ministers and members of the Council, disinclined towards Spain and extremely averse to the alliance with that crown, amongst whom he mentioned the deceased secretary Winwood, advised and persuaded him to take every opportunity of attacking the fleets or territories of the king of Spain, so as not only to generate distrust between the two crowns, but even to give cause for a rupture. Moreover, M. Desmaretz, the late French ambassador at this Court, promised him not merely positive permission to withdraw to France, but likewise, in case of any need, he guaranteed him the protection and favour of his Most Christian Majesty. (Nella inquisitione diligente che si è fatta per venir all' espedition di Ser Vat Rale, ha egli spontaneamente confessato che quando parti per l'Indie occidentali fosse stato da alcuni principali ministri et Signori del Consiglio poco inclinati a Spagna et alienissimi da vedere l'allianza con quella Corona, fra quali ha nominato il già morto Segretario Vinut consigliato et persuaso di abbracciare ogni occasione di attaccare le flotte o li stati del Re Cattolico, da che ne nascesse non solo diffidenza tra queste due Corone, ma, anco causa di rottura, essendole promesso da Mons. di Maretz già ambasciator del Re Christmo a questa Corte non solo la sicurezza di potersi ritirare in Francia ma la protettione e favore in ogni bisogno del Christmo.)
For the better ascertainment of this fact the French interpreter was imprisoned, and his evidence corroborated it, for he said he had been employed several times to convey messages about this negotiation. The French secretary was also summoned before the Council and examined on the subject, but steadily denied everything. Subsequently, as I have previously reported, when he asked for audience, the king refused, sending word that he would no longer recognise him as a public minister or even see him again. Simultaneously the king sent orders to his agent in France to enquire of his Most Christian Majesty whether he had authorised the proceedings of his ministers. But King Louis, aware of the treatment experienced here by his agent, refused either to listen to the English agent or to acknowledge him henceforth in diplomatic capacity. He sent orders to his minister here to take leave and return home. This he endeavoured to do on the day before yesterday, but the king refused to see him, so he has taken leave of some of the noblemen of the Court, without even presenting the letter of his sovereign. Here, in like manner, they have recalled their agent in all haste; and as both courts will remain without any one to palliate such accidents as may arise of a nature to create enmity between these two great monarchs, they will doubtless accumulate daily and produce the worst effects.
With the Dutch likewise, as stated by me in former despatches, the utmost dissatisfaction prevails. To indemnify himself for the damage done by their ships, his Majesty on hearing that two of their homeward bound East Indiamen with merchandise worth more than a million of gold were off this coast, immediately gave orders for his war galleons to seize and if necessary to give them battle, and in short to capture them at all hazards. But before his message reached its destination the Dutchmen had cast anchor and were safe in Holland. Another very rich vessel, however, is expected here from the same quarter and a similar order has been given to act against it in like manner.
A Chiaus has arrived from Constantinople to announce the accession of the new Grand Turk, (fn. 7) and a number of merchants have gone down to the coast to receive and meet him, the king choosing that they should defray the cost of entertaining him. He has already forwarded the letter of the Grand Vizier, which, being very friendly and replete with courtesy, has satisfied his Majesty, who previously felt offended because the English ambassador at the Porte had been treated unbecomingly.
The English ambassador who left with the ambassador of Muscovy last June, with a considerable sum of money from the merchants to present to the Grand Duke, to obtain from him a monopoly of the trade in northern produce, has returned without having been able to effect anything, as he found the country overrun with Polish troops which had advanced under Moscow, and he therefore deemed it advisable to come back without landing. (fn. 8)
Within the last few days diligent search has been made and all homeward bound vessels seized and overhauled, for the discovery, it is said of two priests, who, according to the advices received by the king, are expected here, with had intentions. As yet, however, it is not known whether they have been discovered, although several arrests have been made.
Of the sixty priests who obtained their pardon at the request of the Catholic ambassador and who crossed the channel with him, it is now known that the greater part have returned and are now in hiding in this kingdom. (fn. 9)
Father Maestro, late confessor to the Spanish ambassador, has had audience of the king, who appeared glad to see him. He told his Majesty that King Philip had commanded him to reside here until he should send a greater personage; and that he might be convinced of his master's sincerity by his placing his affairs in the hands of a religious and a priest, thus rendering his Majesty even more assured of the candour of his negotiations and proposals. He has not as yet had a second audience nor is he known to be transacting any other business.
The information transmitted by your Excellencies concerning the discovery of the late conspiracy in Venice shall serve as you command me, solely for my own individual information, and I will avail myself of what you wrote to the Hague concerning the navigation of the Gulf according to such opportunities as may present themselves to me.
I only sent your Serenity seven vessels hence because at the time there was a difficulty in procuring the eighth and I considered that I had thus executed the orders of the state, which enjoined me to hire six or eight.
London, the 26th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
571. To the Ambassador at Rome and the like to the other Courts and the Generals.
It is necessary that you have particulars of the proceedings of the Viceroy of Naples, as being the chief cause of the continuation of the interruption of the peace of this province. On the 13th inst. 18 galleys fully armed, left that place for an unknown destination. They pretend they are going to Sardinia, Barbary or the Goletta. Actually they sailed towards the Strait of Capri. Everything points to their going to Messina and Reggio. Instead of disarming, the Viceroy has begun to raise fresh troops.
The news from other parts shows no change. This is merely for information, to be used only when an opportunity occurs to advance our service.
Ayes81.
Noes1.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
572. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I set out to take up the charge committed to me thirty months ago. On the road I received countless signs of distinction and favour, and to-day, by the blessing of God, I landed in this kingdom. In a few days I hope to see the king and to enter upon my functions, which I will execute to the best of my ability. Meanwhile I must inform your Excellencies of what happened to me on my way through the States which will serve to show your Serenity the esteem and affection of that noble government for you. After descending the Rhine I entered the States and prolonged my journey for a few hours the better to see those fine provinces, and succeeded in seeing the whole of North Holland. There I saw the immense quantity of naval and military provisions, which exceed those of any other sovereign. At the Hague, the seat of the Government, Counts Maurice and William of Nassau called upon me with many nobles, expressing their great esteem for your Serenity. I returned Count Maurice's call, thanking him for his kind expressions. He said that our republics could always join each other by the sea, and the distance was not too great to prevent mutual assistance. He then entered upon particulars of the forces maintained by the States. He said they had 32,000 foot and 3,000 horse, besides 4,000 French paid by the king of France. Their fleets could attack the Spaniards in the Indies, which alone preserved those distracted dominions. He said they had some merchants who were thinking of forming a large company to facilitate trade with the Indies and he advised the States to help them. He said he thought Spain would prolong the truce, knowing that the seven provinces were spending all their revenues upon defence. He hoped the religious differences would soon be settled. The States must have a good peace with entire liberty or else think of war; he intimated that he feared the present government of France and they would have to stir up that of England. He said he desired the same thing for your Serenity as for the States, namely, peace or war. I visited the General Assembly and paid the proper compliments. All of them seemed to desire a constant union with your Excellencies. I visited the Princess of Orange and found Prince Henry somewhat indisposed, and I also saw Madame de la Tremouille and her son.
At Rotterdam I found a noble ship ready to take me to Zeeland and at Dort I was lodged and entertained with ten of my household for eight days. At Flushing they made ready a good ship for me, presented me with wine, did me many honours and fired a salvo of artillery. This country has become a power in the world. It has been free for forty years, is proud and rich, and is most powerful in its numberless ships, its knowledge of navigation, its constant industry in increasing its munitions of war and by the control of everything resting in the hands of Count Maurice, whose will no one disputes.
Gravesend, the 29th October, 1618.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
573. Letters patent of Antonio Priuli, doge of Venice, directing all the ministers of the republic to allow Giovanni Battista Lionello, secretary of the ambassador in England, who is returning home, together with his goods, to pass freely without any hindrance, affording him every possible assistance.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta,
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
574. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
No ships from Holland or England have appeared here for several months, with their customary merchandise, chiefly fish. It is clear that every one is avoiding this port, to the detriment of the city and the loss of the customs.
Naples, the 30th October, 1618.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The chaplain, Mr. Southake, wrote an account of the mutiny which is preserved among the Eton MSS. and printed by the Roxburgh Club. See Mr. Pearsall Smith's Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, ii. page 153 note.
2 The census was made by order in Council dated 6 September 1618. See. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1611–8 page 581.
3 In a letter of September 29th, old style, Lake remarks that the newly chosen president of the Council is a Jesuit, Cal. S.P. Dom, 1611–8, page, 578. This probably refers to Rochefoucauld who was educated by the Jesuits and always favoured them highly. In 1618 Rochefoucauld succeeded Du Perron as Grand Almoner of France, but he did not become President of the Council till after the death of Henry de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz on August 2nd, 1622.
4 The actual commission to Buckingham bears date Jan. 28, 1619. Gardiner, Hist. of England, iii, page 206 note.
5 Robert Elliot.
6 A copy of the above is in the series Senato, Secreta, Communicationi dal Consiglio de' Dieci. The paper constitutes the Venetian official account of the Bedmar conspiracy. It may be compared with the report of Osuna's plans made by Jacques Pierre, at page 201 above, No. 337.
7 The appointment of a Chiaus to go to France and England was announced by Almoro Nani the Venetian bailo on April 26th (No. 338 at page 203 above) and on April 27th Pindar sent word that the Chiaus Husein was to proceed to France and England to announce the accession of the Sultan Osman. He left on May 12th. State Papers Foreign, Turkey. He also came to ask the king to appoint a new ambassador. "This was no part of his message," wrote the merchants of the Levant Company to Pindar, "but we conceive put into him by some one desirous to be employed." State Papers Foreign Levant Co., Letter Book Dec. 17, 1618.
8 "Sir Dudley Digges is returned without performing aught. He alleges, that at his arrival the Russians had received a great overthrow by the Polac; the country much infested by freebooters and no convoy sent to conduct him; so that the journey being altogether useless for himself, and the money he carried being like rather to become a prey to the enemy than serve for the relief of him for whom it was sent, he thought best to come back the same way he went and bring the money with him." Rev. Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering, Oct. 20, 1618. Birch: Court and Times of James I., ii, page 93. He had started early in June on this mission. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1611–18 page 537.
9 "I am told that the major part of the English priests which came out with the Spanish ambassador are returned into England, and if the rest be not there already they will not tarry long on this side the seas." Trumbull to Naunton, 30 Sept, 1618, old style. State Papers. Foreign, Flanders.