Venice
November 1618, 2-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

343-348

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'Venice: November 1618, 2-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 343-348. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88686 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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November 1618

Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
575. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
On the news from Germany you will say that the progress of the Bohemians will afford a diversion for the Spaniards. As the United Princes, the king of England and other princes besides were concerned, they would keep sending more extensive help. We hope for a continuance of their success. The republic will not permit the passage of troops through the Gulf; the sea captains have orders to prevent it.
Second vote.
Ayes54.Ayes60.
Noes2.Noes0.
Neutral5.Neutral11.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta,
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
576. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
My despatch of the 26th will not, I apprehend, reach its destination before these present, because until yesterday all vessels were forbidden to leave this port or any other in England or Scotland (fn. 1) ; not as a sequel to the search for priests, who were said to be coming to plot against his Majesty, but to await the return of a courier who had been sent to France to ascertain the truth of the reported imprisonment of the English agent there so that they could treat the French agent here in similar fashion. This courier has now returned without any confirmation of the fact, the prohibition has been withdrawn and the French agent is ready to set out, though as yet he has not received his passport.
It has apparently been determined to arm all the men-of-war belonging to his Majesty, an order to this effect having been issued by the Council, (fn. 2) as they consider that by having a naval force in readiness it will be in their power to intimidate France and Holland. However, the lack of funds in every department continues and as from this cause a good number of these vessels are in a bad state, it is not clear how the project can at this moment be realised.
The Dutch, having heard of the order given to attack and capture their galleons homeward bound from the Indies, determined to send commissioners to the king that they might try and arrange the disputes and make some compensation for the damage done to the ships of the English merchants captured in the Indies.
Four of the divines here have left to attend the synod to be held in the Low Countries concerning the religious disputes now raging there. They have instructions to allay all differences rather than dispute about them.
His Majesty has been informed of the arrival in Spain of Don Diego Sarmiento, late Spanish ambassador resident here; that his negotiations concerning the marriage have been approved and the articles accepted, even to the point of the Infanta's not enjoying any greater facility for the exercise of the Catholic religion than such as is allowed to foreign ministers in this court, namely, the use of a private chapel in her own dwelling. (E'avisata S. Mta dell'arrivo in Spagna di Don Diego Sarmiento, che ressiedeva qui per il Catolico et che le trattationi maneggiate da esso qui del matrimonio erano state ben intese et abbracciati li Capitoli ristringendosi anco di contentarsi che all' Infante non le sii permesso altra maggior libertà nell' uso della religione Catolica che quella che tiene li ministri de' Principi in questa Corte, cioè l'uso d'una capella privata nella sua casa.)
In proportion to the growth of the troubles in Germany and to the misunderstandings of this Crown with France and the Dutch, do the Spanards affect a union with his Majesty to prevent him, from assisting the Count Palatine, thus rendering the French and Dutch utterly distrustful and even hostile to this country, if it can be effected.
The Ambassador Donato arrived here yesterday, and by order of his Majesty was met by the royal barges and coaches, which brought him hither. I am convinced that his rare qualities, coupled with his extreme splendour, becoming the ministers of your Serenity in so important a post, as also the excellent opinion gained by him here in advance, (fn. 3) will vastly profit the interests of your Excellencies and make ample amends for my own deficiencies, as I can merely lay claim to that good-will towards your service which duty inculcates.
London, the 2nd November, 1618.
[Italian.]
Nov. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
577. To the Ambassador in Spain and the like to the other Courts.
A ship was discovered sailing at the mouth of the Gulf; she tried to avoid capture and was finally run ashore and abandoned. The Viceroy has seized upon this event and has sent word to the king of Spain, distorting the facts. Ossuna has also endeavoured to introduce new clauses into the peace, his sole aim being to prolong the disturbances and make some attempt prejudicial to our jurisdiction. We have directed Spinelli to say that as we have carried out our part of the treaty, we expect the observance of the promises of his Catholic Majesty.
If you are spoken to upon these affairs you will use this information for our service.
Ayes108.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Nov. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Ceffalonia.
Venetian
Archives.
578. GIOVANNI FRANCESCO BRAGADIN, Proveditore of Cephalonia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses the usual mensuali in accordance with instructions. Cephalonia, the 3rd November, 1618.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
THE MENSUALI (extract).
1 Sept. 1618. By the new custom paid by John Fox of the English ship Elizabeth Joan ... 3,100 ducats
[Italian.]
Nov. 7.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
579. Office passed by the Ambassador of England with the Cavalier Foscarini.
On Thursday last the English ambassador came to the house of me, Antonio Foscarini. I received him in accordance with the leave granted to me. He said first, If this office is late it is very friendly and he had expressed a desire for it by his secretary six weeks ago. He went on to say much about the good disposition of their Majesties towards me, of their pleasant memory of my service and their sorrow for my troubles. He spoke very kindly of his satisfaction at my rehabilitation. He said a great deal more in my honour with expressions of great kindness, which I need not repeat.
I thanked him for the honour he had shown me by coming and said that but for our regulations I would have called immediately at his house, as soon as the Secretary mentioned the matter, as I would do now it was in my power. I was much indebted to his Majesty of whose kind remembrance of me I had heard from the Ambassador Contarini, in letters of the 24th August. I begged his Excellency to thank their Majesties.
The ambassador went on to speak of the excellent disposition of the king towards the republic, and that of the Elector Palatine. He enlarged upon the diet now being held by the Princes of the Union at Rotburgh, how they are daily augmenting their forces, that they only desire to protect themselves and maintain peace. He spoke of the ships obtained by your Excellencies from England and of the ease with which they can be obtained in any quantity in case of need, as well as from the Low Countries. He said that experience showed that ships and men could be here in two months at latest. He spoke of Colonel Peyton, to whom your Excellencies have assigned 200 ducats a month and of the desire of Vere to have the title of Colonel. He was quite satisfied about the first because your Serenity had told him that no colonel received a larger salary. With regard to the latter, it was customary everywhere for the Lieutenant Colonel to succeed the Colonel in case of death. Count William of Nassau is certainly of royal blood and highly esteemed in the Low Countries, but at the death of Count John Ernest, when Count John, the brother of both, aspired to succeed him, the States refused and appointed the Lieutenant. I said that your Excellencies would do what you could to satisfy him about Vere and that the sentiments of the Palatine and his Majesty towards the republic were fully reciprocated here. With that the ambassador departed.
It seemed to me from the ambassador's manner that he performed this office by express command of the king. For some years the royal ambassadors in this city claim that they ought to be visited first by the ambassador of your Excellencies who return from the Courts. For this cause they occasionally have not paid visits and that is the reason why I did not want to go and see him first, as I might have done owing to the leave given to me.
On Sunday I returned his Excellency's visit. He met me at the foot of the stairs, gave me his hand and showed me every sort of honour. I passed the necessary compliments and after he had replied he spoke of the time spent by him here, of various orders received from his Majesty by virtue of which he had frequently expressed to your Serenity his Majesty's desire to have a good understanding with the republic. He had always received gracious replies to their advances. His Majesty's sentiments remain the same and are even increased. I replied in a few complimentary phrases.
He afterwards spoke to me about the condition of the Low Countries; of the authority which M. d'Aerssens (Arsen) is acquiring there, who was ambassador in France in my time. He said that he would soon take the place which Barnevelt had held. That the Earl of Oxford, one of the leading nobles of England had agreed to command a terzo of infantry in the Low Countries an unusual thing in an English noble, as they generally live in their own country where they enjoy great consideration. He said the example might be followed by others. He spoke to me about various English gentlemen whom I knew, and of the changes which had taken place, by death and by other circumstances, in the government and Council of State since my departure from England. After I had stayed as long as I thought proper, I left and was accompanied by his Excellency as far as the gondola. He seemed especially anxious that Vere should be satisfied. I told him that I would represent everything to your Serenity and your Excellencies.
[Italian.]
Nov. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
580. To the Ambassador in Germany and the like to the other Courts.
We hear from Naples that the galleons are not proceeding to Barbary and Sardinia as they pretended, but are sailing towards Sicily, suffering from a bad gale on the way. The Viceroy has sent provisions to Reggio, which proves that the galleons were returning towards the Gulf. The Spanish ministers have accepted Ossuna's version of the ship taken by our fleet. The pope, on the other hand, told our ambassador last week that the Catholic king desires peace; but the ministers and Ossuna display an entirely contrary disposition.
Ayes111.
Noes1.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
581. RAINER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English agent is ready to leave here for England in a few days, as I reported. However, he is leaving his house open with his nephew in charge, since he proposes to return soon. He spoke to me about the differences between his sovereign and France, his king having dismissed the French minister. He makes light of the affair, but Marini and the duke spoke to me about it as a very grave matter
Sir Henry Mainwaring, an Englishman, has passed through here incognito on his way to serve your Serenity. He is the one, so he and the English agent have told me, who prepared all the ships levied by your Serenity in that kingdom. He thought of coming himself to serve your Serenity, but was crossed by the action of the Spaniards by whom he is hated as he has inflicted immense damage upon them by his ships, being the greatest pirate that England possesses. So he was obliged to desist and even to withdraw from the kingdom. Now he enjoys the king's favour and says he brings letters from him, as he has received fresh favours and dignities, and thus he is on the way to see your Serenity and to offer his services. He is travelling with the greatest secrecy and in disguise since the Spanish ambassador has sent his portrait to Milan and to many other places to have him stopped and this has caused him to come here by a very devious route.
His Highness saw him privately and made him a present. He told me that he was the foremost and boldest sailor and sea captain that England possessed, and he would be admirable for your Serenity's fleet.
Turin, the 12th November, 1618.
[Italian.]
Nov. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
582. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Seven ships of war should be leaving Texel at this moment under the command of Captain Quast. It is reported that they are to meet some ships coming from the Indies and protect them from any attacks made by the English because of disputes between the two nations. The rumour, current here, that the king of England has granted leave to make reprisals, has induced them here to send the commissioners earlier than had been arranged. It is expected that they will leave for London at the end of the present week.
The Hague, the 13th November, 1618.
[Italian.]
Nov. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
583. To the Ambassador in France.
We send a copy of advices from Zurich about the growing ill feeling between the two towns and the eight Cantons. The troubles seem to have been started by the ministers of the two crowns. Every one marvels at this union between France and Spain; it cannot be due to orders from the king, as any prejudice to those countries would injure his crown. We have used our efforts in favour of peace.
That the like be written to England and a copy of the letter from Zurich sent to the ambassador so that he may communicate the contents to the king in confidence.
Ayes105.
Noes2.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
Nov. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives,
584. To the Captain General at Sea.
We expect the Commissioner Michiel to send us month by month the things wanting in the hired ships in the fleet and the money paid to them, We should like the same information about all the ships. You will also advise us if the Dutch and English ships receive biscuit from the public funds or if it is put to their account.
Ayes106.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 See Cal. S.P. Dom. 1611–18, page 584, order from Lord Zouch to the Mayor of Dover to stay all men and packets from passing unless authorised by the Secretary Naunton.
2 The Lords of the Treasury to Richard Dodsall of York. Command to repair to Whitehall to take order for discharge of a great debt due by him to the king, who needs money, being about to employ large sums for repairs of the Navy and payment of his debts. Oct. 9, 1618. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1611–18, page 584.
3 "A new Venetian lieger is here arrived, not above twenty three or twenty four years old; which the king, discoursing of it to my Lord Arundel and Sir John Digby, seemed to censure as a weakness in any state to send a lieger ambassador so young; and that from such a one nothing could be expected but shame unto the nation; but this you will please to keep unto yourself." Rev. Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering, Nov. 3, 1618. Birch, Court and Times of James I, ii, page, 103.