Venice
December 1618, 22-25

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

402-405

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'Venice: December 1618, 22-25', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 402-405. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88692 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Contents

December 1618

Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
660. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court and the like to the other Courts.
The negotiations for the restitution of ships continue at Rome, but the preparations at Naples make hopes of a settlement seem far off. However, we have agreed to restore the ships which we took and we ask that at Naples they shall be ready to give up our galleys and give our minister an inventory of the goods. Everything would be in good train but for the action of Ossuna, who keeps finding fresh pretexts and raising new levies. They are also making great preparations in Spain, both naval and military, which are reported, even by the Spaniards themselves, to be intended for all manner of different purposes, for Algiers, the Indies, Cyprus, Albania. Their action should lead all the powers to look after their own interests.
Ayes147.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
661. To the Ambassador in England.
The English ambassador here in his audience last month, refered to the suspicions of the expected arrival here of an English gentleman of high birth to treat with us, without doing so through him, and the affairs might concern or be prejudicial to his king. In the sincerity of our love for his Majesty we told the ambassador that we would act with due reserve. Now our ambassador in Rome has sent us a memorial from the Cardinal Farnese, recommending Mr. Geoffrey Pole, a leading English gentleman, who offers himself for our service. We conclude that he is the person described by the ambassador, and accordingly we have replied to the Cardinal in general terms of courtesy and say how much we value his recommendations, but that at present we have no need for the services of this gentleman, but we shall remember the offer and the friendly disposition of this cavalier to serve us. We have told our ambassador to reply in this sense.
Ayes147.
Noes0.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
662. To the Ambassador in England.
What your write us on the 30th ult. about the continued ill feeling between the Kings of England and France seems to us of high importance as being useful to the Spaniards and prejudicial to others. As, however, his Majesty's disposition is favourable and he believes that our offices may aid an accommodation, we have sent to our ambassadors in France and Savoy what you will see by the enclosed copies. We desire to use our intercession for the sake of obtaining good results rather than appear to have a leading part in the matter, as in this way our offices will be better appreciated. You will inform his Majesty and the ministers of what you are doing, our particular desire to give him satisfaction and our unwavering esteem for him.
From the same letters we hear that the agent of Spain continues to buy artillery, and makes arrangements for ships to take it, in the confidence that every facility will be afforded to him for any design whatsoever. We commend your watchfulness in this matter and especially your most prudent representations to the Archbishop of Canterbury, related in yours of the 23rd. We direct you to persevere and to speak to his Majesty also; he previously refused permission to the Spaniards to obtain ships from his kingdoms, at our request, and so we hope that he will not grant them facilities to make such preparations, as they are increasing their armaments everywhere. Their greed for the possessions of others arouses the suspicion that they are contemplating mischief against some power.
With this we send you last week's news; you will use it for information and whenever a favourable opportunity presents itself, referring to the disturbances caused by the action of the Spaniards.
We also send you a copy of the last exposition of his Majesty's ambassador and our letters sent to the Ambassador Contarini about the mutiny of the English soldiers. We may say that the king gently suggested to Contarini that we should put in writing the offences and the cause of punishment. You will take a favourable opportunity to reply in the form indicated in the said letters, since Contarini had no occasion to do so, that to put such matters in writing is not the custom of the republic, though we are always most anxious to give satisfaction to his Majesty. The disobedience was manifest and constituted a very bad example. The Captain General acted with moderation, only punishing the ringleaders and pardoning all the others, while he continued to treat all the English well, as is shown by the general's letter, of which we send a copy; moreover his Majesty's ambassador admits so much, in his exposition. This will serve to prove the truth and to add weight to your representations.
Ayes147.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
663. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
The Ambassador Donato in England writes that the ill feeling between the Kings of England and France continues, but the ministers of the duke have interposed to arrange an accommodation, with good hope of success, owing to the complacency of both parties. They think, however, in England, that the good offices of the republic might further facilitate matters. We have written to France and we direct you to tell the duke that we value his interposition very highly as most beneficial for the common interests. We have ordered our said ambassador to render assistance whenever he has an opportunity. You will send word to us and to the said ambassadors of what the duke replies.
Ayes147.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
664. To the Ambassador in France.
Letters of the Ambassador Donato in England inform us of the continued ill-feeling between the Kings of England and France. The ministers of Savoy have already interposed, but it has been hinted that the offices of the republic would be welcome and useful. Friendship between these two crowns is highly important to us, and we therefore direct you to see the constable and the Count of Verua, saying how much the republic desires an accommodation and that it may be effected by the ministers of the Duke of Savoy. You will also visit the king's ministers and do what you can to facilitate an accommodation. You will send word of what you do to the Ambassador Donato, so that he may perform the necessary offices.
Ayes147.
Noes2.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
665. GIROLAMO SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The progress of the negotiations for the marriage of the Prince of Piedmont to the French king's sister and the successes of the Bohemians cause the Spanish ministers and their creatures much searching of heart. We hear that the King of England is trying to arrange the disputes between himself and the States over the navigation in the Ocean and the Indies, and that these two valorous nations are going to join forces to sail together to the West Indies also. If this be true it will prove a strong bridle upon the petulance of the Spaniards and force them to think more of their own defence than of attacking others.
Rome, the 22nd December, 1618.
[Italian.]
Dec. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Candia,
Proveditore.
Venetian
Archives.
666. PIERO BONDUMIER, Venetian Proveditore in Candia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When the Captain of the Gulf has left with his squadron I will give orders for the making of a stock of biscuits. It would be a good thing for your Excellencies to send here a certain number of round ships or galeasses to secure these seas which are infested by pirate bertons of every nation. Five or six of them, armed at Tunis, frequent the waters of Sapienza and they receive every convenience from the places of the Turk.
Candia, the 22nd December, 1618.
[Italian.]
Dec. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
667. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I tried to obtain information from the merchants Scarlatini and Purpura about the Dutch ship taken by the Spaniards at Ragusa. The former said he had written full particulars to Venice but finding that the Duke of Ossuna had a hand in the matter, he became frightened and tore up the letter. He confirmed the report that the ship had foundered at Brindisi. Purpura told me he had bought it, together with Henry Real, an Englishman, for 2,000 ducats, from the Duke of Ossuna, but the sale had not been completed owing to the sinking of the ship.
Naples, the 25th December, 1618.
[Italian.]