Venice
March 1619, 12-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

487-503

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'Venice: March 1619, 12-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 487-503. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88700 Date accessed: 22 September 2014.


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March 1619

Mar. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
774. That the following be added to what it was decided to say to the English ambassador about the good offices of his king in Spain and the affair of the Uscocchi:
With regard to the repeated instances of your Excellency about the trade in salt fish with England, we have received the report of the magistrates. There are many difficulties in the way, and this has led us to postpone a decision until a more favourable time, in order not to prejudice the existing trade. We can assure you, however, that his Majesty's subjects will always receive the most favourable treatment.
With regard to the Duke of Holstein we have the highest regard for his rank and qualifications. We have decided to direct the Savio della Scrittura to negotiate with him upon terms and especially about the pass which he offers, and we shall afterwards decide what is expedient. This is in order to gratify your Excellency, whom we always desire to satisfy.
Ayes146.
Noes1.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
Mar. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
775. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's instructions about arranging with the duke to write to Rome and England. I asked for an audience at once and had it on the following day. I congratulated his Highness upon the arrangement of a marriage for the prince his son. He agreed with your Serenity's ideas about communicating the league to the pope. I perceive, he said, that we shall be obliged to unite for defence both with the States and England, and with whomsoever we can. I also see how little hope there is of the pope joining and therefore we are the more obliged to make it clear that the evils we seek to remedy require more than ordinary remedies. If history records that the Republic of Venice and the Duke of Savoy leagued themselves with powers of a different religion, perhaps calling them to Italy for their defence, it would also state that they did everything possible to secure becoming assistance.
Turin, the 12th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
776. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I told his Highness the feelings of your Serenity about communicating the league to England. He approved but remarked that he thought it superfluous to speak in the form of justification to the king because he well knew the necessity of your Serenity for a league. He said he would have liked an express invitation to be given. I said it was necessary to proceed with reserve until we saw in which direction their inclinations lay. The duke approved, but said he had great hopes. He should like one of the ambassadors to say something to this effect: that the two powers formed the league the more readily because his Majesty had always praised and counselled such a course and said he would enter if it were made. This would give no offence and would offer the king an opening to declare his opinion. Being strictly bound by my instructions I made answer in a manner satisfactory to his Highness, in the terms contained in the enclosed letter which I am sending to England.
Turin, the 12th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
777. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador at London.
I have communicated to the duke the office sent to you on the 4th about communicating the league to his Majesty, telling him that you will not move until you have heard from me. The duke said he would order his ambassador to arrange with you about speaking to the king. The duke is indifferent whether the office is performed severally or together and you may go and tell the king at once, so that confidence may not be disturbed by his first receiving the news of the alliance from elsewhere. His Highness would like the ambassadors to add that their princes had decided to make the league the more readily because his Majesty had always praised and counselled it, and declared that he would enter such a league if made. You will stop at that point in order not to give an express invitation, leaving it to his Majesty to make the offer. I am obliged to confine myself to the copy of the letter sent to you by his Serenity, and I do not even know if the king has made any offer to the republic.
Turin, the 11th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
778. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Count Scaglia has been to see me and says that his Highness has very full letters from England about various matters affecting the common service which he would tell me; but his Highness had been much disturbed at reading that Donato was spreading reports that he was cooling about the league since the alliance with France, and he begged me to communicate this to your Serenity, as he could not understand the origin of a rumour so opposed to the common interests. I said that all things reported were not true and many were twisted from their actual condition.
I afterwards went to see his Highness and after conversation upon those affairs he drew two very long letters out of his pocket saying these are Gabaleoni's first letters from England since his arrival there. He handed them to my secretary to read saying: You will see how Donato treats me, saying I am abandoning the republic now the marriage with France is made. Then warming somewhat he said: I have not abandoned her. When the enemy was upon me and they frequently offered me peace, I would not accept. Now in my prosperity I will not abandon her. I do not desire this. I honoured this Cavalier as much as possible and I greatly wonder at his conduct. He then took the letter and read this passage, which was underlined: Donato is covertly spreading reports that your Highness has cooled in your friendship towards the republic since your alliance with France. (fn. 1) The duke said: I will write to Gabaleoni for further particulars, and handing the letter back to the secretary he made him read the whole.
The ambassador first speaks of the honour accorded to him at his reception, greater than had been shown to any other ambassador, by sending the royal barges to Gravesend, by salvoes of artillery and by receiving him in the great hall and then more privately at his request. To his thanks for what had been done for his Highness the king replied graciously, saying he had done little by comparison with what he desired and with what he would have done if peace had not ensued. In the matter of money, said the duke, there was little, the munitions were opportune.
With regard to the reconciliation with France, the king said that no other prince could be more welcome as a mediator than his Highness, and for him he would do more than for any other prince in the world. His Majesty had three grievances against France; the order to his physician Mayerne to leave the country; the ill action of the French agent in England and the speech of the Grand Chancellor that France did not want the friendship of one who did not desire that of her king. The king expressed his readiness for a reconciliation as a sign of the value he placed upon the duke's interposition and would forget all occasions of offence. Accordingly it was arranged that his Majesty should reply to the Most Christian King, appoint an ambassador and respond to every courteous advance of France. He left the arrangements to the cardinal prince.
With regard to the league between the republic and his Highness the king said he heard that the Spaniards had arranged with France and were trying to prevent it being concluded. He begged the duke to finish it as soon as possible, because present circumstances required a good union between free princes, who wished to look after their own safety and the public weal. His Majesty added that he understood that the Spanish fleet was to go in the direction of Venice and pass to help the Bohemians, but he had issued orders for the arming of his ships, and these with those of the merchants would join a squadron of the States. He would tell the King of Spain that if he wished to turn his arms against Algiers, as reported, he would help, but if against Venice and the Bohemians, he would enter the Spanish seas to help his friends. His Majesty had sent back Baron Dohna to the Bohemians with a promise to pay 4,000 foot for them, Mr. Albert Morton remaining in London with power to receive the money; the Princes of the Union being bound to notify him beforehand. His Majesty asked the ambassador to send a special courier to ask his Highness to continue to pay Mansfield's 2,000 foot until Wake, his Majesty's agent, returned to Turin.
In the second letter Gabaleoni says he sounded the king tactfully whether he would favour the election of the Palatine as King of Bohemia, shewing that his Highness would never venture to meddle in the matter. The king said that the election could not fall upon the Palatine for many reasons. He was too young; he would have time to think of his children; for the moment it sufficed to take it from the house of Austria. Gabaleoni adds that his Highness may promise himself every assistance from that crown in the matter, but he could not tell the attitude of France, whether she would be the wheel to put the others in motion or to stop them.
The king had spoken to Gabaleoni about the Count of Gondomar, the Spanish ambassador, who is said to be returning. Gabaleoni, considered him a man of ability, cunning and astute. The king replied: You are right; he has negotiated here with cunning and deceit. I found out something after his departure and if I could prove it I would cover him with confusion on his return; I shall know what confidence to place in him, and thus the king clearly showed his dissatisfaction with the count.
His Majesty had anticipated his communication about the marriage of the prince by congratulating him warmly. He remarked that if France, England, Savoy, the Dutch and the Princes of the Union were well together they could make the Spanish party look small. The ambassador assured him that the alliance with France would never diminish the esteem of his Highness for the English crown. In this connection he makes the statement about Donato. The ambassador concludes by saying that he had not been able to discover the condition of the negotiations for the Spanish marriage, but he would keep his eyes open and would point out the harm it would cause the kingdom.
I have reported this fully that your Excellencies may see how openly the duke declares his most intimate plans, and also those of the King of England, and because these matters are closely bound up with Italian affairs. The duke allowed my secretary to copy the most essential particulars.
Turin, the 12th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
779. GASPARO SPINELLI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A knight here told me that they were shortly expecting 3,000 Scottish troops in this kingdom. I think he must have meant the 3,000 Walloons who were to be embarked at Dunkirk.
Naples, the 12th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
780. To the Ambassador Donato in England.
We regret the occasion which has led you to ask leave to return home. The request however is just and reasonable, as every one should have an opportunity of proving his innocence, especially in a matter which concerns his honour. We therefore give you permission. You will just take leave of his Majesty, presenting the enclosed letter, and telling him that a secretary, whom we are sending off, will act until your return, so that some one will always be with him to express the esteem and affection of the republic. You will assure his Majesty that most urgent reasons have induced you to take this step and us to grant the leave. When you have accomplished this and whatever else may be necessary you will come here in the certainty of receiving our kindly protection, as we feel sure you will establish your innocence.
That a secretary be elected at the earliest opportunity by the Cabinet, who shall be ready in the space of five days to set out post to England and serve there until further orders; 500 ducats shall be assigned to him to put himself in order and as a gift, and he shall have 120 crowns of 7 lire a month for ordinary provisions; 10 crowns a month for extraordinary expenses, four months to be paid in advance, without his being bound to render any account. Also that 150 ducats be given to him for couriers and the carriage of letters, for which he shall render account.
Ayes81.
Noes40.
Neutral45.
Second vote—
Ayes67.
Noes50.
Neutral49.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Venetian
Archives.
781. To the King of Great Britain.
Antonio Donato, our ambassador with your Majesty, has asked leave to return home for some time for urgent reasons. We have consented unwillingly, but the request is so just and reasonable that we could not refuse it. We beg your Majesty to graciously confirm this leave. We shall send a secretary immediately who will present the daily occurrences until the Ambassador Donato's return.
Ayes81.
Noes40.
Neutral45.
Second vote—
Ayes67.
Noes50.
Neutral49.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
782. To the Queen of Great Britain.
Our Ambassador Donato has asked leave to return home and we have not been able to refuse. We beg your Majesty to graciously favour his departure, so that after arranging his affairs he may return the better able to fulfil his duties.
Ayes81.
Noes40.
Neutral45.
Second vote—
Ayes67.
Noes50.
Neutral49.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
783. To the Prince of Wales.
We have granted our Ambassador Donato leave to return home on very important private affairs, as you will hear from himself.
Ayes81.
Noes40.
Neutral45.
Second vote—
Ayes67.
Noes50.
Neutral49.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
784. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Sir [Henry] Mainwaring has returned from Newmarket and has informed me of his negotiations with the king to obtain the ships, when he used all the arguments in his power to render his Majesty favourable. But though he found the king in the most excellent frame of mind towards your Serenity, yet the fear of offending the Spaniards in this matter perplexed him. Accordingly he sent to have the opinion of the Council and the reply will be given by them and by the Secretary Naunton. Mainwaring went to the secretary to discover what they would do, and received, as I understand, a refusal. He would not admit this to me, but said that the secretary would speak with me. He did so to-day using the self-same phrases which I reported as coming from Canterbury, namely that it was not honourable, usual or safe to give one's ships, artillery, munitions and royal defences to another power and it was the less expedient to do so now when the Spanish fleet threatened Ireland and they could not even be certain of these kingdoms. Nevertheless the king will permit your Excellencies to hire merchants' ships, of which there are some very powerful ones.
I said all that I knew and all that my feeble wit could devise to prove to the secretary the falseness of their suppositions. But he said such was the opinion of the Council and the wish of the king. Neither of these will ever make any declaration against the Spaniards, not only of vigour but with any shadow of substance. This is the truth, and those who do not wish to deceive themselves must accept it. Nevertheless, as I have not approached the Council or the king with the representations or the powerful arguments which are due to the commands of your Excellencies, I shall not cease from hammering at their sleep in order to awaken them to some concession, if it be possible to obtain any. In the meantime all the other negotiations with Mainwaring remain at a standstill. Without the ships and a command his services are useless, and the expense would be thrown away. In his anxiety for his own advantage he told me that the king will employ him here and that they will need his services.
The preparation of the royal ships continues with the idea of sending them out, and they are also arming fourteen merchant ships for the same purpose. The Dutch have confirmed their purpose of sending out an equal number. But when I asked the ordinary ambassador of the States what he thought would really come of this royal fleet and if it would sally forth in due time, he said that he had passed nineteen years in England and under this king he had always seen things managed very casually, so he thought that any proposal or figment of the Spaniards would throw cold water on the whole affair. This would certainly not be the case with his masters, who were quite determined to arm and be ready at the conclusion of the truce to carry on a fresh and vigorous war. They clearly saw that every thing would turn against them and they could not run into danger by letting things go at haphazard. He added that their affairs here would never be determined, as they are afraid of this new fleet of Spain, and they will not give a shadow of offence or come to any decision in the least degree contrary to the Spaniards, who without moving themselves succeed in inspiring with respect and fear one who should fear them least.
London, the 14th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
785. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
To the usual and inveterate indisposition of the queen, fresh and worse complications ensued and she has ended her days. Freeing others from the trouble of her living longer, she has released herself from the prison of a perpetual death. Her Majesty died three days ago in the palace at Hampton Court, twelve miles from here, without seeing the king, who was at Newmarket. She breathed her last amid a few attendants in a country place, without the help of those remedies which might have lengthened her days even if they did not cure her. However, before dying, she had time to embrace the prince, her son, and had this satisfaction as mother of the succeeding king. She has enjoyed such felicity and greatness all her life. She was daughter and sister of the King of Denmark, went to Scotland as the wife of a king, succeeded to the greatness, the pomp, the countless jewels and the royal condition of the renowned Elizabeth. In succeeding to this greatness she enjoyed for many years the beauty and grace of her own person, popularity with the people and at court, the adornment of children and the perfection of all those graces which rarely go with virtue and fortune. But of late her Majesty had to bear a change of fortune, suffering countless bitter things and great pain. She lost her health and fell out of favour with the king, while her following of courtiers and her royal adornments fell away from her. Thus at the end of her days, at the age of 44, she had nothing but to lament her sins and to show herself, as she was always believed to be, very religious and sincere in the worship of the true God. (fn. 2)
Her Majesty's death does not make the slightest difference in the government of these Kingdoms, except the falling in of 200,000 crowns a year to the king with a quantity of rich and precious belongings and the dismissal of a countless throng of servants and officials. But this loss should grieve your Serenity owing to the love which the queen bore for the republic and for the confidential way with which she dealt with our ambassadors. For this reason, I have thought proper to make these remarks in praise of the deceased princess.
London, the 14th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 14.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
786. The English ambassador was summoned to the Cabinet and the deliberation of this Council of the 7th inst. was read to him. He said:
I am very glad at what your Serenity has made known to me. I will speak first about the instructions you gave me about obtaining ships from his Majesty; the matter is under consideration and will, I hope, turn out as is desired. With regard to the uniting of the ships, his Majesty's principal secretary writes to me that the Spaniards have requested my king to join his ships with theirs and those of the States to hunt down the pirates. It seemed strange to me that they should desire this junction, firstly because the Spaniards do not hit it off with the English, and indeed corpora non sunt compatibilia; and secondly it did not seem to me to be a good arrangement for the Spaniards to join with our ships as they would perceive their own defects and shortcomings from us and become acquainted with our manner of fighting. In fine I have reflected a great deal upon the subject, and am suspicious of some designs on the part of the Spaniards to use this pretext of the pirates to enter these seas and proceed to Trieste. But this would be a great affront to us; we should never suffer it and we shall serve as good spies for your Serenity. For the rest I can assure you that no prince desires the welfare of this republic so much as my king and he will make this clear in every possible way, as they have assured me more than once from England.
With regard to Ossuna, I am not surprised at him. It is always the same tale. Thus he wished to detain two Englishmen by force to serve him, and they had to flee. But I marvel that they have done nothing to remedy this evil at the root especially as your Serenity has given full satisfaction, restoring so much country to the archduke; but perhaps the trammels in which his ambitions have involved him, prevent him from fulfilling his obligations. I will inform his Majesty who will be displeased as every one ought.
The Doge replied that they would always reciprocate his Majesty's friendliness. It was necessary to keep an eye on the Spaniards because of the reports that they no longer wanted to go against Algiers, but intended to take away the liberty of princes both in this and in other provinces. The affair of the Uscocchi was as bad as anything could possibly be. The ambassador should make representations to his Majesty in a manner becoming to his friendliness and prudence.
After the deliberation about salt fish and the Duke of Holstein had been read, the ambassador said that he thought they had not acceded to his request upon the first subject because they feared that the Flemings would desire the same and they did not wish to set a bad example. But his request was made with the motive of increasing trade. He would have asked for the same privileges as a favour to last for two or three years, by way of experiment, and they were not bound to grant a favour to all. He was ambitious to take home this concession and would make a fresh request to his Serenity.
With regard to the duke he considered it an excellent omen that his Serenity had committed the negotiations to the Cavalier Foscarini, whose ability and prudence have always given great satisfaction to those with whom he has had to deal. One is Mainwaring, now in England, who is anxious to serve your Serenity, and the other is Peyton (Piton) who is about to proceed to the fleet to serve you.
The doge remarked that trade was desirable for the general good, but sometimes attempts to increase it do not succeed. They had discussed the matter carefully and he had proposed a postponement. As regards the duke, he honoured his rank and Foscarini would manage the affair excellently.
The ambassador requested that two English gentlemen, who had come to see Venice in their way to the fleet, might be introduced. After this had been done he took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
787. To the Ambassador Gritti returning from Spain.
The Ambassador Donato in England has asked for leave to return home upon important affairs. We have consented, and as it would prejudice our affairs to leave that court without an ambassador at the present conjuncture, we have decided to instruct you to proceed at once to England by the shortest route, to remain until Donato can return thither, which will be soon. We know that this will inconvenience you, as after a long and toilsome service you need rest, yet we believe that you will accept this change willingly to serve your country. Your credentials and instructions will be sent direct by way of Flanders to the secretary who will be there and who will remain in your service, since the one you have is sick. We shall await news of the receipt and execution of the present order.
That Piero Gritti receive 1,000 ducats for travelling expenses and to put himself in train and 500 gold crowns of lire 7 a month for his expenses, for which he is not bound to render account, and that four months be paid in advance; 300 ducats for horses, coverings and coffers, for which he renders no account; 100 ducats as a gift to the secretary, and 40 ducats each to the two couriers who accompany him.
Ayes118.
Noes32.
Neutral25.
Second vote—
Ayes105.
Noes45.
Neutral26.
Pending because it requires ¾.
March 21st in Pregadi.
The above letter was altered, putting 400 ducats intead of 500.
Ayes108.
Noes53.
Neutral12.
Second vote—
Ayes90.
Noes60.
Neutral13.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
788. To the Ambassador Donato in England.
Regret reasons for recall, but grant permission. Must first take leave of the king, presenting enclosed letter, and saying that the Piero Gritti will serve as ambassador during his absence. To leave secretary with Gritti and then return straight home in the certainty of receiving friendly protection, and of proclaiming his innocence.
Ayes118.
Noes32.
Neutral25.
Second vote—
Ayes105.
Noes45.
Neutral26.
Pending because it requires ¾.
On 21st March in Pregadi.
That the above letter be substituted for the preceding ones:
Ayes118.
Noes53.
Neutral12.
Second vote—
Ayes90.
Noes60.
Neutral13.
Pending.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
789. To the King of Great Britain.
Notification of leave to return home for a short time granted to the Ambassador Donato. Piero Gritti will serve as ambassador until Donato's return.
Ayes118.
Noes32.
Neutral25.
Second vote—
Ayes105.
Noes45.
Neutral26.
Pending because it requires ¾.
March 21st in Pregadi.
That the above letter be substituted for the preceding one:
Ayes108.
Noes53.
Neutral12.
Second vote—
Ayes90.
Noes63.
Neutral13.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
790. To the Queen of Great Britain.
Notification of the leave to return granted to the Ambassador Donato.
Ayes118.
Noes32.
Neutral25.
Second vote—
Ayes105.
Noes45.
Neutral26.
Pending because it requires ¾.
March 21st in Pregadi, upon the above letter:
Ayes108.
Noes53.
Neutral12.
Second vote—
Ayes90.
Noes60.
Neutral13.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
791. To the Prince of Wales.
Notification of the return of the Ambassador Donato.
Ayes118.
Noes32.
Neutral25.
Second vote—
Ayes105.
Noes45.
Neutral26.
Pending because it requires ¾.
21st March in Pregadi upon the above letter:
Ayes108.
Noes53.
Neutral12.
Second vote—
Ayes90.
Noes60.
Neutral13.
Pending because it requires ¾.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
792. To the Ambassador in England.
We send you copies of the last two expositions of his Majesty's ambassador to serve you for information. The first is in reply to an office of ours. In the second he urges us to send and receive ambassadors with the princes of Germany to negotiate a union with them. We shall delay our reply to this until a favourable opportunity. If any reference is made about it to you, you will reply in general terms about our good-will, our desire for the prosperity of the princes and our esteem and regard for his Majesty as we do not wish at present to bind ourselves to anything, but to keep ourselves free so that we may act for the best in future emergencies. We have nothing further to add. At Naples affairs follow their evil course.
Ayes168.
Noes3.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
793. The English Ambassador came into the Cabinet and said:
When I went home from yesterday's audience I received letters from England by the courier of this week. They bring good news which I will state briefly. Some weeks ago I told your Serenity that the Palatine was going to send the Marquis of Dohna as ambassador to my king. From that ambassador his Majesty has now learned the warm friendship of the Palatine for the republic and his desire for a perfect understanding in conformity with the ideas of his Majesty. From the Senate's communication of yesterday I perceived the good feeling of your Serenity towards his Majesty. I think therefore that it will be easy now for you to show respect for my master's proposal, not simply as King of Great Britain, but as chief of the union of the princes of Germany, who not only exhorts but begs your Serenity to enter this union and come to a decision beneficial to all, through your skilful ministers. Your Serenity has already expressed to me your desire for the liberty of these princes, and accordingly I decided to come this morning to inform you of my king's commands, so that you may give the necessary instructions to the Ambassador Donato this evening.
The doge replied that they were well assured of his Majesty's excellent disposition towards the republic. Their mutual relations were all that could be desired and the Savii would deliberate upon the matter.
The ambassador said that the king and the princes had no other purpose than to constitute a strong body for defence only, not to attack any one, and to send and receive ministers mutually, which would tend to strengthen good relations.
He added: My letters of yesterday inform me that your Serenity's ambassador with his Majesty has succeeded in inducing my king to arm to create a diversion for the Spaniards. I do not know whether your Serenity still entertains the idea of having four royal ships to serve in the fleet as if you wish I will write again.
When they answered that they stood to what had been already written, the ambassador said he would repeat the representation, took leave and departed. (fn. 3)
[Italian.]
Mar. 15.
Cinque Savii
alla Mercanzia.
Risposte.
Venetian
Archives.
794. Rudolph Simes, a Flemish merchant in this city, beseeches your Serenity for a remedy, as he has been denounced to the Customs officials and his ship the Transisolana sequestrated for wishing to trade in the Levant and lading cloth in that ship for Smyrna. He says that the cloth was laded by his principals in London for Smyrna, and as the Mayflower was first to touch at Venice, the said principals in England wrote, after that ship had left, telling him to detain that cloth until further order, as they no longer wished the ship to make the voyage, but to go to Candia and lade wine for England. After that the principals wrote again telling him to send the cloth to Smyrna at the first opportunity. Accordingly he laded the cloth on the ship Transisolana.
We the Cinque Savii, in execution of the orders given on 16th January last, state that Simes has shown us the bill of lading and the letter of advice. We see from the bill of lading that John Marchan in London on 6 May, 1618, laded on the ship Mayflower four bales of kerseys to be consigned to Richard Miluord and in his absence to Francis Bauche, but does not state to what place they were consigned. From the letter of advice we see that on 2 July following John Marchan writes to Simes asking him to receive the said four bales and sell them and remit the proceeds to him in London or send the price in ryals to Mr. Miluord at Scios; but if he could not find a purchaser, he should send them on to Scios. Simes showed us another letter from Sanson Neuport from London on the 23rd October, 1618, saying he hears from his brother that the ship Mayflower has arrived at Venice, bringing 6 bales of kerseys. If that is so her master and scrivener have done very ill, as they received orders, if they did not proceed on their appointed voyage to Smyrna, to unlade their cargo at Leghorn and put it on the ship Merchant, as that is a free port, and telling Simes, if the cloth is at Venice, to have it laded on the ship Ancilla or any other good ship going to Smyrna; but if he could not do this, to sell it if it will fetch anything. If on the other hand he found a good ship going to Cephalonia, he should lade it upon that, as the ship Rainbow was to touch at Cephalonia on its way to Constantinople, and might take up the cloth there, or he might lade it upon some Venetian ship bound for Smyrna, consigning it to the aforesaid Richard Miluord. Simes found the ship Transisolana going to Smyrna and laded the cloth thereon, paying the import and export duties. He states that as the cloth was passing through he thought it was not subject to the laws which forbid the Levant trade to foreigners. We think that he has become liable to the penalties thereby imposed, but we recommend him to the mercy of your Serenity, to relieve him as you may think best, especially as the ship Transisolana has left without the cloth.
Zuanne Falier.Savii.
Luca da Molin
Zuanne Basadonna. Savii.
Michiel Foscarini.
[Italian.]
Mar. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
795. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A courier from England arrived yesterday bringing word of the Queen's death.
M. de Triglier (fn. 4) has been appointed ambassador to the King of Great Britain and should leave soon.
Paris, the 16th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
796. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Prince Maurice has received orders to recall his officers and men from England and France, to be at the Hague on the 15th prox, and they are not allowing any to leave the country.
The commissioners in England have sent word that the king has shown the most favourable disposition towards the common service. He has urged them to join their ships with his to enter the Mediterranean and observe the proceedings of the Spanish fleet; if it attacks pirates, to help, if the Turk, to stand aside; but if it molests the republic, it was his interest to see that they went no further. His Majesty's ambassador told me all this, but it is not known whether the States have resolved upon anything. In such matters I think I may say that here they place put little confidence in that king. They think he is a monarch abounding in complimentary phrases. Thus they expect no results from his Majesty sending an ambassador to the Princes of the Union and on to the Bohemians. They understand from Heidelberg and elsewhere that the Bohemians, not knowing where to look for the help necessary to carry on the war, propose to make the best terms they can with the emperor. Such is the impression here, but his Majesty would do much to remove it by sending out these ships. The admiralty here are ready to carry out any orders, but there is no sign of movement yet.
The Hague, the 17th March, 1619.
[Italian.]
Mar. 17.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere, Re
d'Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
797. Jacobus, dei gratia etc. domino Antonio Priuli, Venetiarum duci, amico suo charissimo, Salutem. Serenissime atque excellentissime Princeps, amice charissime:
Quod Henricum Wottonum, quem nostri in inclytam vestram rempublicam studii et amoris testem misimus, ad nos, quamprimum fieri poterit, nunc velimus reverti, causa subest et justa et gravis, quaeque illius praesentiam hoc tempore facit hie necessariam. Hoc visum est praemonere, ne aliorsum vestra Celsitudo id acciperet, atque a nobis factum est; neu inter-pretaretur remisisse nos aliquid de illa benevolentia, qua Rempublicam vestram vestro merito jam olim complectimur, praesetrim quum post auditum Wottonum brevi missuri simus, qui ejus vos vices suppleat hominem non minus Venetum, hoc est vestrarum rerum studiosum quam ille fuit, interea vestrae Serenissimae Celsitudini fausta omnia et felicia quod ex animo precamur.
Dat. in palatio nostro Westmonasterii septimo die Martii, Anno 1619.
[autograph] Jacobus R.
Mar. 20.
Consiglio de' X
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
798. In the Council of Ten.
That the letters of our ambassador and bailo at Constantinople of the 1st Feb. last upon the statement made to them by Borisi, the high dragoman upon a request made by Gratiani for his daughter to wife, and the representations made in the matter by Assan Pasha, the Mufti and the English ambassador, be referred to the Savii of the Collegio, after enjoining due secrecy, and to the Senate also if they see fit.
Ayes14.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
Communication was immediately made to the Savii and a copy left in the hands of the Secretary Dolci.
[Italian.]
Feb. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Communicazioni
dal Consiglio
de'X.
Venetian
Archives.
799. FRANCESCO CONTARINI, ambassador, and ALMORO NANI, bailo of Venice at Constantinople, to the CHIEFS of the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Borisi, the high dragoman, informed us a few days ago that since the reconciliation between himself and Gratiani, the latter had asked for his daughter's hand. Assan Pasha and the Mufti had advised him to accept the proposal, and the matter has been published in Constantinople as if it were already settled. However, Borisi, as a public servant, desired advice as to what course he should follow; he is very reluctant and thinks it is only a device of Gratiani to advance his pretensions to the principality of Bugdania. He therefore asked our opinion. We told him that we should be obliged to consult your Serenity and praised him for telling us. He had met Gratiani at the Pasha's house, where the request was renewed, but he had made excuses. He called Gratiani a false man, who was paid by other princes and had done things against the republic.
The English ambassador recently came to speak to me, the bailo, upon this very question. He said that Gratiani through his secretary had begged him to come and ask me to help with Borisi towards this marriage, and Gratiani had wished the Imperial ambassador to come also, but he had dissuaded this, feeling that his relations with me were such that he felt sure that I should take everything in good part, he did not speak at any length on the subject as I think he only wished to be able to tell Gratiani that he had done what he had asked. I said it was no easy matter to give advice in such affairs and I noticed that people usually refrained from meddling in matrimonial matters. I knew Borisi for a man who looked well after his own interests and who was able to decide upon them better than any one else. Therefore I thought it better to say nothing either for or against.
The ambassador thereupon said that he was of the same opinion and he had even declined to advise his brother about the marriage of one of his daughters, because many people judge things by the event, and one is blamed for a wrong opinion although given upon good grounds.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 1st February, 1618. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Mar. 20.
Consiglio de'X
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
800. The COUNCIL OF TEN to the Bailo and Ambassador at Constantinople.
Commend their decision to communicate what Borisi reported about the matrimonial proposal suggested to him by Gratiani, and the prudent behaviour in replies and conversation upon this matter. The letter has been submitted to the Savii of the Collegio under the seal of secrecy so that they may give the necessary instructions.
Ayes15.
Noes0.
Neutral0.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Evidently no love was lost between Donato and Gabaleoni. In a news letter of March 14, Salvetti writes that Donato had sent privily to M. de. Modène in France casting reflections upon the operations of Gabaleoni and Biondi. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962A.
2 Anne died on March 12th at about four o'clock in the morning. The account given here tallies with that sent by Chamberlain to Carleton on the 6th March, old style. Birch, Court and Times of James I. ii., page 145.
3 Wotton's letter to the king of the 5th March, 1618, O.S., describing this audience and the one of the 14th (No. 786 above), does not breathe a word of any desire of the Venetians to use the royal ships. State Papers. Foreign. Venice.
4 Taneguy le Veneur, Comte de Tillières.