Venice
April 1619, 18-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1909

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523-534

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'Venice: April 1619, 18-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 523-534. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88703 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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April 1619

April 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
837. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king is still sick and cannot leave his bed, although he is out of danger as I reported before. I sent a special messenger to the Marquis of Buckingham to lead the way towards communicating to him the news and instructions which I received from your Serenity in your last letters of the 22nd ult. But the the marquis replied as you will see from the enclosed letter, from which you will understand the actual state of his Majesty's health, which certainly is not so assured as could be desired and owing to to his irregular way of living (li disordini del suo vivere), very harmful to all treatment, it becomes daily more doubtful and uncertain.
All business sleeps owing to the king's condition, and notably the two questions which concern the public weal so much and mean a diversion of ill from your Excellencies. One is the issuing forth of the fleet, for although it is ready they have no orders and no decision has been taken. The other is the proposed junction with the States for the India trade. In this, being exasperated by the private negotiations, they are awaiting the interposition of the king's hand to provide a remedy. The commissioners have been hoping to see his Majesty for many days, but they have been obliged to return and will have to wait until he is in a better state of health before they can speak to him.
The report of a league between the pope, your Serenity and Savoy has been published abroad here to the great detriment of the public service, and without the advantage of being true. The author of this false news is Marc Antonio de Dominis, sometime Archbishop of Spalato, who now, as a rebel against God and the Church, enjoys considerable revenues and honours in this kingdom and the king's favour. He has succeeded in bringing this information to the king's ear and has impressed Canterbury and many of the Council. However, the ambassador of Savoy has countermined and prevented his Majesty from believing this lie. He took pains to write the true facts to Buckingham and others of the Court, and he has caused very stern and angry representations to be made to Dominis. But that wretched man never ceases his efforts to injure the Catholic religion and the union, adding false doctrine to his ideas, and the books which are continually issuing from his diabolical forge. Quite recently a very scandalous book has appeared against the Council of Trent. (fn. 1) I will not speak of the above matter unless provoked, and I will await instructions.
An extraordinary ambassador is daily expected from France to offer condolences upon the queen's death. Immediately afterwards Mr. Arbort (fn. 2) will leave for that court, a man of great ability who has followed the profession of arms hitherto; indeed he offered his sword in the service of your Serenity and to levy troops in case of need, appearing very friendly to the republic.
The agent resident at this court for the Prince Palatine is now away in the country. When he returns I will tell him of the league with Savoy. The other day the Ambassador Gabaleoni showed me a letter of the Prince of Piedmont from Paris in which his Highness speaks of me very honourably and thanks me for the manner in which I have always served his house, and commands the ambassador to show me every honour and confidence. So that is the end of the duke's complaint, of which nothing has been heard during the three months that Gabaleoni has been here, though he has resorted to the sovereign upon all affairs. However, I send a copy of the letter which I wrote to Gabaleoni on his arrival at Dover, which will show how I honoured him. As I fear that my unhappy lot and unlucky star may prevail over truth and reason, I have written the enclosed lines to the duke, so that your Serenity may do with them as you please.
London, the 18th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
838. ANTONIO DONATO to the AMBASSADOR GABALEONI.
The reasons for your visit to this kingdom are so worthy of the duke's magnanimity that every one will wish you complete success. His Majesty and all the court show their affection and esteem for you. I shall be charmed by your presence here and shall always be ready to display my esteem for their Highnesses and for yourself.
London, the 4th February, 1618. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
839. To the Venetian Ambassador.
I have communicated your letter to his Majesty, who is much gratified at the affection which you display towards him. Although he is on the way to recover his health he can hardly be called convalescent, but simply better than he was, thank God. As soon as he is fit to attend to business I will let you know his Majesty's will about an audience.
Royston, the 5th April, 1619.
BUCKINGHAM [autograph].
[French.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
840. Translation of the above.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
841. To the Duke of Savoy
There is no one here who does not recognise that my service here for the republic is equally that of your Highness. This becomes me the more because I long had the honour of serving you and of admiring your high qualities. I have always spoken of you with the deepest respect before the nobility and court here. Cease then from your complaints and take better information from the Ambassador Gabaleoni.
London, the 18th April, 1619.
ANTONIO DONATO.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
842. The secretary of the ambassador of the King of Great Britain having come into the Cabinet on the 18th inst, and stated what the ambassador said to the notary of our chancery, adding that he was about to send a gentleman to England and would await the commands of his Serenity: that a secretary go to the ambassador's house and after reading the deliberation of the 21st ult. await his reply and report the same.
Ayes143.
Noes0.
Neutral4.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
843. To the Ambassador in England.
With your letters of the 28th ult. we receive the complaint of the owner of the ship Centurion and other complaints for a like cause. By now he will have been satisfied for a part of his claims. They were reasonable, but it was necessary to correct mistakes, so delay is sometimes necessary. With regard to the payment made in current money, they must abide by the agreement. You must render these merchants content with your usual prudence.
The ambassador of his Majesty resident at the Hague has spoken to our secretary as you will see by the enclosed copy. We direct you to offer our condolences to his Majesty upon the death of the queen. You will add whatever else may happily suggest itself to you. You will also thank his Majesty for the said office performed by his ambassador. We send you the news from Spain of the proposal to unite the ships of the two sovereigns, so that you may discover the truth and advise us. As for the affairs of Mainwaring, since his hopes have lost all grounds you had better let the matter drop.
Ayes144.
Noes0.
Neutral3.
[Italian.]
April 20.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
844. In conformity with the orders of the Senate, I, Giovanni Rizzardo, secretary of your Serenity, went to call upon the ambassador of the King of Great Britain in his house. After the usual compliments he said, I thank his Serenity for the honour done to me. I will not fail to inform his Majesty of what he tells me about the union with the Duke of Savoy. I think he will be surprised at two things. Firstly, that the fact is now communicated to him, although he knew about it because so important a league could not remain completely hidden, and that the republic, which is so friendly with him, has not informed him before, especially as they were dealing with a prince so friendly to him. Secondly, that the announcement is made at this moment because I am informed that his Majesty made earnest enquiries in Spain about their great naval preparations and was assured by the Catholic king upon his crown, his children and his word of honour that they were not directed against the republic. I will inform his Majesty of what has been said to me with such good offices as I always use to serve his Serenity and will supply the reasons given to me, for it is a serious matter for a king to desire one way and his minister to act another.
With respect to the Princes of the Union he said that he would have wished for a more explicit declaration about an ambassador. He said: I have at other times heard his Serenity speak in favour of a union of hearts, and I have been told that they would correspond. It does not seem to me that formalities should change the substance of things. The difficulty seems to consist in who should be the first to send, and this may wreck all. I may say firstly that it is his Majesty who makes the request and he is head of the Union. Then it is not a question of sending to one prince, not even to the greatest of them, who indeed is great, but to all the Princes of the Union, forming a great corporation. It is not a question of making a union or league, but to send ministers mutually to treat of matters touching all the parties. It would be easy to find a way to avoid the formality hindering the substance, by sending at the same time, so that the first meetings of the Princes and of the Senate should discuss the question of sending ambassadors. I was also awaiting good news of the affair of the Duke of Holstein. He has sent to the Grisons to ask for the pass, and found them very ready to oblige him, but as they had recently passed a decree that they would not grant a passage of troops to any power unless that power itself asked for it, they would not grant him anything unless the republic made the request. Thus the matter does not rest with him; he has done his part and it rests with his Serenity to ask for the pass. I should like to see this prince serving the republic, because I know that she would be well served.
I, the Secretary, told him that I would report everything to your Serenity, as I had no further orders, and with that I took leave.
[Italian.]
April 24.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
845. The Ambassador of the King of Great Britain came into the Cabinet and spoke substantially as follows:—
Some days ago I received instructions from my king to inform your Excellencies of the death of our queen. I could not come before because I was obliged to arrange my household in a manner befitting the occasion. We have lost a queen who was universally loved and esteemed. The wife, daughter and sister of a king, she was endowed with singular virtues. She showed herself a true Christian and met her end with fortitude. The loss is great, but I will conclude with Domine fiat voluntas sua, the final philosophy of heaven and earth.
I thank your Serenity for the communication made to me through the Secretary Rizzardo about the league with the Duke of Savoy. I know his Majesty will be glad of it and every one who cares for the general good should rejoice; the angels themselves will rejoice at such a just union for defence. I have, however, something to add. I know that it does not become me to speak, but as a most zealous servant of your Serenity I should like to say, not by way of advice but as a humble reminder, that this union ought to be more comprehensive. A marriage alliance is made between two powers, but a defensive league should be with several and with great forces. The Duke of Savoy is a prince of high standing and this bond is bound to be good, but I believe that an alliance with yet other powers would be more useful and more safe. The document read to me by the Secretary Rizzardo states that the league is defensive, but this end would be strengthened by the accession of other powers. In the matter which I brought forward about the Princes of the Union in Germany, I am bound to say that I expected a different reply from the one that was read to me, because it is too general. I should have preferred it less so. I fear I did not make myself fully understood. The proposal was to send ministers for a mutual correspondence and sign of friendship. From such a general reply I fear that formalities will prevent a favourable issue. But the substance of the matter is perhaps not what it looks like, and the reasons of state are clear. The King of Great Britain has made a proposal, not in his individual capacity, but as chief of the Princes of the Union, for this sending of ministers, and his being the first to ask it should remove every scruple. Even in the greatest affairs good results are often prevented by formalities, but it is material that the king has been the first to ask. I therefore again recommend the matter to the prudent consideration of your Serenity.
In the absence of the Doge, Giacomo da Pesaro, the senior councillor, replied expressing regret at the death of the queen. Their ambassador had been instructed to offer his condolences. The league with the Duke of Savoy was simply made for the defence of their common states. They had informed his Majesty because they hoped he would approve. The ambassador's new request would be duly considered and they would inform him of anything fresh.
The ambassador said: I will not now trouble your Serenity further. I will simply once more recommend the case of the Duke of Holstein. He recently sent his chamberlain to the Grisons, and he wished to go in person; but he received a letter telling him that they had made a decree not to allow men to pass to the service of any power except at the request of such power, and they say it is not proper for the republic to desire troops and to be unwilling to ask for them. I recommend the duke most highly.
The Most Illustrious Pesaro replied that the affair was already taken in hand and they would consider it carefully; with that the ambassador took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
April 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
846. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity's letters of the 2nd inst. have come to me like the means of healing to a sick man, because I can come to defend myself. I will first wait to hear from the Ambassador Gritti, and after kissing the hands of the king and prince and performing other necessary duties I will set out on my journey. When I arrive I will soon clear myself. I thank your Serenity for the favour accorded to me.
London, the 25th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Dalmazia.
Venetian
Archives.
847. MARIN GARZONI, Captain and Count of Spalato, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In prompt execution of your Serenity's letters of the 9th inst. which only reached me the day before yesterday, I set to work to discover the particulars. I find that many months ago some Englishmen arrived in this city who were considered persons of quality, on their way from Constantinople, and who had been in quarantine in the jurisdiction of Trau. On their release they came here to confer with Zuanne Capogrosso, a dependant and close friend of the former Archbishop Dominis. But on the very day of their arrival and almost at the very hour this Capogrosso was buried, having expired the day before. Accordingly these English gentlemen, who called themselves nephews of the ambassador of the King of England, left this city without stopping more than a bare hour.
I find that the present archbishop found at Capogrosso's some books, manifestoes and a portrait of this Dominis, sent by him after his arrival in England, all of which were immediately burned in the archbishop's presence. From that time forward no other Englishman has put in an appearance here to my knowledge, and I make a point of knowing of all the foreigners who come here. It is true that some days ago a tartana arrived here from Corfu of some Frenchmen, laden with gall nuts, but they did not confer with anyone so far as I could learn and they afterwards left for Venice. However, I will use all diligence to discover if there are any further particulars about the former Archbishop Dominis. At present he has no relations left here, since a nephew called Zuanne de Dominis, brother-in-law of Capogrosso, returned to live at his native Arba many months ago, and his cousin Marco Negri lives there at present.
Spalato, the 25th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
848. To the Ambassador in England.
We sent you a copy of the exposition of his Majesty's ambassador. We do not think that the king or anyone else has complained of delay in communicating about the league. In any case you can say that although concluded more than a year ago it had not been communicated to anyone. His Majesty was among the first to be told, as was his due.
With regard to sending and receiving ambassadors with the princes of the Union, you have already had our reply to the ambassador, to which we adhere. If any one speaks to you about the promises made by the Spaniards to the king, you will show how different are the actions of the ministers from the words of the king. You will see by the enclosed copies of letters from Naples how they continue to protect and help the Uscocchi and other particulars disclosing the designs of the Spaniards. You will try to find out what promises has been given by Spain to the king and if there are good grounds for what the ambassador has said. It cannot fail to help if you obtain from his Majesty something which may interest him in our affairs.
If you have already offered our condolences upon the death of the queen, you will do nothing further, but if you have delayed this, owing to his indisposition, we send you a letter to deliver to him, saying appropriate words at the same time.
Ayes125.
Noes0.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
April 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
849. To the King of Great Britain.
We are confident that your Majesty is assured of the great sorrow which the death of the queen has caused us, as her virtues were known to all. We think it right, however, to offer our sincere condolences, which our ambassador will deliver.
Ayes125.
Noes0.
Neutral6.
[Italian.]
April 27
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
850. To the Ambassador in Spain and the like to the other Courts.
The Uscocchi are still openly favoured at Naples. Ossuna encourages their offers to make fresh depredations and has offered them some brigantines. They have promulgated a false report that our resident refused to receive back the stolen property.
At Milan they say the Duke of Savoy is arming fresh troops and from this they pretend that they must arm the state of Milan more strongly, but a person sent from Milan to Piedmont reported that he had found nothing. This is for information.
Ayes129.
Noes0.
Neutral1.
[Italian.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costant.
Venetian
Archives.
851. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Yesterday evening I went to see the Captain Pasha at the Arsenal. He assured me of his friendly disposition towards the republic. He reminded me that his master had commanded him to have no less care of our affairs than of his own. He would have done much more if ill fortune had not prevented him. He would now arrange with me to take his fleet against our enemies if he received 20 to 25,000 sequins and expenses. He did not wish to negotiate about this with me, although he knew we were paying ships from Flanders and England. I said that the English and Flemish ships belonged to private individuals, and they naturally had to be paid, but it would be most derogatory to pay for the Imperial fleet.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, the 28th April, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
852. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king's health continues to improve and should soon be completely established. He has submitted to treatment and to be released from the humours which kept him low. However, he keeps his bed and is very weak, being stunned by the great dangers he has passed through. Accordingly there has been no hope of any negotiations with him for some days past. Nevertheless the Lord High Admiral has had all the other royal ships put in a state of repair, numbering fourteen in all, and they have sent away the merchant ships, thinking that for the same money they can have their tall and powerful vessels all ready and armed. This is a resolution worthy of the greatness of the kingdom and of his own glory, but it delays the actual sailing of the fleet.
From Spain we hear of the total disbanding of their fleet on these shores with a promise not to arm again without informing his Majesty; the forthcoming departure of Don Diego for this kingdom and the ever increasing desire of the Catholic king for a marriage alliance here. Thus their opinions are in a state of fluctuation, and so the Spaniards damp down the ideas and acts which are so necessary for the common welfare.
The Ambassador of Savoy has had a courier from Turin with orders to communicate the league to his Majesty. He came to tell me about it and read me the duke's letter. He seemed anxious that we should perform this office together, as showing greater respect and confidence in the king. I expressed my readiness to oblige him in conformity with my instructions. But Gabaleoni has instructions to formally invite the king to enter the league and expects his Majesty will readily agree. As the king is sick he will leave me or others to tell him about the alliance and not to confuse it with other matters, apparently right enough but essentially useless and harmful.
They are expecting the ambassador extraordinary from France, the Marquis of Trinel, formerly ambassador at Rome, a worthy man for whom they are making suitable preparations. Ambassadors have arrived from Denmark and from the Archduke from Brussels (fn. 3) ; they are expecting Count Villa, ambassador extraordinary from Savoy. Thus the Court is overwhelmed with condolences upon the queen's death, and the affairs of Germany and the Palatine sleep, in spite of continual prayers and requests, and so do all other matters of business.
London, the 25th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Capitano
General
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
853. LORENZO VENIER, Captain General at Sea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses note of the ships with the names of their commanders (governatori).
The galley at Curzola, the 28th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
854. English ships.
Royal ExchangeColonel Peyton.
HerculesPiero Ciuran.
AbigailBortholomio Magno.
Dragon.
Girarda.
Matthew.
Centurion.
[Italian.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Dalmazia.
Venetian
Archives.
855. ZACHARIA CABRIEL, Venetian General of the Islands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Three days ago I was discussing with the General the best and safest way for me to go to Corfu, considering the movements of the Spanish fleet. It was finally decided that I should embark upon the seven English ships, which are here, as he could not let me have any of the galleys. I shall start on these ships as soon as possible.
Curzola, the 28th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Dalmazia.
Venetian
Archives.
856. ALVISE BRAGADIN, Proveditore at Canea, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Captain General proposed to send three of the best galleys of the fleet to take to Corfu the most Excellent Cabriel, general of those islands. The galleys were ready to start when your Serenity's letters arrived. After he had read them his Excellency decided to stop the galleys, and after consulting the Board he resolved to send the seven English bertons instead. This change causes me some inconvenience, but I pray God it may turn out well.
Curzola, the 28th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
857. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Piedmont has made strong complaints against Luynes. He says among other things that when the duke, at Luynes's request, interested himself to bring about a reconciliation between the crowns of France and England, he asked no other reward except that Luynes should do nothing to interfere with his plan to marry one of his daughters to the Prince of Wales. He had broken his promise because among the first things in the instructions to the Marquis of Trinel, the ambassador extraordinary to England, he is to take up negotiations for the marriage of the king's third sister to that prince.
Paris, the 30th April, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
858. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Majesty remains at St. Germains at St. Germans owing to the fear of plague at Paris, several persons having died, including a servant of the Marquis of Trinel. When the marquis proposed to go to St. Germains to take leave, preparatory to setting out for his embassy to England, he received orders to stop owing to this circumstance.
Paris, the 30th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
859. RANIER ZEN and ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The nephew of the English agent came to show me, Pesaro, due honour on my arrival here, notwithstanding the absence of his uncle. I reciprocated the compliment fully.
Turin, the last day of April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
860. RANIER ZEN and ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassadors in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The duke thinks that the fleet now being prepared by the King of England may serve to go to Spain to bring away the infanta as wife for the Prince of Wales and fetch her safely to England. He mentioned how very necessary the settling of this marriage had become to the Spaniards, especially now that so many things are turning to their disadvantage, and also that the English king had always shown some inclination towards the alliance.
Turin, the 30th April, 1619.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
861. The ambassador of the King of Great Britain came into the Cabinet and after making a reverence to the doge, he presented a letter. After it had been read he said:
Your Serenity sees that my king wishes to recall me, not because the ordinary three years of an embassy have expired but for grave reasons. His Majesty shows me not so much favour as justice, as he knows what zeal I have shown for the service of the republic.
With regard to the king's ships, when your Serenity asked for them, I represented the matter as strongly as possible to his Majesty and Sir [Henry] Mainwaring did his share, as I hope your ambassador has represented. His Majesty is most anxious to satisfy your Serenity and is ashamed, if I may say so, at being, unable to grant this. I will give three or four of the chief reasons. He does not feel that the republic needs the ships, because the king of Spain has assured him more than once and has recently pledged his honour that he has no intentions against your Serenity. He feels that he cannot gratify the republic, because his honour and dignity would be compromised by lending ships; he does not think one prince should lend ships to another, however friendly they may be. If his Majesty sent the ships to the coasts of Spain, that would suffice to alarm the Spaniards, and that would serve as the Spaniards would have to be on their guard there. Such are the reasons which his Majesty commands me to state to your Serenity. It is not so much a refusal as a postponement; time will show, as his Majesty is most anxious to afford every possible satisfaction to the republic. I may add that if your Serenity should ask for ships from individuals, the merchants of the India Company have a good number, of seven or eight hundred tons, like the king's, and I think his Majesty would consent to their going to serve your Serenity. He can not only give leave, but use his authority, and if your Serenity thinks that his name would help, they might come under his flag.
I now turn to my letter of leave. I will come on Saturday with your Serenity's permission, to bid farewell, but I hope to return another time. I leave here unwillingly. I consider this my second country, where I have dwelt for many years, but wherever I may be I shall always remain the devoted servant of the republic. I looked forward to staying at least three or four years longer.
The doge replied: We are fully satisfied of the friendliness of his Majesty; if their lordships here think the question of the ships requires further consideration, we will let you know. It is a great thing that the King of Spain should make the promise which you report, and we are bound to believe it, but we cannot understand why his ministers act in a way so contrary to the royal wishes and that these operations do not reach the ears of his Majesty. The great expenses which they are incurring with his money cannot be made without his knowledge. A treaty was made with the interposition of France, agreed to in Spain, ratified in Germany and sincerely carried out by us, but on the other side absolutely nothing has been done. They have not restored our ships, they harbour the Uscocchi and encourage them to attack our subjects. Not a single promise has been fulfilled. The Uscocchi continue their practices and are understood to be planning fresh raids. They have taken ships of great value from our merchants, and we have received no recompense, nor do we expect anything. Your Excellency is well acquainted with all the particulars and we beg you to acquaint his Majesty, so that he may make such representations to Spain as he may see fit, since the preservation of Italy should be dear to him.
Your Excellency has always been welcome and beloved by our republic for your ability and prudence. We are sorry for your departure but feel sure that his Majesty will honour you and give you further employment. We shall be pleased to see you next Saturday, and we wish you a pleasant journey, and all health and prosperity.
The ambassador said he would report as desired. On his way home he hoped to perform some good offices with the princes of Germany. He then presented a memorial about some cloth of Rudolph Simes, an English merchant, took leave and departed.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The History of the Council of Trent published under the name of Pietro Soave Polano, but commonly attributed to Fra Paolo Sarpi. The MS. was brought to England by the Archbishop of Spalato at the end of 1616. See Mr. Pearsall Smith's Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, i. page 150. Nathaniel Brent was commissioned by the Archbishop of Canterbury to prepare an English translation, which appeared in 1620.
2 Edward Herbert, afterwards Lord Herbert of Cherbury. He took part in the siege of Juliers in 1610 and joined the army of the Prince of Orange as a volunteer in 1614. He was very fond of fighting duels, of which his autobiography contains many particulars.
3 Sir Andrew Sinclair from Denmark and the Count de Noyelles from the Archduke.