Venice
May 1619, 1-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

534-544

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: May 1619, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 15: 1617-1619 (1909), pp. 534-544. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88704 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

May 1619

May 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milan.
Venetian
Archives.
862. ANTONIO MARIA VINCENTI, Venetian Secretary at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
While the Spaniards continue to display a strong feeling about the league between the most serene republic and the Duke of Savoy they also continue to publish the most fantastic reports far removed from the truth. They had already given out that the King of England, the States and the Protestant princes were included. Now they say that when the pope refused to enter and the other princes of Italy likewise, your Excellencies turned to the above named heretics. They add that the declaration has rendered it impossible for them to observe their promises in past treaties.
Milan, the 1st May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
863. To the King of Great Britain.
Sir Henry Wotton, your Majesty's ambassador here, has been to inform us of your will and to present letters expressing the same, for his return home. We have always esteemed him highly for the dignity he held and for his own merits, finding him on the second as well as on the first occasion, a man of many high qualities, prudent in action and of great ability in affairs. Although it is superfluous we are glad to render this testimony to his merits, which were recognised indeed by his appointment for a second time to this charge. His long experience has rendered him well acquainted with our high regard for your Majesty. He is exceedingly well informed upon affairs and will assure you of our excellent disposition towards the general good. He will also say how gladly we hear of the continual prosperity of your Majesty to whom we wish long and prosperous years.
Ayes87.
Noes4.
Neutral24.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
864. It being proper to show the same sign of honour to Sir Henry Wotton, ambassador of the King of Great Britain, on his return home, as it is customary for the republic to show towards other ambassadors in similar circumstances, that 1,000 gold crowns be spent upon a chain, to be presented to the said ambassador, and that 200 crowns be presented to his secretary in the usual way.
That the Proveditore in the mint for the stores of gold and silver be directed to consign to the depository sufficient gold for the said value of 1,200 crowns, to be replaced by an equivalent value of silver and the caisse made up.
Ayes87.
Noes4.
Neutral24.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
865. That the Ambassador of the King of Great Britain be summoned to the Cabinet and the following be read to him:
Through all the time that your Excellency has been here as ambassador you have been able to see our esteem for you. We should have been pleased for you to stay longer, but we hope that his Majesty intends to honour you further. We would rather this news had come later, as we have given leave to our Ambassador Donato to return home upon important affairs, though we have sent the Ambassador Gritti to take his place during his absence. It is unfortunate that ambassadors may be wanting on both sides at the same time. We have sent letters expressing our satisfaction with you and we wish you a good journey. You will return to Court well informed upon the affairs of Italy and you know what value to place upon the promise of the Catholic king to his Majesty. If it is carried out, we ask no more and his Majesty will have the satisfaction and the glory. But you see that actions point the other way; they do not carry out the treaty or make restitution. They mean to exhaust the republic and they foment the Uscocchi. One of the most important things you will have to represent to his Majesty will be this truth, showing him the sincerity of the republic and the determination of the Spaniards to harass her. We do not doubt that you will persuade his Majesty to take decisions helpful to the common weal and the universal peace.
With regard to his Majesty's ships for our fleet, we are sure of your good offices and we believe that Mainwaring has done his part. We must thank his Majesty for his friendliness towards our affairs. We appreciate the reasons why he makes no fixed resolutions now, and we feel sure that in case of need we shall be favoured with ships and other things. Your Excellency's proposal about merchant ships proves your good disposition towards us and we believe his Majesty in case of need will not fail us with ships, flags and his authority.
On your journey you will see the Princes of the Union, we hope that you will express to them our concern for their interests. Our fleet is an obstacle to the proposal to send troops through the Gulf to Trieste. We can do no more at present for reasons with which your Excellency is well acquainted.
Ayes87.
Noes4.
Neutral24.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
866. To the Ambassador in England.
The ambassador of his Majesty resident here came before us almost unexpectedly to convey what you will see by the enclosed copy of his exposition, and presented a letter from his king about his return, which is worthy of remark on account of the manner of the recall. We therefore direct you to investigate this matter so far as you can and send us special particulars of the reasons which may have moved his Majesty to take such action, without telling you, without sending any one in his place, and without any previous intimation. We think it for our advantage that he should leave here content and that he may make representations for the benefit of our affairs both to his Majesty and the ministers. We are giving him the ordinary present as well as a letter of which we send a copy for your information, and we propose to have the speech of which we send you a copy, read to him. You will seize a favourable opportunity to assure his Majesty of the complete satisfaction we have derived from the ambassador, with such remarks as are usual upon such an occasion.
You will see what the ambassador said about his king's opinion that we need no help, owing to the Catholic king's promise. The ambassador said the same on the 29th ult. more fully. We desire you to thank his Majesty for his good offices in our favour and at the same time inform him of what is taking place, quite opposed to what the Spaniards pretend, as they utterly disregard their promises. You will speak of the proceedings of Ossuna and the Uscocchi. You will try to induce his Majesty to continue his representations.
You will do nothing further about the ships, waiting to see what reply is given to the Ambassador Wotton in the matter. You need make no further requests, but if an opportunity occurs you can advance the previous arguments and show that you consider the reply not as a refusal but as a postponement.
It also serves our interest to favour the decision to send out the king's fleet. You will praise this prudent decision to his Majesty and express satisfaction.
We expect you have had audience of his Majesty by now and have communicated our league with the Duke of Savoy, unless the duke's ambassador has not received orders for this. If for any reason you have not done this, you will seize an opportunity of executing this necessary office. Canterbury told you that he heard that after the conclusion of the league with Savoy negotiations were opened with the pope. This rumour would produce a bad impression upon the king, and a settlement even worse as well as upon others. You made a prudent reply. The archbishop is naturally opposed to the pope and spoke thus rather for himself than the king. We think you should be fully informed upon this subject and we send you the particulars. If nothing more is said about the matter, as we hope, you had better keep silence, but if you hear anything said at Court you will let it be known that the league has been concluded with no one except the Duke of Savoy and simply for defence. If the king or any minister speaks about it, you will employ your prudence to tranquillise his Majesty and preserve his friendship for us, making a similar declaration and saying that if others were included we should let him know. It was necessary to communicate the league to the powers of Italy and the pope among the rest. It would have been insulting to leave any one out. We knew it would only induce the pope to proclaim his neutrality, as he could not declare against any one defending himself, and in fact he has made such a proclamation. The republic has always acted sincerely and will continue to do so. The league was made because the Spaniards did not carry out their part of the treaty. It was only reasonable that the King of France, who was so much interested, should be invited to enter. All these things are simply for your information, and you will on no account speak about them, especially about France, unless you are provoked by the king or the ministers, and even so you will use all sobriety and circumspection.
Ayes33.
Noes4.
Neutral24.
That the following be added:
If the king speaks about it or expressly orders a minister to do so, although we do not believe that he will, so that you are compelled to reply, you will say as from us that these offices with the powers, which have produced no results, were intended to deprive them of any pretext for taking the opposite side. Things being as they are, it is superfluous to say more, as the republic has communicated the whole truth to his Majesty, namely that the league is with the Duke of Savoy alone.
Ayes87.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
867. That in gratification of the English ambassador and in response to his request made at his departure, the master of the Dazio be directed to release the cloth of Rudolph Simes, which has been arrested, after taking security from those interested that it will not be carried to the Levant.
Ayes87.
Noes4.
Neutral24.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
868. ANTONIO DONATO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassador of the Duke of Savoy went to see the king four days ago and informed him of the alliance between your Serenity and his Highness, giving a formal invitation to the king to enter this union for the common defence and to comprise therein the Protestant princes of Germany and the States. The king listened gladly to the news of the league but made no reply to the invitation, turning in his seat and going on to speak of something else. The ambassador told me this himself when he met me in the street on my way to see his Majesty. He urged me to kindle the king and obtain a reply from him. I said that I would obey my instructions. I did so, telling his Majesty what I was commanded in the letters of the 4th March. The king replied that he approved of the league which he had desired and urged and he ought to think of his own share towards the general good. I went on to tell him of the Spanish armaments, which are constantly increasing and suggested that it behoved him to act when Christendom stood in the midst of such perils. I offered condolences upon the queen's death and congratulated him upon the state of his health. This pleased him exceedingly. When I left the royal apartments the Marquis of Buckingham recommended Sir [Henry] Mainwaring to me in the name of his Majesty. He praised his qualities and said it would greatly please him to see him employed in the service of the republic, which would profit largely from them.
I found his Majesty upon a chair, his legs covered by a velvet cloth and I understood his weakness and feeble state of health, as he is much wasted, still shaken with the fear of his danger, fearful of the future and neither well nor convalescent. However he hears some business and issues a few orders. He is now about to send to Germany Lord Hay, who is ready to sail. He is taking 150 persons with him as he thinks a splendid appearance will help his business, which will need all the help it can get. But private affairs command much more interest here and a report is current that the Spaniards are managing this embassy to work it in their own interests.
The ambassador extraordinary from the archduke has arrived. (fn. 1) I have called upon him and found my visit welcome. He came down the stairs to meet me, and we called each other Excellency. He is a man of high standing and has brought a number of lords and gentlemen with him. He told me that 9,000 foot and 3,000 horse are already on the way to King Ferdinand. They are going straight to Alsace, will touch Lorraine and will reach their destination by June. He said it would be soon over for the forces of the Catholic king will settle everything; they will make Ferdinand emperor and give him back the crowns which are now in dispute.
I have been arranging my domestic affairs. I shall leave all my household here as if I were present, and I am quite ready to start, I am only waiting to hear from the Ambassador Gritti. These hours of delay torture me.
London, the 3rd May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
869. PIERO GRITTI, Venetian Ambassador designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I reached here yesterday after a long voyage due to contrary winds. The journey from Madrid to Barcelona was very tiresome. The Consul Albano handed me your Serenity's letter of 2 April directing me to go to England. The inconveniences could not possibly be greater, as I had already accomplished the greater part of my long journey. However, I am ready as ever to obey the commands of your Serenity without regard to my private interests. I have made arrangements to leave the day after to-morrow. I will travel by sea and the French frontier. I have sent a courier to England to inform the Ambassador Donato of my coming.
Genoa, the 4th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
870. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador told me that negotiations are on foot for the marriage of a daughter of the Margrave of Brandenburg to a member of the house of Nassau. Prince Maurice was conducting the negotiations, which were in an advanced stage. The princess was to go to Cleves on the pretext of a visit to the prince, her brother, and then she would be close at hand. There is some doubt if they would want her for Prince Henry, but his Excellency might take her himself. The reasons for this alliance are not disclosed, but the dowry would doubtless comprise the states of Juliers and Cleves.
The Hague, the 5th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 5.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere,
Re e Regine d'
Inghilterra.
871. Serenissime Princeps.
Quam ex serenitatis Vestrae literis intellexerimus nobilissimum D. Antonium Donatum qui Legationem hactenus apud Serenissimum Regem Dominum et parentem nostrum feliciter abiit a vobis ad breve tempus ad componenda privata negotia redeundi copiam et commeatum impetrasse eum hisce nostris ita Serenitati V. commendatum voluimus ut ex his vobis inclytissimae Reip. constet in eo nullum aut boni civis aut prudentissimi Legati officium desiderari potuisse nobisque ita se probasse ut ipsum prope inviti dimiserimus et ut absentem desideraturi ita reversum complexari et benevolo gratoque animo excepturi sumus. Si quid autem imperare visum fuerit quod a nobis aut Vestrae Serenitatis aut Reip. causa requiri possit pro ea quam saepius vovimus fide curaturos nos spondemus.
V. Serenitatis. Amantissimus
Carolus P. [autograph.]
Dat. ad Theobald. 25 Aprilis, 1619.
May 5.
Collegio.
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
872. The Ambassador of the King of Great Britain was summoned to the Cabinet, and the matter decided upon the 3rd was read to him; he said:
I am gratified with what the Senate has had read to me. I do not merit the favour but I heartily thank you. Before proceeding further I will relate the news from England, which is not too good. My king has been in peril for his life. For eight days his sickness was very severe. He is still very weak but recovering. Your Serenity had a share in the recovery, for Doctor Despotino, a subject of the republic, happened to be there and displayed his great skill and a thorough knowledge of his Majesty's distemper. He gave great satisfaction and the king sent him home in his own carriage, a sign of great favour. (fn. 2)
I now come to the document read to me, I see you remark that the court is without an ambassador. I suggest that the minister left in place of your ambassador will suffice, as it will only be for a short time. When I get back and see his Majesty, I know he will decide to send back me or someone else, and meanwhile I will leave here Gregorio de' Monti, who is skilled, discreet and well known to you. It shows our sincerity when we employ your own subjects, without a shadow of suspicion.
Although your Serenity has not had satisfaction about the ships, at least, his Majesty's good will is certain, and he has received such solemn assurances from the King of Spain that he does not purpose to trouble the republic that he cannot think that it needs help. But in case of need he would undoubtedly come forward. If his Majesty sees me, I will inform him of the evil proceedings of the ministers. At my departure I shall be different from all the other ambassadors. They have all asked for some favour. I have been here three years and have not asked for a single favour and I have decided not to ask for anything on leaving. I have lived circumspectly, admitting nothing contraband to my house, and refusing to receive exiles, though I have had opportunity more than once. If I have deserved your commendation, that will be my reward. I consider myself fortunate in every way, I have regrets upon one subject only, I should have thought that the Duke of Holstein, with his high recommendations would have been considered worthy of acceptance by the republic. I am afraid it will be said that the matter fell through owing to my feebleness. He will be going about with me and will afterwards come to take leave. I beg you to show him your customary benevolence, so that he may depart satisfied. I am leaving Gregorio di Monti in charge and I beg you to give him audience when necessary. I wish your Serenity long life and prosperity, and hope I may return.
The doge replied: We are glad you are gratified with the Senate's communication. We heard of his Majesty's sickness and are pleased at his recovery, and we are glad to hear that he will not in future expose himself so much to the fatigues of the chase and will take more care of himself. We wish him all prosperity and issue for his son with a better establishment of the succession in his kingdom. We have great hopes from the Princes of the Union. The Duke of Holstein shall have a hearty welcome and we shall remember his offer possibly to avail ourselves of it at another time. If the occasion had been greater we should have employed him, and your Excellency's recommendations had great weight with us. We wish you a pleasant journey and all prosperity. If you return we shall always be glad to see you. I have one thing to add, which is not contained in the document; to gratify you the Senate has given orders for the release of the cloth of the English merchant whom you recommended. The Secretary Monti will always be welcome.
The ambassador made some complimentary remarks, and after introducing an earl, who had come from England, to kiss his Serenity's hand, and presenting Gregorio Monti, he took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
May 6.
Show case,
Venetian
Archives.
873. Jacobus dei Gratia etc. Antonio Priolo inclyto Venetiarum Duci, Amico nostro charissimo, Salutem et sincerum amorem etc.
Serenissime princeps amice charissime: Virum Nobilem et ab inclyta vestra Republica Legatum Antonium Donatum, quam in-dicaret nobis sibi constitutum esse serias ob causas in patriam reverti ut ex vestris literis plenius apparet, dimittere non potuimus sine eo quo dignus est, elogio, tum propter insignem morum comitatem et ingenii dulcedinem, tum ob gravitatem et prudentiam maturam, quibus virtutibus se parem ostendit legationis muneri, quo apud nos cum laude functus est et dignum se praestitit Serenissimo suo patruo piae memoriae, nupero Venetiarum Duce, Leonardo Donato. Tam aegre itaque hominem his dotibus nobis charissimum dimisimus, quam libenter, ex iisdem vestris literis intelleximus brevi illum ad nos reversurum: interim qui ejus vices apud nos vestro mandato suppleturus venit, virum patricium, Petrum Grittium, ea qua par est humanitate excipiemus, reditum Donati, confectis feliciter et cum Deo negotiis praestolaturi; Vestram Serenitatem et Rempublicam, quam pace armisque florentissimam vovemus, Dei Opt. Max. commendantes tutelae. Dat. e palatio nostro Westmonasterii 26 Aprilis Anno 1619.
Jacobus R. [autograph.]
et si per has literas quanti aestimarem legatum hunc vestrum fusius explicassem, mihi ipso tamen satis facere non potui, quin per has lineas manu propria exaratas (quod mihi insolens est), vobis testificarem, quam dulcis et acceptabilis mihi fuit ejus conversatio, cum in eo percepissem, admirabilem prudentiam et modestiam in juvene tam precoci ingenio praeditum, nullus ergo dubito quin eum mihi brevi remissurus sis, cum tam bene munitus sit et mea reccomendatione et virtutibus suis proprio. [Holograph.]
A tergo: Serenisso Principi ac Domino Antonio Priulio, inclyto Venetiarum Duci, amico nostro charissimo.
May 7.
Senato,
Secreta
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
874. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Marquis of Trinel has left for his embassy extraordinary in England. They are daily expecting Erebort from that country, who is to reside as ordinary ambassador with his Most Christian Majesty.
Paris, the 7th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 8.
Collegio.
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
875. The Secretary of England was introduced into the Cabinet and the Doge said:
You will always be welcome, and though a subject of the republic we hope you will not neglect your duty to your master.
The secretary said: I have held this charge for fourteen years, and I have always acted in a way to satisfy my obligations to my country, and I hope to do the same in the future. I have two things to say for his Excellency, who would have come himself if he had not taken leave. The ambassador attaches great importance to what was read to him about the passage of the Spaniards through the Gulf to Trieste against the Princes of Germany. His Excellency has heard on good authority, I cannot say whose, that your Serenity has granted this to the Spanish troops, provided they come disarmed and a few at a time. Their numbers will mount up, and arms will not fail. The matter weighs upon his Excellency and will seriously affect the Princes, and he wishes to be at least informed.
As the secretary was about to proceed the doge broke in: You may tell the ambassador that he need not fear that the Spaniards will ask our permission, as they do not consider that they have it by courtesy, their pride would not permit it. They will attempt it by force and we shall resist with all our strength. If they did ask we should never consent.
The secretary continued: My second point concerns the Duke of Holstein. When in camp he sold a horse and arms, worth about 200 crowns, to a German; who has always delayed payment. The duke asks your Serenity to use your authority in the matter. The man is named Rubino, and it might be as well to put him in prison, as if he became suspicious he might retire to his own country.
The doge replied that they would do what they could, and asked when the ambassador was leaving. The secretary said he proposed to proceed to Padua next Saturday and then continue his journey. The Duke of Holstein would also come and take leave. The doge remarked: When the duke comes we shall hear what he wants or you will give a memorial which we shall consider, and try to give him every satisfaction. He charged the secretary to greet the ambassador and wish him a good journey, after which the secretary departed.
[Italian.]
May 10.
Senato,
Secrets.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
876. To the Ambassador Donato in England and to Gritti in his absence.
We believe this will find you, Donato, at Court, as it is not easy to take leave of the king. His Majesty's ambassador has made the representation of which we enclose a copy. You will take an early opportunity of assuring his Majesty of our affection and esteem for him which impel us to reciprocate confidences and to wish him long life and prosperity, with other words to show our affection.
Enough has been done upon the affairs mentioned in yours of the 18th ult. We are glad to hear of the action of the ambassador of Savoy against de Dominis. The false statements of such a man appear the fruits of a perverse seed. The best way to deprive his proceedings of all credit is to despise them as they deserve and show what credit is due to one who has shown himself so unstable. But you will not speak unless provoked.
We have been most gratified to hear of the good relations between you, Donato, and Gabaleoni, ambassador of the Duke of Savoy. We have not thought it necessary to send your letter to the duke, as we are satisfied at seeing your good-will towards the public service.
We have received your, Gritti's, letters, announcing your readiness to serve.
We send a copy of the news from Spain telling of the good offices of his Majesty in instructing his agent to make further representations in our favour at that Court, against the evil proceedings of Ossuna. You will thank his Majesty for this also.
Ayes139.
Noes4.
Neutral10.
[Italian.]
May 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
877. To the Ambassador Giustinian at Vienna, and the like to the other Courts.
Ossuna seems anxious to create the impression that restitution will take place. This is one of the customary artifices to gain time. Other Uscocchi have reached Naples bringing the latest booty. They ask for leave to build ships, proposing fresh plunder. Ossuna persists in keeping ships out buccaneering with orders against our subjects. He has sent soldiers to the Abruzzi and other places on the Gulf. They are trying to raise the people against the nobles.
The ambassador of England resident here has presented his letters of recall. He will return soon, or some one will come in his place. Meanwhile the secretary is acting. Our Ambassador Gritti has proceeded to that Court so that Donato may return home.
All this is for your information.
Ayes154.
Noes0.
Neutral2.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
878. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have decided to help the Bohemians in order to give them fresh courage. They were waiting to see what the King of England would do; but they have since realised that that was pure loss of time and not even a penny of monetary help could be expected from that quarter. They also wrote to the Hanse towns, but they dispair of any help from them.
The Hague, the 12th May, 1619.
[Italian.]
May 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives
879. RANIER ZEN and ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassadors in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Baron Dohna has been to see us. He said the duke's good will was excellent and the states of Holland were behaving well, but he did not seem so satisfied with England; saying that the king had no money, but gave copious promises; his ministers were corrupt and all Spanish; he thought a great deal about the marriage with Spain. He would give them 4,000 foot if it was a question of the defence of their league, but so far nothing much had been seen, only expressions of good will and these promises.
Turin, the 14th May, 1619.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
880. RANIER ZEN and ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassadors in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We have had a long conversation with the duke. Among other things he said that the French were sending the Marquis of Trinel to England. He is utterly Spanish and has instructions to negotiate a marriage with the third daughter of France. This will not take place but it will offend Soissons to whom she has been promised, and will possibly lead them to settle more quickly with Spain. God knows what mystery they have up their sleeves.
Turin, the 15th May, 1619.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Count de Noyelles.
2 See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, p. 40, in a letter of the Dean of Worcester to Carleton of April 25, "Despotine went away with reward and reputation, though the Great Physician did all." Gasparo Despotini, a Venetian physician, was sent to England by Wotton and his chaplain, William Bedell, in 1611. He was settled in practice by the latter at or near Bury St. Edmunds. In March, 1619, he was granted denization in England. Pearsall Smith's Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, ii. pp. 467, 468.