Venice
November 1619, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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38-48

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'Venice: November 1619, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 38-48. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88741 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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November 1619

Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
67. PIERO ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The secretary of Digby has returned, whom his Majesty sent to Spain four weeks ago to say what I reported at the time and to take a letter to his Catholic Majesty. He brings no reply to the letter, which, they say, will be given verbally to the king by the ambassador, who is to come. The secretary could obtain nothing further in Spain in this matter. He has gone to tell the Court which is now at Royston.
The ambassador of France is still awaiting a reply to his last office. Seeing that the king has received the information he required from Germany, with the reasons, drawn up in French, which moved the Bohemians to depose the Emperor Ferdinand, and which his Majesty considers quite reasonable, and nothing is heard of any declaration to help the son-in-law, or of the smallest step taken in that direction, many think that the king has little inclination to involve himself in war or in a settlement. The news of the coronation of the Palatine has reached London from more than one source, but his Majesty has not yet heard it from the Palatine's own letters, as he considers necessary for complete certitude.
I hear that Donato is much distressed because his servant does not return, whom he sent to France and to the Prince of Piedmont, and does not write. I have heard on good authority that they sent the same man to Turin, to recommend him to the Duke of Savoy, so that he might not be against him, but might even help him and take some opportunity of speaking in his favour to your Serenity.
London, the 1st November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
68. To the Ambassador at Rome.
Send copy of letters of the Resident Vendramino at Milan about what occurred to him in connection with the visit of the Duke of Ossuna's natural son to that city. This will serve for information or to use when the subject may be raised, but not otherwise.
The like to Germany, Spain, France, England, Savoy, Florence, the Hague, Naples.
Ayes, 126.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
69. To the Ambassador in Germany.
We hear of the arrival at Naples of the Marquis Santa Croce with eleven galleys and the six of Florence which were going to Leghorn. The Duke of Ossuna met him. Prince Filiberto, having dismissed his squadrons, followed after with the remainder, going straight to Gaeta, without touching Naples, although we hear that Ossuna, by the advice of the Marquis, sent to ask him to proceed to that city, intending otherwise to visit him at Gaeta. Filiberto has received permission from Spain to go to Nice to see the duke his father and spend the winter there. The galleons are expected at Naples, where Ossuna says he only needs three or four for some purpose. The Frenchman who was building the new galley of the Viceroy has been dismissed and the work on the galley abandoned, while Ossuna has countermanded an order for ordnance.
The Uscochi remain continually at the palace asking for support in their evil designs. Since the arrival of Don Ottavio of Aragon at Naples there are various rumours about the removal or confirmation of Ossuna as governor, so that we cannot tell what to believe. His Excellency leaves no means untried to advance his interests and secure his continuance in the government.
This is all for information and to use where you find it necessary and useful for our service.
The like to France, Spain, England, Savoy, Constantinople, the Captain General at Sea, Milan, Florence.
Ayes, 126.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
70. To the Captain General at Sea.
We understand that western vessels continue to frequent the shores of Albania in the Gulf to lade wheat for Naples and Genoa, notwithstanding that some have been stopped these last months. The Captain of the Gulf writes that there were five at Durazzo recently, but he could do nothing as they were under that fortress; we therefore renew our orders to you for the detention of such vessels, and to send them to this city, though you will always respect the fortresses and places of the Turks to avoid any complications in those parts.
Ayes, 115.Noes, 0.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
71. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Viscount Doncaster, ambassador extraordinary of the King of England, has passed this way, who was sent to Germany six months ago to accommodate the disturbances here. At Frankfort he negotiated with the emperor before his election, but left without settling anything. Now by fresh instructions from his king, which reached him at Cologne, he is going to meet his Imperial Majesty to congratulate him on his election.
As I was very friendly with him during my embassy in England, he communicated the following matters to me in great confidence upon the present state of affairs and his negotiations. He said that when he left England his king told him to confide everything to me and salute me in his name, thinking to find me at Frankfort. He was commissioned to urge King Ferdinand to make a settlement with the Bohemians and a truce for the purpose of negotiation and to postpone the election of emperor for two or three months in order to arrange this accommodation first, for which his Majesty offered his good offices. When he made these proposals at Frankfort to the Spanish ambassador, they told him they would think them over, and kept him some days without any decision. When at length he had asked about the truce, they told him nothing was arranged, and as regards the election of emperor it could not be postponed, by the terms of the Golden Bull. Seeing that there was little hope of achieving anything, he left Frankfort before the election. Now that had taken place his king instructed him to offer congratulations. As regards an accommodation, things had now changed so much that he saw no way. Undoubtedly the emperor now wished that he had accepted his king's proposals, but his over anxiety to secure the Imperial crown stood in the way of what concerned him far more.
The ambassador went on to speak of the Elector Palatine, whom he has met on this journey. Although he said he had no certain news as yet whether the Palatine had accepted the Bohemian crown, I understood from the way he spoke that he undoubtedly would accept. He added that he heard from Nürenberg that the Palatine should be in Prague at this moment and that his coronation was to take place on the 14th prox. He indulged in loud praise of that prince, making the most of his strength, spirit and prudence and his influence in the empire, adding that he was on the way to become very great.
The very day that he left Nurenberg his Highness moved towards the Upper Palatinate where he has 18,000 foot and 9,000 horse ready for all emergencies. They say he has taken 3,000 foot and 1,000 horse to Prague. In the Lower Palatinate he has left 20,000 more under Count John of Nassau, to defend that state and has sent his mother, the Duke of Deuxponts and his two younger sons there to exercise the government, while he takes his wife and eldest son with him. The assembly at Rothenburg decided not only to assist him in the defence of his dominions but in keeping Bohemia. The States will do the like and his king cannot abandon him. Up to the present neither the archduke nor anyone else has said a word to him about the Palatine. Only the Spanish ambassador had asked him, epigramatically, whether he was bringing peace or war. He answered, Neither the one nor the other, and even if I brought the former they would not accept it. He had found much decision among the Princes of the Union and the free territories, and great military preparations, without any fear of the Spanish forces, whose prestige had suffered considerably through all Germany since the wars in Italy and Bohemia. This unfortunate turn in these affairs will affect Italy also, and your Serenity had every reason to desire it, as the general welfare depends upon the success of the Palatine. The affairs of the emperor and his house seemed in the most desperate plight they had ever known, and it was well known that only the fog enabled him to save his army the other day.
He told me other things to prove their evil plight, and that the Spaniards cannot make it better. He said he would not disguise it from me that it had been published through Germany and everywhere else that his king had sent him at the instance of the Spaniards to advance their interests in this province, and they had bought him over with their money. He assured me, with much vehemence, that the intentions and instructions of his king were entirely the other way. As regarded himself he would say nothing, because I knew him.
In conclusion he assured me of the sincere esteem of his king for your Serenity. In return I assured him that your Serenity fully reciprocated these sentiments and greatly valued the benevolence and friendship of his Majesty. Throughout the interview I maintained a proper reserve.
He left for Gratz the day before yesterday to offer congratulations. I have not discovered that he has any other business, although they speak of a marriage between the prince of England and a daughter of the emperor. This does not seem likely. The archduke lodged and entertained him here, which is not usual with any other ambassador, and showed him extraordinary honour. He is a man of the highest rank and appeared both at Frankfort and here with great pomp.
It is practically certain that the Elector Palatine will accept the crown and we shall soon hear of his coronation. When that has happened there will no longer be any room for accommodation in the opinion of all, but an extensive and lengthy war.
Since I wrote the above I have heard that when this ambassador took leave of the archduke, his Highness told him he heard from the emperor that the Palatine in reply to a letter of his Majesty and the office of the Count of Frestemberg sent to learn his intentions, wrote to his Majesty that he has decided to accept, and from Prague he hears that the ambassadors of the Bohemians and of the other confederate provinces have gone to the frontiers to receive him.
Vienna, the 2nd November, 1619. Copy.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
72. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I reached this city to-day. I shall take boat on the Rhine to-morrow, which will enable me to proceed with much greater ease and speed. On the way hither I passed through Innsbruck and Bavaria, where I observed the warlike preparations. I remained some while at Augsburg. I was very well received everywhere in the dominions of the Count Palatine. They had no more than 8,000 foot and 1,000 horse, but the people of the country to the number of 20,000 would be available for defence. Many nobles and gentlemen of England have offered to serve at their own expense, but the Palatine relies chiefly upon the Princes of the Union and the States of Holland.
Frankfort, the 5th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
73. CHRISTOFFORD SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Wednesday and Thursday following my despatch of the 29th ult. I was summoned by the seven deputies to discuss the terms of the alliance. I have again thanked the English ambassador, who seemed pleased at this recognition of his efforts, and said he would inform his Majesty of the value we put upon his offices. I will keep up confidential relations with him.
The States, so far as I can discover, will inform the ambassador of the negotiations, but I do not know if they will tell the French ambassador.
The Hague, the 5th November, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
74. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ships of war against the pirates are to leave to-day, their departure being hastened by the constant reports of fresh losses. The English ambassador has again been urged by the ministers here to write to his king to arm likewise against these pirates, in order to strengthen their fleet, so that jointly they may extirpate or at least scatter them. But with all their representations they fear they will obtain nothing. The ambassador sent this request to his king on Sunday, and the States have instructed their ambassador to urge his Majesty to co-operate in such a worthy purpose.
The Hague, the 5th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
75. To the AMBASSADOR LANDO in England.
The affair of Antonio Donato has become more serious and consequently we lay great stress upon it. You will know the representations which we have made to his Majesty, and the replies given to our Secretary Marioni, although we send you copies. But we have largely reserved ourselves to treat with his Majesty through your means. We hope that by the time this arrives, you will have reached London or be close there. Accordingly we direct you, after the first complimentary audience, to ask another of his Majesty, represent to him our entire confidence in his goodness and friendship for us, and inform him of the serious crime committed by Donato in embezzling a large sum of public money while he was ambassador in Savoy; that afterwards, as ambassador with his Majesty, he tried further deceit and to cover his fault, which was so clearly proved, that being no longer able to conceal it, he took to flight. With his continued impudence he returned to England and introduced himself into the house of the republic, for that is the name given to the houses occupied by our ambassadors and ministers in all the courts, and disposed of all the goods there, which could no longer be considered his, but the republic's, owing to the sentence against him which we sent to the Secretary Marioni by express courier. This reached Marioni before Donato's arrival in London, with orders to inform his Majesty. Donato finally laid hands on the public papers in the house, a crime amounting to high treason. These reasons lead us to lay everything before his Majesty. We are sure that you will make his Majesty perceive that Donato's crime is more serious than he has hitherto been led to believe. We feel sure that his Majesty will meet us, as we have always been ready to meet him at the slightest request of his ambassadors, even in a case of mere suspicion, as we have always placed the satisfaction of his Majesty before every other consideration. We hope he will act not only to give us satisfaction but so as to remove the slightest idea that his friendship towards the republic is waning. This idea has been caused by the aspect of Donato being received at Court in the sight of our ambassador. You will urge this point with these arguments though with all tact and gentleness. We especially desire to impress the king with the gravity of Donato's crimes and the justice of our position, and we wish him to drive Donato from the Court and kingdom. You will send us all particulars of what you do and of the king's reply so that we may add whatever else we may judge necessary.
After you have made these representations to the king, you will treat similarly with the principal ministers going more fully into the readiness of the republic to satisfy his Majesty upon every occasion, and trying to induce them to place the matter before the king in a favourable light.
We also wish you to procure full information about all the proceedings of Donato, beginning from his arrival at this Court as ambassador and using all exactitude to bring into relief what he did before coming to Venice especially about obtaining some security for his person from the king, and in what manner; what he has done since his return to England after sentence was pronounced against him; what ministers he has won over and whether he has had any intelligence with the Secretary Marioni; what has become of his property, when was it taken from his house, did it happen at night, what was its value and what did he realise by it; what he is doing now, how he lives and what does he aim at, with any other particulars which you can discover and consider worthy of our knowledge.
We also wish you to make diligent enquiry about the proceedings of the Secretary Marioni, to see whether he had any understanding with Donato after the latter's condemnation, and return to England; more particularly what took place about the courier whom we sent with the news about Donato's sentence and with orders to lay hands on his property. If he executed our instructions without delay or procrastination, and if he did what he should with respect to those and to subsequent instructions, more particularly in negotiating with the king, without making any alteration. You will make enquiries upon all these particulars and send us word.
Ayes, 128.Noes, 8.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
76. That to the ambassador in England be sent what was written on the 2nd ult. to the ambassadors in Rome, Spain, France and Savoy about Naples, to serve merely for information.
Ayes, 128.Noes, 8.Neutral, 12.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghiltorra.
Venetian
Archives.
77. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received confirmation of what I wrote about Digby's secretary, but nothing beyond. I hear that the king has been greatly distressed for two whole days and nights, discussing the matter with Digby alone, but no one so far has been able to discover what decision they arrived at. Only every one recognises, what some of the courtiers and the ministers go about saying, that his Majesty wishes to have it believed that he has not yet heard from the Palatine himself of the acceptance of the crown of Bohemia, possibly with the idea of gaining time before making a declaration in favour of his son-in-law. As a matter of fact four weeks ago the Marquis of Buckingham wrote to the ambassador of Savoy here what I reported to your Serenity at the time. The idea that his Majesty wishes to gain time is held by many, although he says he is waiting to hear from the Palatine himself upon the merits of the case. Moreover he has seen in print the reasons which have moved the Bohemians to depose the Emperor Ferdinand, and considers them very reasonable. On the other hand, the report of the coronation of the prince and princess, with the election of their eldest son to succeed them is recognised as false seeing that they now hear that the coronation of the prince only is to take place on the 12th inst.
Sir [Henry] Wotton has these last weeks been away in the provinces visiting his relations and looking after his private affairs. He is now back in London and at once came to see me. He said that in a few days the period appointed by the king to decide whether he should return to your Serenity would expire. For his part he was quite ready to go and he would say so to his Majesty, who is coming to London to-morrow for the feast of All Saints for a stay of half a week. It rested entirely with the king to provide him with the means; referring, I believe, to a provision of money. That was one of the chief reasons which had brought him to Court. If he was to go back, he would leave here at the beginning of next February unless his Majesty commanded him to go earlier, of which he had some indication, in order that he might pass through Germany to negotiate some affairs there. The extraordinary ambassador would soon be returning from those parts and would take leave of the emperor soon, whose steps he is now following. I understand that they have sent 24,000 crowns to that ambassador to pay his debts in a town where his creditors would not allow him to leave. Wotton also told me that Digby's secretary brought word from Spain that at the time of his departure an extraordinary courier had arrived at the court with news of the capture of Susa in Barbary by Prince Filiberto. This report has got abroad here, to the intense satisfaction of the partisans of Spain and of Savoy.
From Italy however they had so far heard nothing about it. On the other hand I hear that the secretary brought word that they were embarking 4,000 Portuguese infantry to send straight to Flanders, who would be landed either at Dunkirk or at Ostend, both ports facing this island on the other side of the sea.
One day recently the ambassador of Savoy told me in confidence that he heard from a secret source that the Secretary Naunton had conveyed a hint to Donato to live in a rather more retired manner than he has hitherto, since he appears in the streets, withdrawing to some place away from London, where he will not be readily recognised, in order to forestall any representation which the agent of his Majesty with your Serenity has written may be made by the Ambassador Lando when he arrives. The agent Wake moreover writes from Turin that the ambassador of Savoy may make similar representations for the duke at the instance of your Serenity. Donato, in trouble at this news, went at once to Naunton to ask if he had told him this from his Majesty. Naunton replied that he had done it on his own responsibility out of friendship. This warning was sent to Donato last week, nevertheless he still remains in London in his usual abode, as I hear from one who saw him yesterday, awaiting with great anxiety the servant whom he sent to France and to Turin.
The French ambassador has not as yet received a word in reply to his office.
London, the 8th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Diliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
78. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
Prince Filiberto went on to Gaeta without touching Naples. The Duke of Ossuna paid him a visit at Gaeta and the prince continued his voyage, they say to Nice. Ossuna seems glad to have the fleet in his hands again. The Marquis Santa Croce will, they say, leave Naples directly with five galleys to join Filiberto at Nice. Filiberto has sent Filuca to Corfu to learn the language, with letters of recommendation to our officials. Meanwhile the Duke of Ossuna has sent orders that all our ships shall be well received on the shores of Apulia and given every convenience, as a sign of his good-will to the republic. On the other hand we hear that he has given letters patent to privateers to molest our ships and subjects. Nothing is said about the galleons. Ossuna seems inclined to fit out eight or nine galleys to send to Don Ottavio of Aragon against the Turks.
The Uscochi remain at Naples and it is disclosed that they have received patents from the Archduke Leopold to return to their nests. They still plan to inflict damage upon us whenever they see an opportunity.
We send this for information and to use when you think it necessary.
Ayes, 107.Noes, 0.Neutral, 6.
The like to France, England, Milan, Spain, Germany, Florence, Constantinople, the Captain General at Sea.
[Italian.]
Nov. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
79. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Marquis Villa has returned from his extraordinary embassy in England. He travelled with remarkable speed. He brings nothing about negotiations, as being without money from the duke, he had to relieve himself of his charge at the earliest opportunity. His Majesty presented him with four portraits set in diamonds. (fn. 1)
Buckingham has written to the agent of England in favour of Donato, to get him to arouse the duke's interest. The agent himself told me that the duke had repeated his representations, feeling sure that his Majesty will give satisfaction to the republic. The agent who appears to take a just view of the affair, promised satisfaction. He told me that Buckingham recommends Donato to the extreme limits that the friendship of his Majesty with your Excellencies allows.
The priest Gatti has arrived here on his road to Venice, so I understand. He dined with the resident himself; but I have not learned that he had any business. (fn. 2)
Turin, the 11th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
80. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador recently communicated to me letters he had received from his king expressing satisfaction with his offices with the States to induce them to accept your Serenity's views about the Gulf and disabuse those who wanted free trade. He added that the king expressly instructed him to do everything in his power to promote the settlement and completion of this affair. I thanked the ambassador once again and again assured him of the great satisfaction with which your Serenity heard of his friendly offices. I assured him that this new evidence of his Majesty's affection for the most serene republic laid her under great obligations. The ambassador remarked that he thought that your Serenity should order the Ambassador Lando to perform some office with his Majesty, who would, he felt sure, greatly appreciate it, as he liked to receive such testimony of gratitude and confidence and an expression of the value placed upon his representations. I said I had no doubt that your Serenity would have sent such orders for Lando to say as much as I had said. When the Ambassador Lando is here, I will communicate all these particulars to him. I am expecting him every day and I do not think it can be long before he reaches this city.
The Hague, the 13th November, 1619.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
81. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have learned from the Ambassador Carleton that the king is waiting for the coronation of the Palatine and then he will show the world that he means to support him. Possibly it has even now reached the ears of the King of Spain that if he is resolved to maintain his kinsman Ferdinand, his Majesty will be obliged to defend the Palatine, his son-in-law. In telling me these particulars the ambassador said: Believe me, I know what I am talking about. He added that the king's ears would be besieged by the French ambassador, not directly but in an underhand manner, to dissuade him from helping the Palatine.
The Hague, the 13th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano,
Venetian
Archives.
82. GIACOMO VENDRAMINO, Venetian Resident at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Englishman who passed this way recently turns out to be the ordinary ambassador for Turkey, on his way to Constantinople. (fn. 3)
Milan, the 13th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
83. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Since the news arrived here that the coronation of the Prince Palatine as King of Bohemia was to take place on the 12th inst., the king and everyone else have been hourly expecting the arrival of a courier with letters from the Palatine himself. Meanwhile his Majesty has promised the agent of Flanders, who returned recently from Brussels and made strong representations against assistance, that he certainly will not help the Palatine, if the causes for the deposition of the Emperor Ferdinand as stated by him, do not appear entirely reasonable, as the action of the king was most distasteful to him and his son-in-law had embarked on this adventure without his consent. In conclusion he made precisely the same reply as he gave last week to the ambassadors who spoke to his Majesty on the subject.
This week his Majesty has been in London, writing, so I hear, night and day in his study, some say it is about these affairs, some that he is writing a book. Nevertheless he does not fail to witness almost every evening the comedies which are now being performed at the Court. Once he desired the French ambassador to accompany him, sending the invitation by the Marquis of Buckingham, who accompanied the ambassador home. This same ambassador is to go to audience to-morrow when he says he hopes to hear something about the matter which he presented long ago, before his Majesty leaves for Newmarket whither he is going in two days time, to remain there until Christmas.
While Donato was anxiously awaiting the return of the servant whom he sent to France and Piedmont, he received word that the man had been made prisoner when mounting his horse at Turin. This news has rendered him almost desperate, the servant being the only person to whom he thought he could trust his life as well as his affairs, and the fact that he has been made prisoner by the duke shows that there is no hope from that quarter of a satisfactory reply to his request for a declaration in his favour. However he remains in his usual dwelling, always accompanied by a Ragusan of the Gradi family, who has been engaged in trade here for some years; and up to the present he has paid no attention to the warning given to him by the king's secretary Naunton.
London, the 15th November, 1619.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 According to Salvetti in his news letter of the 18th October, the present was one of the late queen's jewels, set with diamonds, which opened and had inside portraits of the king and queen, the Elector Palatine and his wife, and was worth about 2,000 crowns. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962A.
2 In a letter to Naunton of Sept. 20/30 Wake calls Gatti "a person notoriously infamous." State Papers, Foreign. Savoy. This may be on account of the suspicion of his being responsible for Pruritanus. See note to page 25 above.
3 Sir John Eyre.