Venice
November 1619, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1910

Pages

48-60

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'Venice: November 1619, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 48-60. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88742 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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November 1619

Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
84. To the Ambassador in Germany.
After the departure of Prince Filiberto from Gaeta, the Marquis Santa Croce also left Naples for Spain. The Duke of Ossuna continues in his government and seems to be overcoming all difficulties through his influence in Spain, by bribes and the papers he draws up telling of the benefits of his rule. He asks for the punishment of those who spread contrary reports. He is also interceding with the emperor. He is preparing five galleys to send to the east with Don Ottavio of Aragon. No ships will be allowed to leave Naples before the departure of these galleys. Other galleons are expected but it is thought that the demands of the governor of Milan for fresh troops to help the emperor may delay their departure.
The reports of fresh levies of troops in Naples persist, but nothing is being done. The privateer ships are ready and are only waiting for the departure of Don Ottavio's galleys. They all carry Ossuna's flag and his letters patent. Nothing is said against the Uscochi, who continue to frequent the palace. They say nothing about restitution and are doing nothing in that direction and it is quite evident that Ossuna has no intention of making any.
This is for information and to use as our service requires.
The like to France, Spain, Milan, England, Constantinople, Florence, Savoy, Captain General at Sea.
Ayes, 121.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 16.
Senato
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
85. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
As I wrote before, the Secretary of England went to Court about the affairs of Germany. He took the very letter written by the Palatine to his king, giving the particulars of his nomination to the crown of Bohemia. At the same time the secretary told them of the reply sent, how the king dissuaded him from plunging into war and vexation, and advised him to come to an understanding with the house of Austria for which he promised his best offices. Thus that king confirms his inclination towards peace and to give satisfaction in this quarter.
They heard these particulars with great satisfaction and are very pleased with the English king, feeling assured that the affairs of Germany will receive no prejudice from him. However, they say nothing about the marriage or the departure of the Count of Gondomar, who was appointed ambassador to England so long ago.
Madrid, the 16th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Udine,
Venetian
Archives.
86. BERTUCI CONTARINI, Venetian Lieutenant of Udine, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News reaches me from the keeper at Ponteba that the English ambassador arrived there with his suite and baggage with a pass from the board of health of Gratz of the 8th inst. The keeper would not let him pass, but he took the way through with all his train and baggage. The keeper at once advised the castellan of la Chiusa, who would not let him pass and the ambassador withdrew to the town of Dogna, hard by.
I have written to the castellan to notify the ambassador that he must remain in the house where he now is and not allow his people to stir abroad, keeping the baggage separate which is not in ordinary use. I am also seeing that the inhabitants of Dogna do the like and supply the ambassador with necessaries until I send word; and that the ambassador must not pass against the wishes of the keeper, who has instructions to put even the Venetian ambassador in quarantine. I enclose the pass from Gratz which makes no mention of the household and property of the ambassador. They issue passes readily at Gratz, where travellers come from Vienna, taking that route for greater safety, sometimes to people who only stop an hour there, as they do not fear the danger of contagion.
I will await your Serenity's orders by the present messenger, whom I am sending post.
Udine, the 16th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
87. Letter of Ferdinand emperor elect, King of Germany etc. to James, King of Great Britain, etc., in favour of Viscount Doncaster, ambassador, testifying that Gratz is free from all suspicion of plague.
Dated at Gratz on 8 November, 1619.
Signed: Herman Questenbergh.
[Latin.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
88. ANDREA SANUDO, castellan of la Chiusa to BERTUCI CONTARINI, Venetian Lieutenant of Udine.
Sends a letter enclosed from keeper of Ponteba. Has refused pass to the person who calls himself an ambassador of England. Sends word so that what is right may be done.
La Chiusa, the 15th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
89. FERDINANDO LOCATELLO, keeper of Pontebba, to ANDREA SANUDO, castellan of la Chiusa.
Yesterday evening the English ambassador of the Imperial Court arrived here at the second hour of the night, bringing a pass from Gratz signed by his Imperial Majesty. As we have express orders from his Excellency the Lieutenant not to allow such large companies of people to pass before sending word of them, we could not let them through or accept the pass without orders from the lieutenant. The ambassador however determined to move without our authority or consent, in spite of our protests that we knew what you would do when he arrived at the fortress with his people, who number about twenty.
Pontebba Veneta, the 15th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
90. BORTHOLO FERAMONTE to BERTUCCI CONTARINI, Venetian Lieutenant of Udine.
The ambassador sent by the King of England upon public services has presented himself at the fortress here. He tried hard to persuade us to allow him to pass. I told him that I must first inform you, to whom I send the pass which he gave me, and I shall be glad to receive your orders. The ambassador is staying at Dogna, by what he has said.
La Chiusa, the 14th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
91. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The agent of England has urged the duke to render his master a peculiar favour, namely to discover through Prince Filiberto whether the Spaniards really wish to marry the infanta to the Prince of Wales, so evidently that marriage cannot be definitely arranged (l' Agente di Inghilterra ha fatto efficace officio col Sig. Duca perche si compiaccia di far segnalitissimo favore al proprio Re et signore, che col mezzo di Filiberto si sappi se veramente Spagnoli vogliono maritar quell' Infanta al Prencipe di Gales, onde quel matrimonio non deve esser con certa conclusione).
Turin, the 18th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
92. To the Lieutenant of Udine.
The measures taken for reasons of health upon the coming of the English ambassador from Germany were good and prudent, and we hope he understood that he could not proceed through our state for reasons of the general health. We wish you to repeat the orders for taking precautions with all those coming from Germany and Vienna in particular. You must make the ambassador Giustinian observe quarantine likewise. For the rest you will assure the English ambassador of the high esteem of the republic for his king and himself, and you may spend 100 ducats in entertaining him, trying to make him thoroughly understand the reasons for the quarantine. The necessary instructions about the place and time of his quarantine will be sent by the board of health to those whom it concerns and will be communicated to you. We shall await particulars from you.
That 100 ducats be granted to Bertuci Contarini, Lieutenant of Udine, to spend in entertaining.
Ayes, 131.Noes, 2.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
93. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Yesterday in the assembly they decided to inform the English ambassador of the negotiations for an alliance taking place between their deputies and me. They felt they could not do otherwise because that ambassador had endeavoured to advance the affair in the name of his king both in public and in private. Three deputies are appointed for this task and they will perform it to-day. The ambassador is expecting them and I know that he will rejoice at being able to inform his king. On Sunday evening when I saw him, he told me that that very day the French ambassador had asked him if the negotiations were proceeding as he understood that something had been committed to writing. Carleton replied that he had heard some particulars about it and said he had discovered two things, one, that the alliance would be defensive, and the other that it did not prejudice the alliances of the States with other princes. He had gone on to tell the French ambassador of the reasons which led the republic to seek for new friends, as the passes of the Grisons were closed against her. The French ambassador admitted that your Serenity acted quite rightly.
The Hague, the 19th November, 1619.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
94. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
One of the leading men here told me that they would renew their representations to the King of Great Britain and everyone here hopes that he will come to some decision. I have learned from the English ambassador here that the king is only awaiting the news of the coronation. He said they were already making arrangements for assistance and for commanders. He said there would be 4,000 foot and Cecil will have the command, with the Earl of Southampton.
I have received letters from the Ambassador Lando from Cologne. I believe him to be now at Amsterdam and hope that he will arrive here to-morrow or the day after.
The Hague, the 19th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
95. GIACOMO VENDRAMINO, Venetian Resident at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are much disturbed here at the league concluded between your Serenity and the States, in the present condition of the affairs of the world. They fear that Savoy and France and England also will enter it.
Milan, the 20th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
96. To the AMBASSADOR LANDO, designate to England.
We have gladly received your last letters from Frankfort relating the progress of your journey and various news. When you reach the court of England you will find the instructions issued after your departure, which you will execute with your usual ability and prudence.
Lord Hay, ambassador of his Majesty in Germany, having arrived in our state on his return, we were obliged to detain him for quarantine, owing to the place he had come from. From this arose the circumstances which you will see by the copies that we send to you. We have further given orders for honour to be shown to him as you will see from the letters to the Lieutenant of Udine. We send you this as special information, so that you may use it whenever you have an opportunity to show our esteem for his Majesty and our friendship to his ministers.
Ayes, 117.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Nov. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
97. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have had a long conversation with the Prince of Condé_ from which I have gathered four things: (1), his great ambition to use his authority in the government; (2), his wish to be at one with M. de Luynes; (3), his desire to show that he has now no understanding with the Huguenots; (4), his friendly feelings towards your Serenity. He told me that he had the most confidential relations with the ambassadors of the republic, which he avoided with those of other powers. He got on well with those of England but not so well as with the Venetian.
Paris, the 21st November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
98. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
No further news has reached this court from Germany except of the entry of the Prince Palatine into Jalalena, the first place of Bohemia towards the upper Palatinate where he was met and received by twenty-one ambassadors, who acknowledged themselves as his subjects and gave him the government of the kingdom. A few days later he was to reach Prague to receive the crown and that he was afterwards to proceed to Nürenberg to take part in the meeting of the princes of Germany. Nevertheless they are momentarily expecting the news of the coronation and of the proceedings at this meeting, which will enable them to decide whether the son-in-law is to be assisted or no.
The French ambassador has had audience of his Majesty and at length obtained a reply to his office. His Majesty said that he was always most ready to act with the Most Christian king and would join him at the present time to arrange some settlement in Germany if he did not see that it was now too late seeing that the Bohemian affair had gone too far. He would always be ready to prove his willingness to act with his Most Christian Majesty and as soon as he had come to any decision about the Prince Palatine he would inform him of it and so forth. He repeated to the ambassador the same justification which he had made to the other ambassadors, and recently to the ambassador of Flanders, though it is doubtful whether anyone believes that his Majesty procured the election of his son-in-law as King of Bohemia. The king is taking great pains at present to make everyone think so, showing his displeasure at the election and at the Palatine's acceptance without his consent, but those who converse familiarly with his Majesty, tête à tête easily perceive his delight at this new royal title for his son-in-law and daughter.
The King of Poland has written very urgent letters to his Majesty asking him to allow a levy of 10,000 foot in his dominions to serve as a defence against the Turks and Tartars. In case of consent he will allow them to take men from Scotland and Ireland provided that he is assured that they will be employed solely against Turks and Tartars. A brave Scottish soldier has set out this week for Poland to take the orders and receive the necessary money for this purpose. They say that he formerly served the King of Poland, but nevertheless they think that this matter will only be carried out very late or may even come to nothing at all very easily.
The day before his Majesty left for Newmarket he went to Greenwich, near here, to visit the Marquis of Buckingham, the Lord High Admiral, and to christen two fine ships, newly built and not yet launched. These are the first fruits of the arrangements recently made with the merchants, who bound themselves for a certain number of years, to build two new ships every year for his Majesty. On entering the first ship his Majesty sent for the marquis and said that as it was the first new ship to be built since he bore the title of Lord High Admiral, and which he entered in company with his Majesty, he would christen it with a name of good augury, and he therefore called it the Happy Entrance. The second one he called the Constant Reformation. (fn. 1)
Two other ships laden with very rich merchandise have recently arrived from the East Indies. They bring word that everywhere out there the English and Dutch continue to carry themselves very defiantly towards each other, and would certainly continue to do so until the arrival of the news of the agreement concluded these last months between the two nations.
I hear that Donato is committing acts almost amounting to madness since he received a letter this week. I do not know whether it came from London or elsewhere. He is now seen very little indeed, and I am told that he has found another house, in another part of the city.
London, the 22nd November, 1619.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Udine.
Venetian
Archives.
99. BERTUCCI CONTARINI, Lieutenant of Udine, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letter to-day about the English ambassador who has decided to return beyond Ponteba, and says that he will go to Villacho and take the way of Plez. I made the first offer to his Excellency and afterwards in replying to a letter of his, I made use of the ideas contained in your Serenity's letter. The ambassador's letter and my reply will have reached you. To-morrow I am going to write to know where he really is, and to renew the offices committed to me. If he returns to these confines, I will have him entertained in conformity with the public orders.
On the 20th inst. the Ambassador Giustinian reached Villacho, and as there are so many people in quarantine at Ponteba Imperiale that he could not easily get lodgings there, I cleared a house for him at Ponteba Veneta. I have instructed the keeper to see that he is cared for, and that the orders issued by the Board of Health are observed. I have written to the said ambassador that if he meets the English ambassador he should pass compliments with him and ask him to excuse the hindrance to his passage, but that the carrying out of the quarantine regulations is important, and to express esteem for his sovereign and himself.
Udine, the 22nd November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
100. To the Ambassador in Spain.
The galleys of Naples are ready to depart with Don Ottavio of Aragon and will leave at the earliest opportunity, as soon as a courier has returned whom the Duke of Ossuna has sent to Prince Filiberto to ask leave for this expedition. This is one of his usual tricks as he will let it go even without leave. Nothing has been done about the troops asked for by the governor of Milan, though they seem inclined to make a military depot at Naples. The galleons of Naples, after capturing some ships which were going to Leghorn from Barbary, with merchandise and letters patent of the Grand Duke, came in sight of Naples, but could not enter owing to the contrary winds. However, the Spaniards praise their action, as the Florentines fetch from Barbary all the things plundered by privateers, and if the pirates had not a place at Leghorn, they would not know what to do.
Nothing further is said about Ossuna's departure. He is doing everything to stay. They do nothing towards restitution; a good part of the Venetian silk has been sold. At Brindisi they have issued orders for the good treatment of Venetian ships, although the castellan there does not seem inclined to carry them out. We sent this for information, to use as you think necessary.
The like to France, England, Milan, Constantinople, Savoy, Florence, the Captain General at Sea, Germany.
Ayes, 113.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
101. The Secretary of the King of Great Britain resident here having asked by memorial that the sons of the Earl of Arundel, who are going to the University of Padua, may take their goods to that town without paying the duty, which would cost them 50 ducats, that the request be granted, out of esteem for the said king and earl.
Ayes, 121.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
In the Collegio:
Ayes, 18.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Terra.
filze.
Venetian
Archives.
102. Memorial of GREGORIO DE MONTI, Secretary of England.
Lord Mautravers and his brother, sons of the Earl of Arundel, are setting up house at Padua because of the University. I ask your Serenity to allow the goods brought here out of England, of which I enclose a list, to enter Padua duty free, and I make the like request for the tapestries and cloths which they are expecting from Antwerp, both for entering and leaving.
Goods for the use of Lord Mautravers, son of the Earl of Arundel.
New things to be sent to Padua at once—
Two iron bedsteads with beds of down.
Two bedsteads of walnut with beds of rushes.
Four blankets and six covers of velvet.
Four coverlets.
Four linen cloths and five pieces of tapestry.
Three pairs of iron andirons (cavedeni) with fittings and a pair of bronze.
Kitchen utensils of iron weighing 100 pounds and of copper, 50 pounds.
A barrel of pewter ware.
Two barrels of malt to make beer
New things expected by the same lord from Antwerp, by land—
Tapestry, 8 pieces.
Table cloths and serviettes, 3 pieces.
Cloth for shirts, two pieces.
The above goods would pay about 50 ducats in duty.
Lodovico Collini, governor of the customs.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senata,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
103. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are afraid here that the Palatine, in addition to the forces of Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia and Alsace, and the help from England, will also receive assistance from the States in money and men, as they have sent him repeated promises as well as encouragement to accept that crown.
Vienna, the 23rd November, 1619. Copy.
[Italian.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
104. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In Vilaco I found a gentleman of the extraordinary ambassador of England to the Emperor, left there by the ambassador to present his compliments on my arrival. After he had done this he complained bitterly of the hindrances thrown in the way of the ambassador at Pontieba by the ministers of the Board of Health, on his passage through your Serenity's state and of some ill proceedings on their part. This gave me occasion to write to his Excellency to reciprocate his compliments and to assure him that the reasons for delay were very important conditions for health's sake; and were applied alike for all, and to myself more rigorously than the rest. I assured him of the esteem of your Serenity for the ministers of his king and especially himself.
In reply he wrote me the enclosed letter of the 19th showing that he is quite satisfied. The other of the 17th I found here, written to me before. From both it appears that he was only coming to our city out of curiosity, and for pleasure, and from what I understand his journey to Gratz was merely complimentary, to congratulate the emperor on his election in the name of his king. But as his Majesty, at the last audience given to him, wished to converse without an interpreter, both speaking Latin, there must have been business about the Elector Palatine, which I have not been able to find out.
Pontieba, the 24th November, 1619. Copy.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
105. VISCOUNT DONCASTER to ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany.
Your Excellency shows me the same courtesy that you have always displayed in the past, and I thank you. I greatly regret that your Excellency or anyone else should think that I was offended or took in ill part the good treatment which I received on the confines of the most serene republic, where orders exist not to permit travellers from infected countries to pass before a stay of some days. I recognise that the official at Ponteba was only discharging his duty, and there were no ill proceedings. I should be most sorry were he in any way reprimanded. If this should occur I ask your Excellency to favour me by defending him. I have only written to the lieutenant to assure him that my people do not wish to pass without the consent and leave of the aforesaid official. I wish you a happy return to your country.
Poternion, the 19th November, 1619.
My servant informs me that your Excellency told him that a courier from England had passed. I imagine he is sent to me and therefore I beg you to give him the enclosed as it is addressed. Copy.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
106. VISCOUNT DONCASTER to ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany.
When I left Vienna I had no thought of going in the direction of Venice, but when I reached Gratz I wished to satisfy a desire I have always had to see the most noble city of Venice. For this purpose I got about half way, to a place called Ponteba, where I was stopped, and I found the way longer than I had anticipated. I found that foreigners coming from the direction of Gratz were not allowed to pass. I therefore turned back towards Saltzburg with no little regret at not being able to show my great desire to receive the commands of the republic.
Dogna, the 17th November, 1619. Copy.
[Italian.]
Nov. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
107. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The state of the weather prevented my arrival here before the 23rd inst. and I hope it may not be too rough to cross to England. I propose to start from either Rotterdam or Flushing. War, which spreads desolation elsewhere, has brought wealth to this country. I have received visits from Prince Maurice, Prince Henry, Count William of Nassau and the Prince of Portugal, who is here. The States General sent two deputies to see me and the ambassadors of France and England and many others have called upon me. I had audience of the States and presented my credentials. Among other things they offered a ship to convey me to England. In all discussions I confined myself to generalities, especially when they spoke of the alliance, upon which I have no instructions. I told the English ambassador what your Excellencies instructed me to say. I have heard from the Secretary Surian of his action and of your Serenity's satisfaction thereat.
The Hague, the 25th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
108. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of the Bernese have called upon me and told me of their instructions. I assured them of the friendship of your Serenity. The duke has detained them and sent to Freiburg to ask them to send persons here to treat. The resident of England has written to the lords of Berne asking them to permit their ambassadors to stay here and excusing them if, in so doing, they have infringed their instructions, since the affair requires it. The resident of England has stated that no prince is better fitted to arrange their affairs than the duke, since he will command the confidence of both parties. The same resident asked me to secure the co-operation of your Excellencies to smooth over any difficulties which may arise. I therefore ask for instructions to guide my conduct.
Turin, the 26th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
109. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The resident of England has asked three things of the duke: First to pay the Count of Mansfeld, so that the Palatine may not be involved, as he is still moving with caution. The agent told me that the Palatine will not allow himself to be crowned before the separation of the diet. Second, to persuade your Serenity to give some help in those parts. Third, to keep France neutral by negotiation, which will suffice for the Palatine and his adherents. The duke gave him assurances upon this last point.
Turin, the 26th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
110. PIERO ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary in England to the DOGE and SENATE.
By way of Brussels and Antwerp letters arrived here the day before yesterday from merchants and others, with news of the coronation of the Prince Palatine and the Princess also and full particulars of all the circumstances and the ceremony at Prague for this solemnity. Some of these letters were immediately taken to the king at Newmarket, and there has been plenty of time to discover in what spirit his Majesty received the information, but nevertheless nothing is known. Every one of the Court here says that the fact of the coronation is not certain even yet since the king has received no special advice thereof. Therefore there has not hitherto been the smallest sign of public rejoicing in this city over it either among the people or the nobility. But every one rejoices at the defeat of Bucquoi at the bridge, as they hear that he had a force of 4,000 Imperialists.
The grant of a levy of ten thousand men in these realms for the service of the King of Poland has been confirmed to me by Sir [Henry] Wotton, but he told me the grant was an old one (fn. 2) recalled by the king's letters, and would be carried out with difficulty, as it would take a long time for the Scotchman to return who was to bring the money for this and he also assured me that his Majesty desires that the men shall only be employed against Turks and Tartars.
He told me further that they have been very pleased to hear that your Serenity has acceded to one of the two requests of Colonel Peyton, granting him leave to stay in garrison with the remainder of his men. The great satisfaction felt at court over this may possibly lead them to make some concessions in the case of Donato upon the arrival of the Ambassador Lando, when he speaks about it. What had been said and done in the past for the protection of Donato was simply out of regard for his title as ambassador of your Serenity, and because of the laws of this kingdom. About his now going to Vienna Wotton said it would take place if the king will give him the means to maintain himself there. He hoped to go but at present he could not be sure.
The gentleman of the Duke of Rohan, whom I reported had come here to offer condolences upon the queen's death, has been delayed by indisposition, though he wished to depart. He came recently to see me, to take leave. He repeated the office which he had performed before, begging me to write again to your Serenity and say that the duke, his master, is your devoted servant, and desires nothing better than to devote his life to the service of the republic.
The Lord Treasurer of the Crown has at length, during these last days, been sent to the Star Chamber. He was accused of having appropriated to his own uses about 200,000 crowns. He has been sentenced to the Tower during his Majesty's good pleasure and to pay a fine of 120,000 crowns. It is thought, however, that as soon as he has paid this money the king will at once set him at liberty and he will be reinstated in his office, since it appears that it was his wife rather than he who committed the theft in manipulating the money. She also has been condemned to go with him to the Tower.
I have heard nothing further of Donato except that he grows more desperate the more he thinks of the capture of his servant. He has not as yet entered his new house.
The arrival of the Ambassador Lando is awaited here with remarkable eagerness, as they know he has had time to get here. However, the winds have for many days been very high and in the wrong direction for a passage from Zeeland, and this makes them believe that his Excellency has been delayed.
London, the 29th November, 1619.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
111. Whereas Gabriel Dado, courier, who was summoned to give himself up within fifteen days, is now reported to be sick, that he be allowed ten additional days, within which to present himself.
Ayes, 113.Noes, 3.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
112. To the Ambassador in Spain.
The galleons of Naples reached that city with two French prizes, which were taking goods from Barbary to Leghorn, with letters patent of the Grand Duke to the value of some 30,000 ducats. However the Duke of Ossuna let them go, and Tuscany will favour him at the Spanish court.
The galleys of Don Ottavio of Aragon have left Naples well armed and supplied, to go, they say, to the Archipelago. They are preparing six of the best galleys to go to Alexandria and have sent couriers to collect troops. These proceedings cause great damage to the kingdom.
After the departure of the galleys they dismissed the other ships, but some privateers are out, with the special purpose, they say, of molesting us. Giuliani proposes to cruise towards the west and on the Barbary coasts and Vairani instead of going to Zante to hurt us, wants to go to Malta. All will leave at the first opportunity.
At Naples they are making great preparations for a military depôt, but they need money first.
The question of restitution makes no progress. Ossuna seems inclined to send the Maonas (fn. 3) to Baia to leave the port of Naples more free.
The deputies of the city have asked Ossuna to respect certain privileges or to send to Spain to make representations. He threw them all into prison, to the disgust of the whole city. Ossuna has forbidden meetings and any communication with Spain although they think that information about it has already been secretly conveyed to his Majesty. Ossuna tries to gain the principal ministers at Court in order that he may keep his place.
We send this for information, to use as you think necessary.
The like to France, England, Savoy, Constantinople, The Captain General at Sea, Germany, Milan, Florence.
Ayes, 151.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Built at a cost of 8,850l. Oppenheim: Administration of the Royal Navy, page 208.
2 A grant of 8,000 foot is mentioned by the Venetian Ambassador Nicolo Molin in a despatch of the 4th March, 1604. See Vol. X. of this Calendar, page 135.
3 Maona is a kind of troopship. La Germa e la Maona sono navi che si usano nel Levante, ma sono rare. Sono grandissimi vasi e si assomigliano alle galee grosse o galeazze Veneziane ..... non vanno a remi ..... portano vele quadre, sono di tardo moto ..... servono al Gran Turco per portar soldati, artiglierie. Tommaseo e Bellini. Dizionario della lingua italiana.