Venice
January 1620, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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101-111

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'Venice: January 1620, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 101-111. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88746 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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January 1620

Jan. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
173. GIACOMO VENDRAMINO, Venetian Resident at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Excellency has heard from Turin that the Duke of Savoy has orders for many troops from his state, and has sent to Holland and England for provisions of food and munitions of war.
Milan, the 1st January, 1620.
[Italian.]
Jan. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
174. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king came to London this morning about dinner time. Before he arrived Sir [Lewis] Lewkenor, master of the ceremonies, came to me to inform me that his Majesty desired to see me and in order not to inconvenience me he had postponed my audience until his return here. He would send his coaches to fetch me to-morrow and wished me to go to him without further delay. Seeing that I should probably have no time to-morrow I resolved to send my despatch to-day. I therefore have to relate that the silence of Sir [Albert] Morton, who recently returned from Nürenberg, as I reported, although persisted in, arises in large measure because he does not know a great many things, except what is fairly old, as he said he took five weeks on his journey, spent several days in Flanders, and finally proceeded to Calais to cross the sea. However, since his arrival the king seems more undecided than ever and apparently does not attend so much to the pleasures of the chase as to thoughts of greater matters. They say, in particular, that he spends many hours in writing even in the night, and it appears that he is about to publish in a few days a book or manifesto touching the troubles in Bohemia, (fn. 1) the decision of his son-in-law, that his Majesty had no share in these events, which has restrained him so far from rendering any assistance, and finally the declaration that he is about to make in his favour because of their relationship. At the same time there are other opinions about it and I cannot yet make any definite assertion to your Serenity upon the subject, and even if what I first stated be true, it might easily be upset by those accidents which frequently change opinions and resolutions.
His Majesty is much affected and troubled at hearing that the Spanish ministers go about saying, especially in Germany, that it is not true that the Catholic king even requested him to intervene for an accommodation between the Bohemians and the emperor. That his Majesty acted entirely by himself in the matter of the embassy of Lord Hay (le Conte d'Hees), not with sincerity but with a double design, either to have the glory and merit of having brought about a settlement, if he succeeded, or else under the pretext of his zeal for the general peace, having thrown Ferdinand's affairs into worse confusion. At all events Sir [Walter] Aston, already appointed to act as ordinary ambassador with the Catholic king, has recently sent by sea many members of his household and various belongings. They say that he will leave for those parts within two or three days.
They are shortly expecting Lord Hay here, news having come of his arrival in the Low Countries at Leyden, so that by now he should be at the Hague. They are also expecting the ambassador of the Palatine every day at this Court, who will be the Baron Dohna. They also say that an ambassador is to come from the emperor, but there is no authentic news of this. Meanwhile Dohna is probably near at hand, and knocking at the gates of the kingdom. Until his arrival all decisions and discussions are in suspense, although they speak more broadly than they have done hitherto about the necessity for arming, and they openly say that the king will certainly do something to help his son-in-law.
Some articles have appeared recently from which it seems that the Palatine has associated himself with Bethlem Gabor upon very disadvantageous terms. It appears that Gabor claims from the Bohemians and the Palatine the payment of the troops which he sent to their assistance, and that the Duke of Saxony has openly declared for the emperor. The news comes from France, but it is not believed. An opinion passes current at this Court that the most serene republic has paid off the troops of il Ciavalischi and others, not only for the purpose of disarming and relieving herself of the expense, but to give the Palatine the opportunity of obtaining good troops, as most of them would enter his service for religious and other reasons, although they say that many of the soldiers of Levenstein have been practically driven by force to enter the service of the emperor. But everyone believes that these like others before them, unable to endure a compulsory service, will take to flight in a little while to serve under another flag.
London, the 2nd January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
175. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the 30th ult. I mentioned the pretensions which the ambassador of the Palatine might advance. I must now repeat my request for your instructions. At the outset I may be able to follow the example of the French ambassador, but afterwards difficult situations may arise as for example as the masques which are being prepared by the prince. As I said before, that ambassador will have every advantage at this Court. I hope that no difficulty will arise at the first masque which takes place in seven or eight days, as although the ambassador has not yet arrived, he is expected every day, though he may not be here by then, and even if he come he may not be invited, because he will not have had audience. But one may reasonably fear trouble at the other masques which will take place towards the end of the carnival. It is true that in the present state of affairs the ambassador may not raise any pretensions while his prince needs to think more of establishing his Bohemian throne than of points of etiquette, while the republic is like a beautiful woman, courted by everyone. He may, of course, as on other occasions, pass as a member of the king's household, without being reckoned among the ambassadors; but whatever the event I shall be glad to have your commands.
The earl of Arundel has been to see me and said a great deal in honour of the most serene republic, expressing his esteem and gratitude for the honours shown to himself upon previous occasions, and for those recently accorded to his sons at Padua. I made a suitable reply in accordance with the information sent to me on the 30th November. The earl and Colonel Cecil, who accompanied him, spoke of the greatness and beauty of Venice and referred in the course of the conversation to the fact that the Ambassador Hay had travelled towards the frontiers of Venice, but finding impediments in the way and having no time to lose, he had to turn back. They seemed sorry at his not being able to see Venice but for no other reason except that it was a most interesting city; they did not say much about it. In conformity with my instructions I gave them a brief account of what had happened and of the reasons for the steps taken and went on to speak of the friendly disposition of the republic towards the earl both as the representative of his Majesty and for his own sake. I think I made them understand and they left well content without a sign that they thought any more of the matter.
I have little more to add about Donato. This week he has left his house occasionally with some of the Italian merchants here, and has generally frequented the more remote streets and the suburbs, not the city. One morning he attended mass in the house of the French ambassador, but he has not been there at night except on the two evenings that I mentioned in my last. He does not seem to be taking steps to approach any of the ministers, unless he employs an intermediary, for which I am keeping my eyes open, but it is not easy to find out. Perhaps, when the king has come to London he will do something. I will do my utmost to discover everything possible.
The Secretary Marioni has not yet left, and is paying his farewell visits here. He tells me that he will leave in two days. The other day I heard that the king proposed to give him letters for your Serenity in his praise. He told me afterwards that when he went to take leave of the Secretary Naunton and Sir [Henry] Wotton, they had made some reference to this, without any prompting on his part. The letters were finally sent to him by Naunton to this house, and therefore I wished him to remain here until his departure. He told me that he would like to know the contents, because if they were merely in his praise and in recommendation, he did not propose to present them to your Serenity.
London, the 2nd January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
176. To the Ambassador in Spain.
Don Ottavio of Aragon has reached Naples after capturing a Turkish galley. The Uscochi remain at Naples. They say that orders have reached Naples from Spain to levy troops; to get the money they propose to sell lands. They also talk of making a fleet to keep our republic busy. The Duke of Ossuna has sent for the two Maonas from Baia to be put in the arsenal. The other galleys are now unloading their ordnance at Naples; they will be sent to Baia for chains.
We send this for information.
The like to, France, England, Constantinople, Savoy, Captain General at Sea, Milan, Germany, Florence.
Ayes, 156.Noes, 1.Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Jan. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
177. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Palatine is expecting help from Bouillon, from France, from Flanders and from England. And after Gabor has been crowned, the Hungarians and Bohemians will aim at taking Vienna.
Vienna, the 4th January, 1619. [M.V.] Copy.
[Italian.]
Jan. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
178. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The agent of England, who is at home with a slight indisposition, has just sent to inform me that he has received letters from London of the 13th ult. saying that Lando had arrived safely on the preceding day, his Majesty being at Newmarket. He has particulars about Donato after two offices which he passed with the king on behalf of the duke. His Majesty, after a due consideration of all the circumstances, recognised that he could not continue to protect Donato and still retain the friendship of the republic. Accordingly he got the Secretary Naunton to tell Donato that though the king liked him, he would be well advised to withdraw from London to some place where he would not be noticed. Donato was crestfallen and astonished, made difficulties about leaving and seemed incredulous that the order came from the king, knowing that he was under his Majesty's protection. Naunton repeated the message adding on his own account that he advised him to flee from the storm.
The agent told me that the king had seen the copy of a letter written by Donato to the republic containing insults against the Duke of Savoy. His Majesty was much moved and said that your Serenity ought to punish him for that offence alone; he would like to teach him how princes should be spoken of. The order for the withdrawal of Donato from London was immediately issued; they do not know where he has gone.
I thanked the agent profusely and said that this further proof of friendship would strengthen the bonds between his Majesty and the republic.
I think that this disagreeable affair is now in good train and that the representations made from this Court have greatly helped.
Turin, the 7th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
179. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Before Viscount Doncaster left, the States thought fit to inform him of what had been arranged between myself and their deputies. I should have liked Carleton and the viscount to have had copies of the articles in order to take them to their king, but the States thought it better not, because they did not wish to be bound to do the like to the French ambassador. Accordingly they simply ordered the articles to be read over to them. But they did not do the same with the French ambassador, simply notifying him of what had happened.
The Hague, the 7th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
180. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Some persons still cling to the impression that the ambassador extraordinary of England raised the subject of the truce in the assembly of the States General, but their minds seem very free at present from any thought on the subject. After long and friendly compliments, the ambassador exhorted them to have the affairs of Germany at heart, continue to help the Bohemians and to support the Palatine as King of Bohemia. In the reply which the States had read to him and of which they gave him a copy, they insist that this line of conduct is his Majesty's part, and he ought to move in order to encourage those who can do no other but follow him. They further spoke of more private matters, such as helping them against the pirates and some negotiations touching their merchants. The also make request in favour of those condemned for sending gold and silver money across to these parts, who have been fined a large sum of money. This affair is urgent as it affects many individuals not only in their purse, because their goods have been sequestrated in England, but in their honour. Viscount Doncaster promised his most favourable offices to obtain satisfaction for them.
Yesterday morning he went to Rotterdam and he may go on to Calais if he sees that the wind will not allow him to embark at Brill or in Zeeland. During the ten or eleven days of his stay here he has received every mark of honour. He was feasted by the Prince of Orange and Prince Henry, the latter making return for the kindness shown to him by the viscount when he accompanied the Elector Palatine to England. He gave a splendid banquet on Wednesday evening, with dancing and other recreations. Carleton also has spent freely in his own house.
The suite of the viscount lodged in an inn here, where he paid, as he would not allow the States to do so. However, they did not wish him to leave without some present, and as, in the generosity of his soul, he thinks little of gold, they decided to present him with hangings to decorate a large hall, consisting mostly of silk. I could not state its value precisely but it cost some thousand florins. (fn. 2) The viscount did not neglect complimentary visits and called at the house of your Serenity in return for my visit, accompanied by the ordinary ambassador and his suite. He seemed well pleased at the confidence I had shown towards him and promised to tell his king about it. I have sent full particulars to the Ambassador Lando, as well as what he said about the incident on our frontiers. Upon that subject, however, he has never said another word, but it will be good for Lando to perform the office I suggested, as even if the ambassador says nothing, his followers may spread mischief in the Court.
They are anxiously awaiting here the news of the arrival in England of the ambassador sent by the princes of the Union, as they hope that his representations on the state of affairs in Germany, of the meeting of the Catholic League and the fear of its proceedings, what Saxony will do and what the Protestant princes will do, may stir his Majesty to give vigour and heat to his resolutions.
The States have received word that your Excellencies have decided to recognise the Palatine as King of Bohemia, and they have informed the ambassadors of France and England here of this intention. The English ambassadors were very pleased and asked me about it. I said I had heard nothing on the subject, but I thought the republic would act with her customary prudence. The States think that this news will make a great impression upon the King of Great Britain and the ambassadors said as much to me.
The Hague, the 7th January, 1620.
[Italian.]
Jan. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
181. ALMORO NANI, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador has been twice to have audience of the Grand Vizier, but has not succeeded although one was promised him. I hear that a present which he sent before was returned; some say the pasha refused it because it only consisted of eight ordinary garments. Of this I cannot be sure. In these days we have to do more than the ordinary, especially with this Pasha and his court, who are such harpies.
The Vigne of Pera, the 9th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Dalmazia.
Venetian
Archives.
182. ALVISE ZORZI, Venetian Proveditore of Zara, to the DOGE and SENATE.
After the Most Illustrious Ciuran, proveditore of the fleet, had left here to find the Captain General, letters from your Excellencies of the 6th inst. arrived with orders for the landing here of the troops of Colonel Peyton, to the number of about 300 foot, and instructing me to make the necessary provision for their lodging, until the arrival of his Excellency, which may be late. In spite of the short notice and the places being occupied by other extraordinary troops, and the lack of palliasses and rough blankets, for which I have previously besought your Excellencies, I will not fail to do my utmost for these troops.
Zara, the 9th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
183. To the Ambassador in England.
We were glad to receive the letters announcing your arrival in England. His Majesty's ambassador with the States continues to favour our interests, as the Resident Surian advises us. We send you word so that you may add what your prudence suggests to the offices which we have committed to you.
Ayes, 79.Noes, 10.Neutral, 83.
Second vote—
Ayes, 56.Noes, 11.Neutral, 103.
Pending.
On the 11th inst.
The letter was submitted with the addition:
We add for your information a copy of what we have received from our ambassador in Savoy in the matter of Donato.
Ayes, 105.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Jan. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
184. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Friday last, the 3rd inst. at two o'clock in the afternoon the king sent the Earl of Warwick to fetch me. He came to this house with numerous coaches and accompanied by a number of cavaliers and gentlemen of the Court together with the Master of the Ceremonies. He led me to his Majesty, who was accompanied by the prince, his son, and surrounded by several members of the Council, though I noticed the absence of the Marquis of Buckingham in particular. The king was seated beneath a large rich canopy in the presence chamber. At my arrival he rose and led me up to the steps of the throne, listening to me, cap in hand. I stated briefly that the most serene republic as a testimony of her affection and esteem, had committed to me the honour of serving him as ambassador, and I rejoiced at being employed with a prince of such greatness and goodness and at serving a king endowed with such lofty qualities, the sovereign of such opulent and happy realms, a king whose interests were so bound up with those of the republic. Previously the report of the beauty and greatness of this country and its rulers aroused my curiosity and led me to come here in a private capacity, and now I was doubly glad to return with my present character, and I hoped his Majesty would graciously receive me as the minister of a prince that esteems and loves him so much and wishes him every prosperity. To avoid fatiguing his Majesty I would tell him at once, as I was instructed, of the thanks voted by the Senate for the representations made by him in Spain in favour of the republic, and elsewhere, and for the good will which has shown itself in so many public actions. I told him that my poor tongue did not suffice to express this feeling adequately. The republic would never forget the favours he had shown or his representations to other princes in her interests, and would for ever remain under a great obligation to him.
His Majesty listened to me throughout with a smiling countenance expressive of his satisfaction. He replied that he welcomed me as the representative of your Serenity for whom he cherished a sincere and cordial affection. He spoke of me personally in a way that made me blush. He said I should always find him ready to meet me in all negotiations and I should see the strength of his friendship for the republic, and finally expressed his regret at not having been able to greet me owing to his absence from the city.
I thanked his Majesty warmly and humbly and handed him my credentials, presenting to him Sig. Giovanni Moresini, son of Sig. Marc' Antonio, who wished to accompany me on this embassy. After that I presented M. Agostino, my brother, who has come here moved by his desire to learn something which will render him a useful son of your Excellencies. Although of tender years he is very zealous. His Majesty was pleased to receive him very graciously.
On the same day an audience was arranged with me for the Prince on Sunday, Saturday being the first day of Christmas by their reckoning here. The same evening I enjoyed the pleasure of having at my table the Earl of Warwick, who is one of the most gracious noblemen of this kingdom. Many lords came with him and numerous courtiers as well as the Italian merchants who accompany me.
Donato was at Court that same day, an hour before I went there. I do not find that he spoke to the ministers, but simply that he went into the apartments of the Duke of Lennox, who was entertaining some friends, but he did no business with him. Upon my entry into the royal courtyard I saw him stationed in a doorway commanding the whole place. He was alone with no one anywhere near him and he held his cloak over his face, covering it as far as his eyes. I thought I recognised him, but afterwards learned for certain that it was he. He wandered about the palace observing the whole ceremony, while his servants went about spying separately. He departed half an hour after I left, returning to his home in a boat by the river.
London, the 10th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
185. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Sunday after dinner Viscount Purbeck, brother of the Marquis of Buckingham came to fetch me with two of the king's coaches and numerous lords and gentlemen and a large company. This is considered a great favour at this Court, and every day something happens to display the affection of his Majesty for your Serenity. He brought me to the prince who gave me a ceremonious audience in the presence of an unusual number of cavaliers. I told his Highness that the opportunity which brought me here to serve his father as ambassador would allow me also to serve him, and I would gladly devote myself to a prince in whom every virtue flourishes, whose gentleness excites the affection of every one, who is born to rule and whose royal presence alone proves him worthy of the greatest crown. I therefore offered my sincere service and prayed that Heaven would grant him every happiness.
He replied that he had always been brought up to a peculiar affection for the most serene republic, and would always endeavour to show the interest which he felt. He said a few other courteous phrases. As I had received such exceptional honours I thought it only right to make an exceptional return, and so I entertained at supper the said viscount and all the lords and gentlemen who accompanied him. I disguised the depleted condition of our household, in order not to dishonour your Serenity, and to make a good impression upon the Court here and acquire some hold upon the Marquis of Buckingham, by honouring his brother, who seemed to leave perfectly satisfied with this house and made me many offers, so I hope that I have not sowed the seed in vain.
Immediately after my audience of the prince I tried to pay a visit to the Marquis of Buckingham, who had withdrawn to his room, somewhat distempered. At length he received me after sending word that although he was not in a condition to speak much and ought not really to show himself, yet he would take it as a favour if I would go to see him. He was in a room full of people. Owing to his condition and every other reason I simply passed a highly complimentary office, begging him to assist me in all my efforts on behalf of your Serenity, expressing every confidence in his kindness and willingness. He replied as warmly as I could possibly have desired, speaking always in a very modest and prudent manner.
London the 10th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
186. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have executed your Serenity's instructions with his Majesty with regard to Donato and am also negotiating with the leading ministers with the utmost application. I have succeeded so far that in a few hours or days I hope to see the question settled in the manner that you desire. I will reserve my information until all is complete, so as to supply all the particulars at once. Accordingly I am sending these off to-day, while I shall reserve the other for a special courier, Bosis, who accompanied me to this Court.
They say openly at Court here that in the relapse of the King of Spain things have gone so far that he has received the extreme unction. The Archbishop of Canterbury himself told me this, when he came to see me, adding that the king's death could not fail to make a great difference seeing that the crown would devolve upon a child, who would not be able to maintain any single minister in power over the others, and consequently jealousies would arise among them and rivalry to secure advancement over each other. All this would have a very prejudicial effect upon the Spaniards at this time, in the midst of their ambitions to absorb the world. He added that they possessed very little money. In the last fleet from the Indies which brought some 14 millions only 1,200,000 ducats belonged to the king's account, the rest being for private individuals. The dissatisfaction of Lerma might now produce some remarkable results. In conclusion he congratulated me that the republic would have breathing space after the very heavy expenses which she has been bearing up to now. She will know how to bear herself so that she will no longer have reason to fear a sudden attack.
The king still seems irresolute as to whether he shall help his son-in-law, although the Ambassador of Savoy told me that when he had audience of his Majesty the other day, the king spoke more freely than usual upon this, but he thinks his Majesty will persist in I is original opinions until the arrival of the Palatine's ambassador. Nothing has been heard of this individual this week, but they think that his appearance cannot be long delayed. It is thought that the king's manifesto book will not appear before his arrival, although some assert that it is about to be published. Meanwhile they do freely and openly what has not been done hitherto, namely the preachers in the churches offer up prayers for the new King and Queen of Bohemia in this city and throughout the kingdom. (fn. 3)
They assert here that the Duke of Savoy has fallen into the arms of the Catholic king, has hanged some Protestants and banished all the others perpetually from his dominions. The pope and the princes of Italy will unite to support Ferdinand in the name of religion, making the Duke of Savoy general of the armies of the league. In this connection they are very anxious to know what the most serene republic will do.
Sir [Henry] Wotton, in the course of a conversation told me that on his journey back from Venice he spread favourable opinions about the republic in the states of the Princes of the Union. He could tell me that those princes highly appreciated the favour conferred upon them by the republic retaining the Count of Levestein in her service, when she no longer needed him and had paid off all his men.
Lord Hay, his Majesty's ambassador, has arrived at Gravesend and to-morrow he will reach this city. He is anxiously awaited as they think he must bring important particulars. It has come out that Hay was not at all well received by the emperor and welcomed coldly, and he has returned a warm partisan of the interests of the Palatine. All those who accompanied him are also highly incensed, as throughout the emperor's dominions, wherever they went they were referred to contemptuously as the comedians and buffoons of England.
In connection with the subject of comedians I ought not to conceal the following event from your Serenity, owing to the mystery that it involves. The comedians of the prince, in the presence of the king his father, played a drama the other day in which a king with his two sons has one of them put to death, simply upon suspicion that he wished to deprive him of his crown, and the other son actually did deprive him of it afterwards. This moved the king in an extraordinary manner, both inwardly and outwardly. In this country however the comedians have absolute liberty to say whatever they wish against any one soever, so the only demonstration against them will be the words spoken by the king (il che è seguito con grande commotione et sentimento del Re, interiormente et esteriormente, se ben tenendo in questi paesi li comedianti libertà assoluta di dire ciò che vogliono contra chi si sia, tutta la dimostratione contra di loro sarà stata quella che ha fatta il Re in parole).
I will close this dispatch with the news which has arrived here of the birth of a son to the Palatine. (fn. 4) I beg your Excellencies to excuse me, as news is scarce this week, and the visits I have been obliged to make have left me little time.
London, the 10th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 See Lando's despatch of Jan. 14th, at page 128 below.
2 Carleton in a letter to Chamberlain of 1/10 Jan., says the tapestry was worth 1,000l. sterling. State Papers. Foreign. Holland.
3 Yet James rebuked Dr Baily for praying for the King of Bohemia. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, p. 112.
4 Prince Rupert, afterwards the dashing cavalry leader, born at Prague on the 17th December, 1619.