Venice
January 1620, 17-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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135-139

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'Venice: January 1620, 17-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 135-139. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88748 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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January 1620

Jan. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
201. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
With the information supplied by your Serenity about the incident at Pontieba and Lord Hay, I have given a precise account of the facts to various gentlemen and especially to some of his relations. Yesterday at the prince's masque I saw Hay, though hurriedly, and paid my respects. He thanked me for the office and began to beg me not to think any more of the matter, as he was perfectly satisfied, knowing quite well the necessity for such precautions and that the republic acted perfectly correctly in exercising a strict surveillance. He had received full information about the instructions which had been given for his entertainment during the period of quarantine and for his honour in other ways. He considered this a high favour. So I hope all other offices may be superfluous, especially at Court and among the nobility where one no longer hears a word about it. Hay told me that he was anxious to pay me a call, and offered his excuses for not being able to come hitherto, but if I would visit him he would be glad to see me.
This Hay has described to his Majesty at length his journey and the honours he received wherever he passed. He also touched, I understand, upon the Pontieba incident, but very lightly and rather with the air of excusing the matter. The king, being well informed about this custom of the republic, does not seem to have made any reflection upon it at all. Hay expressed himself as very satisfied with the new King of Bohemia, the United Princes and the States. He was equally dissatisfied with the emperor and the Austrians, saying not only that they did not honour him, but displayed contempt and abhorrence, feeling sure that the king had sent him not to compose their affairs but to throw them into greater confusion, and to help the Protestant Princes and the supporters of the son-in-law, while intimidating and dismaying those of the emperor. He brings great hopes that the Palatine may steadily improve his initial good fortune and make even greater progress. But he says that without the help of this crown he could do nothing. Everyone is looking to see what the king will do, as being the thing of most interest. Every one grasps at any pretext for moving with deliberation, from seeing no movement in this direction. He reports that the reasons of the Bohemians for deposing Ferdinand and electing the Palatine were most valid and just. His Majesty's delay in assisting the latter excites much comment throughout the world. The Palatine said he was quite sure that if his Majesty liked he could not only secure for him the crown of Bohemia, but could put himself in a condition to win other things also, not only for the Palatine and his wife, but for himself and his friends. He hinted, so I understand, that the people here, if he wished, would readily subscribe in the Palatine's favour, both with contributions and their lives, owing to their affection for the new queen, as his Majesty's daughter, and from their desire to see the prosperity and aggrandisement of his posterity.
Wherever Hay has been, in the lands of friendly powers, especially the States, he has not only exchanged compliments, but has exhorted them to help the new king. Amid the negotiations for a settlement with the Princes of the Union, he always sowed some similar seed, promising them for their readiness and determination, to support that king. At the same time he always showed everywhere that his Majesty desires peace both with the emperor and with the Austrians, only appearing as ambassador in order to act as a means for a settlement. But as I said above, they placed little faith in him.
Baron Dohna, who reached London as I reported, went yesterday to audience of the king, but privately and practically incognito. He did nothing except pass the usual complimentary office and stayed but a very short while with his Majesty, postponing his business to another audience. That business, so far as I can discover, revolves chiefly about two points. One to show the king the reasons which led the Bohemians to elect the Palatine in place of Ferdinand. They maintain that the latter is decadent and incapable of wearing the crown, which he accepted upon many conditions, which he promised to observe, signing with his own hand, or else he would resign the kingdom, and shortly afterwards he turned completely round and practically tore up the whole thing. Consequently they consider him deprived of the crown. The Bohemians claim the right to offer it to whomsoever they please. I understand that in a few days documents will appear giving all the points in which Ferdinand has transgressed, and then the king, recognising the election of the Palatine to be lawful, will base upon these the decision to defend him which has been so long delayed.
The other point which the ambassador has to deal with is to procure a strong declaration, assistance and succour from this quarter. But I understand that the Palatine relies much more on the hope that once the king has declared himself for him, a large number of private gentlemen and other volunteers will go to help him, who held back while every one doubted whether the king might be offended. He expects more from this than if his Majesty promises the most extensive assistance, though he does not doubt but he will promise help.
The day before yesterday in the evening a gentleman arrived also sent to his Majesty by the new King of Bohemia to inform him of the delivery of the new queen of a son. The king has displayed the utmost satisfaction at all he has learned in these last days, and while at table supping, he joyfully asked for a large beaker of wine and drank to the health of the new born prince in Bohemia and of the new king and the queen his daughter. He then took his purse and gave it with all that it contained to this gentleman, saying to him, Run and tell the good news to the prince and throw the doors open if they are not already open. The prince also received the news gladly, as he has always rejoiced sincerely in the prosperity of his brother-in-law and sister. (fn. 1) Thus here they are throwing aside their reserve, and continually show warmer demonstrations in favour of the new King of Bohemia. But the best remains to be done.
From France his Majesty is advised that the king has ordered levies of 12,000 foot and 4,000 horse. It is thought that they will serve for the needs of the kingdom itself, which as usual is in a great state of agitation owing to suspicions about the queen and the Huguenots. Nevertheless some write that these levies are ordered to help the emperor and the religion. But this is absolutely denied by the French ambassador here and many do not credit it. They think it has been invented to make the decisions of the king appear more reasonable and necessary.
They are afraid at Court, and they say that your Serenity, having disarmed many ships and sent away many men, will allow a free passage to the troops from Naples, who by the advices which reach here are constantly increasing to help the emperor. But while they are anxious for everyone to move in favour of the new king, they remain undecided and irresolute here. They only say that if they decide to afford extensive assistance, the Earl of Southampton will be put forward to take the command. He offers to spend 40,000l. sterling upon this charge out of his own pocket. But if the levies are not so great they think that General Cecil will be sent.
It is reported that the Spanish ambassador chosen by the Catholic king to reside with his Majesty is very near this kingdom. But perhaps this is an artifice in order to keep matters in suspense still longer. However Aston, who was chosen to go as ambassador to Spain does not move, although they said some days ago that he might leave at any moment and although he has sent many of his people by sea to Spain to await him, and his goods also.
I have, obtained information upon the point of the letters written by Sig. Trom from Nancy. There is nothing except that a certain Fleming has the fancy for rearing certain birds which take fish in the water and bring it intact to their master. He has frequently approached his Majesty and obtains complimentary letters to various princes for the purpose of making them a present of these birds and so obtain gifts. He wished to do this at Nancy, but being a man of no position and as he was acting simply for the sake of gain, his letter to his Highness was simply of a complimentary character.
This night the prince's masque took place, in which he and ten other cavaliers made a brave show. Among them Buckingham was first, and apparently he is as great a favourite with the prince as with his father. The ceremony lasted more than three hours, attended by an extraordinary number of ladies very richly dressed and laden with jewels. His Majesty took part with much gaiety and greatly enjoyed the agility and dancing of his son and of the marquis, who contended against each other for the favour and applause of the king and to give him pleasure. I, as representing your Serenity, and the Ambassadors of France and Savoy were honoured and entertained in a seemly manner. We were all placed on a stage to see the dancing and afterwards, following the king, we went to see the supper, in the usual way. At the masque his Majesty sat under his usual large canopy, surrounded by numerous lords. Near him stood the former Archbishop of Spalato, who daily advances in esteem and favour by the publication of books greatly to the king's taste and in other ways.
London, the 17th January, 1619. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
202. To the Ambassador in Spain.
The Duke of Ossuna has released the slaves in the captured Turkish galley. Don Ottavio of Aragon is leaving for Spain with the prize. They are making various naval preparations. The provision for Germany does not get beyond discussion. They have given quarters to the Uscochi.
We send this for information.
The like to:
France, Savoy, England, Constantinople, Captain General at Sea, Germany, Milan, Florence.
Ayes, 172.Noes, 1.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
203. Whereas we employed seven English ships in our fleet, six of which have now been dismissed and have received their accounts of the consumption of munitions from Rudolf Simes, Vanufole and Vamero namely the ships Abigail, Dragon, Royal Exchange, Hercules, Matthew, Centurion, four of which accounts have been reviewed in the fleet by Nicolo da Venetia, and being informed that the distribution of these munitions was in accordance with the necessary use of ships of war, namely for the going of our ambassador to England, in saluting our representatives and principal places and similar things, and therefore it is just that such munitions be made good to them, so that the accounts of those ships may afterwards be made to the armament:
That the said consumption of munitions be made good to those ships, namely—
To the ship Centurion2531ducats.
To the ship Abigail2278"
To the ship Dragon1345"
To the ship Royal Exchange2660"
To the ship Matthew1882"
To the ship Hercules2560"
together with their consumption of ball.
Ayes, 150.Noes, 5.Neutral, 14.
[Italian.]
Jan. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
204. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
From Prague we hear of the rejoicings of the Palatine at the birth of a son, which has delayed his visit to Moravia. The Prince of Anhalt, who manages all his affairs, is asking for munitions of war. He is proposing to bring troops from Italy to Budweis. Colonel Silz, an Englishman, has a grant from the King of England to levy two regiments to serve the Palatine.
Vienna, the 18th January, 1619. [M.V.] Copy.
[Italian.]
Jan. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
205. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States are proposing to send an embassy to Bohemia and to the Princes of the Union, in reply to this mission sent to them. But apparently they will not settle definitely before they hear the results of the embassy sent by the princes to England and of the promises made by Viscount Doncaster, the English ambassador.
The Hague, the 20th January, 1620.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Prince Rupert, born at Prague on the 17th Dec. 1619. But Chamberlain in a letter to Carleton of the 22nd January, says there were no rejoicings as usual at the birth of the new Bohemian prince. The king was said to be a strange father, who would neither fight for his children nor pray for them. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1619–23, page 115. Nichols: Progresses of James I, iii, page 585.