Venice
March 1620, 1-14

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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189-201

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'Venice: March 1620, 1-14', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 189-201. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88752 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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March 1620

March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
269. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The intervention of the French king for the continuation of the truce with the Dutch excites no displeasure here, although they say they derive no advantage from the peace, because the Dutch are constantly doing more damage to their trade in the Indies. The king's expenses are not reduced, and with only 20,000 crowns more he could make war on them in the hope that they would receive neither from France nor from England such help as they had previously.
Madrid, the 1st March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zara.
Venetian
Archives.
270. ALVISE ZORZI, Proveditori of Zara, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I beg for the remaining money necessary to pay the troops. I have paid the 10,000 ducats which reached me with the letters of the 22nd January last in addition to what I had already paid to satisfy the English troops and the satisfaction for the debts of various merchants. They still remain creditors for considerable sums and are constantly besieging me for their pay.
The number of troops now in this fortress amount to 682, including the sick, the English being 334, being almost exactly counterbalanced by the Italians, to the advantage of your Serenity's interests.
Zara, the 1st March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zara.
Venetian
Archives.
271. ALVISE ZORZI, Proveditori of Zara, to the DOGE and SENATE.
One of the English captains left here by Colonel Peyton asked my permission to send two gentlemen from the troops to the said Colonel. In conversation with this captain I learned that the colonel proposes certain reforms among the troops, and as they do not desire them they propose to send these gentlemen with the idea of leaving the service. They have three grievances: first, that in the original contracts the value of their money was omitted, diminishing their pay by 2 lire a month for each soldier, which the captains had to make up out of their own pockets during the time that they remained in the fleet; secondly, by the contract casks should be given to them to keep the water and provisions for the soldiers, and when they did not have them for a certain time, they had to buy them with their own money at great cost and inconvenience. Thirdly, through not having received money in advance according to the agreement, they have been compelled to borrow at 30, 40 and even 50 per cent. I tried to mollify this captain, although he told me that their companies were short by 200 men, and they could not fill them up owing to the distance of their country, and still less could accept the reform as the others had done. However, I gathered that he would readily agree to change their three companies into two, when Colonel Peyton would act as superintending Colonel, and we should save the pay of a captain and the officers of one company.
Zara, the 2nd March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
272. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spanish ambassador, Gondomar, who is going to England, arrived in this city last Saturday on his way to that kingdom. He is staying in the house of the ordinary Ambassador of Spain, and says he will set out within two days to cross the seas.
Paris, the 3rd March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
273. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bouincauser leaves on Thursday for England. He seems to hope that he will obtain help from that king for the Princes and Carleton told me that the example of their High Mightinesses will help to move his Majesty and he rejoiced that Bouincauser had left with such a resolution.
The Hague, the 3rd March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
274. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king has recently proceeded from Newmarket to Royston and is now at Theobalds. He will reach this city to-morrow, having sent word to me by the Lord Chamberlain that on his arrival in London he would at once give me the audience I asked for to execute the commissions of your Excellencies about the conclusion of the alliance with the States.
They are preparing another representation of the masque given some days ago by the prince. He is practising in order to take part in a tilting match in a few days. The public and solemn combat will take place first, although many of the Lords of the Council are humbly trying to dissuade him, owing to the risks run and a reasonable regard for the preservation of his life.
The report is renewed that the Spanish Ambassador Gondomar is on the way and has reached France. The Spanish ministers show his letters written from Bordeaux. But letters which arrived here from Paris yesterday, written eight days after these real or imaginary ones from Bordeaux, say nothing about the matter, so his actual appearance in this kingdom alone will convince many of his arrival.
Four days ago the Baron Bunychausen arrived here, sent by the Princes of the Union, as I wrote in my last despatch. It is given out that he has not come with the title of ambassador, although everyone here believes him to be such, but that he simply comes in the name of the Princes, and in that way their High Mightinesses gave ear to him at the Hague. Yesterday he went to find the king. They are awaiting the outcome of his negotiations. It is now said that the Ambassador Dohna obtained some advantage when he returned to his Majesty last week. The particulars will come out on his return to London.
The Ambassador of Savoy here has expressed his surprise to me that, when he communicated the news of the conclusion of the league with your Serenity to the king and asked him to enter it, he received no reply from his Majesty to this invitation, and he asked me if by chance the king had said a word about it to me. I replied that he had not breathed a word to me on the subject and I did not expect he would, as the invitation certainly was not given on behalf of the republic, which simply made the communication. I well remembered that nothing more was proposed at Turin and that your Serenity, learning at the time that the duke was intending to make some proposal here, took that view of the subject that reason required as well as the importance of the affair and also because there had been no previous arrangement about the matter. Here Sig. Gaballeoni, interrupted me and said neither had he given any express invitation, but by the manner in which he treated the subject he had simply left the door open for his Majesty to enter the league. He then changed the subject immediately. I thought it right to tell your Excellencies of this. Perhaps he said it simply to feel my pulse, so to speak, and discover if I had any order to invite his Majesty to enter the league recently concluded between your Serenity and the States.
The Secretary Naunton told me that he had orders from his Majesty to send orders, in connection with what I had said to him and to the Secretary Calvert, to all the printers of this city, not to print anything whatsoever concerning the interests of princes or mentioning them or any matter of state without first submitting it to the secretaries and receiving express licence. He assured me that no manner of gratification or justification of Donato would be allowed to issue from the press in this kingdom. He said that other specific orders on the subject would be issued in the royal name, without introducing any mention of your Serenity or your ambassador. He remarked that there are no other presses either in England or Ireland except those of this city. He added that he would speak to the king so that orders should also be sent to Scotland, where printing presses exist, as occasionally things very prejudicial to his Majesty himself and very contrary to the religion professed here see the light in that kingdom, although as various printers have been severely punished every one proceeds with great caution in the subject.
Before I received your Serenity's letters of the 1st February, news reached here of the change of the Grand Vizier at Constantinople. They said two things; that he would revive his ancient claims against the republic, to which he would certainly give some trouble; and also that being very Spanish, and richly bribed and paid for a long time by the ministers of the Catholic king, it might be feared that he would put some bridle upon Bethlem Gabor. They think it certain here that he has made a truce with the emperor, a thing that will cause no small prejudice to the affairs of the new King of Bohemia. So far as the republic is concerned I made use of the information supplied to me when any one has spoken to me on the subject. (fn. 1)
London, the 6th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
275. To the Ambassador at Rome.
The disturbances of Medole have at length been settled. They have asked pardon of the Duke of Feria, the governor, confess their fault to their sovereign and ask his pardon also, and further crave the forgiveness of the Count of Solferino. Two of the ringleaders only were punished. Nothing remains to complete the whole affair but the recall of the royal forces to their quarters. The delay to carry this out appears due to the opposition shown by the people in the places where they are stationed; though it is understood that the soldiers have inflicted great injuries in certain parts.
The like to:
France, Spain, England, Germany, Florence, Naples, the Hague, Zurich, Savoy.
Ayes, 166.Noes, 1.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
276. To the Ambassador in France.
The Duke of Ossuna still remains in his government at Naples. He declares he has not been recalled but has obtained leave to return to Court for four months. Borgia wishes to see him out of the way before he leaves for Naples. Ossuna will do anything to hinder the cardinal from coming and relies on the offices of Don Ottavio of Aragon and the favour of the emperor. His Excellency obtains money by threatening to quarter troops upon the people, who offer large sums to escape. Every one is fearful of offending Ossuna. Orders are said to have come from Spain for 2,000 Spanish and 4,000 Italians troops to be sent to Flanders; they say that his Majesty has ordered great sums of money to be levied and that the fleet is to assemble this summer, this being Ossuna's idea to keep up unrest in Italy.
The like to:
Spain, England, Savoy, Constantinople, Grisons, Germany, Milan, Florence, the Hague.
Ayes, 166.Noes, 1.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
277. To the Ambassador at Rome.
We enclose a copy of the exposition of a gentleman recently sent with credentials from the King of Bohemia, and also of the Senate's reply, read to him this morning. We send this for information, so that if you are provoked you may use it for our service.
The like to:
Spain, France, England, Savoy, Germany, Constantinople, Milan, Florence, Naples, the Hague, Zurich.
Ayes, 108.Noes, 5.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
278. Whereas two English subjects named Robert Gorges and Thomas Chier have served under Colonel Peyton among the forces brought to our service, at their own expense, without receiving any wages, as the Colonel testifies and as appears by the memorials and letters shown, and have also shown their devotion by their offers, and though there is no need of their services at present, it is to the advantage of our service that they be kept well disposed, especially as we understand that they are dependants of the Duke of Lennox, a good friend of the republic: that a gold chain of 150 ducats be presented to each of them by the Savio alla scrittura with a suitable expression of our esteem for them.
Ayes, 142.Noes, 8.Neutral, 8.
On the 17th January in the Collegio:
Ayes, 20.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
279. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters from Prague of the 23rd ult. announce that the king has ordered a diet for the 17th inst. At Prague they are filling up the regiments of infantry, the Prince of Anhalt's son continuing his levies in the empire, and the same letters state that in England that Scotch colonel, (fn. 2) already mentioned, was forming two regiments. At Augsburg the diet of the Princes decided to send ambassadors in the name of the Union to France, England and Holland, to make representations to assist their affairs.
Vienna, the 7th March, 1620. Copy.
[Italian.]
March 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
280. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In the course of a conversation the duke told me that he had caused representations to be made to the King of Great Britain that they should endeavour not to allow the cause of the Palatine to become one of religion, as then many Catholic princes would feel free to interest themselves in his behalf, but otherwise religion would prevail over all other interests whatsoever. He added that they had given a very astute reply thanking him and commending the advice he had thought fit to give, but that since religion was not in question, the king considered himself free to move and assist his son-in-law, and even if it was against his will, the kingdom would force him.
The duke said this would be a proper way of destroying the axiom of the Spaniards that this war is for the Catholic religion. He said he would like, in any event, to be against the Spaniards except in the matter of religion.
Turin, the 9th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
281. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In England the chaplain of Gabaleoni, the duke's ambassador, received a severe beating. When the ambassador complained he received the most complete satisfaction, and the king sent the account of the trial to the duke to show that nothing more could possibly have been done. (fn. 3)
Turin, the 9th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
282. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Majesty's agent writes from England that the Count of Gondomar has not arrived, but in spite of all the representations made by Dohna, ambassador of the Palatine and by the States of Holland in favour of the new king, his Majesty does not budge; as he never approved of the prince's decision to accept the crown, so he seems most averse from sending any help. They expect more particulars on the arrival of the Ambassador Arthon, whose reception at Court is only delayed because a house has not yet been prepared for him to live in.
Madrid, the 10th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
283. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are awaiting with curiosity here the decision of England and what they have done, more especially at the instance of Bouincauser. Some English here, but not the ambassador, say that the king will not decide so readily as they could wish for three reasons. First because he does not like to do things lightly; second in order not to encourage the Germans to go on sleeping, trusting to his action, and thirdly because he wishes to observe the action of France, as he thinks if the King of England moves it may prejudice his son-in-law and the Bohemians as the French might seize upon it as a pretext and use it to the disadvantage of both as well as of the Princes of the Union. Thus those who are jealous for the honour of their king advance these arguments until his Majesty decides; but your Serenity will learn the true reasons from the proper place.
The Hague, the 10th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
284. To the Ambassador in England.
We send you for information a copy of what we are writing to the Secretary Surian at the Hague, which will tell you what has happened, so that if you hear any one speaking upon the subject you will be able to supply the actual facts, as you will recognise to serve the reputation of the republic.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
285. To the Secretary SURIAN at the Hague.
We have already sent orders to the ambassador in England to pay for the carriage of letters during the time of Donato's embassy, and no doubt the Ambassador Lando will have done it.
With regard to Lieutenant Colonel John Vere, we have to say that there is no reason why M. Roccalaura should leave our service, so there is no occasion to consider Vere. However, he is known and valued by us and we appreciate his declaration of affection for our service. If he proposes to take up any other command you might sound him about his pretensions, letting us know, as in that case we could receive him upon reasonable conditions.
We shall be glad to hear of the return of the seven ships, and expect news to arrive next week.
At Constantinople the Grand Vizier, enraged because the dragoman Marc Antonio Borisi defended the taking of his galeot, caused him to be publicly executed. We direct you to communicate all this to the States, adding that their ambassador there has performed very friendly offices in our favour, for which we warmly thank them. We should welcome a statement by him of the league concluded between the two republics, which would greatly benefit our mutual interests.
That news in conformity be sent to England for information and a copy sent to Constantinople.
Ayes, 129.Noes, 3.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
286. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, the DOGE and SENATE.
The king returned to London last Saturday. On the road he met with a slight accident, though he escaped with nothing worse than the danger. The horse he was riding, from some caprice, plunged into the middle of a small river, which is usually passed at a ford; however, his Majesty suffered nothing more than a wetting from head to foot. He gave me gracious audience last Sunday, when I communicated to him the alliance concluded between your Serenity and the States, the reasons and necessity which led the most serene republic to take this step, and the laudable intention of the Senate not to claim or desire anything beyond the preservation of your dominions and freedom. I punctually delivered all the items of the instructions given to me on the 24th January.
His Majesty replied that he had heard this also with great satisfaction from the letters of his ambassador at the Hague; that in these times more especially he praised the drawing together of friends and preparations for defence against all contingencies. Nothing could be more commendable than this and the idea of keeping the peace. He had assisted and would continue to assist the excellent aims of the republic, and he would also like to see peace reign in the world amid the present troubles. For this reason he is proceeding with caution and is moving very deliberately and irresolutely, although he has such interests, without paying any attention to the inclination and voice of the common people and the multitude, but considering the disadvantages of making such a great war greater, to kindle a universal conflagration, knowing as he does the powerful forces of the Spaniards (come che nelli moti correnti del Mondo vorrebbe pur anche vedere la quiete universale: che perciò negli stessi procede con riserva et camina molto pesata et irresoluta, benche si ritrovi con tanto stretto interesse; non havendo riguardo all' inclinatione et alla voce della plebe et della moltitudine; ma considerando li contrarii di far maggiore una guerra cosi grande, di accendere un'incendio universale, et stimando quanto si deve, le forze potenti dei Spagnoli).
He remarked with a sign of displeasure that he had heard of a certain representation made to your Excellencies by the French ambassador, and he pressed me to give him the particulars. I told him substantially what I had learned in the letters of the Senate of the 20th, which reached me very opportunely with those of the 8th and 13th February, the day before. He listened with great interest and seemed much relieved by the reply, laying especial stress upon the particular that the republic had punctually and thoroughly fulfilled her part of the treaty, and yet was defrauded while the promises made to her were not kept. He said that truly she was quite right. He knew for certain that that mad Duke of Ossuna would now be finally removed from Naples. At this point he hinted, although with great reserve, that troops from Naples might possibly be allowed to pass through the Gulf. I told him that your Excellencies were not completely disarmed, your ordinary naval forces were not so small and could be increased at any moment, expressing the terms of the Senate's letter of the 13th ult. I went on to inform his Majesty that your Excellencies were much gratified that the representations made by me about Donato had taken effect. They considered it a clear sign of his Majesty's friendship to the republic; I thanked him warmly and said every thing indicated in the latest letters, which I have so gladly received.
The king listened to me with close attention and seemed remarkably pleased. He told me what I said had caused him great gratification, as to satisfy the republic he had violated the laws of the realm, he certainly could do no more. He swore saying: Mr. Ambassador I would not do so much for the King of France or of Spain, or for any other prince whatsoever. The same idea has been already expressed to me by Naunton and by Wotton, as I reported. He went on to praise me because I had foreseen every accident which might give offence to your Serenity, and had very reasonably approached his Secretaries of State about anything which Donato might see fit to print. He told me that all the necessary orders had been issued. Naunton told me afterwards that by his Majesty's orders he had written to Scotland and also to Cambridge and Oxford, university towns, where he remembered there were printers, and everything had been done by the idea and instigation of the king alone.
London, the 13th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
287. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It does not appear that his Majesty was thorougly convinced by the arguments recently laid before him by the Ambassador Dohna for the deposition of Ferdinand from the throne of Bohemia, and the election of Frederick, though he recently felt assured that the kingdom was not hereditary. He has taken up the dispute again with the ambassador here in London, and they have had long conversations in which he has raised many objections. But so far he has said nothing and has given him no reply. However, at Theobalds Dohna had the satisfaction of seeing the king call a toast in his presence to the new King of Bohemia, for which his Majesty afterwards enjoined profound secrecy. Thus the king appears among the clouds, involved in his extreme irresolution, though some slight rays of hope remain, however distant. They are, however, like lightning, for no sooner do they appear than they vanish. Dohna had the honour of being invited to the last performance of the prince's masque, which took place on the day of carnival according to the calendar here. No other representatives of princes received invitations, only he and the Ambassador Caron of the States.
Baron Bunynchausen has made repeated requests to his Majesty in the name of the Princes of the Union for the assistance due by virtue of the alliance, which amounts to 4,000 foot and 600 horse, saying that while the Catholics are about to attack the Palatine, a member of that confederacy, and intend to send their troops into Bohemia, which cannot be done without making them pass through the Palatine's territory, they need the protection and assistance of his Majesty. He has not said anything about the affairs of Bohemia unless provoked by his Majesty, as he wishes to keep his business entirely separate from that of Dohna, although he acts in concert with him in everything. The king, the first time he gave him audience, plunged at once into the affairs of Bohemia, begging to be excused from making a formal reply to his request, upon which he reserved his reply until another occasion. With every appearance of excitement and anger he began to curse the present troubles and the cause of them, saying, My son (for so he always styles his son-in-law) did this without my advice. If he has rushed into this the Princes of the Union ought not to advise him to plunge further. But Bunynchausen reiterated his requests for Germany saying that he left the care of the Bohemian affairs to the one who had charge of them, and he asked not for grace or favour but for justice and his due. He said the same with more emphasis at his second audience, pressing for a speedy decision upon a question which did not require deliberation.
The king put many questions to him, especially asking how the affairs of Bohemia could be called separate from those of Germany; whether the war of the Princes of the Union was defensive or offensive, and in short suggesting the query whether it was reasonable or no and if he was bound to render assistance by his obligations to the Union. He finished by saying that he would not make any decision at the moment, he would do his duty and he hinted his patience was exhausted.
The Marquis of Buckingham told him much the same later on, pointing out, in the course of the conversation, that his Majesty was expecting the speedy arrival of the Spanish ambassador. He could not foresee what a war would lead to in these days, if matters grew worse. This consideration causes his Majesty more thought than anything else.
Bunynchausen openly says that he cannot stop at this Court for a long while, as he is obliged to go to France without delay to disabuse the king there of the ideas with which he is imbued, namely, that the forces of the Princes of the Union are intended to overthrow the Catholic religion, while they have not the slightest intention of doing it the least harm, but simply wish to preserve their liberty and to release Germany from the bitter yoke and the fetters which it finds unbearable. He added that he had not come to argue but to make a request which could not reasonably be refused or prudently delayed. He had nothing to do with the Spanish ambassador or any reason for awaiting him. He simply asked for help, not only for the Union and the Palatine but for the safety of the two children of the new king who remained at Heidelberg. If they are not assisted by his Majesty they may more easily be abandoned by the Princes of the Union, who can have carte blanche from the emperor, if they wish and be heard and satisfied in every respect so far as their own particular desires are concerned. He speaks with the utmost frankness and decision, remembering an old discussion he had with his Majesty previously upon similar emergencies which might arise in Germany. He makes himself almost importunate, appearing daily in the royal apartments putting himself in his Majesty's way as much as possible, an advantage and freedom he has gained by avoiding the title of ambassador.
Some persons begin to express the opinion that the king is not bound in the present circumstances to render any assistance by the articles of the union. They say that he bound himself only in case of direct not indirect attack, or for some similar occasion affecting the state of the princes and in case of unreasonable invasion actually carried out, not merely anticipated. However it seems impossible for numerous and most important reasons to conclude that his Majesty will not turn and make a speedy decision. He himself has always been fortunate and it is difficult for those who have never experienced stress and danger to lend hearing, credence and ready assistance to the needs of others, as we see.
London, the 13th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
288. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It appears that Gondomar, the Spanish ambassador, has arrived at Amiens in France, whither the Most Christian king himself has travelled, as your Excellencies will have heard. He has sent a courier thence to the ministers of the Catholic king here. They at once set out for Dover, believing that he was then at Dunkirk, to meet him on the sea coast, and the royal master of the ceremonies has also been sent in that direction, to receive him.
The French ambassador here goes about proclaiming the intention of his master to have four ambassadors chosen to try and patch up a peace in Germany and Bohemia. He has already invited the king here to join him in the attempt. He would now like to renew the proposal. But until the arrival of Gondomar it is thought that he will proceed with some reserve in order to see better which way things are tending.
A courier sent recently by Viscount Doncaster with royal letters to the emperor has set many tongues a wagging, but it is supposed that the man has only been sent to disabuse Cæsar and some of his ministers of various counts and imputations fabricated against Doncaster about things done by him to the prejudice of the house of Austria in the course of his embassy in Germany, to the advantage and in favour of the new King of Bohemia.
Recently one who was formerly a preacher of the new queen has been put in prison on the charge of having cast the horoscope of the king and prince and divined the time when they would die. He has been tortured severely, as they suspect more, although he is universally held to be mad (questi giorni e stato poste prigione uno che fu gia predicante della nuova regina, imputato di havere studiato sopra la nativityà del Re et del Prencipe, et sopra il tempo che doveranno questi morire. Viene tormentato assai, sospettandosi di più, sebene universalmente era tenuto per pazzo).
It is reported that Andrew Gray, the Scot, who came as reported, for a levy of 2,000 foot, has obtained the permission, although not to beat the drum, as he asked, but simply to gather the men quietly. It is thought that other levies besides will be made in this manner, and possibly his Majesty has issued secret orders and they will be actually paid and maintained by him. If this be so it cannot long remain concealed and still greater signs will speedily appear, especially as many of the young and spirited gentlemen here are eager to serve the new queen and only wish to feel sure that they will not offend the king by going to Bohemia.
There is a rumour, moreover, that the city of London proposes to make a loan to the new queen, which would doubtless be practically a gift. But all this consists merely of surmise.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 15th and 21st ult. with news of the movement of the Governor of Milan towards Medole. I will obtain audience without delay to communicate this to the king. The news of this event reached the ambassador of Savoy here some days ago, but with this difference, that the Duke of Mantua with the knowledge of and by arrangement with your Serenity had placed a garrison of 600 foot in that place, to occupy Castiglione also, without any reasonable cause. This had compelled the Governor of Milan to send troops in that direction together with some pieces of artillery.
London, the 13th March, 1620.
[Italian.]
March 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
289. To the Ambassador in France.
The Duke of Ossuna persists in his usual manoeuvres to keep himself in power. Cardinal Borgia has decided to ask the Catholic king to order decidedly what he desires. Ossuna while accumulating money by every means, gives out that he will make bread and meat cheap and remove some grievances. He says that the billeting of troops was by the royal command and he tries in other ways to make his Majesty unpopular in the town.
The report persists that they are to send 2,000 Spaniards and 4,000 Italians to Flanders from Naples. They say that before leaving Ossuna desires to see the return of the six galleys sent to the east.
The Uscocchi with the other soldiers of Ossuna's company, after laying waste the country where they were quartered, attacked the prince's palace, so that he had to flee.
From Germany they have sent to Naples for money in the emperor's name.
The royal troops sent to Casal Maggiore by reason of the disturbances of Medole, have withdrawn to quarters by order of the Governor of Milan, so that affair is terminated.
The like to:
Spain, Savoy, England, Constantinople, Germany, Florence, the Hague, Grisons. Milan without the last paragraph.
Ayes, 120.Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
March 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
290. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
From your letters of the 21st to the 30th January we hear with great concern of the death of the dragoman Borisi. You have done your utmost but we perceive that you have not assuaged the inveterate wrath of the Grand Vizier over the capture of his galley. You will have to spend money freely, and try to win over the Chislaragasi, the Hoia and the Mufti. We wish above all things to avoid an open war with the Turks at this moment. We do not doubt but that you will maintain a good understanding with the other diplomatic representatives, especially those who show most friendliness and confidence; we think you should have a special understanding with the representatives of the States, our allies.
We may tell you that some of the greatest princes of Christendom are now soliciting the most serene republic to join a league against the emperor. You will use this information as you may judge our service to require, to be employed at the moment you consider most opportune, in conjunction with the ambassadors of England and the States, if you see fit.
Ayes, 91.Noes, 6.Neutral, 57.
[Italian.]
March 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives
291. GIROLAMO SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Here they seem to hope that the affairs of the emperor may any day take a turn for the better. They say that the Protestants are short of money. The greatest support the King of Bohemia possesses is the King of England, his father-in-law, and from him he will not obtain the succour required by his great necessities; so they think it possible that even he may not refuse a settlement in a short while.
Rome, the 14th March, 1620.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The new Vizier who succeeded Mehemet Pasha, was Ali Pasha, an ex-pirate, described by Eyre as a bloody, furious, crafty and false man of his promise. State Papers, Foreign. Turkey.
2 Andrew Gray. SeeNo. 265 at page 185 above.
3 Wake, the English agent, thought that Gabaleoni's "drunken priest" had only himself to blame. He also considered that Gabaleoni had greatly exaggerated the incident. James caused several arrests to be made, and the Duke of Savoy was highly gratified by his conduct in the matter. Wake to Calvert, the 8/18 March, 1620. State Papers, Foreign. Savoy.