Venice
June 1620, 2-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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266-279

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'Venice: June 1620, 2-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 266-279. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88758 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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June 1620

June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
375. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
M. de Lormes has not yet returned, and Falghero is awaiting him at Brussels. But as that Cavalier's obligation does not extend beyond the end of May, Pasini and Falghero fear that the time taken by your Serenity in deciding may upset the whole affair, as the Florentines are doing their utmost to get the Cavalier to gratify their desires. Falghero is at Brussels with express orders to bring M. de Lormes here so soon as he arrives. He has gone to where the ships are, to inform the captains of his negotiations, for their satisfaction and also to give his own orders. If the agreement is concluded they will be ready to carry out the orders of your Serenity whenever they arrive. Pasini and Falghero, both faithful subjects of the republic, think that the opportunity ought to be seized, and under the pretext that any delay in replying might cause prejudice to other princes, you should send the safe conduct for the captains and men. To conclude the negotiations with more safety and secrecy I would suggest that Pasini and Falgher, or one of them, offer to go to the ships to do all that your Excellencies may think fit.
I enclose the copy of a letter from Falghero to Pasini from Brussels, which expresses what I have said. I may add that I think the affair well founded, but it does not admit of delay. However, if the Cavalier comes here, I will try to gain as much time as possible.
The Resident Stick is in prison for forging money. He admitted his guilt without torture. He served twice as ambassador of the Margrave of Brandenburg in England (fn. 1) and was knighted by that king.
The Hague, the 2nd June, 1620.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
376. Copy of letter from PETER FALGHER to GIO. BATTISTA PASINI of Brussels of the 27th May, 1620.
I have just received your letter about arranging an interview between M. de Lormes and the Resident Surian. The matter is in good train but I fear delay may cause some accident before the reply arrives from Venice. If the French ambassador at Venice hears about it he may easily throw difficulties in the way.
The Florentines are at him actively and God knows what will happen, as if they decide there before us, I fear that he will accept. Meanwhile I think his Serenity might send a safe conduct to the Secretary Surian, with which he could make the necessary arrangements with M. de Lormes without further delay.
[Italian.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
377. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has arrived from the East Indies of a new encounter between the English and Dutch, before they had received word of the agreement concluded here. The damage to the English is considered notable owing to the loss of five ships, mostly laden with pepper. They estimate that it will amount to 500,000l. sterling, equivalent to two millions of gold, all belonging to the company of merchants, although the Dutch and others declare it is much less. Moreover a fine present, which the Great King of Mogor was sending to his Majesty, of jewelled arms and other things of price and beauty, has become the booty of the Dutch. The latter, after disarming one of the ships and furnishing it with enough tackle for navigation and just sufficient provisions, put some Englishmen on board and contemptuously sent it to bring the news here, where the blow proves very bitter owing to the dishonour and the loss, although they hope for restitution. (fn. 2) This incident accordingly provides an ample field for those who rejoice in quarrels between these two nations and who try to encourage them.
In addition to the severe proclamations and other measures taken here about the departure of Sir [Roger] Nort, which I reported in my last, his Majesty has put the baron his brother into prison, upon suspicion of having advised him to leave. Everything is attributed to his desire to gratify the Spaniards. The people here and many of the magnates are becoming more and more incensed, with a corresponding increase in murmuring and criticism (Il tutto viene attribuito a desiderio di sodisfare Spagnoli et va ingrossando sempre più gli animi, et il sangue di questi populi, et di molti grandi, con accrescere gli sussuri e li discorsi).
Another result of Spanish influence appears by the presence of the former Secretary Lake in his Majesty's presence on more than one occasion. Some time ago he was forbidden to present himself, but now they think he may shortly return to his office and be employed in the Council, thus overcoming the ill fortune that he suffered for some years in imprisonment and punishment. This matter is considered very significant by every one.
Wake's secretary (fn. 3) left recently for Turin. It is not known whether he will find the duke in the same state of mind as when he left. The Secretary of Wirtemberg is also about to leave both he and the Ambassador Dohna urging the king as strongly as possible for a reply. So far as I can see they will get plenty of specious phrases, and promises not to abandon the Confederate Princes, but will not succeed in obtaining what they desire, possibly not even in case of urgent necessity. Much has been referred to Wotton's visit to them. They say he will leave at Whitsuntide or soon after, and is receiving his instructions now.
Your Excellencies' letters of the 6th May have reached me this week with particulars of the proceedings of Gueffier since his return to the Court of France. Opinions similar to those expressed by him against the most serene republic are heard here daily, being disseminated with remarkable diligence by the Spaniards, the Jesuits and others among Catholics, and by some rascal Italians. Their object seems to be to take away credit from the unsullied piety of your Excellencies, and to cast discredit upon all your operations and those of your representations. I have not written before on this subject in order not to soil the ears of your Serenity and because every day I could fill sheets with the fabrications and diabolical falsehoods which are promulgated. I have endeavoured and still shall endeavour to ward the blow from your Serenity and myself by the armour of patience and the sword of truth and rectitude, which is the most powerful in the long run. But I must not forget one thing, not because it is the greatest but because it is closely related to some of the things expressed by Gueffier and because it came from the lips of the Spanish ambassador here himself only four days ago. At his own table in the presence of many including his own servants, he remarked in conversation with an Italian, that he and many others also were amazed at two things, one that the republic, professing peace and piety, which borders on four great powers, three of them Catholic, and the fourth an infidel the enemy of all Christendom, should have quarrelled and come to a rupture with all three of the same religion in a short space of time but not with the fourth. The second, that she had recently concluded a league with the States, rebels against their king and Protestants, and is supplying assistance in money to the infidels, to the Palatine and to the Prince of Transsylvania who with Turkish assistance is taking possession of Hungary, at the very time when there is a conspiracy to overthrow the Catholic Church. He concluded either that she must change her religion or else decide very speedily to conduct herself in a different fashion.
London, the 4th June, 1620.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 4.
Inquisitori di
Stato.
Busta 442.
Venetian
Archives.
378. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the INQUISITORS OF STATE.
I have received the letters of your Excellencies of the 8th May with the copy of what the Secretary Surian wrote from the Hague about Badoaro and the orders given. All this will serve me for information and I will not neglect my part.
London, the 4th June. 1620.
[Italian.]
June 4.
Consiglio de' X.
Capi.
Lettere di
Ambasciatori.
Venetian
Archives.
379. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
After writing mine of the 16th ult. about Badoer I have continued my application, not being thoroughly satisfied with what Burlamacchi the merchant said, although his informant, Cavalier Dionisio Lazari, a Venetian exile, arrived here some days ago from Paris. He says he has come merely out of curiosity to see the Court. He brought his Majesty letters from the Prince of Joinville, from which arose the office I reported. Lazari has been made much of by the Ambassadors of France and Savoy.
I have also observed Paulo Marchi, in whose house lodge the two Lucchese, Vicenzo Arnolfini and Giovanni Battista Giuniggi. He was soon to lodge a Venetian gentleman, but I have been unable to discover more. However I will not fail to follow up clues in the great wood of this city and of this realm.
I have written to Contarini in France, Surian at the Hague and Pasini at Brussels to send me particulars of his movements and the company he keeps. Moreover, knowing the importance of being beforehand at this Court I have spoken to the Secretary Naunton, as if on my own account, saying I understood that other Venetian exiles proposed to come here, which would be dangerous for the king and would create a bad impression, owing to the good relations between the republic and this kingdom. This impressed him and he said, I know that the king's treatment of Donato may invite many to come here, but his Majesty will not readily grant the same to others. I thought the opportunity favourable to tell him my suspicions that Badoer intended to come, and I felt sure his Majesty would not allow this. I begged him to tell me if his Majesty during these last months had given a safe conduct to any Italian, and asked him not to do so without letting me know beforehand.
Two days later Naunton wrote from Greenwich saying that his Majesty commanded him to assure me that he had not granted a safe conduct to any Venetian and would not do so without my knowledge and consent. He said Venetian not Italian, but if Badoer comes under an assumed name and is discovered the king's wrath will blaze out against him.
I hear that his Majesty has asked for information about Badoer from Sir [Henry] Wotton who supplied it faithfully with more than I had ever heard. He said he had become a priest, so they suspect here that he may be hidden in the house of some English Catholic or some diplomatic agent to attempt some villainy by means of confession or the mass.
London, the 4th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
380. To the KING OF GREAT BRITAIN.
When our Ambassador Lando, by our order, informed your Majesty of the ill will of the present Grand Vizier at Constantinople towards all Christendom and to our republic in particular, and of his rage and avaricious intentions, your Majesty was pleased to write of your own accord to the Sultan, and we are greatly indebted for this favour which immensely increases our obligations towards you for so many other favours of which we preserve a grateful memory. We most cordially thank your Majesty and our ambassador will verbally express our sincere gratitude.
Ayes, 146.Noes, 3.Neutral, 12.
[Italian.]
June 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
381. To the AMBASSADOR LANDO in England.
We send you a copy of the letter sent to his Majesty which you will present in returning thanks for his display of friendship towards our affairs in writing a letter to the Sultan of his own accord. You will speak of our great indebtedness to his Majesty for his favours, of which we preserve a lively recollection on past occasions as well as the present one. All will serve to exalt his royal name and proclaim him as the sincere friend of peace. You will inform his Majesty that we have sent the Bailo Giustinian to the Porte with new instructions. You will express to the Secretary Naunton our indebtedness to his Majesty, and assure him of our esteem and constant desire to please him.
We add, simply for your information, that we think it best to delay the presentation of that letter, as although it expresses his Majesty's esteem for our republic, we think the expressions it contains do not exactly suit our requirements or correspond with the decorum with which the republic is accustomed to treat with the Porte.
With regard to the command of Prince Joinville, we wish you to tell his Majesty that we have always greatly valued his person and abilities, especially because of his connection with his Majesty, and you will endeavour to make his Majesty recognise our good will, although at the moment there is no further necessity for employing the prince.
In our agreement with the States for hiring ships, we are bound to pay for or replace any ordnance in a ship that is lost, such as we must now do in the case of the wrecked Santa Giustina. We send you a copy of the particulars supplied by the Secretary Surian, so that you may know the weight and quality of the ordnance and buy the exact equivalent. But you must first obtain leave from his Majesty for its exportation. You will arrange everything in conjunction with the Secretary Surian, and we will promptly repay all the expenses which you incur.
We need only, in conclusion, commend your diligence in obtaining news. The information about uniting English and Spanish ships against pirates and the negotiations for a league between England and France against other princes is of great importance, as well as the idea to detach the Duke of Savoy from his present friends. We desire you to send us the fullest particulars upon these points.
We add for information only that we hear in letters of the 7th ult. from Constantinople that the two Cadilchiers of Greece and Anatolia have been deposed, and it is universally rumoured that the fall of the Grand Vizier will follow, who is much afraid about it. Mehemet, his predecessor, who is a good friend of the republic is rising in favour, and Giorgio Mehemet, the eunuch, has returned to the Divan for having richly furnished a new kiosk for the Sultan.
Ayes, 146.Noes, 3.Neutral, 12.
[Italian.]
June 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Venetian
Archives.
382. To the SECRETARY SURIAN at the Hague.
You have acted very prudently about the burned ship. We are sending your note about the value of the ordnance lost on the ship Santa Giustina to the Ambassador Lando in England, so that he may obtain ordnance of the same quality and leave to send it away, and we have told him to keep in communication with you on the subject. We wish you to keep him well informed of all the circumstances that arise.
With regard to those who wish to come and serve us, as many have served in previous wars and were paid off, we must say that the republic has never employed any captain in perpetuity, and has only engaged them when necessary for a definite time, renewable at a higher wage if she is satisfied, and that is the only way she adopts. You will try to discover who really desire a command.
We enclose the copy of a letter written by the Ambassador Lando from London, showing the extent of the king's affection towards our affairs. You can use this as you see fit, but not the paragraph referring to the letter written to the Sultan, which is simply for news.
Ayes, 146.Noes, 3.Neutral, 12.
Not given in time.
[Italian.]
June 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
383. To the Ambassador at Rome.
Enclose copy of a letter written by the Ambassador Lando in England showing the demonstrations of friendship made by that king, and of what he wishes to do, especially at Constantinople. This will serve for information to use when required to testify to his friendship and the perfect understanding existing between him and our republic, but not to mention the letter written by the king to the Sultan, which is only to serve as advice.
The like to:
France, Spain, Savoy, Milan, Florence, Naples.
Ayes,136. Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
Not given in time.
[Italian.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
384. To the BAILI NANI and GIUSTINIAN.
When the Ambassador Lando in England informed his Majesty about the unfortunate affair of the Bosnian merchants, his Majesty expressed himself as you will see by the enclosed copy of Lando's letter. He also decided to write a letter to the Sultan of which we enclose a copy. You will use it for information and not communicate it to any one.
Matters now seem to be taking a better turn and the Pasha appears less rigorous. As the letter contains some expressions contrary to our service we have decided to hold it back. We have desired our ambassador to thank his Majesty.
If Giustinian has not arrived Nani will assure the English ambassador at the Porte of our great indebtedness to his king for such an express declaration of his good will to our republic, adding that we are keeping the letter, in order to use it upon a more opportune occasion, especially as we find our affairs are proceeding much better. So we hope he will also agree to the policy of keeping it back to a more suitable time, as at present it might do as much harm as good. You will employ such confidence with that ambassador as will best assist the interests of our service.
Ayes, 151.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
385. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Their High Mightinesses are thinking of sending an embassy to England, and Carleton asks for one about the fishery question and other matters. It is reported that the Kings of both France and England desire to have ambassadors from these parts now the truce is about to expire, while some think it is just a Spanish trick, as in the midst of their great embarrassments they would like to renew the truce but wish to make it appear that the proposal comes from the Dutch.
The Ambassador Carleton told me recently that his king did not propose to remove him from here this year, as he expected to want him in these countries owing to the movements now occurring. He told me that Sir [Henry] Wotton would have orders to go to Germany, a sign that his Majesty no longer thinks of Carleton himself for that embassy.
The Hague, the 9th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
386. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have nothing to add to what I wrote last week about the twenty-four ships except that M. de Lormes has returned to Brussels and Sig. Falghero is ready to set out with him for these parts. Falghero adds that as a greater security he has taken a number of his papers.
The Hague, the 9th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Venetian
Archives.
387. To the Ambassador in England.
We send you a copy of the letter of our resident Spinelli from Naples about the encounter between the ships of Naples and ours in the waters of Candia near Christiana. (fn. 4) We have so far no news from the commander of the fleet or from any other source. We have sent you this news for information and to use for our service if you hear any conversation on the subject, to explain that we were acting strictly on the defensive, and the action was entirely due to the Ministers of Naples.
The same resident advises us that Cardinal Borgia entered Naples very secretly on the 3rd inst. and has been proclaimed Viceroy with every demonstration of joy; so Ossuna has been obliged to surrender his charge, all his evil designs having fallen through.
Your letters have not arrived this week. This is simply to notify the fact, as we are perfectly satisfied with your prudence in negotiation and your diligence in sending advices.
The above, mutatis mutandis to the Secretary Surian, except the last paragraph.
Ayes, 156.Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati
Venetian
Archives.
388. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the 5th inst. the secretary of the Duke of Wirtemberg left to return to the Princes of the Union with the king's replies, which are very long and comprise various points. His Majesty protests more strongly than ever that he is not obliged in the present circumstances to give any assistance by virtue of the alliance. He said that the Union was signed for six years owing to the case of Juliers; they are not fighting now to maintain the dignity of the empire or for the preservation of the privileges of Germany. Originally he was really bound to give assistance and to other points, which were very exactly defined when Baron Christopher Dohna came here on the expiry of the six years, for the prolongation. He remarks that it is not reasonable that this crown should constantly be called upon to give help to others, when it would be able to get little or nothing for its own needs. Moreover it was not fitting that this alliance should destroy any other that he might make. Thus he had made a league with the house of Austria in the fourth or fifth year of his reign; and so he ought not to move so lightly against Ferdinand, especially as he does not consider the war in Germany defensive, but both directly and indirectly offensive, and they ought to consider that as the Palatinate is the patrimony of his son-in-law, so Austria is the patrimony of Cæsar. If the princes as the principal lever to move his Majesty wish to make him believe that the war is one of religion, he does not consider it as such, and even if it were he should not consider himself bound by the league, as he did not wish this point to be included in the articles, more particularly to leave a way open for your Serenity and the Duke of Savoy. Accordingly among other opinions expressed in the reply one comes out very clearly, that his Majesty believes that neither Christopher Dohna nor Bunynchausen has given a correct report of their negotiations to the princes.
A leading minister told me in confidence that he greatly suspected that the princes had not heard from Dohna about the alteration in the articles aforesaid, possibly in order not to diminish the honour and glory of the success of his embassy. Thus that reply would give so much less satisfaction to the Union unless it was ultimately changed to some better sense, as his vehement demands had irritated the king. During some recent negotiations between the king and the Ambassador of Bohemia and his ministers, his Majesty had broken out wrathfully with the above remarks accompanied by many other bitter and angry expressions against the Bohemians, his son-in-law and the princes themselves which it would take too long to repeat. But he said in particular: I am an old king. I will not allow myself to be launched out by a young one, especially as the Spanish ambassador assures me that the Palatinate will not be attacked and also because by not permitting myself to become involved I shall be the better qualified to interpose for an accommodation (io sono un Re vecchio ne voglio lasciarmi imbarcare da un Giovine, mentre massime l'Ambr. di Spagna mi afferma che il Palatinato non sarà assalito, et mentre col non imbarazzarmi posso essere maggiormente sufficiente da interpormi per l'accomodamento). But ultimately he was prevailed upon by the majority of his ministers and by the representations of the Ambassador of Bohemia himself, who by means of his suavity always tries to bring him round to his purposes. On the very day, one may say at the very moment of the secretary's departure with the letters, he showed signs of being quite well disposed. He referred to what Sir [Henry] Wotton had taken to Germany and promised that although he was not bound and did not wish to do anything, yet in order to preserve the inheritance of his innocent grandchildren he would promise what he remembered the Ambassador of Bohemia had proposed, namely, to allow the levy of adventurers and volunteers to go to the defence of the Palatinate who had departed from this kingdom, and that the ambassador might promise himself a good disposition in the king's subjects, from the encouragement given to them.
Thus the ambassador hopes that the princes will remain fairly well satisfied, when they perceive clearly that his Majesty will not allow the Palatinate to fall. Many have impressed upon his Majesty's mind that assuredly if he continues so hard the Duke of Wirtemberg in particular will withdraw from the league and abandon the defence of the Palatinate. There is no lack of those who tell him freely that now, his relations with the Dutch are strained, while he does not stand well with the French or very closely with the Princes of the Union and his own flesh and blood he must not rely too much upon a union with those who are the most remote of all, and who by playing sweetly upon his hopes for the marriage and by singing sweet songs of peace, are like sirens, only trying to send him to sleep for no other purpose than to gain time.
A levy of 4,000 men is now announced, but is not yet certain. The point consists in inducing his Majesty to agree to allow the Earl of Southampton, a leading nobleman, rich and experienced, with considerable influence, to go for the defence of the Palatinate, so that all those who wish to move may enroll themselves under him. In this way they hope to induce a number of noblemen and soldiers of this kingdom to take part, and they predict, though I do not know how they will succeed, that they can collect a large sum of money for this purpose from the country and that they will meet with a most hearty response. Indeed if Southampton obtained leave he would have a larger following than anyone else, and no one but he would achieve much. But the king raises objections, disliking to entrust such great powers to such a man, and for the same reason previous proposals to give him important charges and levies of forces have fallen through. He also says that it is not fitting that a member of his own Privy Council, such as Southampton, should engage in a matter in which he does not wish to declare himself openly.
He has received strong advice upon the subject from various persons, but in particular from the prince and the Marquis of Buckingham, the favourite, who urge the point of the honour of the nation. They say he ought either to do nothing or something considerable. The levy of Gray, a Scotchman, and a man of little consideration, who aimed at his own interests rather than those of his sovereign, has not seemed here to be worthy of the greatness or renown of this flourishing kingdom. They hope in this to attain their desired aims, not only desired by them but by the people and the magnates universally, and by many signs they think that his Majesty intends to give them some satisfaction. But he fears the Spaniards, not wishing to break the thread of his much desired marriage, and seems to do everything against the grain. Perhaps for this reason he speaks more than he would, and differently from what he purposes, and makes the pronouncements indicated above with artifice. Nevertheless they cannot sound well in the ears of the world or of his own friends, on whom, as a matter of fact they inflict severe blows, for every reason.
His Majesty is considering or has been advised to send two persons, one to the emperor and the other to the Archduke Albert, who should proceed together to the Ecclesiastical and Catholic Princes of Germany, to dissuade the former from issuing the imperial ban against the Union, and to learn from the latter what are their true intentions about the Palatinate. Some say they will have commissions to make protests and declarations in the name of his Majesty, but as the king likes in everything to be earnestly besought and whatever steps he takes he moves deliberately and irresolutely, this point and the others mentioned above are not very ripe fruit, but rather flowers, exposed to a variety of accidents, which, however, should either bear fruit or wither away very soon, the necessity pressing so hard, while the supporters of Bohemia bring great pressure to bear, and the partisans of Spain make ceaseless offices and employ numerous artifices in order to gain time and see that either nothing is done or that it is done too late and ineffectively. I must await the issue before judging.
London, the 11th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Seonato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
389. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A servant has recently arrived from Denmark of Sir Robert Anstruther, who went nominally for his Majesty though covertly for negotiations on behalf of the new king for the Prince of Wales. He brings word by letter of the excellent disposition of that king, who offers to remit immediately to any place required the sum of 50,000l. sterling or 200,000 crowns in aid of the Palatinate. The ministers here propose to have the remittance made to Frankfort as being nearest to the Palatinate, with the intention and purpose that it shall not be used for anything except the defence of that state. By next Christmas Denmark promises another 25,000l. the collection of her revenues being fixed at definite periods. This is a very great matter and one that is taking place with the utmost secrecy.
Replies have arrived from the States, not collectively but in-dividually, expressing the entire readiness of the Prince of Orange and other leading men of the government to include the Duke of Savoy in the alliance if he still wishes to enter. Wake's secretary has left, as reported. His Majesty has shown his readiness to help with his offices, but personally he avoids binding himself as much as possible, using general terms, and he wishes, without fettering himself to serve as an ornament to all and to himself.
As regards the marriage everything appears to be arranged; nothing more seems needed except that Father Maestro, the Spanish agent here, should proceed to Rome to procure the dispensation from his Holiness. With this his Majesty will have nothing to do, leaving the King of Spain to do all the asking, and the request has already been presented at Rome with every prospect of success.
The Catholic ambassador professes to be delaying the departure of the father simply in order to await the commands of his king, to whom he recently sent his secretary with full information about his negotiations and the present state of affairs in these parts. But it becomes more manifest every day that all this is nothing but make believe and the self same ambassador laughs about it with his intimates, rejoices at the gain of time and boasts of having so far kept his Majesty's hopes so well buoyed up through his devices (ma per quello che si scuopre ogni giorno più, tutto è fintione, et l'istesso Ambasciatore con suoi confidenti se nc ridde, gode dell'acquisto di tempo et si vanagloria di havere tenuto fin'hora con suoi artificii cosi ben nutrita di vane speranze la MaestàSua.)
The arming of the twenty ships proceeds, but slowly, the Lord High Admiral being more anxious for glory than skilful in obtaining it, owing to his youth and inexperience. Moreover they have come across numerous irregularities, finding the captains to be venal and not of high rank, conforming to what one may call the universal fashion of the present time (incontrandosi pure qui molti disordini, li Capitani venali, et di non grande qualità, seguitando il costume, si può dire universale de' correnti tempi). For arming the six royal ships the king should spend 30,000l., which will not be so easy to obtain. (fn. 5) The burden upon the merchants for the remaining ships will also be very severe, if it continues. I am assured that the articles for joining with the Spaniards in the voyage have already been drawn up and everything is arranged, and the plan is the old one against Algiers. But at the present time this attempt would be most difficult to carry through, and the wise persons do not believe it will be clinched, judging that the Spaniards have only consented in order to show their inclination for a union with this part, while his Majesty has only pursued it in order to advance the marriage. These are all games which will turn out according to the march of events in Germany and Bohemia.
London, the 11th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 13.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere, Re d'
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
390. JACOBUS DEI GRATIA ETC. DOMINO ANTONIO PRIULO, Venetiarum Duci, anuco nostro charissimo, Salutem:
Serenissime Princeps, amice charissime:
Quod in cæteris rebus semper observavimus, ut noster in inclytam Vram. Remp. amor clarissime eluceret, id in Legato nostro eligendo nefas duximus hoc tempore negligere. Mittimus itaque jam tertio illustrem virum Henricum Wottonium quem scimus et decennali vestrarum rerum usu posse, et flagrante prosperitatis vestrae desiderio cupere vestris obsequi commodis atque inservire dignitati; quam sua in legatione id semper praecipuum interpretatus sit, ut mutuae necessitudinis vinculum quibuscunque posset modis inter nos arctius constringeret Pluris hoc facimus quod benevolentiae et affectus similitudine nobiscum conspiret quam Literas ejus et reliqua verae nobilitatis ornamenta, quae tamen nostrorum officiorum et negotiorum interpretem decere putamus vel maxime. Vestra Serenitas ea Legatum hunc nostrum humanitate excipiet, qua nos viros clarissimos omnique insignes virtute ab inclyta vra. republ. admittere solemus, praesertim vero domini Hieronymum Landum, quem ut tempore a vobis ultimum ita affectus erga nos merito facile primum habemus. Cæetera Wottonio nostro credidimus cui parem fidem haberi cupimus ac si ipsi praesentes loqueremur. Eidem votum nostrum, quod chartulae modum superat, commisimus explicandum, ut Vra. Serenitas diu felix vivat in repub. pacis bellique artibus florentissima.
Dat. Grenovici 111o Junii, Anno MDCXX.
JACOBUS R. [autograph.]
June 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
391. PIERO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The fleet which has recently reached Lisbon from Brazil brings word that as in the East Indies, the English and Dutch continue to make fresh acquisitions and progress in those parts, while not only the authority but the forces of this crown are constantly on the wane there. Those in charge of the government there write that his Majesty should send prompt and powerful succour to avert the dangers which are constantly arising with those two nations, protesting that otherwise great loss and harm will result. However they dissimulate these things here and say little about them, as matters which are distasteful to them.
Madrid, the 14th June, 1620.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
392. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When I was discussing with his Highness the affairs of Germany he told me that the King Palatine had good cause to look after his own affairs, taking into consideration the provision of gold made by the Spaniards and the millions obtained from Naples and Sicily, especially if Bavaria and Saxony become his enemies. He would wait to see what the King of England would do if the Palatinate is invaded, and what would be the effect of a decision on his part to protect his grandsons.
In the midst of all these discussions I have profited by the return of the secretary of the English agent from London to discuss some particulars of what is taking place. His Highness said to me that the agent himself ought to speak to him, that if they could they should hold fast to their friendship with Italy, and perhaps he had spoken to me. He had tried ardently for a union with the king of England a long time ago, but his Majesty answered in general terms that your Serenity was not then inclined. He told me that it would be best to cover decently the question of religion, exclaiming: Such a lot of heretics, such a lot of heretics! but if the king would attack Spain with his fleet, he would cause the states of Italy to fall upon the Spaniards.
I have not been able to discover what especially is on foot, as the agent is staying away at la Vigna with all his household, but when next I speak with him I will try to ascertain their negotiations or plans. I have already written that the duke is trying to offer allurements to every one in order to cover his correspondence with the Spaniards and disperse the suspicions aroused by the coming of Filiberto to these states and by his going to Spain.
Turin, the 15th June, 1620.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 In 1615. See Vols. XIII and XIV of this Calendar.
2 The Dutch took by surprise the ships Dragon, Bear, Expedition and Rose at Tiku in Sumatra on the 1st October, 1619, having previously captured the Star in the Strait of Sunda. On the following day they put all the English prisoners ashore, numbering over 170 men, and sailed off on the 5th with their prizes, leaving only the Rose behind, which subsequently brought the news to England. Purchas: His Pilgrimes (Maclehose) Vol. V. pages 80–83, 145. Cal. S. P. Colonial, East Indies 1617–21, pages 312, 317–9.
3 John Jacob.
4 This was Osuna's last act of hostility against Venice. His admiral Ribera took a squadron to Crete where he inflicted some damage upon undefended places. The Venetian admiral, Federico Nani, came up with him at Christiana and at once engaged. Ribera's squadron was defeated with the loss of a ship, Ribera himself taking to flight.—Nani: Hist. della Republica Veneta I, p. 228.
5 The six royal ships were the Lion, Vanguard, Rainbow, Constant Reformation, Antelope, Convertine, mostly new vessels and three of them recently built under the navy commissioners appointed in 1618. The merchants supplied twelve, making eighteen in all, not twenty. Qualità in reference to the captains probably refers to their lack of good birth rather than of professional skill, as many of them had plenty of experience. See Corbett: England in the Mediterranean, i. pages 112–114.