Venice
September 1620, 21-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1910

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409-420

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'Venice: September 1620, 21-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 16: 1619-1621 (1910), pp. 409-420. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88768 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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September 1620

Sept. 21.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
553. To the Proveditore beyond the Menzo.
Enclosed is the roll of the company of Captain Thomas Theobald of the charge of Colonel Henry Peyton, from which you will see that they have been paid as by the agreements, up to the 18th ult. When the other soldiers who are in the fleet arrive, they should be added to the roll.
[Italian.]
Sept. 24.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
554. To the Proveditore Zorzi at Zara.
Errors have been found in auditing the accounts of Colonel Peyton, to the public prejudice, to the amount of about 370 ducats. In the bolette taken by Grisogno it appears that the troops were creditors for three payments, 7,428 ducats, but reckoning by the number of men contained in the bolette, it should not be more than 7,058 ducats 5 lire 4 grossi. The colonel declares that he has not received more than 6,946 ducats 5 lire 4 grossi; and shows a note signed by Grisogno for that amount, and even these notes contain an error of about 112 ducats against the republic. We send you word of all this with a copy of the last bolette, so that you may discover whether the money is in the public caisse or if it has been paid to Peyton in which case you will inform our Savio alla Scrittura so that the public may be reimbursed by Peyton with the least possible delay. You will also make an enquiry into the circumstances and send word to us or come to some decision which you consider best for the public service.
We further notify you that all Peyton's troops in this city have been paid up to the 18th August, half pay being provided for 314 men, and we have also given pay in advance to those who have arrived here, in conformity with the new agreements made with Peyton. We shall do the like with those at present in the fleet when they arrive, as no pay is to be given them there. We send you this so that you may issue orders that no pay of any kind be given in the fleet.
Ayes, 21.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
555. ALMORO NANI and ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassadors at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
By order of the Grand Vizier a Chiaus was sent last week to notify the Ambassadors of France, England, Flanders and myself, that we should share out 100 sacks of cotton (fn. 1) among the four nations, giving the money to the Chiaus Pasha supervising this affair. They afterwards sent a Bugiurdi of the same Pasha to each of us with the same demand. As the affair was very important, as constituting a precedent, we gained time by saying that we would speak to the merchants and afterwards give our answer. On the following day we all met in the house of the French ambassador to discuss the question, and came to the conclusion that nothing could cause us greater prejudice if we submitted to this demand, since by degrees the merchants would be compelled to succumb to this burden. Now with the occasion of silk from Persia, now with the sale of the possessions of leading Pashas when they die and of the Grand Viziers on their appointment, they want to sell the heavy presents, which are frequently given in place of money. This seems to be the case in the present instance, which has arisen from the Pasha receiving from Alexander, the new Prince of Bogdania, a present comprising woollen cloth, silk, and a considerable quantity of indigo; so that if we agreed about the cotton we should open the way to the sharing round of other property.
While we were discussing the matter, more than ten Chiaus came to the house demanding the money with extraordinary insolence in the name of the Chiaus Pasha, amounting to about 4,000 thalers, and meanwhile they placed fifty sacks at the doors of the Venetian merchants alone, proposing to do the same to the other nations. Accordingly we resolved to make an Arz to the Pasha, representing that this was a matter of great importance and the merchants could not consent to such a charge. It was unusual, of pernicious example and moreover the goods were so poor that it would be difficult to dispose of them here. If he would not listen we decided to go and see him, but for various reasons, the Arz could not be presented for two or three days. As the cotton was placed at the doors of the Venetian merchants one of the ambassadors under various pretexts postponed the presentation of the Arz, thinking that his merchants were out of danger. As I, Nani, feared evil consequences, I sent to the Pasha who had the cotton removed and subsequently divided among various Turkish subjects. This course of events has brought a blush to the cheeks of those who grew cold in the thick of the fray. Experience is constantly showing that one can do better alone than in conjunction with others.
The Vigne of Pera, the 24th September, 1620.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
556. That the following be added to the letter directed to the Ambassador Trivisano at the Hague:
You will have received particulars from the Secretary Suriano about the affair of the pirates, who wished to place themselves under the protection of his Serenity, and the instructions we have so far issued on the subject. In considering the question and our previous obligations in writing and in order that the time spent in awaiting our decision may not pass fruitlessly, we have decided to direct you to give means to Pasini to go and review the ships and to make sure of the good faith of the business, with orders, if he finds things are as described in these papers, to assure the pirates, especially those who have made the offer, that we will willingly grant them a safe conduct for their general pardon if they will first send to this city fifteen or twenty of their number, from among their leading men, to stay with us as a pledge for the fulfilment of their promises, assuring them that so soon as they arrive we will send this safe conduct, so that the obligations may be effected without delay. You will send us word of all that you do in the matter.
Ayes, 33.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
557. To the Ambassador in England.
We have your letters up to the 3rd inst. and are fully satisfied with the prudence of your negotiations and your diligence in sending news. Upon the affairs of the Valtelline, after last week's news of the unfortunate abandonment of Bormio we have to add that the five Cantons have sent a regiment of 1,500 men with two companies of Valesani, all paid with Spanish and French gold, to enter the valley of Musoco and stir up the people there and other Catholic communities of the Grisons to join them, saying they will help them to recover the Valtelline, although their object is quite different, and they simply aim at the division and overthrow of the country from which the Spaniards will profit to the prejudice of the common liberty under the false pretext of religion.
We send you these particulars to represent to the ministers in the king's absence. We do not think it advisable for you to go so frequently after his Majesty, when he is simply devoting himself to his pleasures and may not care for business. You will point out that the business ever becomes more important and with the advantage of the season the Spaniards may take possession of the whole valley. You will thank his Majesty warmly for his good and prudent offices in these affairs, adding that the republic will do all in her power, and the Swiss show themselves alive and steadfast, so it only remains with his Majesty, a prince so great and powerful, who can help the interests of the Grisons in so many ways, to effect what his prudence considers necessary in so just and important a cause, so worthy of his royal protection.
You have acted prudently and entirely to our satisfaction in the matter of the guns wrecked off the coast of Ireland, and we shall await further news on the subject.
Ayes, 138.Noes, 3.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
558. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Since by the last instructions from your Serenity of the 28th ult. with those of the 27th about the false revelations made by M. de Lione in France, I understand the urgency of the necessity in the affair of the Grisons and that delay and coldness can be nothing else than poison, I have with due modesty pressed for a fresh audience of his Majesty, especially as the moment seems to me opportune owing to the latest news arrived here of the progress of Spinola in the Palatinate, above anything else that could be imagined. Yesterday I had the honour accorded to me at Haurese (fn. 2) in the country, although it was refused to the Ambassadors of France and Spain, the king being in narrow, one might almost say poor, quarters there, in the midst of his beloved forests, full of great herds of stags and deer, hunting with enthusiasm and with incessant application. I found his Majesty quite remarkably disposed to listen. I told him that in conformity with his command I had some days before represented to the Secretary Naunton the events of the Valtelline, but in order to fulfil completely the instructions of your Serenity and the better to execute my duty, it had been necessary to come and pay my respects to him again. I hoped he would not take it ill that I should show diligence in carrying out the commands of my masters in a matter of more than common importance which brooked no delay.
The king embraced me and seemed to see me with great pleasure. Accordingly I continued: Sire, since the poor Grisons descended into the Valtelline, took Sondrio and some other places, and hoped to recover their liberty and their country, the Spaniards have openly fomented the rebels not only with money but with men, engineers, captains, artillery, munitions and everything else, and in this way have rendered themselves completely masters of the valley where they exercise dominion, compelling the Grisons to withdraw and abandon everything which they had recovered, doing all this under a false pretence of religion. To sustain this idea they have displayed certain banners and distributed various papers. By such unjust means they proceed to occupy the possessions of others, making an insidious attack upon the common liberty. They have not hesitated to try and involve the pope and to enlist troops while stopping those who were already starting for Germany, and have scattered their troops all along the frontiers of the most serene republic, stirring up the Catholic Swiss, their confederates, to stop the passage of men to the others from Zurich and Berne, which were ready to move for the relief of the Grisons, with the object of introducing disputes into those parts also and bring about a war, which was on the point of breaking out. Now the masters of the country proclaim that they do not want any others to interfere, and try to have the matter put in negotiation with such artifice that they might easily deceive the simple and fearful, but which may clearly be recognised by the most moderate and least practised judgment, much more by the remarkable prudence of your Majesty, who will readily perceive that no negotiations can ever be considered sincere which are not preceded by the complete restitution of what has been occupied, and this action of the Spaniards is only designed to strike deeper the roots of their possession and bind the hands of everybody, so that they may hold fast to the Valtelline to cut off Italy from the Ultramontanes and entirely close that important pass. Accordingly the Princes of Italy, of sheer necessity, are strongly moved not to suffer such a prejudice which entails such grave consequences, and all other persons interested in the common liberty ought to reflect deeply upon the subject and not abandon so just and important a cause, but endeavour to provide a remedy against such pernicious ambitions and such detestable actions directed so manifestly to a disturbance of the peace and general welfare. I added this your Serenity felt sure that if his Majesty would consider this matter with his usual prudence and desire for the peace and tranqui lity of this province and of his love of justice he would interpose without delay with his powerful authority, which he had previously exercised, the employment of which would produce instantaneous results. As I was addressing a king of such uncommon prudence and experience I need not dilate upon many things I might say about the gravity of the case, or the many clouds which are about and which may be said to threaten everybody or to point out how this concerned not only the most serene republic and the other Italian powers, but those most nearly united to his Majesty. I would content myself by saying that your Serenity would do your share. You had already paid money to the Grisons and would do the same with the Swiss, promising to the last a monthly contribution, and you would make necessary representations to the Duke of Savoy, who had gone to confer with Lesdiguières on the subject. Finally, I summed up the three points committed to me, urging his Majesty to encourage the Grisons and Swiss to defend the common interests by arms, to adhere to negotiations, to expose all the fraud introduced by the Spaniards, to make them recognise that these affairs concern him greatly and finally to proceed to some open and generous declaration which will prove of assistance to the general interests. I several times insisted upon the importance of suffering no delays to intervene, while I warmly thanked him for the representations made by Mr. Wake, his resident with the Duke of Savoy to his Highness, and I will not fail to execute your Excellencies' commissions about his relations, who are in the country, I understand.
The king replied that he had written to France and Spain, for which I thanked him duly. He said that he would also speak to the Ambassador Gondomar here, but, here he stopped and shook his head, indicating he did not expect to gain very much by that. He promised to issue fresh instructions so that suitable offices should be passed both with the Grisons and the Swiss. He thought he had already done so, but as so frequently happens at this Court, when they think of doing anything they believe it already accomplished.
He afterwards spoke in a rigmarole of phrases, telling me several times that he recognised the gravity of the case, and the interests of his son, that is his son-in-law, and he seemed thoroughly to understand the Spanish device of declaring that they did not want anything belonging to others and in trying to submit the question to negotiation. He told me that on the previous day, when he had met the Ambassador of Savoy, not for an audience but out hunting, when he came to kiss his hand, he asked him what the duke was doing. He replied that no prince was more interested in these affairs than his Highness, and accordingly the king in some sort hinted to me that your Excellencies could not do better than cultivate his friendly disposition. However I have since heard that Mr. Wake advised that his Highness has drawn up a certain paper in which he shows that what the Swiss and Grisons hold is all usurpation, partly from the state of Milan and partly from his own dominions, with other things which show that he leans strongly to the side of the Spaniards. The king also spoke to me about France, saying that they also ought to move themselves, and he referred to the King of France and that this ought to stir him. He added, Unless all the world and the Devil are joined together in opposition. (Mi tocco anco il Re della Francia, et che questa doverrebbe riscaldarsi, soggionendo se mo tutto il mondo et il Diavolo non fosse congiunto contra.) In this connection I said that a declaration of his Majesty would be calculated to give heart to every one, and referred to the good effect he produced by a declaration previously to his great glory, and that beyond a doubt his mere shadow would produce a great effect. He answered smiling beningly that I spoke as if the sum of all things depended upon him, and that there were also the affairs of Germany. He afterwards said: What do you want me to do ? If I declare myself, must I arm ? If I involve myself without arming, shall I not expose my reputation to dishonour and insult ? Upon the question of glory, he remarked that this was vanity and by now he had had his fill of such smoke, clearly showing how far his intentions are from any declaration, although as he was not taken unawares and had come prepared to hear me, he tried his hardest to afford me the utmost satisfaction, and by studious language to disappoint me as little as possible. In conclusion he offered his good offices in the warmest manner and everything that he could do in honour. (Poi disse, che volete ch'io faccia! S'io mi dichiaro ch'io m'armi? o che senza armarmi impegnando la mia riputatione incontri in dishonori ed in affronti ? al punto della gloria accenando che queste sono vanità et che hormai puo esser ben satio di tali fumi, chiaramente scuoprendo il concetto del suo animo essere dal punto delle dichiarationi lontano assai, seben studiosamente s'ingegnava non essendo stato colto alla sprovista, et essendo venuto preparato ad udirmi, di darmi ogni maggior sodisfattione, et con la sobrieta delle parole di suellarsi sopra l'istesso meno che fusse possibile tornandomi ad offerire in fine con pienezza di affetto ogni buon ufficio e tutto cio che con honor suo potesse fare.)
He was very pleased with the thanks for the letter written by him to Constantinople. He seemed curious to know whether that trouble had really been settled I said to him the very words expressed in your Excellencies' letter of the 6th ult., and he showed that he hoped the matter would not go any further. I thought the opportunity favourable to touch upon the question of the loan, which the ambassador of the King of Bohemia asked for at Venice, and that your Excellencies had to rule your wishes according to your powers, and you had borne very heavy expenses in the past, which continued to increase owing to the serious events taking place. I remarked upon what had been done by your Serenity in keeping closed the passes against troops and munitions destined to serve against the King of Bohemia, and how much it behoved our state to remain armed at the present moment with troops on her frontiers.
The king replied that everything I said was most true, and the republic was entirely in the right. He added that when they spoke to him on the subject he said frankly that the present moment was not opportune and they must content themselves with what was possible and reasonable.
London, the 25th September, 1620.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives559. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When the Ambassador of Bohemia complained to me that your Serenity so far had given the king his master nothing but specious promises, I replied in much the same terms as I had used with the king with other suitable matter. I do not know whether he was satisfied, but he had not a word to say in reply. I tried, by informing him of the office passed by your Excellencies with the agent at Venice to incite him to fresh and forcible representations about the Grisons. He has not yet received any instructions, and as I told your Serenity, he has so much on his hands on his own behalf that he can spare very little application for other matters.
Viscount Doncaster, with whom I conversed some little while after my audience of his Majesty and who is a sincere minister of perfect understanding, told me that his Majesty, before I went, came to speak to him about what he thought I should ask. He assured me that the question exercises the king exceedingly and that he desires to do more than he says.
The Ambassador Carleton writes from the Hague that the Secretary Suriano has urged him to recommend the affairs of the Grisons to his Majesty and to make very strong representations, like those of the Agent Wake from Turin. The Ambassador Caron of the States, who are said to have decided to send an ambassador extraordinary to this Court, read the king a letter from Aerssens, in which he relates the honours he received from your Serenity and the ratification of the league, which the king praised highly. He said that they ought not to undervalue what the republic had arranged to the disgust of the pope and the Spaniards. He afterwards remarked that he had executed his instructions in favour of the King of Bohemia with your Serenity, and had received the reply that when your Excellencies were free from the molestation of the Turks you would not fail to perform your part with money. He added that he had met with a favourable disposition everywhere, but that everyone was waiting for the sovereign here to move.
When this same Ambassador of the States, some days ago, invited the king to join with the ships of his masters against the pirates, his Majesty replied that he had come too late, as he had made a close agreement with the Spaniards, and without their assent he could not unite with the Dutch. He gave orders that this agreement should be communicated to the ambassador as a sign of confidence so that he might see that there was no intention of prejudicing anyone, but they aimed solely at the general good by the extermination and persecution of the abominable pirates. He added that he would give orders that the Dutch ships should receive good treatment, and he would be glad if they sailed, as it would strengthen their forces and they could defeat the pirates more easily. He ended by saying that his own ships had not started yet, indeed M. Caron and many others believed that they will not start just yet awhile, although the General Mansfilt has taken leave and has gone to join the ships in the Downs with all the captains to weigh anchor. He can leave when he likes and he has been most carefully cultivated by the Spanish ambassador. He is a bold, ardent and very ambitious man, not ill inclined, I fancy, to the most serene republic, as being the owner here of all the glass furnaces, he has some business at Venice and has had relations for many years with the Muranese especially with some who make good mirrors.
The universal desire would be to see the fleet go against Antwerp, but he who holds the reins of these realms in his hands is imagined to be very far from such lofty projects. Mr. Trumbull the agent at Brussels, writes that many of the subjects of the archduke have already abandoned their houses in the country and gone to live in the towns for fear of some invasion by the English, so much so that his Highness has himself undertaken to reassure them by his letters, inviting and encouraging them to return home.
Letters have arrived post from Heidelberg for the Ambassador Dohna from the Duke of Deuxponts, informing him of the first blow struck against the Palatinate by Spinola in the capture of Creutznach and some other places. They write from many parts that the Princes of the Union profess that they lost this place in order not to fall into disgrace with his Majesty here, who gave them to understand by his ambassadors that they must not be the first to attack, but must content themselves with a modest defence. The same princes have clearly and frankly written to his Majesty with their own letters saying that they have allowed many favourable opportunities to slip for the same reasons.
The king has been greatly moved by both these items of intelligence and shows himself saddened and perturbed by many outward signs. He said that he never believed that the Spaniards would attack the Palatinate, although indeed the Ambassador of Spain finally and Lord Digby told him so. He declared that he had never given such instructions to his ambassadors, but had only signified to the King of Bohemia that he should refrain from attacking Austria, that being as much the patrimony of Ferdinand as the Palatinate was his. Accordingly his Majesty has written to Germany, whither quantities of letters now go, so that his ambassadors may give an account of what they actually said, with orders to send further attestations and proofs signed by the Duke of Wirtemberg or by the Margraves of Baden and Inspach of what they have done, declaring that he will punish them if they have transgressed. The ministers say that the case resembles that of Wesel, for which they laid the blame on his Majesty's Ambassador Wotton, but they do not think that the ambassadors have exceeded their instructions, since they are informed that they even refused to satisfy certain requests of the said princes to write to Spinola to prevent him from proceeding further, offering as excuse that they had no instructions for such a course.
The whole court is boiling over with rage at the news, and from that of the prince in particular issue fiery and vitreous declamations against the Spaniards and those who here foment these advantages, and some so loud and free that it seems impossible that they should be borne. In the city also the commotion is great. The king immediately gave audience at Windsor to the Ambassador of the States and then to him of Bohemia. With the latter he remained closeted most secretly for an hour, but it does not appear that anything happened than a rigmarole of phrases and inconclusive promises. The Ambassador Caron told me in confidence that he hoped for some good results, and he hinted that they think of supplying the necessity with money, as apparently they suffer from no lack of men, and they propose to obtain it upon the credit of the royal promise, all other methods appearing too long and difficult. I have found no confirmation of this, and so far as I can discover the idea is still very immature. The turmoil of confusion makes it difficult to distinguish what really will take place. One can only say that the king speaks in a fashion in some respect different from what he has done hitherto; nevertheless they keep procrastinating as much as possible, and postpone all succour in this urgent need.
The Spaniards say that the Princes have allowed these places to fall without resistance in order to involve his Majesty and make him declare. Many others believe the same. They go about saying that the places taken are of small importance, and they have not been occupied to hold, but to make peace by mutual restitution; that it will be necessary for the whole Palatinate to be occupied in order to arrive more easily at a settlement, and they observe with extraordinary attention all the movements of this Court, and by numerous and powerful devices they try to divert or to postpone any declaration or even the smallest step, with good hope that in the long run nothing will be done that will really be worth anything. In addition to other reasons they well know how infatuated his Majesty is over the marriage, how apt to listen to what they say and how important it is that the Lord High Admiral, the favourite, shall continue to cherish his pique against the Ambassador Dohna and maintain his bitter feeling towards the King of Bohemia which has been carefully fostered by them, chiefly because he has applied more to the other ministers than to the said marquis. It would be possible to say a great deal in this connection, but your Serenity's prudence suffices upon a point upon which the aspect of everything depends in great part if not exclusively. (Ma alla prudenza della Serenita Vestra tanto basti sopra punto dal quale dipende in gran parte per non dire assolutamente la faccia qui di tutte le cose.)
I find that the intercepted letters of the emperor, which were sent a while ago by their high Mightinesses to their ambassador here, have been completely deciphered, notwithstanding that the cipher was new and very difficult. They disclose the following plans, that Spinola should enter the Lower Palatinate and the Dukes of Bavaria and Saxony are recommended to undertake Austria, Bohemia and the Upper Palatinate. Saxony showed some reluctance, notwithstanding very energetic offices made to him, because he wished that the Imperial ban against the Palatinate should be solemnized by a meeting of the electors. Many other weighty matters are disclosed and it is clear that because of the interception of these letters Spinola delayed his march for five weeks.
Sir [Robert] Anstruther has returned from Denmark. He brings word in substance that if the king here raises his hand for his son-in-law, Denmark is disposed to do the utmost that lies in his power. In addition to the money already sent he has promised to supply as much again in a short time, which sums are understood to be in return of loans to this Crown.
London, the 25th September, 1620.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25.
Inquisitori di
Stato
Busta 442.
Venetian
Archives.
560. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the INQUISITORS OF STATE.
I have opened all Sembenini's last letters and send copies. Your Excellencies will see the nature of the fellow and how far he is from being capable of doing what is suspected. He is also sick. As soon as possible I will examine his room.
I must notify your Excellencies that one Federico Federizzi, a Venetian, an old man who has lived over here for twenty-two years, a bankrupt merchant, accustomed to frequent the table of the ambassadors of the republic, and, as I have observed, the spy of other ambassadors, has become more malignant of late against his country, for which he bore little affection. He left this kingdom a few days ago to return, so he told me, to Venice. If he does so he will probably go to the house of Comino Cominzuolo, his nephew, a young lawyer, who lives in Campo San Zaccaria. I think he should be watched, although a change of clime may alter his ways.
London, the 25th September. 1620.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
561. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
To correspond to the mission of Marsigliac, who was sent by the Queen to Spain to congratulate the king on his recovery, they sent Don Juan della Cueva, brother of Bedmar, to congratulate the queen on her recovery. He afterwards left for Flanders to see his brother. They say he will return again to this city as ambassador extraordinary, until the Marquis of Mirabel arrives who was appointed ambassador some while ago.
In conversing with me upon the mission of this individual the the English ambassador said that he had been sent here to observe whether he had any idea of using this army of his against Navarre, as was reported, the Prince of Conde? being in favour thereof, but hé had discovered nothing.
Donato has been here in Paris on his road from England, and has conferred with the Ambassador of Savoy. He is no longer here, having left for Lyons with Count Agrafin di Moretta.
Paris, the 29th September, 1620.
[Italian]
Sept. 29.
Misc.
Cod. No. 46.
Venetian
Archives.
562. HIERONIMO TRIVISAN, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in the Netherlands.
On Saturday the 26th the English ambassador came to see me. He excused himself for coming late, but said that he wished to be the last to see me. He is well known to your Serenity and professes the most perfect devotion, and this is confirmed by every one. He never tires of expressing his obligations towards the most serene republic and recalling the honours, received and his delight in his service there. On the affairs of Germany he spoke to the same effect as the French ambassador, seeming to think little of the places occupied by Spinola. I told him the news about the Grisons contained in your letters of the 11th inst. and urged him to make strong representations to his Majesty. He thanked your Serenity for the confidence and promised to present the matter so that his Majesty should recognise its importance. With this the ambassador took leave.
The Hague, the 29th September, 1620.
[Italian.]
Sept. 30.
Misc.
Cod. No. 46.
Venetian Archives.
563. HIERONIMO TRIVISANO, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are awaiting news of the arrival with the Princes of the Union of Prince Henry with the cavalry and the English infantry. They hear that he encountered some difficulty in crossing the Moselle, so that he may have been obliged to take some other way.
The other day a courier passed through, sent by the Princes of the Union to inform the King of England of the movements of Spinola and his conquests in the Palatinate. Perhaps these advices will hasten some good resolution to their advantage. When any one mentions this question to the English ambassador he holds his peace and tries to change the subject, as he cannot commend this dilatoriness.
The States are proposing to send ambassadors to France and England, to the former about M. Barnevelt and to the latter about the whale and herring fisheries, but both will have commissions to treat for the renewal of the alliances touching the truce. Upon the decision of these two crowns their action will probably depend; I find a general inclination towards war. Only those interested in trade and negotiations are opposed. They will send to England M. de Bentusen, a burgomaster of Hoorn and a deputy of Delft, and each province has the power to send others, I do not know if they will.
The Hague, the 30th September, 1620.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Eyre calls it cotton wool. He says that all the ambassadors succeeded in escaping this except the Venetian Bailo. State Papers, Foreign. Turkey.
2 Havering.