Venice
April 1621, 23-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1911

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28-39

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'Venice: April 1621, 23-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 28-39. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88813 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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April 1621

April 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra,
Venetian
Archives.
33. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Digby and his adherents make as much to do as if the Palatinate were completely restored, but they do so from the heart seeing that they have made a good impression on the king. He has assigned to Digby 2,000l. a year, that is 8,000 crowns, and given him 50,000 crowns and more for the embassy which he has to make. He dealt with these points at Brussels, first, a truce for two months in the Palatinate; second, the restitution of that country; third, to ask their Highnesses for their offices in Spain that the marriage with England may be carried out according to the treaty without further delay. Their Highnesses granted the first, but they say here that the point had been previously settled between the princes and Spinola. When someone spoke to him at the beginning about an armistice he answered: With whom? I have never seen a soldier against me. To the last they made ample promises of their good offices. To the second they said that the matter concerned the emperor and the Catholic king, with whom they would employ their offices out of respect for the king here.
Besides the claims of the emperor already mentioned in case of restitution, which are confirmed, they claim in addition to place Spanish garrisons in the four fortified posts on the Rhine, that the Palatine shall be tributory to the emperor and shall lose the vicarship of the Holy Roman Empire during a voidance. Here, however, they hope, by Digby's mission to Spain to have everything simply by giving up the kingdom of Bohemia. He will leave very soon but it is not yet decided whether he shall go first to the emperor or to the Catholic king, as they think matters may be greatly changed by the death of Philip III. This all serves to take up time on quite reasonable pretexts, I do not know if I may not say endless. Two royal ships are quite ready to take him to Spain and are afterwards to join the fleet of twenty ships, relieving two of them which are unfit for service. (fn. 1)
They speak here of the giving up of the kingdom of Bohemia as a thing quite reasonable and already granted, Villiers having brought word, confirmed by the ambassador of Denmark, that the King of Bohemia expressed himself as quite ready to follow his Majesty's advice, but upon condition that the Palatinate should be completely restored with all its former prerogatives and the King of Denmark is understood to have written to the emperor with the other Princes of the circle that if his Majesty will restore the Palatinate he will perform good offices for all the rest. The king here recently said to the ambassador of Savoy he would to God his son had left it to him from the first, as by now all would have been settled; he was glad he had gone to the Hague as it was easy to correspond with him when so near. He also expressed his pleasure to the ambassador of the States, thanking him for the entertainment prepared by his masters. He has done this the more readily as he now seems assured that neither the king nor the queen will come here. But their presence there may alone serve to keep him uneasy, owing to the possibility of their crossing the sea, as it has already disposed him to give them some assistance in money to supply their own needs. The most prudent feel sure that there will be a great deal to say about the conditions of the restitution and the Spaniards will not agree to this unless driven by necessity, by a heavy charge in Flanders and generous efforts elsewhere on the part of princes interested in the weal of Christendom.
We hear there are some indications that Spinola may be leaving the Palatinate, as two of his veteran regiments are collecting their baggage with every appearance of going away. But if he returns to Brussels it will clearly be more for the requirements of Brabant than to give anything but an empty satisfaction to this quarter, especially as it is believed that Leopold and Bavaria will take his place with strong forces, and the emperor recently issued directions for the partition and assignment of the places in execution of the imperial ban. The Spanish ambassador says that restitution will take place when the marriage does. He calls the uprightness of his king to witness, but adds clearly that he does not know when it may happen. There is much talk about the truce. Some consider it mortal for the United Princes and the King of Bohemia as it will give the Spaniards time to arrange their affairs in Flanders, Germany and elsewhere, while compelling the princes to keep armed, a great burden. Others think it a trick on the part of both sides. I leave it to your Excellencies. I may add that it is not held to include either the King of Bohemia who might turn against the ecclesiastical electors with the troops granted to him by the States, or the king of Denmark, who thought of making some attempt with the other Princes of Lower Saxony. But the season will not permit campaigning for some weeks yet, and the halting not to say crippled movements in this quarter, will stay everyone, it is thought. Every one seems to be looking after his own interests, so many think that they may arrange a new truce in Flanders. If so Germany and the Empire would remain absolutely in the hands of the house of Austria, leaving Italy in great danger. This would affect them but little here, as while patching up their own present troubles, they aim at little else than to live in peace and tranquillity, and look no further than the present.
Trumbull has proceeded from Brussels to Germany. He will also go to the United Princes to discuss their requests, sent here by Murton, to show how unreasonable they are and try to keep them well disposed and contented. But words alone will not suffice to support their fallen fortunes. On his journey he was robbed, stripped and beaten by disbanded soldiers.
The Danish ambassador made three proposals. For an offensive and defensive league between the two crowns, whose example might induce the States, the Hanse towns, all the princes of the circle of Lower Saxony, to join with the King of Sweden, the United Princes of Germany, the Swiss Protestant Cantons, your Serenity and the Duke of Savoy. I find that the Kings of Denmark and Bohemia have these last much in their minds and may make some formal proposals. Thus the king's first physician Mayerne, a Frenchman of the reformed religion, leaving here for the Swiss, although going ostensibly on his private affairs, is thought to have some commissions from his Majesty for the said Cantons, but it is not supposed, nor is it likely to be upon such matters because his Majesty does not seem to have the slightest inclination for such a league. He might say something about it, perhaps for defence only, but they will simply procrastinate in order to do nothing, if possible, or very little.
The second proposal is to recover the Palatinate if his Majesty will give 10,000 foot and 1,000 horse, or more, at his own charges, Denmark offering to undertake this in person. His Majesty replied that he would do even more if they did not make restitution, but he wanted first to see the results of friendly negotiation. He expresses, however, the intention of collecting a force of troops for next May.
The third, of less moment, was to unite for the affairs of the East Indies whither some Danish ships have already gone. The reply was that as his Majesty was already united with the Dutch for this he could do nothing without them. Thus the answers although not final gave no immediate satisfaction, although at first the king seemed very well disposed.
All these things are delayed by Spanish artifices although the King of Denmark wrote to his Majesty and to various ministers begging for a speedy reply, either yes or no, so that he might know what to do. His Majesty by speaking to ambassadors and others seems to fancy that in this way he will threaten the Spaniards sufficiently, saying: If the Palatinate is not speedily restored to me, I have a treaty in hand with the King of Denmark, which will get it back for me; but all relates to the future and nothing effective is done in the present.
Poland has obtained a levy for 10,000 foot. It is not thought, however, that they will be able to raise even 3,000, since the captains named are of slight standing and less following. A rumour stated that he asked for more than 100,000 crowns in loan from his Majesty to carry it out, but any idea he may have had vanished from fear of a refusal, owing to the small amount of money here. The king goes about saying that he will always be zealous against the Turk, and he would never regard as a good Christian prince any one who did not do the same, and he regretted he had received no return from the King of Poland for this favour except that he would approach Spain and the emperor for the restitution of the Palatinate.
London, the 23rd April, 1621.
[Italian.]
April 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
34. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The other day the king left Theobalds post for this town much moved by the interference of the populace to prevent the sentence against the apprentices who insulted the Spanish ambassador. In an unusual manner, which excited much comment, he went to the Guildhall, the seat of the mayor, aldermen and sheriffs of the city, and grew very heated, insisting on their repeating the punishment and holding the populace in check, telling them that if they could not he would manage this himself, threatening to take away their privileges and proceed to extraordinary measures. In conformity with this he issued a severe proclamation and ordered the lawyers to search if there were laws whereby the offending apprentices could be hanged. They found none and finally his Majesty ordered the bishops and clergy to exhort the people to respect ambassadors and not to refer themselves to the affairs of princes. For this one preacher is already in prison for telling some tales to the prejudice of the Spaniards. Some other ambassadors besides Spain, complain of ill treatment by the populace. Thank God, out of respect for your Serenity I have always met with respect and honour, especially from the populace. They do not mind the whip so much as being whipped for a Spaniard. The execution finally took place with guards and every circumstance conceivable against any prince and was undoubtedly better calculated to kindle than to assuage the wrath and spirit of the multitude, which here possibly more than elsewhere has never been accustomed to suffer control by force. (fn. 2)
The said Spanish ambassador, to whom the king has shown extraordinary honour by assigning to him as his residence for this summer the fine royal palace of Nonesuch, told a familiar of his some days ago that he will leave here in a few months. Some believe he will do so, arguing from many subtle considerations and from his rigour against the populace, in order to have some colourable pretext for leaving, since the matters in treaty, the marriage and the restoration of the Palatinate, have reached an impasse. The king perceiving this is trying to satisfy him in every way in order to deprive him of a pretext. I cannot say at present, he is so well off here that he can desire no more. Nothing is done to displease him, and if anything happens which they think may offend him they offer excuses or say it is a matter of small importance. And thus owing to the arts he knows so well how to use, it may perhaps be a long while before matters come to a crisis. Only a perfect harmony in the parliament and between it and the king can shake him seriously, as if the former obtained its ends it would cut away the foundations from under him. But even this requires time, and the victory would be excessively difficult. Parliament reassembles next Tuesday.
I have heard on very good authority that the said ambassador told a confidant a few days ago that his king had decided to give your Serenity every satisfaction, and be good friends, it being so important that Catholic powers should not foment the Protestants, and stand together, and he wished to forget all the injuries done to him and the house of Austria. Your Excellencies will understand if there be any trick in this.
The whole Court is now in mourning. The said ambassador has sent to inform all his colleagues of his king's death, including Denmark, but excepting Bohemia, the States and myself. All the others have put on mourning. I have thought fit to do the same to avoid any occasion for remark that I have acted in a way taken only by the representatives of powers which are declared enemies of the Spanish crown. Two reasons have moved me, to imitate the Court and because I know your Serenity respects the Spanish crown equally with every other prince. It has earned me the praise of all, so I hope it will not displease your Excellencies.
The ambassadors of the States have taken leave of the king and are about to depart. All have been made knights and presented with 1,000 ounces of silver gilt each. They have treated of nothing more than I have reported, and leave very ill satisfied. They have received no definite reply about the Valtelline; and have refrained from pressing the matter, perceiving clearly that if the king will not move for his own children he will do even less for others. With them the Ambassador Dohna of the King of Bohemia will also leave for the Hague to go and see his master, who desires to hear from his lips about affairs here. He will have a great deal to say on the subject, though little to please him. The ambassador told me that he expects to return in three or four weeks.
I have received your Serenity's letters of the 20th and 26th March. I have nothing to add to what I wrote about the ambassadors of the States on the 19th ult. except that I shall await instructions. They say nothing here about the affair of the French ambassador's house in Spain. The Ambassador Gondomar said something about it to the Ambassador Treliers only, but made no mention of any but Frenchmen.
London, the 23rd April, 1621.
[Italian.]
April 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
35. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of the States have sent word of their negotiations with Spinola, one was a truce of ten months and the other for two months. The States rather favour the second, and decided in their Assembly to inform the ambassadors of France, England and Denmark asking them to write to their sovereigns to use their influence to sustain Germany. The King Palatine and the States also greatly blame the King of Great Britain for his letters exhorting the princes to make an accommodation. The letters were sent here to the King Palatine.
On Wednesday the King Palatine sent Mr. Nidersel, formerly English agent to the Princes of the Union, to inform the king and ministers in England of what has taken place and try to impress upon his Majesty the prejudice he suffers in his daughter, and to persuade him to send immediately to Germany to keep the princes there united or to take some other courageous resolution. Here they think that his Majesty has gone too far in professing indifference about this great affair, and with his love of peace he will accept what has happened. So they think that Niderzel will obtain no results from his offices. The States have also sent to the Ambassador Caron to get him to urge on the king.
The Hague, the 26th April, 1621.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 28.
Collegio
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
36. To the Podestà and Captain of Treviso.
Whereas we understand that Captain John Thomas, a Scot, is raising inexperienced and unfit men for his company, many being pure vagabonds, we direct you to hold an unexpected muster of this company, making special enquiry of each man of how he enlisted and under what promise of pay, and to send us word.
Ayes, 19.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
37. That when the English Ambassador comes into the Collegio the following be read to him:
What your Excellency has represented about the Prince of Joinville has given us great pleasure, as showing his Majesty's continued affection for our republic, and because of our esteem for him and all his house. The present state of our affairs does not permit us to avail ourselves of his offers as we should desire, but we shall always preserve a grateful memory of them.
We will grant liberty to the twelve soldiers of Colonel Peyton, condemned to the galleys, solely out of our desire to please your Excellency and to show our esteem for your nation, and will also give them the debt which they have contracted. This will serve as a testimony of our satisfaction with the said colonel.
That in satisfaction of the English ambassador, the twelve men named below, who were soldiers of Colonel Peyton, be released from the galleys, and that the debt they contracted of 201 lire for cloth for each one, be remitted, the Proveditori all' Armar being charged with this.
Upon the galley of Sig. Antonio Navagier
Henry Pauel.John Isem.
Manfred Guaremo.James Griffi.
Walter Walter Auort.Anthony Gargen.
James Coremio.Christopher Gheller.
John Ercle.
Upon the galley of Sig. Domenico Thiepolo.
William Erner.
Richard Deches.
Thomas Borlo.
Ayes, 153.Noes, 1.Neutral, 13.
On the same day in the Collegio:
Ayes, 25.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
38. To the Ambassador in England.
His Majesty's ambassador here has recently executed his instructions about the Prince of Joinville, leaving a copy of the letter written to him on the subject. We send you copies of this and of our reply to serve you for information, to use as our service requires.
The ambassador also asked for the release from the galleys of twelve of Colonel Peyton's soldiers, and we have conceded this, releasing them also from their debts, in order to show our esteem for the ambassador and his nation.
We have received your letters this week, which confirm your diligence and prudence, especially your application in the matter of the levies. As we have mentioned before we desire you to keep the negotiations alive but not to press them, so that you may rule yourself by the instructions which we may think it necessary to add.
Ayes, 153.Noes, 1.Neutral, 13.
[Italian.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
39. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
So far not a word has been heard of the complaint made by the Ambassador Wotton. I have tried most cautiously to ascertain whether he wrote anything here. A minister excellently disposed towards your Serenity, one of the leading men in the Council, who knows how to keep counsel and do what is needful, assured me he had not, (fn. 3) and promised to inform me punctually of all he might write in the future on the subject, and for the rest to hold his peace. It is true that his Majesty's ambassadors are not bound nor accustomed to write of all that happens to them. It is also true that the ambassador's complaint and his expressions far exceed the nature of the business and all reason. It is also most true that his feelings are not considered at present to be what they were at first and for some time during the course of his embassies at Venice, since he received some ill satisfaction, as I understand. It may also be that by stirring up something fresh he hopes to advantage himself with the ministers here who are most in favour, whose dispositions I have so often reported; and if the occasion seems suitable he may not let it drop, but your Excellencies will see that he has no reasonable pretexts, even in appearance, because evil meaning ministers may always support his actions and lead to important consequences, arguing that after an experience of Venice of so many years he cannot be mistaken, and that he always represents himself as a true Venetian in sympathy. Although generally and by the king himself he is considered lightsome and too vivacious (arioso et di vivace troppo) so that when such things happen they do not attach the greatest importance to them, yet I think it best upon every account that they should not happen, if I may venture to say so, so as to give no grip to the evil influences which now prevail here against all princes who love liberty, so that the water which is now clear for your Serenity may not be troubled, as has happened in these times in the interests of so many other princes, but to maintain the usual confidential relations, considering this influence as against all reason, so that we may hope for its ultimate fall, and the end of it all in a few months. Once the general state of affairs changes the particulars will also improve and we shall see that the abilities of so many ambassadors and ministers, the officers of princes, the interests of blood, religion, dominion, friends, the old councillors, the people, the parliament, so well inclined will not be thrown away.
I have nothing to add about the complaint except that the ambassadors at this Court would have plenty of reasons for complaint on good grounds if they were not more concerned to maintain good relations between the powers and rest satisfied with the king's good intentions, than to reflect upon the treatment accorded to them in ceremonies and business.
Recently I endeavoured to thwart one Leonardo Michelini, a Venetian of low birth, who was here four years ago, a very sorry rascal, who rarely appeared in my house because he discovered that I knew him well; at the first report of levies for your Serenity he had the assurance to try and traffic in captainships, in the hope of some earnest money. I finally got him fined and imprisoned during my pleasure. I hope that will suffice for him and serve as an example to others. I have encountered so many difficulties that I am amazed, such things not being considered a crime in this country, and yet they are calculated to injure seriously the interests of princes and the honour of those who serve them while they infect all such operations. I find he had the protection of the one who can do so much here, and he will use every means in his power.
I am sorry about the misfortune to my letters of the 5th March as they were of no slight importance. They were mostly in cipher. I hope the duplicates will arrive safely, which I am sending week by week by my Secretary Zon.
London, the 30th April, 1621.
[Italian; the part in Italics deciphered.]
April 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
40. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The other day news reached the king that the Landgrave of Hesse, the Duke of Wirtemberg, the Margraves of Anspach and Baden and others of the united princes and the free towns had made an accommodation with the emperor. His Majesty, although he expected so much, has complained bitterly because they did not communicate the negotiations to him before. Now one hears him and the ministers blame the want of heart and coldness of the Germans, while they magnify the succours which have reached them on several occasions from these parts, especially in money. His Majesty now perceives that the whole weight of the recovery of the Palatinate will rest upon his shoulders alone; that he has as yet no preparations nor money or any thing else necessary for taking an adequate army so far into the continent among the most vigorous forces of the Austrians; that he could receive no help; he has always had such an aversion for this, and abhors diversions so much that if he was cold before he now seems ice, and if ever he inclined to negotiations he now thinks of nothing else, and it is thought he will go so far as to fear that every sword sharpened and every pike made ready may prove a cause of disturbance (et vi mirera si crede, a segno che ogni spada che si lastri, ogni picca che si acconcia, tema che possa riuscire di sconcerto). Accordingly everyone predicts that he will do nothing but offices for an accommodation. At present he does nothing except sending Digby to the emperor. This has been settled because by the death of the King of Spain all the threads of his negotiations in Brussels have broken, the letters of his Highness no longer having any value, being directed to the dead king. After the negotiations with the emperor, upon which they do not build great hopes here, since he has been strongly advised to chastise Germany in order to fasten her chains, and who seems very disinclined to listen to proposals for restitution and accommodation, they think that Digby will proceed to Italy and then to Spain. Some say Italy merely for the passage to Genoa, but I hear on good authority that it may be for negotiations with your Serenity and the Duke of Savoy, which may serve to alarm the Spaniards and facilitate their plans. But the idea is very immature as yet, and is in the hands of a minister of such character that the Spaniards will know all about it and turn it to their advantage.
The king has given orders that the members of parliament shall meet him to-day, as it has assembled again. The prince constantly increases his popularity therein by his modesty and other great qualities. It does not appear whether they will discuss the Palatinate at all, as reason and necessity seem to require, or whether they will devote themselves to the proceedings already well advanced against the favourite's adherents and brothers, with yet higher aims. The general curiosity is great because both points are important.
The king has sent the 20,000l. already mentioned, by Burlamacchi to the Duke of Deuxponts to be divided among the dowager Electress, some ministers and others of the Palatinate to relieve their necessities. It appears that one must no longer speak of the Princes of the Union. They have written very haughtily to his Majesty laying upon him and his irresolution all the blame of their failure, threatening moreover, if he will not send them 50,000l. to pay the troops, to let them go and ravage the Palatinate, and they seem even to hint at occupying some part of it. Murton said something of the kind on his return here, which they here considered to be extravagant and most unjust. The really prudent ministers lament this desperate state of affairs, the more so because, from this quarter, whence they could have done so much, they seem rather to make matters worse. Gabor also is reported to have made an accommodation to his entire satisfaction, Caesar proposing to withdraw Bucquoi's army to employ it in Germany.
The Spanish ambassador at his last audience said that a Savoyard was at Vienna intending to assassinate the emperor, but the Count of Bucquoi prevented the blow, and seeing the emperor uninjured the man struck himself thrice in the breast with his knife, and expired. The same news reached me several days ago from Brussels with the addition that they had found some letters directed to your Serenity. I thought it one of those fables such as one hears every day, and perhaps it is.
We hear that the King of Bohemia proposes to send his leading councillor here, and they think he may stay on in place of the Baron Dohna, who left so tired and satiated with this Court, letting it be clearly understood that he would never again return in the character of ambassador, so as not to expose himself to the disagreeable things he had so frequently experienced. The king gave him 1,500 ounces of silver gilt and if he returns it will be as agent or as a simple gentleman of his master.
I have seen a genuine letter of the Queen of Bohemia written to one of the leading countesses here, an intimate of hers, saying how she has reached the Hague after a long and toilsome journey where she enjoys more popularity among the people, with her husband, than she has ever experienced anywhere else, and where she will stay a while, seeing she cannot come where she ought and asking the countess if she heard any talk of her coming to this kingdom to contradict it, as she certainly will not do so for reasons which cannot be put upon paper, but which the lady can easily imagine. She adds: Everyone is awaiting some good resolution from his Majesty; for my part I expect very little, but it will only redound to the triumph of our enemies who mock and jest at him. She concludes: You will have heard of the death of the King of Spain; may all his race perish so, especially the women (nella quale le racconta dopo longo e travaglioso viaggio essersi ridotta in Haya, dove gode d'un affetto dei popoli verso di lei e del Re suo marito singolare e migliore che habbia incontrato in qualsivoglia altro luoco, e dove si fermirà per un pezzo gia che non puo essere dove se le doverebbe et converrebbe, pregandola se sentisse a discorrere che ella havesse a passare a questo Regno, a procurare di levarne il concetto, non essendo ella per effettuarlo al certo per quei rispetti che non si possono mettere in carta e che essa Dama può ben considerare. Aggionge poi Ogni uno sta attendendo qualche buona risolutione di S. Mtà. Io per me ne aspetto molto poco, ma ciò non riesce che a trionfo de'nostri inimici quali la burlano, et la beffano et finalmente sigilla con dire haverete inteso la morte del Re di Spagna cosi andasse tutta la sua razza et spetialmente la feminina).
Many lords and ladies who seemed resolved to go and visit the queen, fearing that this may not please the king, owing to some words let fall, are putting off and may give it up altogether. It is thought that the King of Bohemia will be well placed at the side of the Prince of Orange, whose advice will keep him from making mistakes; but the worst errors have already been committed. He commits himself as regards the kingdom of Bohemia to his Majesty but not as regards his son, saying that he must not prejudice him, but his Majesty claims to make this point good as the boy's grandfather.
A report is current here on high authority that the late King of Spain, before his death, summoned the infanta to him and told her he was sorry he had not married her, but that would concern her brother, who ought to make her empress. Some say that through this and other things his Majesty is beginning to perceive that the Spaniards have deceived him, and he has hinted as much very clearly, but the infatuated ministers and the usual artifices will play their customary parts.
I have seen the written reply given by the King of France to the ambassadors of the States. In addition to the question of the interests of the merchants, he expresses his intention to continue the alliance which existed during the truce, reserving to himself to speak about it to the king here, with whom it was made; but here they may give no other reply than what they gave to the late ambassadors.
There is a strong rumour about the extension of the truce in Flanders. It is not known who is negotiating it, though they insist that there is a tacit connivance for six weeks. They say Digby brought the news, but this is not believed.
The Danish ambassador is not yet completely despatched, and the gout keeps his business in suspense. Many points are arranged about the offensive and defensive league which he continues to negotiate, and many remain to be settled. The offensive part is subject to so many conditions and reservations that it will serve for nothing, and this will serve for nothing more than to show the King's esteem for his brother-in-law and as some intention to revive an ancient alliance which existed between the two crowns two hundred years ago. (fn. 4)
The 100,000 crowns I wrote of were actually demanded of his Majesty as a loan by the Polish ambassador of whom the king has made much, urging him afresh to get his king to interpose with the emperor for the restitution of the Palatinate. Of his own accord the king has given him the great palace of Hampton Court as a place of retreat so long as he remains here, that will be about two months, as he has to await replies from Poland about the levies granted to him.
Signori Iseppo Porto, Antonio Velo and Fulvio Franco, gentlemen of Vicenza, are favouring this house led by their desire to see the kingdom, after previously accompanying the embassy of the most excellent Priuli in France.
London, the 30th April, 1621.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 The Victory and the Dreadnought. A warrant to advance moneys to furnish these ships for six months for a voyage to the southward was issued on the 23rd March, old style (Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, page 237). The Victory was a new ship built in 1620 (Oppenheim: Administration of the Royal Navy, page 202). The Dreadnought had been commissioned to fetch Digby back from Spain in 1618 (see the preceding vol. of this Calendar, page 179n).
2 The Rev. Joseph Mead gives a full account of this affair in a letter to Sir Martin Stuteville dated April 9th, old style (Birch: Court and Times of James I, II, pages 247–9). For the proclamation see Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, page 245. The preacher referred to was Dr. John Everard, Rector of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, imprisoned in the Gatehouse for a sermon preached on February 25th, old style, in which he spoke against the Spanish match and denounced the Spanish cruelties in the Indies (ibid., pages 233, 294).
3 See note at page 12 above.
4 Presumably an allusion to the alliance concluded between Henry VII of England and John of Denmark on the 20th Jan., 1490. Busch: England under the Tudors (Eng. Trans.), page 75.