Venice
February 1622, 5-14

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1911

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223-237

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'Venice: February 1622, 5-14', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 223-237. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88826 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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February 1622

Feb. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
305. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court.
The governor of Milan has published the articles arranged with the Grisons. He is said to have remarked that the treaty of Madrid was done with and had been torn up by past events, but the Grisons must keep what they have now freely sworn to observe. He has made the communes of the Valtelline pay the pensions of the Grisons and also supply the troops sent from Milan to Alsace, many of whom have died, fallen sick or deserted. Mansfelt's cavalry is scouring round Basel for the purpose of opposing their passage. Leopold has withdrawn to Breisach. This is for information.
The like to:
France, Rome, Savoy, Florence, Naples, England, the Hague, Spain.
Ayes, 117.Noes, 6.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Feb. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
306. To the Ambassador in France and the like to the other Courts.
The Count of Mansfelt has signed an engagement to serve us; he asked if we should want him for the spring. We told him that we should give him early notice when we required him. This is for information. The Count has signified his readiness to act for the recovery of the Valtelline with his own forces, but we replied that the republic could not decide a matter of such consequence on its own responsibility.
Ayes, 60.Noes, 3.Neutral, 64.
Second vote: Ayes, 46.Noes, 7.Neutral, 75.
Thereupon the letters were referred back with an addition to Savoy.
Ayes, 109.Noes, 2.Neutral, 11.
[Italian.]
Feb. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
307. PIERO GRITTI, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English resident complains because they have refused him a copy of the emperor's letter to his king, and concludes that it was intended merely to gain time in order, after the empire is settled and peace made with Hungary, to refuse openly the reinstatement of the Palatine. He seems to think also that some of his letters have been intercepted in which he expressed these opinions to his king, and believes that is the reason why they will not show him the contents of the letter. He fears that the King of Great Britain may easily be deceived by this artifice owing to his desire for peace, and he would rather take any way but force. He recently asked his Majesty for the restitution of what had been taken from the Palatine's mother and brother. They replied that his Majesty could not decide about this before the principal question of the Palatinate was settled, but they would order the Marquis Spinola to provide the mother and brother with maintenance. This reply greatly dissatisfied the resident and only confirmed his opinion that they do not mean to satisfy his king in the rest.
Vienna, the 5th February, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
Feb. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
308. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
With regard to the English marriage Lodovisio confided to me that the commission was nothing and would do nothing; but they announced so much at the request of the Spaniards, who do not themselves desire it, but in their own interests they have sent these ministers here, who are deceived by the Spaniards themselves, giving them to understand that they desire it, and that they are making good progress, but at the same time they desire neither the conclusion nor exclusion of the business, to enable them afterwards to do what the progress of events may show will profit them most (che niente è, et niente se ne farà dalla Congregatione, ma che ad istanza de'Spagnoli cosi si pubblica, et che loro medesimi non lo vogliono, ma per i suoi interessi hanno mandato qui questi ministri, quali sono ingannati dali medesimi Spagnoli, dandogli da intender che lo vogliono, et che caminano da buon passo, non vogliono però, ne conclusione ne esclusione dal negotio, per far poi quello che nell' intanto delle cose conoveranno esser lor maggior servitio).
Rome, the 5th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian.]
Feb. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
309. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
This week I called upon the new English ambassador. After the usual compliments he said he had special orders from his king to be on good terms with the Baili of your Serenity and to exert himself in your interests, with other expressions showing his king's excellent feeling towards you. I answered in most friendly fashion. He warmly praised the Ambassador Lando, saying he was much loved and esteemed by his Majesty and all the Court. In speaking of his journey he said a great deal about the Barbary pirates, who infest the seas and trade. He complained bitterly of the manner of his first entry, as no one was sent to welcome him or offer the refreshments usual upon such occasions; moreover the Emir had claimed duties on his goods, and many other grievances, upon which he had resolved to make an Arz to the Grand Vizier. He gave it me to read. It ran: Seeing the dissatisfaction at his arrival he asked to know the reason so that he might tell his king why he had left, before he went back on his ships, and also to tell the king the slight esteem they had here for his embassy and friendship. But as the Grand Vizier subsequently ordered the usual refreshments to be offered the Arz was never presented. But other misfortunes befell the merchants of his nation with the customary wrong in the payment of the duties for the goods which came in the said ships, and especially in the burning in public of some casks of tobacco by the Aga of the Janissaries. The old ambassador was hastening on his departure, and as the new one would not kiss his Majesty's hands or visit the Vizier before he received the refreshments, while they would not introduce the old one to his. Majesty unless he came too, the latter decided to leave without this customary ceremony with the Sultan. He has embarked upon the ship Martinella, and if the weather is favourable he will start this evening. If he cannot obtain a passage for England at Zante he proposes to go on to Venice in that ship and travel thence by land. At his request I gave him letters for the Proveditori of Zante and Corfu to show him favour.
The Vigne of Pera, the 5th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian; deciphered.]
Feb. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
310. PAULO BASADONNA, Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
An individual calling himself Louis, Count of Lormes, arrived here recently in the tartana Balbi. The moment he landed he began to publish that he was engaged on great affairs of the republic. He came to see me so suddenly that I had no time to decide how to receive him. He said so much about his greatness that I was surprised at his bringing no public letters, especially as he stayed some days at Corfu. I behaved with great reserve towards him and finally induced him to show a patent recommending him to the public representatives. He said he was going to Candia to continue his journey.
Zante, the 6th February, 1622.
[Italian.]
Feb. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
311. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Last Wednesday the English ambassador left word that he had something to tell me. I accordingly called and he asked me if I had heard anything from Venice about an office of the Ambassador Wotton. I answered I had not. He said the ambassador had tried to dissuade your Serenity from engaging the Count of Mansfelt. Doubtless he had the best intentions as apparently he had no instructions from England, where his Majesty was very vexed about it as he feared your Serenity would think that he did not wish the Count to enter your service. His king had ordered him to assure me that, on the contrary he would be very gratified, feeling sure that you would not withdraw him from his present service, especially as you do not need him. Yesterday evening the king spoke to me to the same effect.
The ambassador suggested that your Serenity should send money to the count for his present undertakings.
The Hague, the 7th February, 1622.
[Italian.]
Feb. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
312. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The decision of England to maintain 8,000 horse and 1,500 foot in the Palatinate, and to send Lord Chichester as ambassador and commissioner general to the Palatinate and urge the princes to make a fresh union, and the letters to the English ambassador here in conformity, telling him how they mean to find the necessary money, have induced the States to consider Mansfelt's request for the continuation of his monthly subsidy of 50,000 florins.
The king has written to the States to support this, and he tells them of England's decision and the advice given him thence to send to Denmark.
The Hague, the 7th February, 1622.
[Italian.]
Feb. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
313. That the English Ambassador be summoned to the Collegio and the following be read to him:
Your Excellency's reference to the Count of Mansfelt at your last audience gives us an opportunity of showing our continued confidence and proving our zeal for his Majesty's interests. We have been in negotiation with the count, not to divert his operations but to provide for our future needs. With this object we have arranged the first articles, but this will only serve to strengthen him in his present position; thus his Majesty and the Palatine should welcome the issue of this affair, recognising in it our sincerity.
Ayes, 139.Noes, 2.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Feb. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
314. To the Ambassador in England and the like, mutatis mutandis, to the Secretary at the Hague.
You will communicate to his Majesty and the ministers the result of our negotiations with the Count of Mansfelt, especially as it is reported there that the articles provide for his bringing his army here. We send you a copy of our office with the Ambassador Wotton, showing our true objects in this affair.
We hear from Rome of the action of the Spaniards in trying to keep a decision about the dispensation in suspense and this taken with the anxiety shown at the Imperial Court to send an ambassador to England, clearly discloses their real objects. You will remark upon this in conversation when you have an opportunity, the more so because Cæsar's true determination to leave Bavaria with the investiture of the Palatinate is finally proved from what his Majesty's is said to have assured the pope.
Ayes, 139.Noes, 2.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Feb. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
315. In a despatch of Moderante SCARAMELLI from Zurich.
List of forces levied in the name of the elector palatine, King of Bohemia, to be ready in the spring.
(1) The Margrave of Baden prepares:
Horse 1,000 cuirassiers under Otto, Count of Rheno.
1,000 cuirassiers under William, Duke of Saxe Weimar.
500 cuirassiers under Magnus, Duke of Wirtemberg.
1,000 arquebusiers under George von Fleckenstein.
500 arquebusiers under Colonel Goldstein.
Total 4,000
Foot 3,000 under William, Duke of Weimar.
2,000 under Duke Magnus of Wirtemberg.
2,000 under Margrave Charles of Baden.
3,000 under Colonel von Helmstet.
2,000 under Colonel Goldstein.
2,000 under Count George Louis von Levenstein.
2,000 under Colonel Pocklino.
Total 16,000
1,000 dragoons under Colonel Sturzli.
(2) The Count of Mansfelt commands as general:
Horse 1,000 under Count Henry of Ortenburg.
1,000 under Duke Christian of Brunswick.
1,000 under Colonel Steif.
1,200 under Duke Frederick of Weimar.
600 under Duke William of Weimar.
1,000 under Duke Francis Charles of Saxe Lauenburg.
1,000 under Count John Casimir von Levenstein.
1,000 under Col. Joachim de Garbiz.
1,000 under Col. Obentraut.
1,000 under Lieut. Lintenau.
1,000 under Lieut. Russen.
500 under Lieut. Escremacher.
500 under Lieut. Pfaingher.
Total 12,800
Foot 2,000 of the guard under Col. Goldstein.
2,000 of the red regiment under Lieut. Schlamerstorf.
2,000 of Lieut. Escher.
3,000 under Duke William of Weimar.
2,000 under Duke Francis Charles of Lauenburg.
2,000 under Count Reinhard von Solms.
2,000 under Charles Grey, an Englishman.
2,000 under Count John Casimir von Levenstein.
4,000 under Duke Christian of Brunswick.
2,000 under Col. Christian Schon.
1,500 under Col. Knighausen.
1,000 of the city of Spires.
1,000 of the city of Cronwissenburgo.
2,000 of M. Porratlaron.
4,000 of M. Bonacurt.
Total 32,500
(3) Troops of the Lower Palatinate under General Vere:
Horse 600 under Colonel Magon.
400 under the electoral vassals.
Foot 3,000 of the English infantry.
2,000 of Col. Waltmanshausen.
2,000 of Col. Grieff.
2,000 of Col. Landtschad.
Total of
horse & foot 10,000
(4) Levy of the Duke of Wirtemberg, 1,000 horse and 3,000 foot.
(5) Levy of the Margrave of Anspach, 500 horse and 2,000 foot under Colonel Nicholas von Bulac.
(6) 24,000 English expected at the earliest opportunity. Grand total of horse and foot, 108,800.
Prince Bethlehem Gabor has offered 20,000 Hungarian hussars in case of need.
[Italian.]
Feb. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
316. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity's instructions of the 31st December and the 7th January would have been very useful if they had reached me before I saw the king at Theobalds. I begged that audience in order to salute his Majesty before he went away again, as he will remain away from this city for more than two months, and in order not to keep silence any longer, although he noted that of the Ambassador Wotton, which was due possibly to lack of material or from the king's fear of offending the Spaniards by a show of confidence with your Serenity, while his Majesty's hopes of receiving satisfaction from them still live.
I told him what I was instructed about the Valtelline, but the more important letters of the 22nd, 26th and 30th October, were intercepted by Mansfelt's soldiers and only reached me two days ago in good condition though late. If I had had them I could have spoken more at length, especially as I found the king very well disposed with the intention in particular which afterwards disclosed itself to have his offices followed up. Wherefore if his Majesty were here I should not think it inopportune to broach the very important questions which your Excellencies commit to my poor judgment, but he is naturally very averse to being disturbed in distant places where he likes to remain with his favourites, free from all cares and anxieties, as much as possible, while he has ordered his councillors not to go and bother him so long as he remains at Newmarket. Accordingly I should have hesitated to ask for an audience if your Serenity had left me free. But as I owe obedience I asked the Lord Chamberlain for one as tactfully as possible, in a way that cannot offend the king, and if he shows any reluctance I shall think it best not to press the matter. I hope he will grant it, because I understand that he spoke to some of his ministers in terms of the highest praise of the prudence of the republic. If I am referred to one of the ministers, as is the usual way, I shall do the best I can since one can never feel sure here that in this way everything that one says reaches the king's ears without alteration, or if it does, that it will produce the effects which you desire and does not fall without any reply and without the king disclosing his intentions at all.
Every time that I have seen the king I have addressed such offices as I considered opportune to the prince; but as his Highness has never uttered anything of moment for some time, and is taken up by his desire for the marriage, merely moving in time with his father, I thought it superfluous to mention the matter to your Excellencies.
The Archbishop of Canterbury, whom your Serenity mentions, is certainly among those who always seem cordial towards you but as I have so often written, the old ministers and those who look upon matters otherwise than he desires, know little or nothing now of the king's proceedings, as he avoids all except two or three strong partisans of Spain. Accordingly his Council is a mere shadow for ordinary affairs, to toil about providing money and to edit matters which are intended for publication.
I have always cultivated his Majesty's ambassador at Paris, (fn. 1) a minister of excellent opinions and well inclined to your Excellencies. I will also continue to cherish the friendly disposition of others, although they have no influence at present, and will try and advance our interests with those who have, although that is difficult.
I have the best relations with the ambassadors of the States, and I have told them of the contributions which your Serenity has decided to make to their masters, a piece of information which has touched their hearts.
They have not yet broached any question with the king except the India affair, and will not before that is settled and they find a suitable opening. It has now been arranged that the compensation shall be paid here, as the English merchants desire, and not in the Indies, as they wished, the English having to allow the exchange, insurance and hire of all their goods sent thence upon Dutch ships.
Two very rich Dutch ships from the Indies have reached Plymouth. It is reported that they have hoisted the Danish flag from fear of being arrested, and under this flag they passed before the guard ships of this kingdom to return to Zeeland.
This has offended the king, who may not be too pleased at the agreement made between the Dutch and the men of Algiers and Tunis, for offence and defence, with the recovery of a large number of their fellow countrymen. It is said that the king ordered the Earl of Oxford to embark upon the fleet and pursue them. It is true that they sent post to him and he has already left. Some believe that the ships have already reached port, and in that case the earl might be going after others which may come. The ambassadors do not believe this change of flag, and know no reason for such a step, as no one has breathed any complaint to them, and their business is proceeding smoothly, although they fear that if mischief is intended the fleet may yet come up with their ships, and ships of 500 tons after a voyage of nine months, cannot resist unaided. But they say that they will easily find assistance at sea. They made complaint to the Commissioners of the Council, who answered that they had nothing to do with it as their instructions only referred to the India business. Accordingly they asked for an audience of the king or some explanation, as they are very anxious and fearful that something serious may happen. Amid the general uncertainty some believe that the orders were actually issued, by the king and the favourite only, as I hear also on many sides, though perhaps not to be carried out, but merely to frighten them and make them more ready to satisfy the merchants in this business, and also more ready to supply his Majesty with money for his current needs, and also possibly to improve their position with Spain and Rome. Moreover the fleet is in a bad condition, ill provided with breadstuffs and various other things, and some of the ships are very defective.
London, the 11th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
317. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Before the king left Theobalds recently, when dining in public with the prince, he made a long speech about those spirits who aimed at putting him at discord with his subjects in the parliament, saying that they deserved to be spat out (ispurgati) (and indeed some of them are sent to the Tower every day) and he was much consoled, because he clearly perceived the affection of his subjects in their readiness to supply him with money. This was manifestly pronounced with the object of inviting them to do so; but they have not responded to this either with cheerfulness or with dissatisfaction. (cio che non è seguito ne con illarità ne con scontezza), not even here in London, where the bulk of the rich people reside and those most concerned with the Court, not to speak of the country, where they expect to encounter great difficulties. The king proceeded to make specious promises of good government with peace and justice and to persuade his Highness to do the same when he holds the sceptre. He added that men had grown suspicious on the subject of religion but he prayed God never to help him if he did not do everything in his power for the preservation and increase of what he has professed hitherto. Although he would not receive directions from them as to what course he should pursue they might rest assured that as he would endeavour to leave his realms entire to the prince his son, without the loss of a single flower from his crown, so he wished to restore his son-in-law to his ancient possessions and titles without a single inch of land being wrenched from him or an atom of dignity, and for this he would imperil all his dominions if necessary.
A book has appeared with a declaration of his Majesty about the events of the parliament with all the letters which I forwarded to your Excellencies, but I have not yet had time to have it translated. There are fresh rumours of a new parliament.
Chichester will leave for the Palatinate in a few days. He is also to go to the diet of Ratisbon, which, to the king's disgust, has been postponed until the 10th March, in order to prevent any unfavourable results and procure the restitution of all the states and dignities of the Palatine. It now seems that they have changed their mind and that he is to go straight to the Palatinate with commissions also to the free towns to try and join them with the princes of the late Union. The propose to raise the number of foot from 8,000 to 14,000 and for their maintenance have ordered the merchants to send letters of remittance.
The courier sent to the Imperial Court has returned with answers which are reported to be favourable. He proceeded immediately to his Majesty. I have discovered from secret but well authenticated, information that he brings nothing but bare hopes with many difficulties and delays which are covered over by the sending of the ambassador extraordinary here and the commissioners who are to meet at Brussels. The Agent Simon Digby presented the king's letter to his imperial Majesty, and it is to this that the courier brings the reply with the emperor's own letters; having asked for a copy of the reply Digby could not obtain it, and for this reason and other causes of offence he asked for leave to go, and at the departure of the courier he instructed him to tell Lord Digby that a member of that Council, his intimate, had given him to understand that the emperor has written to his Majesty something that will not please him much. Accordingly his lordship has warned the courier on his life to say nothing about it to anyone, and he has been sent back to the Palatinate, Vere and the Imperial Court.
I also hear under the seal of the greatest secrecy that General Vere has intercepted letters written by the emperor's own hand to the King of Spain, which he sent to his Majesty, though he informs one of his friends in confidence that he fears they will never be allowed to reach the king's hands, and indeed I know that an important minister has kept out of the way for fear of presenting them. They remark that he is more inclined to make terms with Gabor than with the king here, who can do neither harm nor good, and one Bethlehem is more to be reckoned with than four James. As for the Palatine he expresses his desire to root him up from the electorate and the Palatinate as well (intendo insieme sotto molto secretezza che il General Veer ha intercette lettere scritte da mano proprio di esso Imperator al Re di Spagna, quali egli invia a Sua Maestà come avisa confidentemente ad un amico suo, teme che non saran lasciate capitar mai in mano di lei, come veramente io so, che un ministro grande si è schivato per timore di presentarle; et quali contengono concetti, che più si sia per pensare ad accomodarsi con Gabor che con questo Re, quale non possa far bene ne male, che si deve stimar più un Betelem che quattro Giacobi. Quanto al Palatino mostrandosi di volerlo estirpare et dell' Elletorato et dell Palatinato).
This has been communicated to me with the utmost confidence because such points are now more than difficult to penetrate here. Nothing has appeared from the king or from the two or three persons aforesaid except that before granting the dispensation the pope seems to require greater concessions for the Catholic religion, while the Catholic clergy here have issued two papers one urging the toleration of our religion here, not by connivance but by open permission, ratified by the parliament, which must revoke all the laws against recusants. They have answered that his Majesty has done and is doing quite enough, to the great offence of the bulk of his subjects. The other paper asks for a promise that no help or assistance of any kind shall be given to the States from this quarter. Accordingly there is some doubt whether that business also may turn out quite happily.
The Protestants here are afraid that the Cavalier Gage now at Rome is really carrying on negotiations by order of his Majesty, just as they also imagine that Dominis is leaving here with some orders from the king, and as rumour accordingly publishes abroad, with the idea of converting him. I hear that Dominis tells those who speak to him that his idea is to unite the two faiths as mediator, which the pope has urged upon him for a long while, and he is only waiting for the bull; apart from this he has no orders from the king, who does not want to mix himself in the matter; he has asked in a letter for leave to go, and he hopes to depart with his Majesty's favour. (Quel Cavalier Ghez, ch'è a Roma, questi Protestanti temono che in effetto tratti, si maneggi per ordine di Sua Maestà come pure sono adombrati il Dominis si parta di quà con qualche ordine di lei, et pero ne vada divulgando la voce, stimando di poternelo divertir; a chi ne parla a lui stesso intendo che responde che pensa di poter unire come mediatore le due Religione, ch'e stimolato di lungo tempo dal Pontifice, che non aspetta altro che la bolla, che non va altrimenti di ordine del Re quale non si vuol mescolare in ciò, ma che bene per una sua lettera li ha dimandato licenza e spera di partire con buona gratia di Sua Maestà).
The king deputed the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishops of London and Winchester, who after speaking and disputing with him, subsequently examined him in some sort, after which he seemed very melancholy. I understand that the Spaniards promise him a pension of 12,000 crowns until he receives a bishopric such as Salerno, a very large sum, which indicates either that they do not mean to let him have it so easily afterwards, or that they expect some advantages.
The Spanish ambassador and the agent of Flanders have asked and obtained from his Majesty a levy of eight, some even say twelve ships, owing to the good relations now existing with their masters, alleging the example of the grant previously made to your Serenity and the levies granted to the States, Poland and others. The ambassador has been in treaty with merchants and sea captains these last days, saying that he wants to employ the ships at Dunkirk and in the Strait. (fn. 2) At first some of them listened to him, especially some who were discontented owing to the business of the Indies and the Levant, but afterwards, all of a sudden, they all changed their minds, owing to some hint from the king, some artifice of others or their own misgivings, and not one would go. They remarked that although they had lost a great deal with the Dutch, they recognised that to ruin everything was not the right way to recoup themselves. Thus no one says any more about it; except to say that the Spaniards had better build their own.
The Earl of Argyle, who is in Flanders, seems to intend to levy twenty companies here, and is drawing up his list of officers. But his own followers admit that the king does not wish this to be done before he has the men whom he needs for the Palatinate. Moreover the king has decided not to gather troops here but to send the men singly to Germany, really because he detests all levies in these parts at present and he imposes the conditions that he wishes first to be satisfied in his own affairs, although some days since orders were issued to the ports of the realm to allow English recusants and other subjects of his Majesty to pass without the customary examination and oath.
The Spaniards are circulating reports that these troops of Argyle will be sent to Sicily to serve against the Turks, so that they may go more readily without fear of being employed in ways displeasing to this country. I think I perceive that this ambassador means to make the most of these and other circumstances. He has announced that all the affairs of Hungary are settled, enlarges greatly on the surrender of Juliers, says that disputes have broken out between your Serenity and the States, owing to your reluctance to pay the contributions arranged by the alliance, and finally that the ambassador of Denmark in Spain is to negotiate for a peace or truce in Flanders although the States profess that they returned a very resolute and lively reply to that monarch on the subject.
London, the 11th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
318. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Requests a vote of money for posting letters, for which he encloses the accounts with the receipts from the Master of the Posts, beginning from October, amounting to 38 lire 3 soldi or 158 ducats di Banco.
London, the 11th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian.]
Feb. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Brescia.
Venetian
Archives.
319. ZUANE BASADONNA, Captain at Bressa, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses abstract of the troops in the town. They beseech him for money with tears; wishes he could provide it with his own blood in order not to trouble their Excellencies.
Bressa, the 11th February, 1622.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
320. Extract from list of troops in the town according to the muster taken on the 28th January.
Colonel Henry Peyton, Englishman, with infantry:
last month 207
at present 214
sick 25
absent 6
effectives 183
Captain Christopher Peyton, Englishman, with infantry:
last month 194
at present 195
effective 163
sick 11
absent at Martinengo 21
[Italian.]
Feb. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
321. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court.
The governor of Milan has distributed his gifts to the envoys of the Grisons and they have departed. It is still said that the agreement will not last and the envoys themselves remarked that they did not know what they were signing, and that the printed copy contained many things they had not treated upon; many in the country do not accept it and have gone to France to appeal to the king. Count Teodoro Trivulzio threatens to yield his claims to Leopold or the Spaniards. This is to serve you for information.
The like to:
Rome, France, Spain, Savoy, Naples, Florence, Zurich, England, the Hague, Constantinople.
Ayes, 151. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Feb. 12.
Collegic,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
322. The English ambassador was summoned to the Cabinet and the Senate's decision of the day before yesterday was read to him. He spoke as follows:
I always come readily to receive the commands of your Serenity and the Senate, but I come even more willingly than usual this time because I can assure his Majesty of the highly correct manner in which the republic is proceeding in a serious matter capable of a sinister interpretation. I confess I have already written something to his Majesty of your Serenity's intentions, and I rejoice in being able to substantiate it.
Nothing has been said about Mr. Peyton, and so I understand that your Serenity does not propose to do anything as yet for his relief. He only asked for a favour which would be very opportune, though he will not in the mean time abate anything of his zeal in your service.
Before leaving I must mention the loss of Gregorio de Monti, secretary of the embassy, a subject of the republic. He was a worthy, diligent and faithful man, who served Mr. Carleton and myself and always showed himself devoted to his country. I owe this trifling eulogy to his memory. (fn. 3)
Many people have applied to me for his post and a fellow-countryman of mine has come expressly from Turin with letters of recommendation. But wishing to show my independence, I have not allowed myself to be influenced by any outside considerations and have chosen a French gentleman, born at Lyons but educated in Italy, who came here some years ago, of whom I have excellent accounts. I beg your Serenity to receive him kindly here and courteously afford him audience.
In the absence of the doge Councillor Tagiapiera replied saying they would welcome any dependant of the ambassador. They would inform him if anything further was decided about Colonel Peyton.
At this the ambassador introduced his secretary, took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Feb. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
323. GIOVANNI FRANCESCO TRIVISANO, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spaniards think they have the whole matter of the Valtelline settled without fear of disturbance from the French, and they declare that their forces will all be directed to Flanders next season. For this I understand that they want to make an accommodation in Germany by restoring the Palatinate provided they are sure and have a definite promise from the King of England that he will not intervene or join with the Dutch in the navigation of the Indies, a matter which weighs with the Spaniards more possibly than any other.
Florence, the 12th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
324. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Count of Chiombergh told me that hitherto the king had been ruled by favourites. The king is valiant and generous and will not submit to Spanish ascendancy. He must first deal with the Huguenots, but that is not a question of religion. I suggested this should be done quickly. He said: The Count of Mansfelt is in the service of the King of England for the whole of March. It would not be bad to stir him up. His Majesty will make his power felt in the Grisons this summer.
The President Jeannin said to me with great prudence and sincerity: Sir, this is a very important matter. We must work for peace in this kingdom in order that his Majesty may act as is becoming. I will work with all my heart for peace and a remedy in the Grisons. Marshal Lesdiguières is ambitious to die in battle against the Spaniards, but if war breaks out in Italy the Spaniards will make peace with the Netherlands. The King of England, who ought to stand well with France, would assist such a peace with all his might, in favour of the Spaniards, in his hope of a marriage with the infanta and that this would be sufficient to recover the Palatinate, and so the war would fall entirely upon Italy.
Paris, the 14th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
325. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The papal nuncio with great violence is working for war. The English ambassador has great hopes of peace from the negotiations begun and perhaps also from the necessities of the parties. Some are negotiating for the purchase of thirty ships in Holland to meet the Rochellese at sea.
The ambassador of England sent his secretary (fn. 4) to la Rochelle for peace. He has returned with words about peace and security, which means the claims of the Huguenots undiminished. On this side they claim absolute obedience with the idea of their utter destruction, and so this step has not produced the slightest result.
Paris, the 14th February, 1621 [M.V.].
[Italian.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
326. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have called upon Prince Maurice. Among other things he spoke of the King of England and seemed doubtful about any good results from that monarch's resolutions, for reasons I have given before. He told me of the levies made by some of the princes of the late Union. From him and others I have gathered that these princes have decided that they will not bind themselves to what the King of England may do, but will arrange so that they may go forward even without him.
The Hague, the 14th February, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
327. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has arrived that two ships of this country have reached Zeeland from the East Indies with a rich cargo. The States were warned that the English meant to attack these, but the sailors being advised, kept away from England. Prince Maurice told me this and seemed very indignant about it.
The States were warned that the Earl of Arga, the Scot who is serving the Spaniards, had obtained leave to make levies in England and Scotland. They decided to send out three ships, one towards Calais, a second towards Boulogne, and the third somewhat further on with orders to make prisoners of all troops they might find at sea on their way to serve the Spaniards.
The Hague, the 14th February, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
328. PAULO BASADONNA, Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Yesterday I sent to call on the English ambassador, (fn. 5) offering him every accommodation. He received the visit graciously, but apparently does not like his seclusion, and he suggested that as he and his household were perfectly healthy, he would take it as a great favour if he might embark on the galleys of the Captain of the Guard and proceed by way of Corfu to Venice or Otranto. The person sent to him answered guardedly though promising everything for his satisfaction.
Zante, the 14th February, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Lord Doncaster, ambassador extraordinary; Herbert, the ordinary ambassador returned home in September: see page 134 above.
2 Salvietti writes on the 4th February: Questo ambr. di Spagna ha ottenuto licenza da S. Maestà di noleggiare in questo Regno otto nave per armarle et mandarle su la costa di Francia per tenere aperte quei loro porti di Gravelinga, Dunoherche et Ostende. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27,962B.
3 Monti died on the 22nd November, 1621.
4 John Woodford. See his letter from Paris of the 25th January, 1621, old style. State Papers, Foreign: France.
5 Sir John Eyre, returning from Constantinople, which he was expected to leave on the 5th February. See Giustinian's despatch of that date, No. 309 at page 225 above.