Venice
April 1622, 1-9

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1911

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273-284

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'Venice: April 1622, 1-9', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 273-284. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88830 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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April 1622

April 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
390. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king returned to London not altogether free from his, indisposition, but much relieved. He honoured me by giving me audience in his bedchamber, for about an hour, when he listened and spoke very graciously. I began by congratulating him on his recovery, and told him what I was instructed about the engagement of Mansfelt. The king said he was very glad of this, as he feared that the count inclined to disband his troops, chiefly owing to the negotiations to take place at Brussels. He now hoped this would infuse him with fresh vigour and serve the general interests. I coupled this with the office passed with me about his son-in-law by saying that I thought it would serve for the ends desired by his Majesty, as your Serenity joined his interests with your own, and it was desirable that every one should likewise do his part. I also reminded him of the heavy expenses incurred by the republic. The king admitted the truth of this and said he was much beholden, and he seemed completely satisfied by my arguments and to claim no more, and what he had written and caused to be said to me was the result of the frequent pressure brought to bear upon him. As the reply of the republic might arrive while he was away from London he begged me to consign it to the Secretary Calvert.
I afterwards enlarged upon various points in the letters I hold, that I had on good authority from various sources and would not refrain from communicating to him in confidence, that although in appearance the Spaniards did not agree with the emperor about the Palatinate, yet their action and aims concurred in not making restitution, and the only difference was in the means. Cæsar wished to confer it entire upon Bavaria, with the title of Electoral Prince, and the Spaniards wanted to keep the Lower part for themselves. Seeing that he listened attentively and was impressed, I thought the moment favourable to go further, saying how closely one ought to watch their good as well as their evil action, so that the former may not be converted to evil uses. I proceeded to communicate the important advices from Rome with that modest liberty of speaking which this monarch now and then enjoys, not making the office expressly in the name of your Excellencies, but saying that I thought I should fail in my duty if I did not tell him of a matter that concerned his interests so nearly, adding that the republic and her ministers were not accustomed to report mere imaginings, but acted with sincerity and purity of motive, and I felt sure this would meet with a response from his Mafesty. Your Serenity desires the restitution of the Palatinate as much as he does, and even if the Spanish marriage takes place it would make no difference and would not cool the affection the Doge has always shown, which is rooted in such firm foundations, and I would assure his Majesty that everything I told him was solely intended for his interest and advantage.
The king embraced me and expressed cordial esteem for your Serenity, and his assurance of your sincerity. He wished to impress upon his memory the name of Cardinal Fresia and seemed to attach great importance to the document promising the interposition of some prince about the emperor's decision to confer the electoral vote upon Bavaria. He seemed anxious to know specifically what prince had interposed, so if the letters had been a little fuller they would have produced a greater effect.
With regard to the idea of marrying Leopold, he said they had first arranged the marriage with the emperor's son; they profess to have broken it off at my request. But what about this? I shall keep a sharp look out to see if these things are true, since all the advices which we princes receive are not infallible. This is indeed important and calculated to excite amazement. If I am deceived it is a huge trick; neither I nor my son will suffer it, we shall become perpetual enemies of the whole house of Austria and shall pursue our revenge to the death.
As regards the marriage, they have shown me letters written by the Catholic to the pope praying for the dispensation; that Father Maestro wrote from Rome to the Spanish ambassador, telling him that the matter was adjusted, but the arrival of the news of the disturbances in parliament about religion and a war against the Spaniards upset everything. If all these things are fictions, one can only say that they are the biggest rascals in the world. A private gentleman would disdain and blush to do such things, for he would be breaking his word; how much more a great prince, whose interests also require this marriage, and that is why I have believed it more readily and built more strongly upon it.
I touched on the advantages they derive from delay, their object to drag the matter on for ever, their habit and facility of colouring their delays, their interest in the negotiations lasting a long while, the artifice with which they proceed in all the items of news to which they give birth, the number of instruments captured by them in such a sorry way, whom they employ everywhere, and similar things, ending by saying that if his Majesty's inveterate prudence was not more capable of divining this than the tongue or brain of any one else soever, I should not have passed the limits dictated by modesty and respect.
The king remarked, As regards the Palatinate they have shown me letters written by the Catholic to the emperor, professing peculiar anxiety to satisfy me. But indicating by a gesture that he feared for the electoral vote in particular and Cæsar's harshness, he said: The emperor's ambassador is at Brussels. I will try to have the matter despatched in the shortest way possible; in fine if there is any artifice I shall declare myself, and as it is, they have gone so far that I must see what steps to take.
I am sending Digby to Spain and charged him to show all diligence, and I was amazed to find when I arrived here that he had not started. But he may leave any moment. I have charged him to bring the negotiations to an end, because I must and will know everything, and I can have no more delay about the Palatinate. Orders for arming are already issued, for which I have a great weight on my back, as 800,000 crowns have already been spent in making provisions of munitions or something similar, and with that, he shrugged his shoulders in a very expressive manner. I will do everything in my power and I hope God will help me, and if I find that I have been deceived I will use my teeth and nails. He said this with great warmth.
At this point I suggested that the events in the Grisons might serve as an example, and we could also see the result of the negotiations in Germany. Instead of restoring the Valtelline, the Spaniards had subdued those people and the country. He answered that the Swiss and Grisons had also been much to blame, his Agent Wake, everyone else and even the book recently published at the Hague called Cancellaria Hispanica (fn. 1) admitted as much. I also admitted that those people, in their desperation, had not acted wisely, and had not hearkened to the advice of their good friends.
But I said that their desperation was only caused by the delays of the Governor of Milan and President Dole, and the postponement in fulfilling the promises so solemnly made in Spain, while, with their usual artifices and powerful means, they excited impatience and tried to stir up the people in order to avail themselves of the pretext and do what they have done to the loss of those poor people and the community. So it was perfectly clear where the principal fault lay. I then spoke of the last new treaty made at Milan (fn. 2) when the Grison ambassadors said they did not know what they had signed and swore that they had not discussed or agreed to many of the articles, telling him that various persons in the communes were not satisfied and had sent to France.
The king seemed anxious that they should not be satisfied and deplored the wretched state of that affair, calling it the most prejudicial blow suffered by Christendom for many years past. He said that the new treaty was a filthy thing, a loathsome and base compact (un sporchezzo, un impiastro stomacoso, indegno), and when they showed it to him he refused to read it, thinking it shameful to show and speak about it. But he said: I cannot embroil myself in so many things. I will tell you what I have done in the matter. I have ordered my Ambassador Doncaster to return to France one of these days, aud to do all in his power to bring about peace in that kingdom and to urge that king to force the fulfilment of the promises. He is going to Lyons as you will have heard. He professes that he can effect both, but I laugh at it and do not believe he can manage so much; unless he makes peace with his subjects what can he attend to elsewhere.
His Majesty thus gave me to understand that he could not go any further for the sake of those interests, although he is equally sensible of the need, because he has so great a burden on his shoulders, and unless the Most Christian, the republic and the Duke of Savoy (who would do better to apply himself to the Grisons than in exciting alarm in Geneva and the Pays du Vaud, as he told the person (fn. 3) who acts as a kind of agent for the duke here) quite fail to play their part together, he hoped all would turn out well in the end, and that great prejudice would be removed; while he will do what he can for the Palatinate.
I replied as instructed, more for the purpose of showing confidence than of acquainting him precisely with the facts, and that it might serve as an example for the Palatinate, to which it is so closely related, not to press him or embarrass him further. A mutual understanding about affairs was the only salve for the wounds. Mansfeld had gone to Alsace and the Governor of Milan immediately sent troops to cut him off, though in the dead of winter, availing himself of the newly acquired pass. I referred to your Serenity's offices with the Duke of Savoy about the Bernese and the good effect produced. This pleased the king greatly and I understand that he immediately told his physician Mayerne, their agent here. He told me that he also had written strongly to his Highness on the subject, and doubtless the towns of Zurich and Berne will always be perfectly ready. He then repeated that he meant to finish his negotiations by the short way; he will assist the interests of Rhetia with his good offices to the extent of his powers and if everyone does his share he hopes, with God's help that any deceit will be exposed and remedied. I urged that all delays should be cut short and praised his Majesty's prudence and good intentions, assuring him repeatedly of the resolution and disposition of your Excellencies towards whom he again shewed the utmost graciousness both in word and deed.
To avoid fatiguing your Excellencies I will reserve all other news for future despatches. I will simply add that the Ambassadors of the States have resumed their negotiations with his Majesty, who referred them once more in gracious terms to the Commissioners of the Council, and now they are very hopeful of securing an adjustment satisfactory to both parties.
I have received the letters of the 18th February, which escaped from the rifling. I do not know if there was anything from your Serenity in the despatch of the 25th, but as the letters to the Secretary Surian at the Hague have come straight to me by mistake, I expect mine have gone to him. I have sent them to him immediately as there might be something of importance.
London, the 1st April, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
391. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I had audience of the Captain Pasha and urged him to punish the pirates, telling him of the pirates who took refuge under Navarino, and of the news from Scios which has just reached me in letters of the 21st ult. of the capture by six bertons of Barbary under the pirate Sanson of the ship Martinella, with the English Ambassador on board, showing him how necessary it was to hunt down these pirates and chastise them.
The Vigne of Pera, the 2nd April, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
392. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Holiness's brother (fn. 4) visited me three days ago. In the course of the conversation I pointed out to him that the Spaniards never desire anything but negotiations, and they never concluded anything. I instanced the marriage negotiation with England, wherein they were inwardly quite determined to do nothing, as the cardinal his son knew full well from his share in the commission thereupon, their only object being to prevent that king from helping the Palatine. We must never trust the promises of the Spaniards, and be well on our guard about their negotiations.
Rome, the 2nd April, 1622.
[Italian.]
April 2.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
393. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They find themselves unable to fortify Moscheniz for lack of money. In the Court here an English knight named Eliata has been staying for a long time. He is one of those who came with the ship with munitions to Trieste in the time of Osuna, who employed him, and who was sent several times to Spain and here to induce the emperor to get the Spanish to enter the Gulf and make a diversion. I think your Excellencies are well informed about him owing to the diligence of the Secretary Spinelli. He is a man of a restless and turbulent disposition and strongly prejudiced against the most serene republic. He has sounded all the ports, rocks and shoals of Istria, Dalmatia and Albania and claims a thorough acquaintance with the whole of that coast. He has visited it on numerous occasions guided by Vicenzo Griglianovich, the man who murdered the most Illustrious Veniero, (fn. 5) to make these soundings, especially in the port of Pola and the rocks of Veruda. He proposed a raid upon Pola, saying that if the Spanish fleet had it they could stop all Venetian shipping, and that they should besiege Peschiera by land; he offered himself to command at sea, being very skilful. Such were his plans, and in part they listened to them, but peace came. Yet he has persisted in the same ideas and stayed on here in order to obtain something from his Majesty, in which he succeeded though he did not get much. He has now left and gone to Flanders to marry. (fn. 6) I understand that he will proceed to Spain or Italy to propose the same ideas, but I have not yet been able to discover to which he will go first, but I will endeavour to send word at the earliest opportunity.
Vienna, the 2nd April, 1622.
[Italian.]
April 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
394. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received your Serenity's letters with instructions of the answer to be given to the king here, the English ambassador and the Prince of Orange. I performed the office with the first two yesterday evening. The king expressed his thanks and praised your Serenity's action in the Valtelline. The ambassador also thanked me and seemed to appreciate the reply given to Wotton, whose proposals may have been a good preparation for the request made in his king's letters. I simply kept to the things already said, endeavouring to prevent a renewal of the requests. The ambassador then praised your Serenity's conduct about the Valtelline, but he seemed doubtful about France and whether they would settle down there.
Early last week the Palatine sent his horses and baggage towards Germany, and he set out this morning before daybreak. The English ambassador told me that he had gone to Brill to embark, but as the wind is contrary I feel sure he will return to the Hague this evening. In his study the ambassador showed me the journey on a map, either by Hamburg or Bremen, and added in his usual confidential manner, perhaps he will go there, pointing to England, to meet the king incognito. He said he told me all this in confidence and asked me to keep it secret. I thanked the ambassador and said I wished his Majesty a most pleasant journey.
The ambassador also told me that he had as much money with him as he could take for the Duke of Brunswick, and he would find more in the Palatinate, but as regards the requirements of the Count of Mansfeld, he shrugged his shoulders and said he knew nothing about it.
The English ambassador has arrived at Brussels, but we have not heard anything of his proposals, the last letters thence not even stating whether he had yet had audience of the Infanta.
The Hague, the 4th April, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
395. PIERO GRITTI, late Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I arrived at Monaco on Thursday last and had an interview with the duke. Among other things he remarked, Since his imperial Majesty proposed to the King of England a congress at Brussels to be attended by ambassadors of all the powers concerned, to settle their differences, they have gone no further. No one knows whether this step pleases the King of England, and although he has had plenty of time to declare his wishes and answer the emperor's proposals so far we all remain in the dark. I answered that I heard from Spain that the Catholic favoured the cause of the Palatine and so England might prefer to have the negotiations there. The duke said, I have heard from England that Digby has left for Spain, which confirms what you say, but I do not know if Cæsar has given the Catholic power to treat in his name and still less if the Palatine has referred his affairs to England.
Augsburg, the 7th April, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
396. To the Ambassador in France and the like to the other Courts except Rome.
The count of Monterei, Ambassador Extraordinary of his Catholic Majesty to the pope, at his recent public audience at Rome gave instructions that all the cardinals should be invited except the French and Venetian. This caused a grave scandal at the Court. The excluded cardinals decided not to receive private visits from the Ambassador, and Cardinal Valiero carried this out.
Ayes, 137.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
The like to:
Spain, England, the Hague, Milan, Savoy, Naples, Florence, Vienna, Zurich.
[Italian.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
397. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Digby left recently for his embassy to Spain, but we have not yet heard of his embarking, as he goes by sea. Before he left he went about saying that he was neither French nor Spanish, that so long as the king seemed desirous of standing well with Spain he directed his offices to that end, and even now he is labouring with all zeal to bring the marriage to completion, but, if he perceives that the Spaniards are not proceeding with steadfast tread, he will at once send word frankly, they will remove the mask and if his Majesty changes he will be the first to second him. He told me further that he would rather marry the prince, who is of the right age and who cannot wait long because he is the sole heir to the throne, to any princess whatsoever in a month than wait a year for the Spaniard.
His instructions are specious and wide (larghe), more restricted for the Palatinate, but for the marriage he has liberty to stipulate the contract for his Highness in his own person and together with the ordinary Ambassador Aston he is to endeavour to obtain some binding promise in writing from the king, such as they claim to have had from his father.
Gondomar announces a fresh confirmation of his leave or order to return to Spain in about twenty days. This is thought to be due to Digby leaving before he expected and from the assurance that he is really going to oppose any more delays in the negotiations. He recently expressed great displeasure to a familiar, as other things also are not proceeding altogether to his satisfaction; because his Majesty is so much upset at the announcement that Dominis is departing hence, being sent to do some service to religion, saying that such an idea although untrue might easily take root by its mere expression, and in short this business could not harm him at Rome or elsewhere. After having laboured much to obtain the leave to depart, he told one who complained in his Majesty's name because he had tried to get Dominis away from here, you ought to thank me for ridding you of such a rogue. He was not solicited by me, but it was he who solicited me, and so I tried to bring him to such a point that his inconstancy, ambition and avarice might be recognised as well as the motives which guide him, and which prevail with him above all considerations of religion. If his Majesty has him hanged I shall not mind, let him do what he pleases.
The ambassador thus dexterously avoids giving greater offence to the king, and in any event achieves his intent. Dominis considers himself deluded in this manner, and agitated for some days (perhaps still, I do not know) by uncertainty about his retreat, has been much moved and curbing his tongue humbly submitted himself to his Majesty these last days and expressed his desire to throw himself again into his arms. Notwithstanding this it was announced that the king desired to give him the leave which he requested so earnestly. But actually in the assembly of the prelates here, after hearing their opinions and after a third signed declaration from Dominis that there was never any question of sending him to Rome for the said purpose, suggested by or to the king or any of the councillors or others in any way soever, they decided to expel him altogether from these realms, after a definite time, sending on word to Italy, while detaining him here, although deprived of all his benefices, in order to make his deceit manifest to the world in this way and show the emptiness of the said report, and for that purpose they have written to Wotton and to Wake at Turin.
They have appointed an ambassador for the negotiations at Brussels, Mr. Weston, a new councillor, who was in Germany a little while ago. They hear that Cæsar, who has arrived there for the same business, complains of his delay in going thither. And yet it is probable that he has no less intention of dragging out the time than President Dole had for the affair of the Grisons. Accordingly the king is urging on Weston's departure, but in the stir of such an imperial embassy there seems no other liberty for the moment than to make a conditional armistice. Some say that the king does not incline thereto, but it is perfectly clear that he asked for it at Brussels through his agent a while ago, and this same Digby told me that he feared they would find points among the conditions difficult to overcome, and whatever they were they would certainly be pernicious for Mansfelt's forces and Brunswick's and for the levies which are not yet even made. Accordingly the Palatine will not readily consent thereto; but on this side I believe they would incline to one without much reluctance in the constant hope of facilitating the restitution by such means, and still more owing to the ever increasing difficulty of recovering what has been lost by force and to shirk the burden, as they have no means of raising money adequate for the crisis, and owing to its scarcity Chichester and everyone else who is ready to start has to put it off.
The Queen of Bohemia has written to the Infanta at Brussels recommending the interests of her husband and these negotiations. The reply was courteous and friendly, though they do not say here whether it was written or verbal, calling her Countess Palatine, and merely expressing the hope of enjoying the same friendship and confidence with her as with her mother Queen Anne.
Last week the prince was formally declared a Councillor, the king employing him in the affairs of the government in a remarkable manner. (fn. 7)
The Ambassador Doncaster, being pressed as he declares by the Most Christian to return, is trying to get the deputies of la Rochelle to leave the kingdom, in order to facilitate his negotiations with that monarch. The Ambassador Trilliers has also asked for this saying it is not possible for his master to incline to any negotiations while they remain here. Accordingly they have secretly advised them to go, and they are about to leave. They presented a paper to his Majesty showing by examples what little reason they had to trust any promises. He sent a reply that he could not tell them everything but that they may rely upon him and be of good hope.
London, the 8th April, 1622.
Postscript.—News has just arrived that the emperor's ambassador has started on his way hither from Brussels. Accordingly Weston's departure is postponed and they are preparing to receive the other with great honour.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
398. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
From what his Majesty said to one of his leading ministers after my last audience, relating some particulars of my office and showing how much he valued the advices, it seems clear that the participation of such matters will prove helpful, provided they are weighty and actual, and that one is free to use them at favourable opportunities without affectation and without the necessity of asking for frequent audiences.
Moreover this has coincided with the confirmation, published generally in letters from Rome, that the Spaniards while making a show of soliciting the dispensation are really trying to postpone it, as by means of delay they expect to derive greater advantages here than hitherto. This and other proceedings which appear on every hand, together with the rumour of a proposed league against the Protestants supply them with material for reflection.
In addition to this there is another matter, although they profess not to believe it, notwithstanding that they have some confirmation. A certain Scottish gentleman (fn. 8) has come post from Spain, leaving behind his property there, a Catholic who has been absent for many years, to advise the king, who heard him privately with great attention, to stand on his guard and not to trust the Spaniards too much, affirming that the large fleet which they are preparing, is certainly intended to strike a blow at these realms, saying he will be content to go to prison and be hanged if it is not so, and if it had not already been discussed by the Council there. But in that case the report alone would suffice to divert it, and the present time might not be very suitable, although great disorder and corruption prevail here and they are very ill provided. Some of the Protestant leaders have also observed that for some days past the Catholics have been making an extraordinarily extensive purchase of horses.
The ambassadors of the States, on the strength of the latest instructions from the Hague, have shown more disposition to give satisfaction. At their audience of the king they received a most favourable reply and their negotiations seem to be in good train. They seem to depend more upon the style to be adopted in the Indies henceforward than upon past events. When they asked the king to withdraw his commission to the earl of Oxford to arrest their ships, they obtained his promise, but the fulfilment being delayed either through forgetfulness or intentional dilatoriness on the part of ministers, it happened that the Vice Admiral of the fleet having with him three ships to serve for Digby's voyage, fell in with one of the Dutch returning from the East and arrested it without a fight, as it was rather in confusion than armed, and brought it into the Downs. (fn. 9) It was announced to be worth 200,000l., but actually the value does not exceed 20,000l. His Majesty immediately sent Edmondes, the Secretary of the Council, to express his sorrow to the ambassadors at the event, adding that it must not upset the negotiations, the commissioners shall attend first to giving them satisfaction, the order has been immediately withdrawn and such mistakes shall not occur again. The ambassadors confined themselves to speaking to the commissioners, expressing their regret, and saying that they could not continue any negotiations until the ship was released. The commissioners expressed their willingness to continue the negotiations but the ambassadors absolutely refused and pressed for a fresh audience of his Majesty which they had this morning resulting in the release of the ship. They have just informed me that the king spoke to them in the most friendly manner and said he would not abandon them and would attend to anything else they might desire. I will reserve a more exact report of this for my next despatch as I have not had time to learn more. I may add that at the first audience, when they pointed out the ascendency of Spain and of all the house of Austria, and how it demanded attention, and if his Majesty abandoned them they could no longer resist, which would eventually result in grave prejudice to these realms and to the general peace. He answered by assuring them that he desires and always has desired their preservation, that he has more reason to distrust the Spaniards than they have and loved them no more than the Dutch, but he did not proceed to any more binding obligations. Such expressions and still more the action recorded above show very clearly that his Majesty never really meant to have a quarrel with them, but merely made a show which he may have thought would help the negotiations in hand, as I have frequently written, and with the object of providing food also for Rome and the Spaniards, although the latter, for their own purposes, have greatly exaggerated the reports.
London, the 8th April, 1622.
[Italian; the parts in italics deciphered.]
April 8.
Consiglio di X.
Lettere di
Ambasciatori.
Venetian
Archives.
399. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the heads of the Council of Ten.
While acknowledging the receipt of your Excellencies' letter of the 6th February, I have to add to what I wrote to you on the 11th and 18th ult., and to what I wrote to the Senate last week about Dominis, the idea that in going to Rome he will broach the subjects mentioned these last days is much weakened, although it seems certain that the design was actually prepared. It may have disappeared because if the aspect of affairs has changed he might not consider it to be for his own advantage to trouble the republic at present, even if we did not entertain any doubt about his present altered behaviour being merely feigned. The Spanish ambassador, since the strong feeling shown by the king upon the subject, beyond what he imagined, says that it is enough for him to have exposed Dominis as a rogue who turns with the wind of ambition or avarice, and professes to have given him up altogether, but possibly in order to have him chased hence more readily. This will occur and the decision on the subject has been drawn up, although not yet imparted to him owing to the king's indisposition and it remains secret. The said ambassador may either intend to interest himself further in the matter, without appearing to do so, or, in order not to injure himself here, get the whole thing placed in the pope's hands and depend solely upon his Holiness, at whose feet the said Dominis (in the confusion that has made him contradict himself on more than one occasion, just as I believe it has made him change his plan of asking for passports of the other ambassadors and of me) said he would go and throw himself, without asking for any guarantees, confessing his errors and asking for mercy, trusting to the pity and compassion of his Holiness. If the correspondence between him and the said Spaniard was a fact, the latter might have taken from him the letters and other things which he had and consequently squeezed the juice out of him, and might then desire no more than his complete ruin. If I can discover something further from the French ambassador, as your Excellencies suggest, I will not fail to do so but knowing him as I do I feel sure that either he will tell me nothing more, or else not without concerting with others, so that it is not likely to serve any good purpose; but after the departure hence of this man, which cannot, I think, be long delayed, I shall be able to extend my observations elsewhere and then this can be done.
London, the 8th April, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 8.
Consiglio di X.
Criminale.
Venetian
Archives.
400. In the Council of Ten.
That Antonio Foscarini, knight, son of the late Nicolo, accused of having secretly and frequently conferred with strangers by day and night, in their own residences and elsewhere, in this city and on the main, in disguise and in his ordinary clothes, and of having revealed the closest secrets of the republic to them by word of mouth and in writing, and of receiving money from them, be arrested, and should it not be possible to capture him, that notice be left at his house charging him to present himself at the prison of the chiefs of this Council within the next three days to defend himself against the aforesaid charges, as otherwise, on the expiration of that period legal proceedings will be instituted despite his absence. In the event of his presenting himself or being seized, that he be made over to our Inquisitors of State, with all the usual and accustomed clauses.
Ayes, 15.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 9.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
401. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are now considering the choice of the commissioners to go to Brussels. On their own behalf and for Bavaria they will agree to an armistice in the Palatinate, if Bavaria retains what he has, and if England will promise for Mansfelt. Bavaria will agree to this the more readily from his fear that Mansfelt may invade his own duchy.
Vienna, the 9th April, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 A book, the title whereof is Cancellaria Hispanica, wherein are contained divers letters of the emperor's and others, which were intercepted by the Count Mansfelt.—Digby to Calvert on the 29th May. State Papers, Foreign: Germany (empire).
2 Signed on the 22nd January, 1622, see Dumont: Corps Diplomatique, V, pt. ii, pages 406, 407.
3 Giovanni Francesco Biondi. See Vol. XIV. of this Calendar, page 459.
4 Orazio Lodovisio, father of Ludovico Lodovisio the Cardinal, a senator of Bologna and general of the Church. Ranke: Hist. of the Popes (Bohn) ii, page 307; iii. page 335.
5 Christoforo Veniero, whose galley was surprised by the Uscocks in the port of Mandre, in the island of Pago. All on board were murdered, Veniero being put to death afterwards with peculiar barbarity. Nani: Historia della Republica Veneta, Bologna, 1680, pages 14, 15.
6 Elliot married a daughter of Mr. Ward in Flanders. He also had a commission from the Count of Altaun to erect a college of noblemen and gentlemen of the English nation for the Militia Christiana.—Trumbull's despatches of the 28th February and 18th March old style. State Pavers. Foreign: Flanders.
7 Charles was apparently admitted as a regular member of the Privy Council on March 26/April 5, or Tuesday of the same week in which Lando wrote this despatch. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, page 362.
8 His name was Thompson. Cal. S. P. Dom., 1619–23, page 366.
9 "I should have advertised your Lordship sooner of the taking of the Dutch East India ship this last week by two ships of his Majesty's in the Narrow Seas, under the command of Sir Henry Mervin and Capt. Porter, who were going down to Plymouth to transport my Lord Digby into Spain."—Calvert to Carleton, the 3rd April, 1622, old style. State Papers, Foreign: Holland.