Venice
May 1622, 20-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

322-334

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'Venice: May 1622, 20-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 322-334. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88834 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Contents

May 1622

May 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
460. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Relates deposition of Sultan Osman and reinstatement of his uncle Mustapha. In the consequent disturbances the embassies were in great danger. In kissing the hands of the new Sultan will rule himself by the action of the other ambassadors.
The Vigne of Pera, the 20th May, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
461. SIMON CONTARINI and GIROLAMO SORANZO, extraordinary, and ALVISE CORNER, ordinary Ambassadors in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador has called upon us. He spoke about the affairs of the Valtelline. In the course of the conversation he remarked that the Spanish ambassador in England had approached the king there to induce him to help the Huguenots against his Most Christian Majesty. Digby, the ambassador extraordinary of England, who will arrive here in a few days, brings various matters to treat of, namely the marriage of the prince, the introduction of liberty of conscience into England, the truce with the Dutch, the restitution of the Palatinate, and the abstention of the Dutch in future from trading in the Indies.
He said that really they are playing with the king there over the marriage and he knows it full well, but he wishes to derive advantage from it with the parliament of his kingdom, as while telling them that he can obtain some millions thence by the marriage, enabling him to put his affairs straight, it will offer to abandon the whole business if they give him an equal sum of money. (Disse che qui veramente si tratta da burla con questo Re di matrimonio et che egli ben lo sa ancora; ma che si vuol proffittare di questo concetto con il Parlamento del suo Regno perche dicendo di poter havere di qua con il matrimonio qualche millioni, con quali aggiustarebbe le cose sue, si offerira quando riceva da lui un' altrettanto denaro, di abbandonare assolutamente questa pratica.)
The English ambassador has called upon us very courteously, expressing the greatest esteem for your Serenity.
Madrid, the 20th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
462. The Secretary of the English ambassador came into the Cabinet and said:
The ambassador being away for the sake of his health had sent him to kiss the doge's hand, convey his good wishes and present letters. After the letters had been read, the secretary added that on the 28th ult. the Queen of Bohemia had given birth to a daughter, whom God had given to her after four sons.
In the absence of the doge the senior councillor Vicenzo Dandolo replied. They rejoiced at the news given. The letters should be considered and a reply sent. With this the secretary took leave and departed.
Owing to a weakness of the stomach my doctor advised me a change of air and so I have come to the neighbourhood of Padua. An urgent matter has arisen which would bring me to your Serenity did I not feel certain that the pen would suffice. I therefore beg you to receive these lines from my secretary, with the copy of a letter from Count Ernest of Mansfelt to Sir Horace Vere, general of his Majesty's auxiliaries in the Palatinate. The times the Senate has assured me that they wished the count to remain where he is and not to take him away; but this letter shows that he inclines to leave, unless the Senate makes provision in time. I have no doubt that they will and I hope they will make the count understand what they desire for the common interests and confirm him in his present service, contributing towards the maintenance of his men and so act the part of a true friend.
The 22nd May, 1622.
HENRY WOTTON.
Monsieur,
M. Flinck has arrived here and tells me that you ask me to send you at once 2,000 horse and 400 foot to succour Steinberg. The matter stands thus. I am ready to send to you and to the general of the King of Bohemia not only these but all the men I have, since I have no means of satisfying them and it seems useless to keep them here, more especially as I have entered the service of Venice and am about to proceed thither. Accordingly if you will send some one here to take the men I shall raise no objections, and you can use them for the King of Great Britain or the King of Bohemia, as you please.
From Germersheim, the 10th April, 1622.
ERNEST, COUNT OF MANSFELT.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Consiglio di X.
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
463. In the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Grant to Geronimo Vano in consideration of his services, of the power to release two exiles or two prisoners, except those under the ballot or confined for affairs of state, so that he may continue his good services.
Ayes, 12.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.464. Petition for reward of Geronimo Vano, who has laboured constantly in their service for five years, in which he has frequently exposed his life, and has frequently been promised rewards.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
465. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador designate for England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
During my stay at Turin they neglected nothing to honour your Serenity in my person. The prince and madame received me at Miraflores outside the city and gave a banquet attended by the chief lords of the court. The Cardinal Prince received me afterwards; he seemed inclined to go to Rome, but I dissuaded him. At my house I found refreshments sent by the duke. I responded to the persons who brought them, as at all the courts the smallest things have to be paid for at a high price. At Chambery, where Prince Thomas resides as governor, he sent his coaches to meet me with three senators. I paid my respects on the following morning. He told me that the duke had ordered his ambassador in France to follow the king, of whose visit to Lyons there was now little hope. He thought the Ambassadors of Mantua would leave Milan unsatisfied, which he considered a gain for himself. They escorted me out of the city just as I was met; hardly had I left when I met a courier from Spain with news of the taking of Roian, which has since been confirmed.
The troops of Lesdiguières are scattered about Dauphiné. They are said to number 6,000 foot and 500 horse. Each cavalryman receives a French crown per day, paid by the country. At Bonvisin, where I stopped a night, there was a company of cuirassiers and the commander received me courteously, while I entertained him and his officers. Nevertheless reasons for misgiving exist. Soldiers are everywhere, chiefly French. I find that the marshal, though highly esteemed by all is unpopular with some owing to his extortions for the purpose of enriching himself.
At Lyons I exchanged visits with the governors and learned that the Duke of Guise, who had passed through ten days before, is actively collecting forty tall ships against Rochelle. He took 100,000 crowns with him, 70,000 of them being remitted from Paris for this purpose. He will go with the fleet himself. M. de la Force was negotiating with M. de Sully for an accommodation with the king, placing in his hands all the strong places of Guienne except Rochelle, and asking to be made a Marshal with 200,000 crowns and I know not what else. The king had gone to Santafoes with a large army and hoped for its speedy surrender.
Hope of peace is universal here, and certainly the weakened Huguenots desire it. I do not know what the king thinks, now he is flushed with success, or his councillors, who are interested in the war.
I am told that a courier from Spain has passed, leaving letters of the 10th inst. About the Valtelline there is never any lack of good news. God grant that the results may correspond.
Deodati of Lucca, a merchant here, has been to express his regret at not having fulfilled his contract for wheat. He explained the difficulties he had encountered, and truly some are apparent.
I am going towards Orleans, a road which I am told is without danger. Thence I shall proceed to the sea by the shortest and quickest route.
Lyons, the 23rd May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
466. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is not known what will happen about the truce or armistice, as they have heard nothing more here beyond the arrival at Brussels of the imperial and English ambassadors. The last letters state that they have only had their first audience. The king's followers are very anxious because of his promise to place his affairs in the hands of his father-in-law, but they do not see how he can agree to an armistice, since he has put himself in the hands of the troops who would require to be fully paid up. Meanwhile they are anxiously awaiting news of the negotiations. I hear on good authority that the king is acting in complete accord with Prince Gabor.
Lord Chichester, whom the King of Great Britain is sending to the Palatinate in order to maintain the 8,000 foot and 1,600 horse, arrived here last Wednesday. His Excellency met him with a most noble company and he had audience on Thursday morning, which passed in compliments and in exhorting their High Mightinesses to help the Palatine. He used an interpreter, as he speaks nothing but English. He left for the Palatinate on Saturday morning. With him went Burlamachi, a merchant of London, to make the provisions at Frankfort or at Nürenberg. They announce that the said ambassador had provision for 44,000l. sterling for three months, that is to say, 176,000 Venetian ducats.
The Hague, the 23rd May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
467. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Their High Mightinesses contemplate with much concern the tardiness with which the ministers and councillors of the King of Great Britain proceed in the matter of the East Indies, as they cannot come to a head while the ambassadors are always encountering fresh difficulties. To overcome them their Excellencies and the Prince of Orange counsel them to employ modesty, patience and phlegm, but they know that the offices of the Spaniards form a serious counterpoise, and that they strongly oppose a speedy termination of the business.
Some of the Assembly of the States, seeing the business drag on so long, have proposed to recall Aerssens and send him to your Serenity; but it was pointed out that this would ruin the whole affair, as another sent in his place would not readily grasp the situation, and it might even offend the King of Great Britain and the Council, increase the difficulties and notably prejudice the interests of these provinces. They are therefore in a dilemma, because they fear that your Serenity may take offence at the long delay.
The Hague, the 23rd May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
468. SIMON CONTARINI and GIROLAMO SORANZO, extraordinary, and ALVISE CORNER, ordinary Venetian ambassadors in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are expecting Lord Digby here shortly, the ambassador extraordinary of England. Accordingly Father Hyacinth is hastening his departure for Germany, as he does not wish to be here at the same time. They are preparing every outward satisfaction for the ambassador, because at present they are very uneasy about his king owing to the news that the Palatine has joined Mansfelt, which makes them anxious.
Madrid, the 25th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
469. To the Ambassador in England.
Wotton previously spoke to us in the Cabinet about our negotiations to engage Mansfelt, owing to the fear that we should divert him from his service. Our reply should have dissipated that fear, as well as what you said to his Majesty, who recognised the advantages that his son-in-law would obtain and charged you to thank us. Now by means of old letters which the ambassador has presented to us through his secretary, he makes a fresh office. Although we do not consider it opportune to make any reply to this, yet we wish you to have all the particulars, and as it clearly appears that Mansfelt has written the said letter for his own advantage, you will have an opportunity for showing our steady persistence in our first intentions.
We have already advised you that the Spaniards suggested the Catholic's sister for the Archduke Leopold, though they have so long conducted negotiations to give her to the Prince of Wales. They have now offered her to the grand duke, and these various proposals show constant change of purpose. This will serve for information.
That copies of these presents be sent to the secretaries at the Hague and Zurich for their instruction.
Ayes, 99.Noes, 0.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Consiglio di X.
Parti Secrete.
Venetian
Archives.
470. To the Ambassador in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 29th ult. Commend his diligence about the cipher and other matters.
Ayes, 14.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
471. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They seem determined to continue the war here. We shall see if the Rochellese can hold out after losing their leaders, or whether they will decide to hand themselves over to England, a thing they have never consented to even in their worst misfortunes; but there is some talk of it now. The King of Great Britain would be compelled to take this up, as the states can appeal to his coronation oath to recover the White town, that is la Rochelle.
The Huguenots are not content with the English ambassador because they do not need offices but force, and they think he acts with too much subtlety and patience, as he has not been able to conduct any negotiations since his arrival, but is taken from place to place, while they carry on their operations without listening to his negotiations. But the Huguenots hope that if their difficulties increase the Spaniards themselves, through English councillors, will induce that king to take some steps in their favour.
The king has complained to the States of the action of the Dutch at Bordeaux, and claims his right to lay hands on those ships in his port. They have decreed that in future the Dutch shall do as the English, unlading their ordnance at Blaye, treating them with as much mistrust as the English.
Liburno, the 27th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
472. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
From conversation with the English ambassador it seems to me that the chief object of his negotiations is to bring about an accommodation for the sake of the Palatinate and the Valtelline as they hope then that the mere report of a union between France and England will bring about the restitution of both. He told me that this would facilitate the general tranquillity, the proposal was more advantageous for the Valtelline than the Palatinate; his master would direct his efforts in every direction, but if this opportunity was lost and the Spaniards gave up the Palatinate the Valtelline might not prove so easy a business. I adapted my opinions in order to win his confidence.
Liburno, the 27th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
473. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Vercellini, a gentleman of Lady Arundel, arrived here four days ago before your Serenity's letters of the 28th and 29th ult., having been sent in haste by the countess to her husband the earl marshal with an account of all that passed at Venice and copies of the narrative presented by her and the Senate's reply. He immediately went about publishing the matter and told me also. Previously there was a report in Court against the lady, based more particularly upon letters from Venice to the Ambassadors of France and the States. With the earl marshal, who had already expressed to me and declared everywhere his great indebtedness to the most serene republic, I delivered my commission very fully. He thanked me in the most cordial manner imaginable, saying that he and all his house would be eternally devoted to your name and would ever look for opportunities to serve you, even with their blood. He told me that the Ambassador Wotton had written him a letter full of praise of his wife, but if she had shown less spirit she would have incurred the slur and an indelible affront with other consequences. He did not believe in any malice, but the advice given her was not good or friendly, and so forth, in fact he complained bitterly, suggesting that it might not advantage him, as it was not good for his Majesty either to have such ministers. He added that the king had been much moved and would have sent to thank me, he thought. When I offered to speak to his Majesty whenever he chose to ask me, he answered that it would be quite superfluous, and also to read him the decree of the Senate, as he had already seen an exact copy. I hear indeed that the king said, if the imputation had been true he would have expected the republic, in the confidential relations existing, to say a word to the ambassador first, and if Wotton knew of it fifteen days before, as he professed, he should have warned the countess earlier.
The Secretary Calvert came to this house this morning to thank me in the king's name for the honour shown to the lady. He said that it would be reciprocated cordially upon occasion. They recognised how sincere and steady was the friendship of the republic towards his Majesty, who would express himself more fully to me at the first opportunity. I answered in a suitable manner, assuring him of the esteem of your Excellencies, the innocence of the lady and the worthy education of her sons, promising to express myself more fully at the same opportunity.
From what the secretary distinctly said to me and others also, I gather that much attention and blame attach themselves to Wotton, and for other reasons also, as I have already suggested, and he may easily be removed from Venice. But his Majesty does not always show what he has in his mind, and for the moment he may not come to any decision, or if he does he may not carry it out immediately, according to his custom, especially as Wotton is creditor for certain amounts which it would not be easy to give him.
The populace, however, who do not love the Earl of Arundel and who look askance at the stay of the countess, not under the mantle of your Serenity but in Italy, for various important reasons, have made up their minds that there is something more behind, and after hearing my explanations they stick to this opinion, many saying that the republic is prudent and knows how to dissimulate. But all value and appreciate the honour shown to their nation to the great advantage of your Excellencies. I have devoted my energies to relating the truth, absolving one party without blaming the other, thinking that the public service required this. Without any encouragement on my part Vercellini told me that they did not put every particular into the narrative and altered some things for the gratification of the ambassador. He offered some difficulty in signing it, fearing that it might prejudice him. At the beginning he told me many particulars corresponding with what your Excellencies send me and hinted at the same end which you suggested he might have.
London, the 27th May, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
474. GIROLAMO LANDO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
After his Majesty had welcomed the new Spanish ambassador (who has not yet responded to my office) the old one received great honours, dining with the king at Greenwich, and with the prince and the Marquis of Buckingham, in familiar fashion, I might almost say like a second favourite. On taking leave he received presents of jewels not only from the king but from his Highness, and as he had given some to various ladies, he received others in return. Finally after banquetting with the Duke of Lennox on the day of his departure, he was conducted out of the city with unusual honour by the duke and by many other gentlemen and their wives. All this is a sign of their hope or rather desire for the marriage, though the generality look upon it with more wrath than affection. He is to be taken to Spain, where he has heard of Digby's arrival, by two royal ships, which are being got ready, (fn. 1) but under the pretext that they are not yet in order it is thought he will go about visiting his devotees in the kingdom for several days, while some fear that he will never go. The Catholics are not very content with him at the moment, as he has neither asked nor obtained the favours which they expected. Colonna, who remains behind, possesses neither the nature nor the credit that Gondomar has enjoyed, but he will have the same powerful instruments and means here.
Before Gondomar went away he left a report that Chiavenna was restored, and there was a rumour of some movement among the Grisons. Many have asked me about it, but I confined myself to the public advices. Gondomar also left a report that Mansfelt was defeated, the Palatine slain and all Cæsar's affairs flourishing, at which the king for some hours appeared most deeply affected, but afterwards news came of Tilly's complete discomfiture and capture, the capture of all his baggage and some guns including two lost at the battle of Prague. His Majesty sent to inform the ambassador, laughingly telling him to temper his joy a little. Now by letter from the Agent Trumbull at Brussels they learn that Tilly was not really taken, although they believe him wounded, and that his troops, though beaten and dispersed, rallied afterwards under Cordova, while Mansfelt, believing them undone, had gone to relieve Hagheno, given to him by the King of Bohemia, as a member of the Palatinate, besieged by Leopold, who hearing this, abandoned it. Cordova in a fight with Baden restored the spirit of his troops and came off victorious, capturing several guns and much baggage, though the margrave kept a considerable force together. So Vere writes that the Spaniards have no reason to boast of this victory as they lost heavily. However in Brussels they lighted bonfires and showed other signs of rejoicing, a lieutenant of Cordova having taken to his Highness and the Marquis Spinola three cornets and two flags, but their joy was soon turned to sorrow on hearing of the army of the States being under their very eyes, the smoke being visible a mile from the city, striking terror into everyone. The poor peasants and the nuns were running for refuge to the town, bringing their scanty possessions with them. Prince Henry and M. di Marchet are burning villages, the provinces being void of troops, the Count of Bergh, who had crossed the Rhine, having the best cavalry with him, the rest being in the Palatinate, while they have little money to raise new regiments.
It is said that Mansfelt's army through plundering and not fighting is losing its discipline, and if the Spaniards let things go in favour of the Palatine it would be a sign that they desired restitution, but if they abandoned their own country to maintain the Palatinate, any person of judgment could draw his own conclusions.
Since his first audience Weston, who is lodged and defrayed by the infanta, has been referred to negotiate at Court with the deputies, the Chancellor Pecchius and another, and he writes that things are proceeding very well. It is announced that the emperor would rather treat for a general peace than a truce. They fear some additional trick, and Weston left here with power simply to make a truce, on the terms that every one should lay down his arms until peace was concluded, merely leaving garrisons in the places occupied, whereby they say that Mansfelt will be able to retain a considerable number of his men. But the point is for him to have money and, although he seemed desirous of being included in the treaty, that he shall agree to what is arranged, as once his men are disbanded it will be difficult to collect them again.
They have asked for further particulars about the proposals of the Landgrave of Hesse's son, who spoke in particular against the ascendancy of Bavaria, with the electoral vote. Accordingly he has sent to his father and until fresh instructions arrive he will travel about the kingdom and go to see Scotland also. I am assured that he has not said a word about a marriage.
Chichester left with the title of ambassador to the empire rather than to the emperor, and to all the princes concerned. He will pass through Holland to see the queen, and also Burlamachi, who will receive ten per cent, for all his advances. He professes to be paying 40,000l. down and 15,000l. every month, but it may not be more than I reported. They ought to spend this rather to maintain Manen, Frachendal and Haydelbergh than for a large undertaking, with the view of helping fortune when she appears rather than of opposing adversity. They are postponing a reply to Colonel Gray's requests for money to maintain the army, in Mansfelt's name. He enjoys some honour in this kingdom on his own account, in addition to the levies I reported and recommendations upon affairs in general.
The Rochellese are making themselves felt in these parts, severely harrying all French ships, even attacking those passing from Calais to Dover. They captured one ship laden with silk cloth and other merchandise for the London merchants, estimated to be worth 25,000l. to 30,000l., so that those interested make loud complaints. In their captures they detain as prisoners the French and Spaniards, letting the subjects of this king go absolutely free, plundering all others but not taking their lives, as for example with a Modanese priest who said he was a subject of your Serenity, so that people have gone about saying with the usual malice that their commissions were to harm neither Protestants nor Venetians. The French ambassador has remonstrated strongly to his Majesty, saying that if he did not remedy this they would have to stop intercourse. He complained that they were received and favoured in the ports, accordingly orders have been issued that they be no longer admitted or allowed to sell their goods in this realm. They will try and obtain compensation, possibly punish some who encouraged them and even send out ships to keep the coasts clear. The sixty Dutch ships which passed are said to have been mostly traders, convoyed by some men-of-war.
The ambassadors of the States have finally prevailed about the demand for 100,000 crowns of the merchants here, having recourse to the king's judgment.
It seems that the most Christian only thinks of following up his good fortune, although they say in his heart he is determined upon the recovery of the Valtelline. As it is not thought fitting for the capture of places and such things to take place before Doncaster's eyes, and as he writes that he is wasting time and labour, the king has given him liberty to return if he sees that he can do no good, and in that case they will send back the ordinary ambassador Herbert, or let him stay away, as he pleases.
On the news of the departure of the Ambassador Valaresso to relieve me I received no ordinary honour from the Marquis of Hamilton, the Lord Marshal, the Lord Chamberlain, the Secretary of State and other councillors, ministers and gentlemen, who came to honour my table with most noble ladies. I tried to uphold the public honour, though it was a heavy burden on my slender fortune. The prince has honoured me with his portrait, and in the interests of your Serenity I have procured some vanity for the house of the Marquis of Buckingham, though personally I would rather have avoided it.
London, the 27th May, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 28.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
475. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have directed the Count of Suorzemburgh to come straight here on his way back from England and not to stay at Brussels as at first intended, professing that they have given the infanta full powers to treat with the English ambassador. But the real reason for this course, as his Majesty himself has said, is because he knows for certain that England does not mind his son-in-law remaining bereft of his dominions and chastened, and he neither makes nor will make any request for him, but all his concern and his requests are for his grandchildren, and that is what inclines him to proceed by force. The Catholic ambassador here says the same, and they flatter themselves that their ideas will meet with no obstacle from that crown (ma la vera causa e come Sua Maestà medesima ha detto, che lo fa, perche sa di certo che Inghilterra non si cura che il genero resti privo dei stati e castigato, e che per lui non fa ne fara alcuna instanza, ma che solo preme e insta per i figlioli, e per cio si inclina proseguir inanti con le armi: et quello Ambasciator Catholico lo stesso afferma, et si promettono non ricever alcun ostaculo a lor pensieri da quella Corona).
Vienna, the 28th May, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
May 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
476. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A Flemish subject calling himself the Viscount de Lormes has arrived here from Candia. He told me about his offer to bring pirates to your Serenity's service, and of his obligation to recover the captured Venetian ships. He went to Scios, whither he thought the pirates had taken the said ship, and not finding it there he had come here to look for it. He ended by asking for money. As he brought no credentials I refused to have anything to do with him, telling him that I had no instructions. I intend to watch his proceedings.
The Vigne of Pera, the 28th May, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
477. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Prince Maurice remarked to me that he feared Mansfelt's forces could not possibly maintain themselves, and nothing much could be expected from the King of Great Britain. For my part, he told me, I could not possibly look for less. The King of England will do nothing, indeed he is more likely to do harm than good to the general interests and the particular ones of his son-in-law. The Ambassador Chichester, who passed this way, had no orders except to maintain Vere's troops, and that will merely serve to excite discontent among the men of Mansfelt and Brunswick, when they see these others paid and get nothing for themselves. So it will do harm all round and I see clearly that there is nothing else to expect. The States have done everything in their power. We have too great a burden on our shoulders.
He also seemed greatly concerned about the negotiations which the King of Great Britain has on foot at Brussels for a truce or an armistice. If the Austrians obtained this, he said, it would produce nothing but evil consequences. He told me he had gathered from the Ambassador Chichester that he had instructions to urge the Palatine in the strongest possible manner to agree to a truce or an armistice. He remarked, That is the object of this embassy and the King of England will see clearly enough afterwards what he has done for his son-in-law by this armistice. He expressed a hope that the King of Bohemia would not consent, as he could not do so without injuring himself seriously, and it would not be in his power to yield this point. If he does so, he said, he is ruined by his own troops, if he does not, his father will abandon him and cease to pay the 8,000 men in the Palatinate; he will remain bare of all assistance, with his country destroyed, abandoned to the mercy of fortune.
The English ambassador received his letters from Venice yesterday by way of Cologne and Amsterdam. Wotton tells of the reply given to his requests on behalf of the Palatine, and so does Calandrini. The ambassador said to me that your Serenity's help would have been the best remedy to sustain the forces of Mansfelt. The Ambassador Chichester, as I might have observed, was no courtier, but was chosen by his king for his knowledge of war and that he might help Vere. I have learned from him that Wotton has resolved to write to his king to induce him to express himself more clearly and perform an office with the Ambassador Lando.
The Hague, the 30th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
478. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador remarked to me that the Duke of Bavaria was not moved by altogether disinterested motives and the Spaniards would rather give the electorate to the Duke of Neuburg.
The Hague, the 30th May, 1622.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
479. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador designate for England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I arrived here, at Orleans, yesterday evening. The governor, the Count of St. Pol, called upon me this morning. He told me of the surrender of Santafoes, Clerac and Monte di Marcan, through M. de la Force, who has returned to favour with some recompense. (fn. 2) The king entered Santafoes on the 25th and will shortly proceed with his army to Guienne and Languedoc. He seemed not to know the conditions of surrender and without showing curiosity I expressed my gratification at the news. I think his silence shows that the terms were not bad.
M. de Bethune has arrived at the same hostelry where I am staying, on his way home. He came to call upon me and confirmed the governor's news. He added that they were negotiating for peace, the English ambassador being at Rochelle for the purpose, but no one says anything about the Valtelline. They all keep silence as if it did not concern France and if I raise the subject they make an apathetic reply. It is desirable that these internal troubles should end, if an evil born with France can ever end. I am sending these letters on foot to Lyons to catch the ordinary.
Two days ago I fell in with M. de Crequi on the road, on his way to visit M. de Lesdiguieres, perhaps about the peace negotiations. I am debating my journey to the sea.
Orleans, the last day of May, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Nonsuch and Assurance were first selected for this duty, but subsequently Pennington's ship the Victory was chosen to replace the former.—Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, pages 377, 392.
2 Sainte Foy (Gironde), Clairac (Lot et Garonne) and Mont de Marsan (Landes). La Force was made a marshal of France.