Venice
July 1622, 2-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

361-372

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: July 1622, 2-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 361-372. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88837 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

July 1622

July 2.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
514. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
At Brussels the English ambassador proposed an armistice in the two Palatinates only; as this would only benefit the Palatine and his adherents the infanta expressed great astonishment at the proposal, and wanted to send to England to assure herself of the king's intentions. But the Englishman succeeded in preventing this and withdrew his proposal, creating thereby the impression that the idea was his for the Palatine's benefit. They have written from here to the infanta that they suggest an armistice whilst the congress sits for the states of those taking part, with the object of protecting the dominions of the ecclesiastics.
Vienna, the 2nd July, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
July 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
515. GIOVANNI FRANCESCO TRIVISANO, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A Persian ambassador has just arrived, who has come from Spain, they say. He is an Englishman. He has with him his wife and eight persons in all. The Grand Duke fetched him from the hostelry and brought him to the palace, where he is lodged and defrayed. It is not clear as yet whether he has come here expressly with letters of credence, as an ambassador or whether he is merely passing through this city on his way to his master. (fn. 1)
Florence, the 2nd July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 4.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
516. The English ambassador came into the Cabinet, accompanied by the sons of the Countess of Arundel. After they had been given seats above the Savii of Terra Ferma, the ambassador said:
The king my master was much gratified by the honours shown by the republic to the Countess of Arundel after the false and scandalous report against her, and has written this letter of thanks.
After the letter had been read the ambassador resumed: His Majesty desires me to add that if a similar affair occurs to any of the republic's subjects in England he will be glad to make a suitable return. The Earl of Arundel also writes that he would like to hasten thither to thank your Serenity and again see this city, which he admires so greatly, but as he is unable, owing to his occupations in his Majesty's secret councils, he sends his sons, and begs you to accept their devotion.
The doge replied that they had only done what was right in the matter of the countess. Doubtless his Majesty would have done the same in like case. We highly value his affection for us, to which we heartily respond. We also thank the earl and embrace his sons. They have so well acquired the manners and tongue of this country that we consider them very Venetians. He added other courteous expressions.
The ambassador replied in the same strain and then, drawing somewhat nearer to the doge he said: Although the present occasion is not suitable, yet I am instructed never to approach your Serenity without reminding you of the King of Bohemia. The doge said they had the best intentions and would do something.
After some English gentlemen had been admitted to kiss the doge's hand, the office terminated and the ambassador took his departure.
JAMES, King of Great Britain, etc., to ANTONIO PRIULI, Doge of Venice.
Our ambassador has told us of your kindness to the Countess of Arundel and Surrey. We desire to thank you for all you have done, and we shall not fail to do the like in similar case. The Earl of Arundel is especially delighted at the public honours accorded to his wife. His predilection for your city is shown by his sending his sons there to be educated, not only with our consent but with our approbation.
From the palace at Greenwich, the 10th June, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
517. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king has shown every honour to the English ambassador, promised to inform him of everything that takes place, and told him that what he would not do for him he would not do for any one else in the world to induce the ambassador to postpone his departure. But he excused himself saying he saw he was useless, and took leave with a courtesy becoming his noble condition. He left to-day after having dined with his Majesty in the house of the Prince of Joinville, the Prince of Condé and the Duke of Epernon also being present. He takes with him some silk and gold arras from the king's wardrobe, worth 10,000 crowns.
The ambassador announced that M. de Soubise was in England, but the king had kept him from all machinations which might prejudice France, although the Prince of Wales would entertain him as a kinsman of his house. However, this does not satisfy them here and they are somewhat suspicious, and some uneasiness remains, although this is the less owing to the slight consideration that the English enjoy at the present time (et si resta con qualche glosia, la qual si fa minore con la poca riputatione che ha hoggidi l'Inglese).
The governor of Calais, who is an old servant of the crown and of the late king, has refused a passage to the English, and has sent his serjeant major to tell his Majesty of this step. It has caused satisfaction and dissatisfaction according to the good or bad opinions of the individual.
Toulouse, the 4th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
518. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear that when Lord Chichester wrote to Don Gonsalvo de Cordova that he ought not to continue hostilities while the negotiations were proceeding at Brussels, Cordova replied that he had heard of the negotiations but had no orders to stop, and he would guide his conduct by the course of events. Tilly, to whom Chichester wrote to the same effect, said that he was the servant of the emperor and the Duke of Bavaria, and took his orders from them. The King of Bohemia sent word to Chichester that they could not trust the enemy and must be ready to meet blow with blow.
We do not hear much about Brussels. It seems that the Spaniards desire an armistice or pretend to, and Spinola has been constantly present at the congress; but they feel sure here that this is only in order to gain time and induce the King of Great Britain to do what they wish, while the troops of the Palatine, having no subsistence, will disband and scatter.
Their High Mightinesses and Prince Maurice are much disturbed and amazed by the news recently received that the Spaniards, with the consent of the King of Great Britain, are enlisting 4,000 of his subjects for their service. His Excellency told me this yesterday with great emotion, adding that one day the Spaniards would use the same men against that king himself.
The Hague, the 4th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
519. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Last Monday the 4th inst. the Cavalier Lando my predecessor left for Venice. His ability has won him the esteem of everyone, and he takes away a handsome present from the king. My pen cannot recount the praises which his merits deserve, but I will try to imitate him. He consigned to me the public papers, gave me much information and performed the necessary visits with me. His brother Agostino who remained here through his embassy shows how much profit a young man may derive in the Courts.
As I have no secretary I might have detained the Secretary Zon, who expressed his willingness to stay, but as I hope to have my own soon and as his own interests call for him, I did not think it right to impose this burden upon him. Sig. Francesco Grimani son of Sig. Piero remains, who accompanied me on my journeys to render himself more capable of the honours which have always pertained to his most noble house.
Some days ago his Majesty sent to Sig. Lando and myself a present of half a sturgeon, a very highly prized fish rare in this country and pertaining to the king alone, so the honour is no ordinary one.
Hitherto it has been so rainy and cold as to belie the present season, and it makes us fear a very bad harvest.
London, the 7th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
520. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The son of the Landgrave of Hesse has returned from Scotland, where he went to see the kingdom, and has been to call upon me. When I returned his visit he told me that he would shortly be leaving for Germany and meanwhile he was awaiting the return of a gentleman whom he sent to his father with the general reply which he received from the king here to his representations about the advancement of the house of Austria and the needs of Germany.
Soubise is constantly at the king's side importuning for some reply to his request for men and help recalling the promises already made. Some say that he offers la Rochelle and the restitution to England of the kingdom of France. Offers that are much more likely to have been made to the king than received by him. So far they have kept him waiting for an answer until the conclusion of the negotiations of the Ambassador Doncaster, who seems to all to be staying a long while in vain, without being able to obtain a reply or a second audience, which is a slight upon the king.
I understand that the Huguenots urge Soubise to return, and a leading nobleman told me that while lamenting the bitterness of the King of France against his party Soubise himself had told him that among other offers for a settlement the Huguenots had bound themselves, upon the restoration of peace in that kingdom, to go with their forces for the recovery of the Valtelline, engaging themselves upon such a notable service for France and in that way affording an assurance of their obedience.
Here they received news of a victory and afterwards of a great defeat sustained by Brunswick. The news at court, although they expect further particulars, is that Brunswick, gathering his force of 6,000 horse and 10,000 foot near Frankfort took Hoest and after building a bridge over the Main, made up his mind to cross, after much conflicting advice, so late that Tilly came up and engaged, the rear guard alone sustaining the fight. Brunswick's men gave way, the bridge broke under the confused multitude, many were drowned and others scattered in flight. 1,000 horse and 500 foot perished, and they lost 3 guns and the heavy baggage, but saved the money chest. They hope that the fugitives will come in and that by now Brunswick has joined Mansfeld. If so the loss will be somewhat discounted by their having crossed the river and joined the others, the two things the enemy chiefly wished to prevent. (fn. 2)
Before this happened, Chichester, ambassador of the king here, renewed the promise of an armistice from the Palatine, Mansfeld and Baden, but Tilly refused it saying that he had no instructions to accept. In this Court they seem to agree that the armistice cannot be extended to Brunswick, because he always keeps himself apart owing to his dependence upon the States and his obligations to them.
Owing to this fresh accident, and because every one of the ministers here says openly the army of the princes is inferior in numbers and discipline and in the ability of its commanders to that of the Imperialists, the king and Council insist more than ever upon the advisability of an armistice, with their customary hope that with the approaching conclusion of the marriage in negotiation with Spain the question of the restitution of the Palatinate will also be settled, two things which they consider here inseparable. But the truth is that the united princes cannot stay in that country whence all provisions and everything else have been cleared away. Accordingly if they could render their three fortresses safe the wisest think that they should enter Bavaria to live upon the enemy's country and create a diversion.
An action has occurred between some ships of Holland and of Dunkirk. We hear that the latter came off worse, though they say they were inferior in numbers and profited by the vicinity of a certain port of Scotland where they took refuge. (fn. 3)
From Spain we hear merely that Digby has arrived and was awaiting or had sent to ask for the coming to Court of Gondomar, and the negotiations are postponed for that reason. But one may easily recognise from long experience that the Spaniards will never lack pretexts to spin out these negotiations so long as it suits their purpose, while here they loudly profess that they will not suffer any more delay and they desire immediately either total abandonment or a settlement, and once they have the bride they imagine that they can make the King of Spain do what they please, while they will not submit to him in anything, ideas which may have some basis in the marriages of private persons but which do not apply to princes, least of all to Spaniards (cosi qui professano a piena bocca di non sofferir più dilatione al sicuro e voler immediate o la totale exclusione o la finale conclusione, anzi l'effettuatione medesima. Come pur si presupongono havuta la sposa di poter volger a lor modo et in ogni cosa il Re di Spagna e non dover in nulla dipender da lui. Pensieri forse più riuscibili negl' accasamenti de' privati che ne'matrimonii di Principi in particolar Spagnoli).
Two days ago the king went to see his ships at Chatham. This has excited much gossip as to whether he may have gone to choose ships to bring over the Spanish bride. The real reason, though the king is accustomed to pay such visits occasionally, was for the sake of the Duke of Lennox who induced the king to go because of a house which he wishes to exchange with his Majesty. (fn. 4)
The Spanish ambassador here never returned the visit made by the Ambassador Lando on his arrival or greeted me as is customary with new comers here. I fancy he thinks the compliment paid through Sir [Lewis] Lewkenor in his name at Gravesend will suffice, which I reported. He behaves in very different fashion from Gondomar, with whom he never had good relations, and though one sometimes arrives at the same end by different ways, it is undoubted that they agree too well in their ways of serving their king.
In Ireland almost the whole of a town called Croch recently has been burned by the fall of a thunderbolt. (fn. 5) The Catholics there become daily more active and arouse no small misgivings. so they have discussed in the Council some means to repress them.
The king has begun his usual round of the country, called a progress, instituted for use but now good for nothing. (fn. 6)
Two papers have appeared here from Savoy, one giving a clear relation of the negotiations of the Duke of Feria upon the duke's claims against Mantua, the other about the precedence and nobility of the house of Savoy over that of Gonzaga.
If these letters do not bring better or fuller news your Serenity must excuse me as they are my first and I am new here. In future I will have a due regard for brevity to avoid tediousness. You must also make allowance for the situation of this kingdom, practically separated from the world and to the nature of the government, inclined to or possibly determined upon peace, kept in suspense by the hopes, or as some declare by the pretext of the marriage, reduced to great want of money though averse to obtaining it through parliament, and meanwhile doing nothing, so that it affords more material for reflection than for writing.
London, the 8th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
521. To the Ambassador in England.
We have received your letters of the 10th ult. which confirm our satisfaction with your services. With regard to the armistice, the instructions we sent on the 24th ult. will suffice to show what we think and we do not think that we can add anything further on the subject, feeling sure that your ability will prove equal to the situation. You will in particular draw attention to the grave prejudice that such an armistice would cause to the Palatine, the Grisons and to all Italy.
What you write to us about the proposals to take away their trade from Constantinople seems to us a matter of great consequence. You will keep on the alert to find out all that is said and done thereupon. You will second the arguments of those who advise such a course, remarking that we also should have done the same had not the very sufficient reason of our extensive frontiers towards the Turks restrained us, especially seeing the continual losses and other vexatious events which are experienced in those parts. That the notion of taking their trade to Ragusa would be the same, as one may call the Ragusans Turkish subjects and Spanish subjects also, as is continually shown by their actions. In addition to this their goods would be subject to the usual duties in passing through our Gulf. By such considerations, tactfully advanced, as coming from yourself you will try and get that trade transferred to this city. This will serve for the moment to show you our views, so that you may act as opportunities occur if the business appears to take a favourable turn; and according to the advices which we receive from you we shall send to you what we consider that the circumstances demand.
In the matter of the Grisons you will have had occasion to afford satisfaction to his Majesty and the prince, especially in communicating the events of which we advised you in our last despatch of the 24th. Since this we have heard to-day that the Grisons are daily becoming more united among themselves, maintaining their stand with vigour and prudence. They have decreed a general pardon, appointed colonels and ordered the necessary provisions for reoccupying the country. In communicating these matters, you should mention the constant assistance which we supply to these Grisons, although the great importance of the business and the state of their affairs demand that they should be assisted by others also, especially as their need has reached its height, to maintain themselves in what they have retaken and to continue their progress towards the recovery of their country and liberty.
Ayes, 110.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
522. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A most serious dispute has arisen between the Grand Vizier and the English ambassador about a certain quantity of silk which the English merchants here are sending upon a berton of theirs, the Vizier claiming that they must pay the custom of the messetaria thereupon, while the ambassador asserts that they are exempt by the capitulations, and rather than give his consent to this he would have the silk unladed and let the berton go without it. Matters went so far that after the Vizier, with his usual impetuosity, had abused the ambassador with many injurious words and called his attendants to have the dragomans hanged, the ambassador in a great passion threw down the capitulation and left the audience (et passò la cosa tant' oltre, che havendo il Visir col suo solito impeto strapazzato con molte ingiuriose parole l'Ambasciatore et chiamate sue genti per far impicar li Dragomani, l' Ambasciator grandemente commosso gettatali la capitullatione inanti parti dell' audienza).
He immediately sent his secretary to inform me and the ambassadors of France and Flanders of these circumstances, asking us to meet him. Accordingly we met at the French embassy. We discussed many ways and means of finding a remedy against the proceedings of the Vizier, who rages so furiously against our dragomans that they do not dare to appear before him or to express our desires. England and Flanders were in favour of presenting a joint arz to the king, and making the strongest representations against the Vizier, but as I observed that this would probably do no good while it would infallibly drive the Vizier to great wrath and feeling against us and our affairs, and as France backed my opinion, we talked of trying some more subtle method. I will duly advise your Serenity of what is arranged.
The Vigne of Pera, the 9th July, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 9.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
523. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN. Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The emperor and his Court feel absolutely certain that there is an agent of the Palatine with the Hungarians, negotiating with them, but they have not been able to discover anything despite their efforts. They believe that the English resident here has conferred with him privately in villages, as he has been away once or twice for two or three days at a time, although he says it was from curiosity to see at a place four leagues away a bath in which they say men and women mingle with great freedom; but the Court is very suspicious.
Vienna, the 9th July, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
July 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
524. GIOVANNI FRANCESCO TRIVISANO, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Persian ambassador has left for Rome. I do not hear that he negotiated anything beyond the compliments which he paid to their Highnesses. (fn. 7)
Florence, the 9th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
525. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
While the ambassadors were debating upon finding some remedy against the action of the Vizier, events occurred which settled the matter without any move on our part. The Vizier Cusein took to flight in a tumult raised at a report of the Sultan's death. Mustapha was appointed in his place, a man without knowledge or experience, but subsequently deposed and the first Aga set up by the Janissaries. (fn. 8)
The Vigne of Pera, the 10th July, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
526. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Every day of late men have been passing from England to Dunkirk to serve the Spaniards, a matter which the States feel very deeply. His Excellency in particular told me he heard that the King of Spain was sending ready money to Dunkirk by way of England, and a considerable sum had recently passed in this way. The captains of the ships blockading Dunkirk are severely blamed for allowing all this to get through, and their High Mightinesses intend to take strong measures in the matter.
Your Serenity will have heard of the fresh difficulties raised in England over the East India question. The subject has caused a great commotion here and they do not know what to expect. However from letters which have reached the merchants of the English Company from the East they promise themselves some relief, although the English ambassador said to me yesterday that he feared it would prove a long business.
The Hague, the 11th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
527. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Pinnacher, the professor of Groninghen, who is going to treat with the pirates of Algiers, could not leave before Friday owing to contrary winds. He is to arrange with the pirates for the security of the Dutch traders, and it becomes more and more certain that he is to conduct some secret negotiations with them for the advantage of these States against their enemies. This mission does not please the English ambassador, who told me they had concealed from him what they had decided to do, and he called it a resolution prejudicial not only to his king, but to all the powers and the whole of Christendom. I know that he has sent word of it to his sovereign. (fn. 9)
The queen here told me she had received a letter from Venice from the Countess of Arundel speaking highly of the honours she had received from your Serenity and of her devotion to the republic, and she asked me to thank your Serenity, as I duly promised to do.
The Hague, the 11th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
528. To the King of England.
Every show of esteem and affection towards those who depend upon your Majesty is a part of the cordial disposition of our republic, increased in the case of the Countess of Arundel by her own dignity and qualities and the merits of her husband and his noble house. The pleasure expressed in your Majesty's letters, recently presented by your Ambassador Wotton, has increased our satisfaction at what we did to satisfy the countess and our desire to do so upon every other occasion. We only wish that frequent occasions would present themselves to enable us to show your Majesty our constant affection and esteem, and we wish you a long and prosperous reign.
Ayes, 104.Noes, 4.Neutral, 10.
[Italian.]
July 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
529. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of the States here have almost completed their business about the claims of the merchants, and have only one matter of slight importance to finish it entirely. They have to treat with his Majesty about some fortifications in the Indies and they told me that in this they could not yield an inch. I remind them how necessary is tact at the present time and they hope that the king will admit their arguments. The Spanish ambassador here says that he means to make claims for restitution amounting to some 400,000 crowns for what was taken from Spanish ships in the Indies by the English ships which arrived here recently with some Dutch ones, as my predecessor reported. The demand is not likely to be granted, so far as one can see.
The news about Constantinople was announced by the Spanish ambassador here five days before I learned it from your Serenity's letters. Many gentlemen of the Court came to ask me about it and some expressed astonishment that such news, which nevertheless passes through Venice, should be known by the Spanish minister before the Venetian.
I am assured that the Ambassador Weston has written to the king from Brussels representing the impossibility of obtaining either a truce or peace in the Palatinate. He abhors the Spanish method of negotiating and exposes their deceit. Some say that the infanta herself has written frankly to the king saying that these affairs will never be settled unless the Palatine gives up everything and remains Palatine simply, and if he is not disabused by these advices he must take pleasure in being deceived.
English and Dutch ships have united to prevent the Portuguese trading in the seas of Goa, and when a carrack bearing some 2 millions of gold wished to leave Goa no one on this mart would insure her for any money. There is a rumour however that they are preparing a powerful fleet in Spain composed of large vessels, though from what I hear they do not seem to be intended for those seas. Some which are laded here for those parts are thought to have been stopped and we hear of promises of high wages.
I hear on good authority that the king is beginning to despair of the Spanish marriage. I understand that he has been much concerned by a report, which reached his cars from this embassy derived from public advices that the Spaniards are negotiating a marriage with Florence, which I increased by pointing out how this fitted in with the promise to nominate that prince as depository of the Valtelline. Accordingly they recently sent a courier to Spain with letters urging the Ambassador Digby to ask for a final answer without further delay. A person worthy of confidence assured me that if the matter was not arranged within three months it would certainly be broken off for ever. But those who know the power of the Spanish artifices can never be sure of anything.
This uncertainty about the marriage seems to have started some rumours about summoning a parliament for Michaelmas, but the proposal was discountenanced though raised in the Council.
The Ambassador Doncaster in France has sent a gentleman to his Majesty with letters relating the rigour of the king there against the Huguenots without consenting to listen to any proposals. It is thought that he has taken leave to return. The generality of this kingdom hear of the sufferings of the Huguenots with much feeling. They accuse the king there of tyranny and would like to see some resolution in his Majesty.
Soubise has been somewhat offended but is now all right. In order to thwart and discredit him they have represented to the king how little consideration could be held for a person who conducted himself and his followers so badly, and accusing him either of great ignorance or of treason in the defeat he suffered. He defends himself by the instructions he received, namely to remain in the enemy's country, and on no account to draw the sword against the king himself.
The French complain that not only do English ships serve the people of la Rochelle, but the latter make use of English flags to capture French ships by stratagem, and if this continues it may arouse a strong feeling in France against the English.
Through a discreet person I have approached Naunton in a cautious manner; I thought it well to cherish his affection towards your Serenity which was always great, and as the charge which he lost has not been given to others he may easily rise again.
His Majesty has recently nominated two new Councillors, Coneual and Sengia. (fn. 10) Both are considered most loyal to the welfare of the kingdom and men have remarked that such a choice of good and uncorrupted persons has not been seen for three years. I hope it may not simply be in order to alarm the Spaniards and obtain advantage in the negotiations.
Sir [Edward] Cuc who was sent to the Tower for his free speaking in the last parliament has been absolved by the commissioners, appointed by the king to try his cause, of any fault by which the king could have any action against his life or property, which is large, and at which apparently they aimed when sending him to prison.
When the company of the Indies here, consisting of many leading gentlemen and merchants, was about to elect a new governor and deputies in the usual way, the king sent a note containing the names of some whom he wished to be chosen, but the choice lighted upon men of the party and of opinions diametrically opposed to those whom his Majesty desired, and the Earl of Southampton is the new governor, the only one whom the generality of the people resolutely designated, but whom the king regards with suspicion, as a poppy higher than the rest, which must be abased.
At this very moment I hear that a courier has arrived in haste from the Palatinate with news of moment. It is secret but I gather that he brings word that the Imperial army is scouring right up to Heidelberg and wishes to attack it, seizing the opportunity of the absence of the Palatine's forces in Alsace. The fortress is so feeble that the governor wrote here some time ago that he must surrender at the first summons, but with the slightest fortification and munition the enemy's army could not stay there long owing to the scarcity of provisions and the desolation of the country, probably the chief reasons for the Palatine himself leaving the place. We shall now see what respect the Spaniards bear for the King of England, and how he will put up with the affront and the war made on that place, which one may call his own, seeing that it is garrisoned by his troops, commanded by his captain and supported with his money.
London, the 15th July, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Sir Robert Shirley, who had been in Spain since the beginning of 1618 (Vol. XV of this Calendar, page 110), left for Rome in the spring of 1622. See E. P. Shirley: The Shirley Brothers, Roxburgh Club, page 88. Mr. Shirley was unable to find any notice of Sir Robert from the time of Aston's letter to Digby of the 25th March, 1622, announcing this journey to Rome, until Sir Robert's arrival in England in January, 1624.
2 Duke Christian was routed at Höchst on the 20th June, 1622, by the united forces of Tilly and Cordoba.
3 On the 10/20 June Carleton reported that two Dutch ships had been attacked by two Dunkirkers. The former defeated the latter and drove them into Leith. Later, on the 5th July old style, he writes to Calvert: the Vice-Admiral Haultain has come to this place [the Hague] to give account of the fight between his ship and the Dunkirkers at Frith in Scotland ... He left two ships besieging this Dunkirker at Frith ... He left two more lying in wait for another at Abarden in Scotland. State Papers, Foreign: Holland.
4 The king means on Tuesday to be at Rochester to overlook his navy and to dine the next day at Cobham, to see if that Lady of Kildare may be brought to part with it to the Duke and Duchess [of Lennox] upon reasonable conditions. Chamberlain to Carleton, 22 June o.s. Birch: Court and Times of James I, ii., page 316. Lennox entertaind the king and prince at Cobham Hall on Tuesday, July 5th. Ibid, page 318.
5 Nearly 1,500 houses in the city and suburbs were consumed. Council Book of the Corporation of Cork. ed. R. Caulfield, page 102.
6 James did not go further away than Windsor, and on Thursday, the 21st July, he was in London. Nichols: Progresses of James I, iv., page 772.
7 Wotton in a despatch of the 2/12 August writes: "Our Sir Robert Shirley hath very positively passed his audience at Florence and Rome. The generality of his errand is to raise some strong diversion out of Christendom against the Turks. Lord, how unfit we are for it and almost how ridiculous is that holy motion !" State Papers. Foreign: Venice.
8 See page 311 above. For Roe's account of the whole matter see Negotiations of Sir Thomas Roe in his embassy to the Ottoman Porte, pages 61, 62, 65. Roe obtained a judgment in his favour about the silk in the open divan.
9 Carleton's despatch about Pinnacher's mission, dated the 25th June, o.s., is preserved. State Papers, Foreign; Holland.
10 Oliver St. John, Viscount Grandison, and Sir Edward Conway were sworn of the Privy Council and sat as Councillors on June 25./July 8. 1622. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, page 415.