Venice
July 1622, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1911

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372-383

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'Venice: July 1622, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 372-383. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88838 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Contents

July 1622

July 16.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
530. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We hear from Brussels that the infanta has received full powers from the emperor, whose ambassador pressed hard to go and execute his repeated orders, but her Highness would not consent, and begged him to wait and see the result of the negotiations. The Palatine has sent M. Andreas Paul, his councillor, to the English ambassador there, to inform him of his wishes, and M. Wis accompanied him on behalf of Mansfelt. (fn. 1) Since their arrival the said ambassador asked for an adjournment of the congress to inform his king of their coming and to await fresh orders from him, for which purpose he has sent a courier to England.
Vienna, the 16th July, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
July 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
531. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Every one here admits how much your Serenity is doing for the King of Bohemia. The queen expressed to me the obligations of the king and herself, and in passing made a slight complaint of her father (si compiante modestamente del Padre). The Ambassador Carleton also thanked me for the office I performed with him, and promised to report your Serenity's representations to his king, knowing that he would always receive in good part everything that came from you.
The siege of Heidelberg was begun on the 3rd inst. They say that the king left the Palatinate with his troops, leaving behind only those of the King of England, for two reasons, the impossibility of staying more than a few days owing to the lack of provisions, and the advice of Lord Chichester, the English ambassador, who hoped that the negotiations at Brussels would prevent them from proceeding with hostilities if none but the troops of the King of England remained. The event has proved otherwise, and when Chichester wrote to Cordova and Tilly asking them to desist from hostilities they replied that they had no orders from their sovereigns except the original ones.
The ambassador accordingly resolved to send to his master. His first messenger was detained at Crucignach but a second reached the Ambassador Carleton here last Thursday, who sent him on to the king the following day adding further particulars to enlighten his Majesty upon the deceit practised by the Spaniards, affecting his reputation. These events ought to arouse the just resentment of that king.
The States are much mortified by the difficulties their ambassadors encounter in England in their negotiations about the East Indies, despite all their hopes, and they no longer know what to expect.
The Hague, the 18th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
532. ALVISE CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king has been twice running to the Council of State. This is thought to be in order to give some appearance of alacrity in response to the instances of the ambassador extraordinary of England. It does not appear whether they have gone any further with respect to the marriage. At all events the ambassador has sent a gentleman to his king. People think it is about the free exercise of religion and the education of the children. The ordinary ambassador has confirmed my belief in these particulars.
The infanta, who suspects the settlement of this alliance, which she loathes, has wept pitifully before the king, protesting that she would rather take the veil. As his Majesty loves her dearly it is not thought likely that he will do anything to grieve her, the more so as they say the emperor is asking for her in order to obtain continued assistance. However, many discerning and well informed persons are of opinion that they will withold a decision and they will continue to treat with England, so that if the Most Christian should declare war they would make this alliance with the King of Great Britain in order to cover themselves from that quarter.
Madrid, the 21st July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
533. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
Our ambassador in England writes that the king there has ordered his ambassador to remonstrate strongly about the loss inflicted upon his subjects by tall ships armed at Tunis and other places on the Barbary coast, protesting that if the Porte does not remedy this his Majesty will hunt those pirates to their lairs and even take further steps. We think this will be a favourable opportunity for you to resume your office about the damage inflicted by the pirates, urging the reasons we have previously supplied you with, showing how the royal revenues suffer by the stoppage of trade, and how the pirates are received in the Morea and other places of that empire, and the encouragement they receive from Turkish ministers, who share in the booty; so that it would prove salutary to punish some of these ministers in order to check the pirates. We hope that the repeated offices of more than one representative of princes friendly to that empire, if duly urged, will prove very helpful in inducing the Porte to take the necessary steps.
Ayes, 102.Noes, 0.Neutral, 13.
[Italian.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
534. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are watching attentively here to see what Soubise will obtain in England. They expect he will get connivance for raising levies but fear that he may also have some intrigue for la Rochelle.
Narbonne, the 22nd July, 1622.
Postscript.—The following news reaches us from the Court.
Mansfelt proposes to enter France to help the Huguenots. They reckon here that the King of Great Britain may agree to this, and that Bouillon may know something about it, and that the whole thing has been prepared; in short they fear some underhand blow from the English. Also the Spaniards take pleasure in their efforts to move England in order to keep France quiet in other directions.
There is also news that 4,000 foot, English, Walloons and other nations, may land in Normandy, where they could unite with numbers of Huguenots, without any possibility of prevention, as the king only has small forces in those parts.
[Italian.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
535. To the Ambassador in England.
We have your first letters about your entry at that Court, where your first offices have given us entire satisfaction. A gentleman from the Margrave of Baden came here recently, asking for help in Germany. We replied to the same effect as our answers to the English ambassador and others who have preferred similar requests, whereof we send you a copy for your full information. Matters there are now proceeding favourably, as Mansfelt in conjunction with Brunswick is marching towards Alsace, whilst Leopold is also in great anxiety about the progress of the Grisons. Accordingly all negotiations which would tend to slacken this good progress would do so much the more harm. In this our opinion coincides with the general one. We hear that the dissuasions from the court of France have been withdrawn. This will serve you especially for information, and for the present we do not wish to charge you with anything further.
We send you a reply to the king's letter of thanks about the Countess of Arundel, which you will present, making an office in conformity.
Ayes, 146.Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
536. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Rumours of conflict between the people and the troops, the former wishing to depose the Sultan Mustapha and to substitute his nephew Amurath, and the latter wishing to maintain him. This has alarmed even the Turks. The ambassadors, as most exposed to danger, have met together to discuss means of providing for their safety. The Vizier seems inclined to settle all foreign questions so that those who wish to make internal disturbances may not obtain any assistance therefrom.
The Vigne of Pera, the 23rd July, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
537. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They write from Aleppo that the King of Persia with the help of the Khan of Siras and of some English bertons has taken possession of the land of Ortmus, though the fortress remains in the hands of the Portuguese, who expected help from the Viceroy of Goa and hoped to resist and even recover that land.
The Vigne of Pera, the 23rd July, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
538. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have stated here recently that the commission for the marriage between England and Spain has granted the licence, though with conditions upon the point of religion, which the piety of the Catholic king would approve, while they would be verified by the Parliament. I took an opportunity to send and ask Cardinal Ludovisio to tell me in confidence if this was so. He replied in most friendly fashion saying there was not a word of truth in it, or he would have let me know, as the negotiations were only in their initial stages of which he had already told me.
I have heard from another source that they propose to appoint persons with the rank and title of bishop in the kingdom, where they will remain in secret and serve the Catholics in ordinations and matters concerning their ministry. But the Jesuits oppose this vigorously, saying that it will not be proper to do so without the king's participation and consent, accordingly the question remains undecided.
A certain Catholic Englishman (fn. 2) has left this week for England, who came here in the interests of the marriage, with the king's knowledge. He takes with him this resolution about sending bishops, although in suspense, and great hopes about the marriage, which is precisely what the Spaniards desire in order to keep that king's attention engaged.
I hear that a sword jewelled with diamonds has been seen here, sent by the Duke of Savoy as a gift, and declared to be worth 50,000 crowns. I think it must be the one I saw in Piedmont, which the King of England gave to him.
Rome, the 23rd July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
539. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They write from Brussels that when the English ambassador pressed hard for an armistice the deputies of the infanta asked him to show his powers from the Palatine and others united with him. He would only show those from his king, but the deputies declared they would not do another thing unless he produced the others also. All this is contrived merely to gain time to allow Mansfelt's forces not to remain idle and that Spinola may delay taking the field while awaiting the issue of these negotiations.
Vienna, the 23rd July, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
540. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Captain Ulisse Salice arrived here the day before yesterday. He brings word among other things that the King of Bohemia is undecided whether he shall proceed to Mannheim, and govern himself according to the negotiations of the King of England and the counsels of General Vere, or whether he shall stay with the army of Mansfelt, who does not want him, as he will only be in the way, and there is the danger of some misfortune to his person, as he has not the power to give any real satisfaction to the troops.
Zurich, the 23rd July, 1622.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
541. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Marquis of Buckingham, who constantly receives fresh marks of his Majesty's favour, has been made lieutenant of London, (fn. 3) a very high charge as it involves the command of numerous troops, and without conferring it on others the sovereigns have hitherto always kept it for themselves.
They expect the Ambassador Duncaster in a few days on his return from his embassy to France. He left with little satisfaction and angry words passed between him and the Prince of Condé. The king here blames the Most Christian very freely. To the pernicious advice of Condé they attribute here all the ills of that kingdom, as he hopes to profit by the dangers and misfortunes of the king, and gain the crown itself.
The son of the Landgrave of Hesse has been to take leave of me. He has fresh orders from his father to proceed to Paris and there await fresh instructions, possibly to go to the army and make some representations in favour of peace. They are delaying their reply to Soubise until the arrival of Doncaster, but I am not sure of the object of this delay as they know by his letters all that he can tell them orally. I hear that secretly but by connivance of the king they have levied three companies of volunteers and four are being levied for the service of Soubise, and that for this purpose some money has been remitted.
In Virginia in the Indies, the natives, although deprived of all their weapons, obtained by a stratagem those of the English colonists and slew about 400 of them. (fn. 4) The English hope to profit by this accident, as it provides them with a reasonable pretext for rendering the Indians more subject. They have decided to send out a larger number to replace the slain, each county of the realm providing six men.
The members of the company of the Indies have made an arrangement with the king to give him one third of the profits upon tobacco upon condition that none comes from Spain except a small quantity for the first two years only. This will bring in a revenue of about 100,000 crowns a year, whereas before it was only 32,000, so great and universal is the habit and consumption of tobacco or the queen's weed in this kingdom. They discussed this arrangement some time ago, but the Spaniards always opposed.
There is a report here that the Margrave of Baden has come to terms with the emperor, and has to some extent abdicated, leaving the government to his son.
I hear that the king takes ill the negotiation of the States with the pirates of Algiers, in the hope of receiving some benefit from a union against Spain. His hatred for those pirates because of the serious losses which they have inflicted upon his subjects may be the principal reason and the pretext of others to encourage this feeling in him.
They announce here as a fact that a large number of Cossacks have joined the Spaniards in Flanders. Another informant while confirming this news tells me that they are not for service under Spinola. They are better adapted for ravaging than fighting, and it seems that water rather than land is their proper element.
I hear that the Spaniards could not obtain the 400,000 crowns they asked for on the mart of Antwerp although they offered 30 per cent., though it was afterwards reported that they expected English ships at Dunkirk from Spain with much gold.
The news from Constantinople causes much comment. They think this revolution may have benefited the emperor's affairs in Hungary.
From the Palatinate we hear that Mansfelt has turned towards Bavaria and Tilly has started after him after a feint of attacking Heidelberg, under which he might not have been able to remain for lack of provisions.
The Palatine has gone to Sedan. The reason remains in doubt, but perhaps the most likely is that he hopes to avoid angering his father-in-law and to evade the blame for breaking off the negotiations by this fresh invasion of Mansfelt, or perhaps by thus leaving all his affairs and his state in the king's hand he intends to devote himself the more thoroughly to the defence of his own.
London, the 24th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
542. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the 21st inst. I received your Serenity's letters of the 24th ult. I notice that you wrote upon receiving the news about the negotiations for an armistice in the Palatinate by order of the king here, and recognising what harm such negotiations may effect you wish me to oppose them with due occasion and reserve in my offices with his Majesty. Upon the arrival of the letters there is no doubt that the negotiations have fallen through, arms are resumed and all is changed. But as the evil has increased rather than diminished, and accidents have changed rather than the essentials, while I am sure that you desire the matter to be kept before the king, and as he might be in a better mood at present owing to the suspicion which the Spaniards have recently caused him, I went to audience in order to strike a blow while the iron was hot. I asked on Thursday and it was immediately granted, a thing that does not always happen. I had it on Saturday at a country house called Wanstead, where the king was, having already begun his progress. I began in the conventional way, and then expressed the great sorrow of your Serenity at the bad news from the Palatinate, and your desire for speedy help as a diversion, so that something may come of the great hopes placed upon his Majesty, of the need for vigorous decisions, leaving negotiations, through which we might consider the Palatinate to have been lost, as the artifice on one side matched ill with the sincerity of his Majesty. The example of Retia showed that what negotiations could never decide arms alone could recover. At this point I described the recent events there in detail. I added that the Spaniards use duplicity and seize every opportunity in their negotiations, not excluding the sacred marriage of their own daughters, marketing them, so to speak, to advance their own ends, and here I referred to the negotiations with Florence about the infanta.
The king heard me very graciously and said he thanked your Serenity for your consideration and friendship for the Palatine, but he hoped matters would come out well, if he could believe in human good faith, since the Spanish ambassador had been to audience two days before and assured him that everything would happen to his Majesty's satisfaction. He rejoiced at the success of the Grisons, praising your Serenity for your help, and blaming France, which, intent upon her own ruin, with a king cruel to his own subjects, had caused all the evil in the Grisons. If the Swiss had moved to their assistance as they ought all would have been well. He praised the Grisons highly for their behaviour to the Bishop of Coire, saying that it would benefit their cause with the pope.
With regard to the marriage with Spain he said that his Ambassador Digby gave him good hope, and that the Spaniards would be the most rascally men in the world not only to settle but to negotiate with others. He told me he was advised that the Duke of Savoy had notified to Spain either that they should get the Duke of Mantua to make good his claims or he would employ the forces which he had got ready to attack Monferrat, adding that he heard of strong revolutions in Naples against the Cardinal Viceroy. In short he diverted the conversation from a subject which did not please him. I found him full of his characteristic ideas, determined upon peace, unwilling to believe what he did not wish and perhaps taking pleasure in deceiving himself in hoping always for the best and to avoid the necessity of giving up his too rooted maxims of peace and justice.
I could not see the prince as I wished, as he was away at his usual pleasures of the chase, which occupy both father and son to such an extent that they seem the most important business they have to transact (la quale occupa di maniera il Padre et il figliolo, che pare sia il maggior negotio che essi habbino).
Now at my return from the audience a present has reached me of a magnificent stag, taken this morning by his Majesty, which he has sent to me as a gift.
The ordinary left yesterday and this night I am sending the present despatch after him, which I held back in order to report this audience to your Serenity.
London, the 24th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
543. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have replenished the garrisons in Flanders, from which the old soldiers have been removed, by the English recently brought over by the Earl of Argyle.
It is announced that Heidelberg is not besieged, a report being put abroad that this was out of respect for the King of England. The queen said to me that this was only in order to deceive her father.
The King of Great Britain has given his son-in-law to understand that he is greatly displeased at the imprisonment of the Landgrave of Darmstat, (fn. 5) and has exhorted him to release the landgrave and show him every courtesy inducing him to interpose for peace. I hear that the landgrave has been released and has gone to Mayence.
The Hague, the 25th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
544. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity will see in my preceding letter an abstract of what I said to the king at my audience and of his Majesty's reply. I have since learned on good authority that the king was pleased at my mentioning the marriage negotiations of the Spaniards with Florence, as although he affected not to believe in them, yet he could not take it well if I passed over a matter of which both I and my predecessor had told others, through whom it had reached his ears. I will postpone an audience of the prince for the present, as it might seem affectation now when he is so far away when there is nothing pressing.
It is certain that the last letters from Spain have confirmed the king's hopes for the conclusion of the marriage, as it also appears that both he and the favourite grow more determined not to suffer any more delay beyond a certain limited time. Some think that the marquis fears that all the blame and punishment will descend upon him if it ends in nothing after all this time, and accordingly he says openly that he wants to make an end. And I hear that the king sent word to Soubise by Lord Adinton that if the marriage has not taken place within a month or a little more, he will freely help the Huguenots, and if it is not arranged then he will join France against Spain and make them accept peace, so that in any case he will have what he desires. One thing is certain that the king has suspended for a month the decree of the Council to grant the general and free pardon and reward, which used to be done at the conclusion of parliament and as he was advised at the time in order to obtain thereby no small emolument in the present needs. Thus it now appears that he intends the suspension in not having ill-satisfied the people by the novelty and detriment of the decree, in case the marriage should fall through and he should need a parliament (cosi pare che hor miri la sospensione al non haver mal sodisfatto al popolo con la novità et danno del decreto caso che mancava il matrimonio e bisognasse un parlamento). Therefore the king here either knows well how to conceal his own thoughts and has something in his mind different from what he expresses with his tongue, or he is himself involved in confusion through his determination to base his decisions upon the very deceitful desires of the Spaniards.
Here one observes the beginning of the preparation of a fleet, (fn. 6) and actually two days ago, the Marquis of Buckingham, the Lord High Admiral, went in person to review the royal ships to impart order and zeal to their preparations. It may be that in arming them they have various objects in view, and possibly among other things something for the advantage of the Huguenots, since Soubise gains ground hourly and they have no lack of disagreements with France; or they may wish to alarm them by rumours without deeds, as with their lack of money here they can ill support the great expense of a fleet.
I hear it confirmed that the Palatine withdrew to Sedan by the advice of or out of consideration for the king here, in order not to afford a pretext for the breaking off of the negotiations, although some feel sure that either disgust or suspicion of his own people has induced him to take this step, and many agree in thinking that the Palatine does not show the prudence required in his condition for the recovery of his lost dominions.
Every day they send to the queen consort at the Hague the things most useful and necessary for a family, and so this worthy but unfortunate princess is forced to accept slight sustenance from those who owe her the greatest help.
A third ship has arrived from the Indies, companion of the two I mentioned before. It brings merchandise of great value and a quantity of silk from Persia which will be manufactured in this kingdom.
Three English ships coming from Spain with about 800,000 crowns in bars or specie (fn. 7) for some private persons of Antwerp have been detained by the king's order. He wishes to have it coined at his mint and profit thereby.
The French ambassador here seems to derive little satisfaction from the news of the progress of the Grisons.
London, the 29th July, 1622.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
545. To the Ambassador at Rome.
Since what we advised you about the settlement in Spain over the disputed way, the commissioners on both sides have met, and at first everything seemed to promise a favourable issue; but soon the royal ministers began to show a very different spirit, as while the Milanese examined their own witnesses, they refused to examine ours. Our commissioners insisted upon this, refusing to proceed otherwise. Accordingly the royal ministers have succeeded in breaking up the commission, leaving the matter unsettled entirely owing to their own action, while on our side we have done everything to facilitate a settlement. We send this for your information.
The like to the ambassador in Savoy.
The like to the following, adding: So that if you hear the matter referred to you may use this for our service, as we direct you to do:
Germany, England, Naples, Spain, Milan, Zurich, France, Florence, the States.
Ayes, 125.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
546. The English ambassador came into the Cabinet and presented a letter from the King of Bohemia. After the letter had been read the ambassador said:
Although the letter is somewhat old, it shows his Majesty's excellent disposition towards the republic, in sending word of his affairs. I have told him that when the republic is freed from her present embarrassments she will do something for the general service. I do not think it necessary for me to importune-your Excellencies further in this matter.
I have come this morning to present this letter and then to treat of an important matter in the name of Colonel Peyton. He offers himself to serve among the Grisons, either with the command of the republic or if it is considered better, by connivance, accompanied by letters of recommendation to the Grisons. The idea seems very honourable, and even if your Serenity does not approve you will at least recognise his good intentions and his desire to serve the republic. He greatly regrets that he is not employed more, fearing that he is not considered able. He desires nothing better than to shed his blood for your Excellencies.
In the absence of the doge, the senior Councillor, Vicenzo Dandolo, replied, thanking the King of Bohemia for his letter and the ambassador for his good offices. They would consider Colonel Peyton's offer.
With this the ambassador took leave and departed.
Frederick, King of Bohemia, Count Palatine of the Rhine, etc. to Antonio Priuli, doge of Venice.
Our last letters informed you of the calamitous condition of Germany. We have now overcome many difficulties and have returned safe and sound to our Lower Palatinate, where almost at the moment of our arrival our forces under your general Count Mansfelt obtained a victory over our enemies. Christian, Duke of Brunswick, our kinsman, is assisting us, and we feel sure that God will not abandon our just cause. Unfortunately we are unable to satisfy the demands of our troops for their pay which is in arrear for some months, and are obliged to fall back upon the liberality of our friends, among whom your Serenity holds the first place. Your Serenity realises how important it is for all Germany and for your republic that we should not fail for lack of means.
Dated at Darmstadt, the 26th May, 1622, old style.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
547. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear that the decree made by the commission about the marriage with England runs Papa possit et debeat dispensare, but it requires a lawful, profitable and reasonable cause, a point debated in the days of Pope Paul but never decided; nor do they wish to decide as it serves as an excuse for procrastination if they express doubts about the pope having this authority. With this decision the gentleman I wrote of (fn. 8) has left, and they write to the king that the reasons given above seem reasonable but they must first be arranged with England. Here they consider that this decree has prorogued the affair, though the commission will continue to sit and that is what the Spaniards desire.
Rome, the 30th July, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 This day M. Andreas Pauel for the King of Bohemia and yesterday one M. Weis for the Count Mansfelt arrived here with commissions to represent the interests of their masters in the present treaty of deposing arms. Trumbull to Calvert from Brussels the 11/21 June, 1622. State Papers. Foreign: Flanders.
2 George Gage.
3 It should be Lieutenant of Middlesex. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1619–23, pages 404, 405.
4 See Birch: Court and Times of James I, ii., pages 321, 322.
5 Louis of Darmstadt, taken prisoner by the Margrave of Baden on the 2nd June.
6 Salvetti in his news letter of the 29th July remarks: "Non si e fatta simil diligenza da che mori la Regina Elizabetha." Brit. Mus Add. MSS. 27,962B.
7 Salvetti gives the amount as 80,000l. sterling and says the money was sent by Spanish merchants to Calais or Dunkirk to pay the troops in Flanders. Letter of July 29th. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27,962B.
8 George Gage.