Venice
October 1622, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1911

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466-477

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'Venice: October 1622, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 466-477. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88844 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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October 1622

Oct. 1.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
610. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spaniards, with their usual subtlety and duplicity, wrote letters to the Infanta and emperor asking them to conclude the negotiations with the English ambassador speedily, as I reported last week, in favour of the Palatine. They have now written again to the emperor in favour of Bavaria and Mayence. They wrote the preceding letters in order to show the King of England that all the fresh matters which arose prejudicial to his son-in-law came from this quarter and not from them, since the emperor can suffer little or no harm from the wrath of that monarch. The English resident here perceives this and says that his sovereign is deluded and deceived and the Palatine despoiled.
Vienna, the 1st October, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
Oct. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives
611. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States have received word of the fall of Heidelberg. The faubourg was taken on the 16th ult., sacked and burned. On the following day the town was attacked from five directions. The Germans mutinied, but Sir [Gerard] Herbert, governor of the fortress, fought valiantly with a few of his men. He broke three pikes against the enemy, but was slain at the third assault, and all those with him, numbering about a thousand. Colonel Merue, being unable to resist, withdrew into the castle. The townsmen made terms, saving their life and goods, but the enemy sacked and ravished and murdered many in spite of this. The castle held out until the following Tuesday, the 20th, when they made terms and were accompanied to Berghstat on their way to the Netherlands, as they were not allowed to go to Franchendal or Mannheim. They fear here that these men will be murdered on the road, as usual.
Leaving a garrison at Heidelberg, Tilly turned to besiege Mannheim. General Vere, who was within, sent for six companies from Franchendal to strengthen himself, much to the distress of the poor inhabitants. The town is already formally besieged. It is thought certain to share the fate of Heidelberg and that Franchendal will follow.
On Friday evening Mr. Francis Nedersol, the queen's secretary, arrived here, sent by the Ambassador Chichester to proceed in haste to England and tell the king the state of affairs, and how little the Austrians and Spaniards respect his Majesty, and hoping that their action may move him to think more of his own reputation and the safety of his children. He left in haste on Saturday morning for Brill and set sail at four, so with a good wind he should have reached England yesterday evening. With the ambassador's letters were others of the queen to her father and brother, and the Ambassador Carleton also wrote very strongly. It is thought that the king will take fire, but it will soon die away owing to his nature or to some artifice. We are awaiting with curiosity and eagerness the results which the events and Nedersol's relation will produce.
The Ambassador Chichester had instructions to attend the diet of Ratisbon to protest against some negotiations they proposed to open about the Palatinate, as it was understood that only the emperor, the King of England, the Infanta and Bavaria had to negotiate thereupon. However, as the aspect of affairs has so greatly changed, that minister represents that it is no longer necessary for him to go to the diet, and he asks to be recalled.
Baron Dohna told me that the Ambassador Weston also was to leave for England last Wednesday, unless he was detained by some fresh incident, although it is not easy to see what fresh pretexts they could find to deceive.
The King of Great Britain is spoken of little to his advantage and reputation. They blame his fixed idea of peace and they fear he may make some declaration in favour of the Spaniards to the general prejudice, more especially as at their request he has detained some Dutch sailors as prisoners in Scotland. They are looking closely to see what will come of the numerous ordinances in favour of the Catholics, whom they call the Hispanomaniacs, and about the marriage which their ambassadors feel sure will take place, although they add that the dispensation sent from Rome was so full of clauses and conditions that it was impossible for the king or the kingdom to accept them, from considerations of conscience and good government. Their own negotiations proceed well one day and the next they encounter serious difficulties, and they can only be patient and hope.
The Hague, the 3rd October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
612. GIOVANNI FRANCESCO TRIVISANO, Venetian Secretary at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Archbishop of Spalato is here, having been sent from Flanders by the Cardinal Bedmar. He has spoken at length with his Excellency and is about to leave for Rome, to receive a benediction and pardon for his past errors from his Holiness, and also to treat with the pope in the name of that cardinal.
Milan, the 5th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
613. Letters patent of Antonio Priuli, Doge of Venice, directing all the ministers of the republic to grant every favour and convenience to the Countess of Arundel and her company, who is on her way to England, giving her an escort and allowing her people to carry arms, even though prohibited. (fn. 1)
Ayes, 19.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
614. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received the instructions of the 2nd ult., which reached me soon after I had sent off my preceding despatch. I noted there the paragraph from Zen's letter saying that his Majesty had written to Cardinal Borgia in favour of the marriage and desiring an understanding with that Court. In spite of every effort I find no confirmation of this news, but it seems to me so unlikely that the impossibility of discovering anything agrees with the incongruity of a King of England, however infatuated about the marriage, taking such a new step and adopting such inadequate means as writing to a Cardinal Borgia, with whom he has not the slightest tie, there being difference of nation and religion. But besides the recent letters which I have had from that ambassador and from other quarters I learn that they speak openly of this fact in Rome. But as secrecy would be the keeper of the truth owing to the reasons for which they might desire an understanding and reconciliation with the pope, so publicity is a clear argument of the falsity of the thing disclosed; their real object is to profit by the rumour, which will totally discredit the king throughout the world and cause him the greatest prejudice in England, as dissension spread among his subjects stirs up hope in some and fear in others, but creates confusion in all, giving birth ultimately to a complete change in the kingdom (il vero fine e di proffitar con questa voce laqual diffusa a total discredito del Re per il mondo e ripportata con suo gravissimo prejudicio in Inghilterra come zizania sparsa tra suoi sudditi muovi in alcuni la speranza in altri il timore in tutti la confusione da che ne nasca in fine la rivolutione del Regno).
Fresh letters have come from the King of Spain to his Majesty, with the usual promises of every good office with the emperor for the restitution of the Palatinate. He protests that he cannot go any further and in any case claims to be guiltless, shielding Spain without caring whether the odium falls upon the emperor. The last reply made to these letters was that they will not pursue the marriage negotiations before the Palatinate has first been restored. They are about to send to that Court a gentleman of the prince (fn. 2) who will take this decision in particular and some others. It is thought that they will order Digby to return if they do not receive greater satisfaction.
Four days ago his Majesty received the news of the fall of Heidelberg (fn. 3) without any terms for the people of the town; 115 English soldiers came out under an obligation not to serve in other fortresses of the Palatinate. The remainder of the four companies in the fortress died in the defence. The governor, Herbert (Abbort), was slain there, the citadel surrendered and the palace, the usual residence of the Counts Palatine, was sacked. The Ambassador Chichester remonstrated with Tilly for committing these hostilities during the progress of negotiations with the Infanta at Brussels for an armistice. Tilly answered roughly that he did not know what the King of England had to do with the dominions of the emperor; the king would do better to have the other two fortresses surrendered; for his part he served the emperor and not the Infanta.
New proposals come from Brussels, that Heidelberg be restored to a son of the Palatine on condition that he is brought up a Catholic. They demand Franchendal and Mannheim in exchange for the hostages kept in England until the absolute conclusion of peace.
Schomberg, a gentleman of the Palatine who brought the news of the capture of Heidelberg, has come to emphasize this fact and if possible to obtain some good resolution. The king, indeed, cannot fail to be much moved, as I hear he was, receiving with indignation the last proposals from Brussels. Many things have been reported to me about the king's emotion and words, and if he continued in the same mood one might hope for good results. Certainly he advises a bold course and seems resolved to be patient no more. Yet it is extremely doubtful whether his wrath will turn either against the emperor or the King of Spain. I think I may assure your Serenity that his Majesty will not lack good advice. Many councillors, and the most intimate, are moved by their own interests. Some recognise that they cannot persist in their first advice without open perfidy; some move for the purpose of benefiting their affairs in the present poverty of the king, despairing of improvement, especially the favourite, who hopes by such means to secure his fortunes with the king by the sincerity of his intentions, with the kingdom by the merit of this advice, and with the prince by conformity of inclination. God grant that for once the king may close his ears, which he has hitherto kept open, to the artifices of Spain, and that he may resolve and persevere with better advice. Certainly decisions cannot be delayed and, we may call the times critical. They have promised an answer to Schomberg, and he told me he hoped for a good one. They have ordered the Ambassador Chichester to return home.
Thinking it for the service of the state to strike while the iron is hot, I have taken a chance of an audience. I shall go and strike my blow, if not with much force at least with great spirit.
A relation of Doncaster has been sent to the Most Christian with letters from his Majesty advising peace once again. The step is due to the French ambassador, who said that the moment was favourable for some good office by his Majesty. They wrote to the Duke of Rohan also to the same effect.
Fildin, the lord treasurer, Digby and Doncaster have been raised to the rank of earl, (fn. 4) the two last for their embassies, Fildin as brother-in-law of the marquis; and the treasurer, a very rich man, could not attain to the dignity without unburdening himself of much of his money. The king, a profuse distributor of wealth, now seems a free dispenser of titles, the extension whereof injures their value.
London, the 7th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
615. To the Ambassador at Rome.
The Archbishop of Spalato has arrived at Milan. We send you a copy of what our Secretary Trivisano writes on the subject. You will make such observations as you can: what he is treating, with whom, and with what objects.
Ayes, 72.Noes, 3.Neutral, 12.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
616. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany to the DOGE and SENATE.
To-day that Englishman entered this city who as ambassador of Persia had been at Rome. The emperor sent the Secretary Frai to him yesterday to ask if he came as an ambassador and if he brought credentials with this title or some other. He answered in the affirmative, and accordingly his Majesty has arranged for him to meet M. de Ois, president of the chamber. The marshal of the court will receive him in the emperor's name at the quarters prepared for him by Cæsar's orders, where he will be defrayed for some days. (fn. 5)
Vienna, the 8th October, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Prov. Gen.
Nelle Isole
di Levante.
Venetian
Archives.
617. ANTONIO LOREDAN, Bailo, ANTONIO VENIER, Proveditore and Captain, and ANTONIO DA PONTE, Proveditore General and Inquisitor in the Three Islands.
Enclose particulars brought by an English ship of the great mortality caused by the plague in Algiers and Tunis and particularly the death of Sanson and Ward (Guard), their most famous chiefs. God grant it be true!
Corfu, the 8th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in the preceding despatch.618. On the 18th September, 1622.
Captain Robert Axton of the English ship Hercules, which reached this port last night. Left Cartagena four weeks ago. Stopped at Sardinia only three hours to get information about pirates. Heard from French ship that plague had made great ravages at Algiers and Tunis, the pirate ships being abandoned in the port. The mortality of the Barbary people said to amount to 350,000, mostly at Algiers and Tunis, and they had not enough men to arm even a single vessel. Among those who perished were Captain Ward at Tunis, and Captain Sanson at Algiers with all his men. They cannot bury the dead, but throw them into the sea.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
619. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity will have heard of the raising of the siege of Bergh. Prince Maurice, Count Henry his brother, the Count of Mansfelt and Count Ernest of Nassau proceeded thither on the 4th inst. accompanied by the cavalry.
Belfort, a Scottish captain of cavalry, has captured some waggons, which lost their way and fell into his hands when they thought they were arriving in Spinola's camp. They contained in particular the Duke of Holstein's silver and some 8,000 reichsthalers belonging to him. He also took Cordova's provost general and eight others.
The Hague, the 10th October, 1622. (fn. 6)
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
620. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador has left Brussels after protesting that the king his master will make war on the emperor and the Duke of Bavaria. He did not mention Spain, in order, so they say, not to disturb the marriage negotiations, which, however, are not expected to succeed; at least it is desirable they should not.
Lord Chichester lingers on at Frankfort. Your Excellencies may have heard the reply that Tilly is said to have given him, but I will repeat it. The ambassador wrote to him very seriously, saying they ought to raise the siege of Mannheim in accordance with the Infanta's letters from Brussels. Tilly answered that he was acting for the emperor his master, and he did not think the King of Great Britain would wish to meddle in the affairs of rebels against the empire or assist them in their mutiny, but rather exhort them to make submission; and the king would do well to order General Vere to evacuate Mannheim and Franchendal without resistance, in order that by such means the emperor might be induced to pardon the rebels. This answer is supposed to be the reason for sending the queen's secretary to England. The action to be taken from that quarter is awaited with great eagerness, and what that king will decide to do when he sees how he has been deluded and deceived.
The Hague, the 10th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
621. The Countess of Arundel and Surrey and the Ambassador of Great Britain having pressed strongly for the release of Antonio Moreto, exiled on the 9th September last, that a safe-conduct be granted to him for five years, provided that within fifteen days he deposit 200 ducats in the office of the Avogadoria to be given to Zuanne Corseti, the person injured, and find a surety for 1,000 ducats that he will not harm the said Zuane; otherwise this grace shall be null and void.
Ayes, 150.Noes, 22.Neutral, 3.
In the Collegio: Ayes, 16.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
On the 2nd November in Pregadi:
Ayes, 105.Noes, 8.Neutral, 9.
Pending because it requires 5/6.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
622. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A gentleman has arrived opportunely from the King of England, who was influenced by the news of the disposition of the Most Christian towards peace, with letters for his Majesty and Rohan, in which the King of Great Britain exhorts his Majesty to give grace to his subjects, and urges the same on Rohan, showing that Montpellier must needs submit and receive the king in any event.
These offices have been welcomed with delight here, in the hope that the English king is rousing himself. The gentleman affirms that his Majesty is disposed to open his eyes, and many of the nobles here aspire to stronger correspondence with England. The same person confided to me that the chancellor at Paris had let fall some remarks about marrying Madame Henriette to the Prince of Wales.
From the camp under Montpellier, the 11th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
623. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I had a long and confidential interview with the constable. He said they had accepted peace with the Huguenots to get a breathing space. It was clear that the greatness of Spain must be opposed. The King of England had always desired peace here, because without it he could do nothing of consequence. The Dutch had certainly suggested to him this last office through the gentleman he had sent.
I gather that they propose to unite the interests of the Grisons to others which the King of Great Britain has against the Spaniards. I cannot say whether this is in order to find some new excuse for seconding the proceedings of that king, or because they really want to make things better by some resolute co-operation. They hope that the English will at length move, after the betrayal disclosed by the taking of Heidelberg.
The camp under Montpellier, the 11th October, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
624. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The internuncio of Poland is preparing to go to Spain to act as ambassador extraordinary for his king. I hear on good authority that the object of this embassy is to treat for a marriage between the Polish prince and a sister of that sovereign. To facilitate the success of his negotiations he takes with him a quantity of jewels and many thousands of crowns to present to the ministers at that Court.
Naples, the 11th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
625. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The gentleman from England speaks of the intention of his king to unite with France about the Valtelline. I do not know if this is official, after the manner in which that sovereign has always declared himself to this Court, or due to the necessities of the case.
Monghio, the 13th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
626. To the Secretary at the Hague.
After the losses of the Grisons through the violence of the Austrian arms a conference met at Lindo to treat for peace. The Swiss proposed that the ten Jurisdictions should be set at liberty, but the Austrians would not consent, and so the Swiss wished to leave the negotiations undecided. The Ambassador Casati tried to stay them, offering to act as a mediator. Leopold's ambassadors then issued their articles as a final declaration of their wishes. Nearly all the Catholic cantons objected, and so did the Interpreter Molino in the name of the Most Christian. But the deputies of the two leagues accepted the articles, separating themselves from the third league, and this has greatly prejudiced the affair. In this way the conference terminated. But we hear from Milan that a courier brought the governor word that at the rising of the diet the following points were decided. That the ten Jurisdictions should remain completely subject to the Archduke, and must keep the Catholic faith; the Archduke may build churches, but all the heretics must leave the country. The Archduke may build fortresses anywhere and keep garrisons, and the Grisons must submit to the confirmation of the articles arranged at Milan.
This news will serve you for information and in conversation to point out the determination of the Austrians to deprive all of their liberty and take possession of everything. We also send you copies of further letters from Milan and Zurich which will serve for your information.
The like to the ambassador in England and to the ambassador in France.
Ayes, 94.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
627. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Weston, finding no sign of any advantage, has returned. The Infanta tried to detain him. He did not accept the present because he did not approve of the embassy, in which he obtained nothing whatever. To his Majesty he spoke, as he wrote, very freely of past deceits and the necessity for new resolutions.
With the news that Tilly is turning his thoughts to the two fortresses still holding out in the Palatinate they hear also that these cannot resist. Mannheim does not lack fortification either by art or nature, it has 1,200 English and a good commander in Vere, but the country is wasted, the enemy always near in command of the passes and rivers, who has not allowed them to take the necessary supplies. The king has sent orders to Vere to make honourable terms if he cannot resist. I fancy I detect a notion that as a lesser evil they may decide to put those places in the hands of the Infanta rather than be compelled to yield them to Tilly. Thus in the present condition the weighing of evils proves a sort of benefit. Meantime here they are urging the exaction of the money called benevolence, of which it has nothing but the name, as it is hated by the people and as much has been uselessly squandered as would have sufficed, they say, support a royal army.
The Queen of Bohemia has herself sent her Secretary Nedresol to make remonstrances. He has pointed out the desperate state of affairs and the grave injury inflicted on his Majesty.
The favourite has changed his opinion, though I cannot say whether this is merely an artifice. He speaks now to another tune. He told my informant that there was no longer any doubt about the deceit of the Spaniards and swore they would have to make war on them if they did not speedily redeem their promises.
There are some rumours of a parliament, and some of the gentlemen here give me hope of it. As a matter of fact, without it everything else is vain, it will be the gateway of good, the dawn of day; it alone can unite the king and kingdom, provide money and put everything in good train.
Porter, the prince's gentleman who was to go to Spain as I reported, left four days ago with a limited time for going and returning. He takes orders to the ambassadors to ask for audience at once, and request the king either to redeem his promise for the restitution of the Palatinate or to join his Majesty against the emperor if he refuses restitution. If they do not obtain either the ambassadors are to return. The instructions are real and the demonstration specious, but Porter is thought to be Spanish in sympathy. These missions are threadbare expedients (mezzi usati). They will have an answer for the new proposals and will ask for time, which is a salve for the Spaniards but poison for others.
Meanwhile the king's ardour has spent itself. He believes or feigns to believe that he has done enough and that these remedies suffice, being suited to his nature, which is opposed to war or rather so blindly infatuated with peace without seeing that the means whereby he obtains a brief and deceitful peace lead the kingdom to future irreparable ruin. He seems satisfied with postponing but not removing difficulties; of his own accord his Majesty will certainly never move except in this manner, yet it is not impossible that some great necessity, violently compelling events, may force him out of himself.
Not a word about the marriage is heard at present. The claim of the Spaniards that the children shall be educated by their mother to the age of fourteen will always create a difficulty. Their thoughts are now directed to the Palatinate. The dominions of the Palatine might possibly arouse jealousy in England, but the beggary of that prince and his children cannot fail to affect the interests of this crown and bring discredit upon it.
They desire Naunton to give up the charge of secretary, from which they wish to remove him. They would fill his place, so I hear, by a person of such condition that he would in part make good that loss. In exchange they offer him an equivalent or better post. Certainly to give parliament a good start it would be necessary to reinstate and rehabilitate Naunton.
Twenty-two ships have been sighted off Plymouth; they are commonly supposed to be Spaniards. Six of them are of 1,200 tons with 60 pieces of ordnance. It is not yet known what they have come for. The Spanish ambassador, to whom the king sent for information, said that he knew nothing about them, but could only assure his Majesty that if they were Spanish they had come to defend this kingdom; but the general report is that they have come against the Dutch.
The French ambassador here, with his customary freedom, told me that the king, in telling the Spanish ambassador what the Dutch ambassadors had told him about the design against the Indies, remarked that he had answered them that this was no food for their teeth (che questo non era osso per i lor dente), to report the exact words. If it be not true that the king performed such an office, I cannot imagine for what purpose the French ambassador should say so; and if it is true, one perceives only too well how far the king is from proper sentiments and how dangerous it is to negotiate with him.
The Earl of Desmond, formerly Lord Dingwall (Dinguem), has been to see me on a complimentary visit. He reminded me of my hospitality to him when I was treasurer at Palma, and professed his great indebtedness to your Serenity for the honours which he had received. He could not conceal from me his dissatisfaction at not being employed after having practically settled everything with the Ambassador Barbarigo. He is a great lord, a great favourite of his Majesty and the prince and connected with the Marquis of Buckingham by a recent marriage. I will do everything in my power to encourage in him the warmest feelings towards your Serenity.
Biondi, who remains a good subject of your Serenity, has recently been knighted by his Majesty for his services to this crown. I have received your Serenity's letters of the 16th September with congratulations upon success. I will take a favourable opportunity to impart the recent unhappy events in Rhetia.
London, the 14th October, 1622.
Oct. 15.
Misc. Cod,
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
628. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spanish ambassador is sending a courier to Brussels to-day to obtain powers from the Infanta for what he is to do at the congress about Burgundy, which means appropriating a part of the Palatinate. In this way they will break up the negotiations at Brussels and the English ambassador may go back to London stuffed with fair words, because the ambassador now in the Palatinate will represent England at the congress.
Vienna, the 15th October, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 She took leave of the doge on the 23rd September. She went with a large train with two coaches drawn by six horses and 30 to 34 horses in all. Filippo Calandrini to Sir Dudley Carleton from Venice, the 23rd September, 1622.—State Papers, Foreign; Holland.
2 Endymion Porter.
3 The garrison capitulated on Tuesday the 20th September. See Surian's despatch from the Hague of the 3rd October, No. 611, at page 467 above.
4 William Fielding (or Feilding) was made Earl of Denbigh, Lionel Cranfield the treasurer Earl of Middlesex, Digby Earl of Bristol and Doncaster Earl of Carlisle. The patents are all dated 12th September, old style.—Cal. S.P. Dom., 1019–23, pages 446, 447.
5 Digby in a despatch of the 8/18 October mentions the arrival of Sir Robert Shirley upon his return into Persia, when he was very honourably received and defrayed, though there was a subsequent diminution of cordiality, due to Shirley's own indiscretions.—State Papers, Foreign: Germany, Empire.
6 A noble gentleman of ours. Sir William Balfourd, captain of horse, having the guard on Sunday night last at Rosendal, next the enemy, had the good fortune to have his late loss near Skinckscone (where he was taken prisoner) well repaired by a party of men, 6 horse and as many foot, which conducting 6 waggons laden with baggage belonging to a Duko of Holstein, fell into his hands, both men and goods (among which is a service of plate) by mistaking their way. Carleton to Calvert, 24 Sept., 1622. st. vet.–State Papers, Foreign: Holland.