Venice
October 1622, 17-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1911

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477-488

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'Venice: October 1622, 17-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 17: 1621-1623 (1911), pp. 477-488. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88845 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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October 1622

Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Comunicazioni
dal Cons. di X.
Venetian
Archives.
629. In the Council of Ten.
That the letters of the duke and captain of Candia about the Viscount de Lormes be sent to our cabinet to do what is considered best for the public service.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.630. NICOLO PONTE, duke, and NICOLO VALIER, Captain General of Candia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Notification of the arrest at Canea of the Viscount de Lormes, accused of having taken money for some false pearls and of certain dealings prejudicial to the public service.
From Canea, the 19th August, 1622, old style.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
631. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The regiment of Gauri, a Scot serving the Infanta, has been sent to Harental. The troops are calling out for money. The Spaniards try to appease them with fair words, but without effect.
The Hague, the 17th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
632. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Some of the King of Bohemia's household arrived here two days ago, and he himself is expected soon. Schombergh reached Calais from the English court last Tuesday week. They say he asked nothing of the king except to permit his son-in-law to return here. They say here that his Majesty was reluctant to grant this in order not to offend the Spaniards, but finally consented because he did not know of any other safer place of refuge.
They are waiting eagerly to see what effect the relations of Weston and Nedersol will have upon that sovereign, the reasons of kinship, the manifest way in which Spain has been playing with him over these negotiations, his own reputation and that of his crown, and that his ambassador has seen the remaining fortresses of the Palatinate taken under his very eyes, to the contempt of his own subjects, all these things make their High Mightinesses and everyone believe that he must of necessity take some decisive step, although they feel by no means sure, fearing fresh artifices on the part of the Spaniards. They are especially afraid that what Digby has written from Spain will make an impression upon him, that the Catholic king or his ministers have announced that if the emperor will not make restitution, they will join forces with his Majesty to compel him, at which they laugh.
Since Weston's departure from Brussels, they have taxed him at that Court with spoiling the arrangement of an armistice, saying that he contrived to waste time and so afford Mansfelt an opportunity of entering the service of the States.
From conversation with certain persons of influence, I find that they are trying to devise a means of inducing the King of Great Britain to maintain the forces of the Count of Mansfelt and the Duke of Brunswick, so that they may throw themselves into Germany, and the ambassadors of the States will try to make an impression upon his Majesty. They hope that if he moves Denmark will do so also and other princes who have long waited for him to set an example, and they also count upon Gabor, although the queen told me the day before yesterday that she did not know what to expect from him. Nevertheless some believe that if only the King of Great Britain will move in earnest they may do some good.
On Friday morning the merchant Doulbier left for the Count of Mansfelt. Before he started he had a long interview with the Ambassador Carleton.
Yesterday and the day before the States were in great alarm at the news that a great Spanish fleet had arrived in the English Channel. They say here that the King of Great Britain was also in great alarm at the news that a large number of ships had been sighted off the coasts of Ireland.
The States have informed the King of Great Britain of their decision about the West Indies, and have offered his merchants a share. Their ambassadors were told that the matter would be considered. I understand that the reason why they have informed him and others was to learn his intentions, since he has interests there through Virginia, as they do not wish to encroach upon the boundaries which he claims for that colony, and they will inform the other powers when everything has been arranged and the administrators appointed.
The Hague, the 17th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
633. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has reached me this moment, which has caused the utmost satisfaction, that the King of England has declared war on the emperor, and has decided to raise an army and send it through Flanders, with the leave of the Spaniards if they will grant it, if not he will take it. The coming of the Spanish fleet is confirmed, but the report that the king would allow it to enter his ports for provisions is denied. The news comes from Aerssens. Carleton has received no letter yet.
The Hague, the 17th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
634. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England to the DOGE and SENATE.
The gentleman of the prince (fn. 1) who left for Spain, as I reported, after he had only proceeded a short distance, fell in with one Cottington coming from those parts, and returned with him to his Majesty, moved by the prudent consideration that this one's fresh advices might lead to a change in his instructions. Cottington is the gentleman who remained in Spain for some time as the king's agent. He is considered a good Englishman as he did not change his manners in that dangerous air. He returns, according to common belief, as secretary designate to the prince. It will be more than a month since he left. He brings nothing except the usual hopes of the marriage, the promises of good offices for the Palatinate and news of a relapse of the Ambassador Digby in his sickness.
In full council they decided to send back Porter. All the councillors held that there was no reason to depart from their former decisions, the prince and the Marquis of Buckingham speaking hotly against the false methods of the Spaniards who with fair words proceed to the most pernicious acts. They pray his Majesty, almost on their knees, to proceed to action required by the situation without more vain questioning or protest.
I understand that the king has somewhat cooled, putting a good interpretation upon what Cottington brings, the reception of things depending usually upon the disposition of the recipient, but owing to the strong representations of the prince, they added to the first commissions that the King of Spain should be asked for a passage through Flanders for 40,000 foot under the command of the prince himself, to recover the Palatinate if it should not be restored, to the end that if the king grants the request he will declare against the emperor, and if not they will have just cause for breaking with Spain, as if they had not enough already and as if any one could question the indissoluble intelligence and uniformity of interests between those two houses.
I believe that his Majesty agreed to this without departing from his usual style—threatening but not meaning to make war, but perhaps the prince has other objects and expects in this way to engage his father and compel him to act. It is certain that the Council has never shown itself so unanimous or better disposed or the prince more ardent and resolute. Accordingly at present only the king, from his natural inclination, clings to counsels of peace and agrees almost readily to loss and deception. As nothing is easier than to deceive those who wish to be deceived one may well imagine the success of the Spaniards, who are masters of the art, and by negotiation and exciting hopes they will manage to get through the winter, as if the better weather finds their opponents unprovided all efforts will prove vain. But such is the nature of this kingdom that the will is equivalent to the deed and an army can always be formed whenever they want one, although certainly to take it across the water and bring it to the Palatinate will always involve numerous difficulties.
The belief that the ships sighted off Plymouth were Spanish has become a certainty. They have counted twenty-two of them the others not flying their flags or not having yet arrived. It seems that the fleet ought to number about sixty; some are very large. The commander is said to be a Toledo. Rumour says that they bring about 16,000 soldiers. The Spanish ambassador who presented letters from his king to his Majesty informing him of their coming to these waters, said they came to punish the Dutch and requite them for Brussels. He asked the king for the use of his ports and provisions. The former was refused and the latter granted; but by a final arrangement they agreed to allow access to the realm up to eight Spanish ships.
The Ambassador Digby who sends word of the expedition of this fleet, one may say at its actual arrival, writes that he remonstrated about their not having communicated their decision to him. He spoke first to Gondomar, who shrugged his shoulders in answer. The other ministers said they thought it superfluous but in the future they would not omit to do so. They are very dissatisfied here with Digby over this matter, as they do not love to see this fleet so unexpectedly, from which England may perchance have no better defence than Spanish good faith affords, or rather the diversion afforded by the Dutch forces. The forts of the realm are so denuded that some have not powder to fire a single arquebus, and they have sent them provision from the Tower; and although the crown has never been better provided with ships, both in numbers and quality, there being about thirty very large ones at present, furnished at every point, yet they remain like corpses, without the soul of sailors, and languish idly at Rochester without the motion of navigation.
The twenty-two ships recently left Plymouth and have practically disappeared and we have heard nothing more what has become of them. The Dutch do not seem alarmed. The greatest damage might happen to the fisheries and their fishermen, but they will not pass the strait of Dover without great peril, especially in the absence of commodious ports in Flanders.
The Dutch ambassadors communicated to me the news of the raising of the siege of Berg. The news arrived here some days ago but was doubted and many bets were made about it. The certainty rejoiced everyone, the Spaniards being correspondingly cast down. I went on purpose to congratulate the ambassadors, with whom I will not fail to maintain the best relations. They recognise the occasion as one in which to press on their very difficult task, as, like the hydra, no sooner do they cut off one head than another comes. This delay does not displease the king, as he may be able to make a profit in the present state of affairs with Spain.
I have been to call upon the Ambassador Weston and did not omit to give him the praise that his faithful service for the general good certainly merits. Assuredly the frank reports of this excellent minister have not counted for nothing in the decisions taken. He thanked me warmly. I remarked that the chief person with whom he treated at Brussels was Belmar, now a cardinal, though he will not leave because he knows affairs there so thoroughly. He seemed to fear that the two places of the Palatinate cannot hold out owing to lack of supplies. He added that in Flanders they are beginning to run short of money, and shortly before Spinola raised the siege he was reduced to less than 10,000 foot, although he had about 30,000 when he arrived, with 10,000 horse.
We hear of the arrival of the Palatine at Calais, and he may now be at the Hague.
Soubise has not yet left Plymouth. He is experiencing many misfortunes and difficulties, and it seems that even the two royal ships are doubtful, as they fear some mishap to them which would seriously injure his Majesty's prestige.
The ship bearing the munitions granted by the king to the Spanish ambassador, as I reported, has been captured by the Dutch, who by their own hands have prevented the fulfilment of an improper concession.
Here they have decided to reply to the extraordinary embassy from Florence, and the same person will proceed afterwards to Parma to offer condolences upon the duke's death there. (fn. 2)
Two ships of Dunkirk of the Dutch continue to remain blockaded in the ports of Scotland. The ambassadors ask the king to release their fellow subjects detained with these, but his Majesty considers himself insulted because those ships fought almost in his own ports, and says if the prisoners are given up they must release the ships of Dunkirk.
In the multiplicity of affairs and the numerous offices passed with the prince, I have thought it best to abstain from audience, for which I shall reserve myself for next week. The king, one may fear, will get away from the city in order to escape from affairs, but the prince may stay behind and in that case I shall address my audience to him more gladly.
The ordinary of this week has not yet arrived from Italy.
London, the 21st October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 22.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
635. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It is thought that the English resident here may have been won over by the Spanish ambassador, against whom he does not speak as he did before. Recently he received a courier from the ambassador of his king in the Palatinate, asking, so he says, when Caesar will leave, after which he had a very close interview with the said ambassador, sending off the courier subsequently for what purpose I have not yet discovered.
They announce from Brussels that the negotiations with the English ambassador are broken off. He has returned home in a state of extreme dissatisfaction, and refused to take the presents sent to him by the Infanta.
Vienna, the 22nd October, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
Oct. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
636. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador at Brussels on the news of the fall of Heidelberg made the most vehement remonstrances but with little effect, and they say he writes that he has to do with phlegmatic and interested people, who are difficult to persuade.
Florence, the 22nd October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
637. ALVISE CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of the King of Great Britain have made a strong remonstrance about the capture of Heidelberg and about the continued operations against the rest of the Palatinate, since they had withdrawn from all offence through the offices of their sovereign. They were told that the forces of Bavaria had occupied Heidelberg and if those of Leopold had taken part, it was without their consent here, where they were quite ready to keep their promises; and if the emperor does not agree, they will use force to compel him to recognise the claims of the King of England. The ordinary ambassador told me this, being deluded into believing it, and he speaks against the merits and action of the Palatine. He declares indeed that his king wishes to reinstate his son-in-law, and will not accept any excuse that the Catholic may offer for not keeping his promises.
Both ambassadors were recently summoned to the Escurial when they found some of the members of the Junta for the marriage, notably the Count of Gondomar; but what is negotiated does not transpire, because since the Junta was nominated it has always met without the presence of the ambassadors. (fn. 3) I know that the latter hope more every day to arrange the matter. It is more and more discussed, especially as the Count of Olirares inclines to it, desiring to secure himself soon from the Infanta's vivacity, who does not seem to like him, and the king's affection for her might prejudice his position as favourite. It is therefore thought that he urges on this marriage, and to facilitate it he has had his intimate friend Don Fernando Giron nominated to take the place of the late Don Baldassare, and he has also introduced him into the Council of State to strengthen his party.
Madrid, the 23rd October, 1622.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
638. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Their High Mightinesses hope that the King of Great Britain will decide to maintain Mansfelt's forces, and I find that the King of Bohemia, who arrived here on Wednesday, has written to urge this on his Majesty, and he would like it done soon in order that Mansfelt might hasten with his forces to the Palatinate to raise the siege of Mannheim and save that place and Franchendal.
The Hague, the 24th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24. Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
639. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I visited the King of Bohemia on his return here. He said he hoped that God would put his affairs right and inspire the King of Great Britain to move decisively against the house of Austria for the recovery of his possessions.
With all their eagerness here to see what steps the King of Great Britain will decide to take, they are the more amazed that no letters have arrived from that quarter, either for their Excellencies, the Ambassador Carleton or his Majesty, although five of his household are in the English Court. It is true that the wind has been contrary for some days, but they hope some news may arrive at any moment.
The news of the arrival of a Spanish fleet in the English Channel is confirmed. At first they said there were seventy sail, report says there are no more than twenty-seven, and that they were sighted off the Isle of Wight. At all events they have sent a special messenger to England to learn the truth.
The Hague, the 24th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
640. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
We send you a copy for information of what our consul at Aleppo writes about a conversation he had with one who said that he was sent with patents of Callil Pasha, Captain at Sea, to negotiate a junction of the French, English, and Dutch fleets with that of the Turks and with the pirate ships, to harm the Spaniards. This will serve you for information and will help you to penetrate further into the matter, and to see if this person really was sent, as he asserts by order of the pasha and if such a junction is really contemplated by that empire, as a matter which deeply concerns our interests.
Ayes, 78.Noes, 5.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Oct. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
641 To the Ambassador in England.
Your letters, which we receive every week, afford us entire satisfaction. We gather that his Majesty is beginning to tire of the ill behaviour of the Spaniards and to think of drawing closer to those princes with whom he has more in common and to the crown of France in particular. In this connection we have to inform you that we hear from our Ambassador Pesaro that a gentleman sent by that king to the Most Christian about peace with the Huguenots, confided to him that the Chancellor at Paris said something to him about marrying Madame Henrietta to the Prince of Wales. We also hear from Naples that the internuncio of Poland there is going to Spain to act as ambassador, although under another pretext, to negotiate a marriage between the Polish prince and the Catholic's sister, taking numerous jewels and presents for the leading ministers to help his negotiations. We send these particulars for information. You will take opportunities to second any idea of union with France and of assisting the Dutch, laying stress on how little the Spaniards consider the interests of any one, their aims being purely selfish; and pointing out the advantages of their own relations, as your prudence will know how to do.
The good understanding you have with the ambassadors of the States corresponds with our intentions. You will continue this for the general advantage.
We approve of the good treatment you have accorded to Captain Bernardin Rota, and as you write that he is going to Holland we will send a duplicate of them to the Hague.
Ayes, 70.Noes, 2.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
642. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king only came to London for a single night and on the following day went to Royston, fifty miles away, to his customary pleasures of the chase. The prince and the Council remained behind and I, thinking the moment favourable, asked his Highness for an audience. After preliminaries I began by speaking of the recent unfortunate events in Rhetia, which happened under promise of an armistice. I pointed out the great concern of all the powers in this loss, what your Serenity had done and proposed to do, and that others should assist. The prince replied that the misfortunes of that people distressed him greatly; but for the distance his father would have afforded them assistance. France, so deeply interested, ought to help, especially now they have peace, so we hear. I remarked that the Palatinate and Rhetia were at present united and things would not be so bad in one if they were better in the other, but they were equally bad in both. The prudence and power of his Majesty and his Highness had a large field in the Palatinate to raise up the fallen and so confer a notable benefit upon the Grisons. I developed this point. His Highness replied that his Majesty would not neglect to do what was necessary, in fine I could obtain nothing more upon the events of the Palatinate beyond very general ideas all depending on his father and nothing of his own. I hope, in any case, that my modest representations may not prove useless to incite or confirm this young prince in worthy decisions and inclinations.
Every day recently he has discussed with the Council the means of convoking a parliament. Though this is most necessary it will always be difficult owing to the mistrust of the people and their resentment at the king's conduct, and owing to the discrepancy and opposition between their objects and his, and to have a good parliament in England and continue the old negotiations with Spain are to my mind incompatible. In any event the convocation must either produce very good or very bad results, there can be no mean.
When it became known that during the progress of these consultations the prince would remain here for some days, the king sent for him to join him. God grant that this may not upset what has been well begun either through political fears or from the usual love of peace.
Porter, the one sent to Spain, fell in leaving the boat at Calais and severely injured himself. The prince sent him his surgeon. It is believed that he will continue his journey; he has a courier with him who will carry the despatch in any case.
That Gezi who was at Rome has left for Spain with another, as Spanish as himself. I am informed that although their business in general is the same as Porter's, their methods may be different and possibly one mission may weaken the other. This last mission comes from the king alone while the other may be styled rather the Council's than the king's.
The Spanish fleet of which I wrote has left these shores and will have returned to its first course which was to ensure the passage of their fleet. There are various opinions about it here. It may be that bad weather drove it this way, but one may readily believe that they took the opportunity to show themselves off these coasts in order to arouse the king's fears, although the Spanish ambassador, with his usual craft said that they came against the Dutch.
There are eighty Dutch ships under the Isle of Wight (Veet), some as escort and some traders for various parts.
They have taken the seals from More, (fn. 4) formerly the prince's secretary, depriving him of his post, and given them to Cottington, who is reputed a Spaniard and a pensioner of Spain.
The king is sending a gentleman to advise the King of Poland to make peace with the King of Sweden. It seems that another is to go to Denmark to urge the king there to move for the Palatinate. Such advice given to others but not adopted by himself may not produce much effect. I understand that the king there, though well inclined himself recognises how little can be expected from this quarter.
The French ambassador came to tell me about the conclusion of peace. (fn. 5) The conditions are not known except that the people of Montpellier will not accept them, a circumstance which in my opinion makes it doubtful. He told me that now they will attend to the Valtelline. I pointed out to him the advantages of keeping an army employed which could not be disbanded without danger. He told me that Bassompierre had a large share in this peace. I replied that the same person after securing a useful internal peace should urge on a useful external war, with equal advantage.
The Spaniards at this Court announce that they raised the siege of Berghen op Zoom on account of the treason of some Italian soldiers afterwards declared rebels.
Seven hundred Irish, already granted by his Majesty, have crossed to fill up the company of the Earl of Tyrone. They are very fine troops, better than the English or Scots. The companies of this nation in Flanders are all but annihilated, and from what I hear from letters from gentlemen and officers of the army itself Spinola's entire force scarcely exceeds 20,000 men. Although they previously refused to Mansfeld a levy of English in his own name, the king has now informed him that he thinks of employing him and his force which is valued here on account of the cavalry, which this kingdom lacks. The Duke of Lennox told me this in confidence to-day when he came to call upon me. He held out hopes of good results after they have received the replies to the last despatch to Spain. I did not neglect to make the necessary representations to him, and he could not deny the tardiness of the king and his excessive leaning towards peace.
Vere not having enough men properly to defend the extensive circuit of the walls of Mannheim, has left that town and withdrawn to the citadel. It seems they hope he will be able to hold out for four or five months; but it is more probable that it will suffer the fate of the other fortresses.
Tilly, who has treated his Majesty's ministers very badly, would not allow any letters of the Ambassador Chichester to pass to those fortresses, saying he would do better to write and tell them to surrender. Much is written about the cruelty and barbarity shown to Heidelberg. Franchendal also is on the point of capitulating.
I have received your letters of the 23rd ult. and note what the ambassador at Rome writes; I regret that they go on swallowing the fortresses of the Palatinate without masticating the points which he reports the Spaniards think of proposing.
London, the 28th October, 1622.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Misc. Cod.
No. 61.
Venetian
Archives.
643. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Emperor and the Court left for Ratisbon on Tuesday. The Spanish ambassador left on Sunday and so did the English resident. Owing to the close negotiations between these two it is thought that they have gone on beforehand to confer on the way with Cicerstorf, the English ambassador who was in the Palatinate, and who is to represent his king at the congress, although with little profit according to the general opinion, as they know full well here how the Palatine stands with his father-in-law, and they feel quite sure that the King of Great Britain will not move in his favour more than he does at present, and the claims of kinship will have no more influence with him than reasons of state or his own honour, as he is thought to be infatuated by the Spaniards and by his desire to see the marriage negotiations concluded. (fn. 6)
Vienna, the 29th October, 1622. Copy.
[Italian.]
Oct. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
644. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Lord Chichester is now here, very mortified at the result of his negotiations. But the outrages he received in the Palatinate were not enough. When descending the Rhine he was stopped near Papemuts and a son of one of the Councillors of the Provincial court here taken from him under the pretext that he had been with the Duke of Brunswick, notwithstanding his protests. Moreover, two couriers whom he sent to Vere with passports from the Infanta were stopped by Tilly, who said he had nothing to do with her Highness there.
Chichester arrived on Saturday and I immediately sent to call upon him. He excused himself saying he was in bed with some fever, but I saw him yesterday. He seemed much distressed and intends to tell his Majesty of the affronts and treachery he has experienced. He felt sure that the king would not put up with it, and would find another way than negotiation to reinstate his children. He has correct views and seems full of the zeal that a good minister should have for his prince's reputation, but the original warmth and subsequent coldness make people here doubt what will come from England.
The ambassadors of the States in England write that the king has sent to the Catholic to ask a passage for his troops through Flanders to the Palatinate, but they think here it will end in nothing and the Spaniards will know how to divert this heat in the usual way. They fear the king will cool the more as they hear of no results from the inclination and fervour shown some days ago, excited by the prince's own voice. (fn. 7) No news reaches the ambassador or the King of Bohemia, so that his Majesty is very melancholy, at seeing himself abandoned on every side and not knowing what to expect from his father-in-law. The king and queen are indeed most unhappy; they have no permanent abode and are surrounded by many who have lost everything for them. They have three of their children here; the eldest son, the one born at Prague and the little daughter born recently.
It is thought that Mannheim will fall soon, as Vere has withdrawn to the castle, not having men enough to defend the entire town, which he burned before the withdrawal. The castle is strong, having six bastions, and can easily hold out if they have provisions. Vere was ill and so they fear the total loss of the place.
There is a variety of reports about the Spanish fleet, though all agree that there is a number of well armed ships with infantry to land at Dunkirk and Ostend, or as some say, at Embden. They suspect here that the King of England will afford them the convenience of his ports to withdraw to in case of accident and they believe he will allow the Marquis Spinola to make fresh levies in that kingdom, but they console themselves by the hope that when the king sends his troops to the Palatinate through the state of the Catholic, all his subjects will join them.
The Hague, the 31st October, 1622.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Endymion Porter.
2 The ambassador was George Gage. Salvetti in his letter of the 21st October says that Gage was to go on from Spain to Florence and Parma. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962B. See also Valaresso's dispatch of the 4th November, below.
3 The members of the Junta are given by Aston in a despatch of the 26th August, old style: Don Baltasar de Zuniga, Gondomar, the confessors of the king and of the late archduke, now bishop of Segovia, Antonio de Arostegney the king's secretary, and Andres de Prada, secretary. State Papers. Foreign. Spain.
4 Thomas Murray.
5 Peace was signed on the 22nd October, owing to the efforts of the Duke of Rohan. Siri: Memorie Recondite, v, page 413.
6 The modern copy of this despatch, made from the original at Vienna and kept at the Frari, gives what is undoubtedly the correct reading of this passage, viz.; essendo tenuto incantato da Spagnoli et dal desiderio di veder ultimate il negotio del matrimonio. The copy in the Miscellanea reads: in contato for incantato, and dal Residente per veder instead of dal desiderio di veder.
7 For the appeal of Charles to James, see Birch: Court and Times of James I, ii, page 344.