Venice
May 1623, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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'Venice: May 1623, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 18: 1623-1625 (1912), pp. 1-12. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88886 Date accessed: 31 August 2014.


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May 1623

May 1.
Misc. Cod. No. 62. Venetian Archives.
1. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They write from Augsburg that when Verdugo went to take Frankendal in deposit, although the governor was willing to hand the fortress over to him, the inhabitants objected, saying that they did not recognise the King of England as their superior, and they did not wish to submit to any one soever, except at the wish of their own lord. Consequently Verdugo has not yet entered the place. But the people will have to yield, to avoid a siege. Bavaria so far seems determined to hold on to the other fortresses, about which they have not entered into any negotiations with him.
Prague, the 1st May, 1623.
[Italian; copy.]
May 1.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
2. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States resolved on Saturday not to mix themselves in the levy of Colonel Gray of 4,000 foot in Scotland and 2,000 in England, for which Mansfeld asked them to give their patents, in order not to incur such an expense, as they are extremely short of money. They clearly see from what the King of Great Britain said to their ambassadors in that country, that he would be pleased for Gray to levy the troops, but wants it done with patents from the States, and that they should pay the men. Accordingly they refused, and Captain Corbun left last night with this sorry news, which will not please Mansfeld, whom Colonel Gray and the others interested had filled with great hopes. Colonel Gray told me clearly that they could not make the levies and get the men embarked before the middle of June, whereas the allies want them as soon as possible.
The Hague, the 1st May, 1623.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 1.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
3. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are eagerly awaiting the outcome of the Spanish marriage, though they do not know whether it is arranged; but every one thinks that it must be, and the King and Queen of Bohemia in particular told me that they considered it as good as done. The English ambassador, with whom I directed the conversation into this channel, said about the prince's unexpected mission, that the Spaniards were disturbed by the agreement arranged in England between the two East India Companies, believing that the king would no longer think of the marriage, and he wished to show them the contrary by sending the prince to Spain, but still more to obtain assurance of so many promises and to escape becoming a laughing stock to the world, as his Majesty had been involved in constant negotiation without any results. If this is the true reason, your Serenity will have heard it on better authority. The king and queen here accept what they cannot help.
The Hague, the 1st May, 1623.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 2.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Roma. Venetian Archives.
4. RANIER ZEN, Venetian Ambassador in Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Particulars about the dispensation for the English marriage are kept most secret. This causes the more murmuring, as they think there that matters involving religion ought to be dealt with publicly here. It is thought that interests of state and private promises will lead those affairs in a direction in which right and duty could never go, as was the case with the dispensation for the nephew with Venosa, (fn. 1) about which one could never learn anything. They attribute everything to the pope's excessive amiability, as he leaves his nephew to rule even in things which he ought not.
Rome, the 2nd May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Francia. Venetian Archives.
5. ALVISE CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have done my utmost to get information upon what the French ambassador said to me about the proposals of the King of England. Things point to its being practically true, as the Regent Caimo remarked previously that the marriage will only be concluded if they can arrange a league against his Majesty, and they will afterwards proceed to take steps against the most serene republic. The ambassador of Savoy told me this. The English themselves also state freely that once they are allied with the Catholic they might not permit him to be molested, but will share fortunes with him.
The ordinary ambassador expressed the same idea to me, though he modified it by saying that his king would persuade the Spaniards not to disturb Christendom by fresh acquisitions, and especially not to offend the most serene republic, as a power so friendly to him. A person of weight has also assured me that the Count of Olivares often impresses upon the nuncio that nothing better can serve his Majesty to bridle his enemies than the speedy effectuation of this marriage, as the prince expresses in his father's name, his readiness to afford all the satisfaction that will be asked of him for the benefit of the Crown of Spain. From this I gather that they are intriguing against the league, and the nuncio does not deny it.
The promise of the dispensation has already been sent by Cardinal Lodovisio with letters to the Count of Olivares, who went to congratulate the prince on the good news, asking him, however, to keep it hidden until everything was complete. But the English have announced that all is done, at which they say the nuncio is not a little angered. He sent a strong note to Olivares at Aranjuez stating freely that Cardinal Lodovisio expresses merely hopes and intentions, and if his Holiness intends to dispense, he requires these conditions, either the prince must become a Catholic and have Catholicism preached throughout his dominions, or he must allow complete liberty of conscience with security for its maintenance. He added that if he had demanded a great deal before arriving here, he wanted much more now (aggiongendo che se avanti fosse capitato qui dimandava tanto, assai più pretendeva al presente). This frank utterance of the nuncio seems to have diminished the very intimate relations he had with the Count.
Madrid, the 3rd May, 1623.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 4.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Francia. Venetian Archives.
6. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have found that they are carrying on active negotiations for the marriage of Madame Henrietta, his Majesty's sister, to Caesar's son, although they pretend not to care about it. The mother inclines to it from ambition to make her an empress. But as this certainly would not be the way to divide the house of Austria, but rather to strengthen it, they content themselves with keeping up the negotiations.
The ambassador of Savoy told me that his Highness would desire that princess for the Grand Duke, and that the queen does not altogether incline to that idea.
The negotiations with the emperor on the subject are a fact, but nothing else is certain.
Melun, the 4th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 4.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Svizzeri. Venetian Archives.
7. GIROLAMO CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Various persons have come here from Frankendal which surrendered, on terms, to the Infanta of Flanders. They report that if the King of England had not withdrawn his supporting hand from the garrison, it might have held out for a long time.
Zurich, the 4th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 4.
Cinque Savii alla. Mercanzia Risposte. Venetian Archives.
8. With regard to the petition of the Flemish nation for the continued exemption from import duty of wool brought from the West in Venetian and foreign ships, which exemption terminated last March, we consider that the conditions which led to this grant still obtain. The Genoese have recently been induced to declare their port free merely to permit Spanish wool to enter, expecting to obtain it cheap, and to compel Venetian merchants to buy it at high prices. The custom duty would stop wool from coming to Venice, to the grave detriment of the wool workers' guild. Moreover the wool trade will bring many more vessels to the port, which will lade other goods for the return voyage. This will help the sale of silk as well as of woollen cloth, and cloth working is being introduced in various parts of Italy, notably at Leghorn. The exemption of this wool has benefited the trade of our mart for many years, and we think it should be continued for such time as your Excellencies think best.
Marc Antonio di PriuliSavii.
Marco Zustinian
Piero Foscarini
Lorenzo Valier
Zorzi Corner
[Italian.]
May 5.
Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Roma. Venetian Archives.
9. To the Ambassador in France.
As the idea of the ecclesiastics is to divert the Rheno into the Po grande, we have decided to send an ambassador extraordinary to the pope on the subject, and have chosen Geronimo Soranzo, knight. Other grave matters now current have induced us to take this step.
The like to:
Spain, England, Savoy, Germany, Milan, Florence, Naples, the Hague, Zurich.
Ayes, 99.Nos, 2.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
May 5.
Senato. Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.
10. To the Secretary at the Hague.
Upon the affair of the Grisons the Most Christian has informed our ambassador that he thinks we should consent to the deposit with the pope, but upon condition that the demolition of the fortresses both in the Valtelline and in Rhetia be completed within three months, and the three Grey leagues and their friends restored to their prestine condition. He declares that he will not on this account abandon his warlike preparations for the league, but he thinks this course the best to achieve our purpose of getting the Spaniards out of the country. We have always opposed this deposit, and that has probably led the Most Christian to impose this condition. In order to maintain our union we have agreed to this course, as we have no other objects except to help the common cause and maintain liberty, our friends and the public weal. God grant that the negotiations may lead to a satisfactory termination, and that Spanish artifices may not gain the upper hand.
The Duke of Fiano, the pope's brother, sent for this deposit, had, according to our latest advices, already arrived at Genoa and started for Milan. Nothing fresh has happened so far.
We desire you to inform the States of our offices to obtain a large sum for them from France. Our ambassador in England has also performed an office with the Lord Chamberlain to remove the suspicion caused by the journey of the Prince of Wales. This has led that monarch to order his ambassador to assure the States in a special audience of his unchanging friendship, and that he will never do anything to their disservice.
The first paragraph to the ambassador in England, with this addition:—
We send this for your information with the news that our ambassador in France has invited the Swiss to enter our league, and they have summoned a general diet to Baden to concert their answer. We take this opportunity to acknowledge the receipt of all your letters, and express our increasing satisfaction with your services.
The first paragraph to the secretary at Zurich also.
Ayes, 123.Noes, 1.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
May 5.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
11. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have just returned from Windsor at the very moment that the ordinary is leaving for Italy; but this shortness of time will not excuse me from sending the latest news from Spain. His Majesty has heard of the prince's visit to the Infanta on Easter day, when she was with the queen, and his complete satisfaction with her great beauty; the arrival to the Catholic of a courier from Rome, according to some with the dispensation, to others with the assurance thereof; the latter seems more probable, since neither the king nor the prince has heard anything about it from their agent Ghesi, though certainly the prince then felt assured of its being granted.
They have revoked the order for the tilting horses, and are hastening on the ships, being assured of a speedy return. But I hear very secretly that the prince has been led to believe that the dispensation has been opposed by the offices of other princes. All the negotiations are passing solely through the hands of the favourites, Buckingham and Olivares, with the closest understanding between them, and little to the satisfaction of the Ambassador Bristol. The Earl of Carlisle is about to return, they say in order to relate the state of affairs, but possibly in order to get him out of the way, as he has always been considered French in his sympathies, and this caused surprise at his going. The short stature of the Infanta marred her beauty; the prince had so far given her a great deal, but at his departure the gifts would amount to a great sum of money.
Many things are less than the fame of Spanish greatness would lead one to expect. The two preaching ministers will not be sent back, as expected, and a solemn procession, including numerous flagellants, as usual in holy week, seemed strange to the prince, and the horror of it had increased his detestation of the Catholic rites. I am scarcely less certain of all this news than if it came from the prince's own pen. The king has sent one Mathu (fn. 2) to Spain with his own letter. This would create astonishment if any one could still wonder at the extravagances which abound daily. He is Spanish in sympathy, and Catholic by religion, having lived long in exile and disgrace with the king on these two accounts. I have not yet discovered the contents of the despatch. I think he has been chosen to show the amount of liberty enjoyed by the Catholics here, and indeed the king shows wonderful judgment in selecting his instruments for the purposes required of them. Many have noticed, though no one has said anything, that the king has neglected to take the communion this Easter according to the Protestant rite. One may make many conjectures, but there is certainly a mystery.
Franchendal does not accept the deposit arranged here; this is attributed to the burgesses' desire to receive the commands of their natural lord first.
The rumour of a truce in Holland constantly gains strength. I have seen a letter of Aerssens representing their state as confused, if not desperate, and concluding that they must be advised by necessity.
The French ambassador came to tell me about the 200,000 crowns with which the Most Christian is helping the Dutch, promising as much again soon. I thanked him, and commended the step, remarking that the arguments which led to this applied much more strongly to effecting the league on every count of honour, benefit and necessity.
A few days ago in a frank conversation with a leading nobleman, one of my most intimate friends, I remarked among other things, that as his Majesty had thought fit in his prudence to send his son to Spain, he ought to try hard to get him back as soon as possible if only for the security of his own life, among many other reasons, as sons are always considered a protection to the life of their crowned fathers. He seemed to meditate upon this, and told me that he had afterwards said as much to the king as his own idea, who replied that his daughter in Holland was a good protection for his son in Spain and for himself in England.
In response to my invitation I went to the installation of the Marquis of Hamilton, on St. George's day, the patron of the Order of the Garter. A prominent place was secured for me, from which I saw everything. I had a state banquet, and many signs of honour from his Majesty. I kissed his hand, thanked him, admired the order, and said that nothing was lacking save the prince's presence. He replied that they wrote that their return would be within six weeks, he had seen the Infanta, and found her most beautiful, whereat he rejoiced exceedingly. The day being somewhat warm, the king told me that in Spain they had felt the cold so far, and it rained during the prince's entry. I said I feared that as usual the later the heat came the more intense it was, and the rain was a presage of fruitful marriage, for in these deplorable times flattery is a counsel of prudence.
I have received the ducal missive of the 6th of April.
London, the 5th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 8.
Misc. Cod. No. 62. Venetian Archives.
12. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Infanta of Flanders proposes to the King of England a meeting at a convent at Augsburg to negotiate for a settlement of the affairs of the Palatine. This is what they promised to the Duke of Neuburg. The proposal is general, without saying what part the emperor, electors and princes will take to discover what that king proposes. Undoubtedly he will do what the Spaniards suggest.
Prague, the 8th May, 1623.
[Italian; copy.]
May 8.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
13. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has come of the surrender of Frankendal. The remaining English troops from that fortress reached Dordrecht on Friday last, and the officers came here to visit their Majesties and the English ambassador, and then left for England. This loss has especially affected the king, who remarked to me, Behold me utterly ruined, and I see no hope unless God sends it, adding that perhaps fortune would change. When the Spanish governor entered he desired the keys of the fortress, although the English governors and others remonstrated that it was the privilege of the citizens to keep them, and the terms stipulated that their privileges should be respected. Nevertheless the Spaniard insisted upon having the keys, and consequently they fear the worst for the inhabitants, who are largely refugees from Spanish dominions.
The Preacher Slatius was beheaded on Friday for the conspiracy. The English ambassador had urgent instructions from his king to press for the release of the Dominican friar (fn. 3) , whose case is not being hurried, although some have demanded his life.
Miller and Rota also have informed me that the King of England has let it be understood that if the Spaniards think of doing any bad turn to the prince his son, he will find a way of revenge, and to that end will have his daughter proclaimed Queen of England, some say regent. The queen herself told me recently that she will always be the salvation of her brother while he remains in the hands of the Spaniards. Some one remarked that such a declaration of the king would please the Spaniards, as it would arouse dissension between the brother and sister, and they could fish to more advantage in troubled waters. Denmark does not believe that the marriage will take place; Mansfeld told some one that he had certain advices indicating that it would not, others cherish similar hopes. But the Ambassador Carleton has heard from his king's agent at Brussels that the Cardinals at Rome had granted the dispensation for the marriage, though he was not certain whether it had been sent to Spain.
The Hague, the 8th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
14. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Earl of Rutland is announced to command the ten ships for Spain. His only daughter is the wife of the Marquis of Buckingham. He belongs to a great family, has a large revenue, inclines to Catholicism and is Spanish in his sympathies; all these things have combined for his appointment, as I foresaw and wrote. Lords Windsor and Morley will have the titles of Vice and Rear Admirals respectively. Both are thought to be Catholics. The other ships will be commanded by gentlemen chosen by the earl. Among these they think that Sir [Henry] Main waring may have the first place, being an experienced seaman, well known to your Serenity. I hear that this fleet will go to Coruña, in Galicia, as the other ports are not sufficiently safe or large. The ships of the old admiral did this when sent to the Catholic to swear the last peace. The remainder of this journey to Madrid will be made by land, a very bad route and long. Every day they hasten on the preparation of these ships; but they move slowly and need some days yet for completion. It is certainly most remarkable that a kingdom that once made ready great fighting fleets in a brief space cannot now fit out a mere parade squadron without great time and labour. The chief reason for the delay, however, is the lack of money, and they reckon that this equipage will cost as much as 30,000l. sterling. The king has signed an order for the provision of two special ships for the prince and the Infanta. He has already decided that the Infanta shall make her first landing in the kingdom at Southampton. They have renewed their discussions about building a Catholic chapel here and the question of its site, assisted by the Spanish ambassador. He does not neglect, so I understand, to make the most of this opportunity for his own advantage, though he may have only been sent for through the imprudence of others. The Earl of Arundel, one of the delegates, is praised for having spoken prudently on this occasion.
Amid so many indications of the certain and immediate coming of the Infanta, there are some who believe and even wager the contrary. One of these told me he had seen a letter of the Marquis of Buckingham to his secretary, saying that there was no need to prepare more than one ship, for the prince, as the Infanta would travel by land to visit her sister in France.
His Majesty has received word of the dispensation or brief from Rome sent to the Catholic and a copy by a person who arrived from Spain three days ago. I do not know what its nature may be, but it does not give satisfaction. This defect or doubt in the dispensation, if nourished with the usual arts, may serve to bring the prince back alone, though not unaccompanied by the ancient hopes of the marriage. Assuredly henceforward English insensibility and stupidity will put up with anything. It is also certain that the Spaniards clearly perceive that between the extremes of violently detaining the prince and the loss by completing the marriage, it is most advantageous for them as a means to keep the negotiations alive, keeping the Infanta with them, encouraging the prince's hopes and binding him by negotiations while leaving him personally free; but everything is in God's hands.
I hear two things which I must neither believe nor suppress. One that the Spaniards have asked the king for a port towards Cornwall as a repair for their ships in case of need; the other that under cover of some ships sent there they propose to get safely out of the Scottish port the ships of Dunkirk blockaded there for so long by the Dutch. I also knew that they are reawakening the pretensions of this realm upon the Dutch fishing in these seas, a matter to speak plainly, better calculated than any other to bring about a rupture between the two nations and which, in any event, would mortally wound Holland. I will keep myself informed and tell the Dutch ambassador of anything, using my services where they may prove helpful.
Naunton received orders, in the form of a request from his Majesty, not to leave his house or appear in the council until his son's return from Spain.
The wool merchants here, moved it is thought by Spanish craft, have besought his Majesty that as their art suffers great prejudice here from the Scottish raw wool which goes to Holland, certainly to the great advantage of that country, he will forbid its exportation, while they undertake to receive the Scottish wool at a reasonable price. The king sent this request to Scotland. Answer came that this matter could not be decided without a parliament, as the arrangement had previously been established therein. In fine, after some exchange of messages, the Scots stood firm to their claims, and the question dropped, things being left as before.
The French ambassador showed me a letter written by him home urging on them the undertaking established by the league. I thanked him and remarked that one might learn at the cost of the pope's reputation in the last action of the Governor of Milan, not to believe Spanish promises, and one might consider it an infallible maxim of state that all negotiations with Spain are absolute loss of time.
London, the 12th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Francia. Venetian Archives.
15. ANDREA ROSSO, Venetian Secretary in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A Scottish colonel (fn. 4) sent by Mansfeld to the Hague to ask the States for permission to levy 6,000 English and Scots in their name, does not seem to have succeeded. The ambassador of Savoy, who says that the King of Great Britain may be glad of this, has urged the ambassador of the States to induce his masters to satisfy Mansfeld, but his Excellency said that he could not move without orders from the State.
Paris, the 12th May, 1623.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 12.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Costantinopoli. Venetian Archives.
16. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Owing to disputes between the ambassadors of France and England it has been proved impossible to perform a joint office either in person or by letter with the new Pasha of Aleppo, so that he may act differently towards our merchants from what he has done in Cyprus.
The Vigne of Pera, the 12th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 13.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Firenze. Venetian Archives.
17. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary in Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English gentleman (fn. 5) has arrived from Rome and performed his offices of condolence and congratulation with the Grand Duke in his king's name. He is to proceed to Parma on a like mission. About the marriage, he told me that the dispensation will have reached Spain by now and will take effect next month. He himself referred to the prince's journey with astonishment, and it might be regarded as something fabulous rather than an actual event.
The gentleman told me further that your Serenity knew of this journey before any one else, through the Ambassador Valaresso's letter, and he did not know how he succeeded in sending the news on the day following the event. He not only commended the ambassador's ability and diligence, but also his suavity and splendour, whereby he has afforded complete satisfaction to the king and the whole Court.
Florence, the 13th May, 1623.
[Italian.]
May 15.
Misc. Cod. No. 62. Venetian Archives.
18. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Three days ago a courier arrived from Flanders with news of the armistice in the Palatinate arranged between the Infanta and England, and the articles, whereof I enclose a copy. They promise a general peace in the empire, but many believe Mansfeld and Halberstat will not accept these articles, since they may claim that they are not dependant of England or the Palatine, and so they conclude that the armistice will not amount to much. The congress for the peace negotiations will meet at Frankfort next August. The emperor, the Prince of Ozoller and perhaps some others will attend.
Prague, the 15th May, 1623.
[Italian; copy.]
Enclosure.19. Terms of the armistice arranged between the King of Great Britain and Isabella Clara Eugenia, Archduchess of Austria, for fifteen months.
Dated at Brussels, the 1st May, 1623.
[Latin; copy.]
May 15.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Germania. Venetian Archives.
20. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Scottish Captain Corbun has brought me letters from the Count of Mansfeld of the 8th May. I gave a general reply, but when I saw Prince Maurice on Thursday I tried to find out what the States had decided about his requests. Captain Corbun has come on Mansfeld's behalf to ask the States for at least 20,000 florins in order to levy the 2,000 foot with Colonel Gray, though he does not ask for their patents as at first. The States decided to do nothing until his Excellency's return.
I do not know what judgment to form about Brunswick's junction with Mansfeld. The duke told the Queen of Bohemia that he meant to do something for her. The queen did not dissuade him, but thanked him and said no more, leaving the duke to suppose that she would approve of anything that he might undertake. The duke's mother wrote asking the queen to dissuade him from his purpose. The queen has not yet replied, and is uncertain what to do, because she thinks that he might place her in a less wretched condition than her present one. She seems always more courageous and does not show her hidden grief, although she, the daughter of a great prince, finds herself his pensioner in this corner of Holland, the mother of six little children, with a seventh in her womb for five months.
The Hague, the 15th May, 1623.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 15.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
21. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States have decided to write to Langerach, telling him that there is no truth in the rumours of their negotiations for a truce. The people generally perceive that it is only a trick of the Spaniards, who do not cease to announce in Brussels that the King of England will be the one to arrange the truce and bring peace to these Provinces. In fact I have not met anyone who believes the Spaniards, and there is no sign of any negotiations with them. However, necessity sometimes compels people to do what they do not want.
The English ambassador has obeyed his sovereign's command in the assembly of the States in recommending the imprisoned Dominican, presenting his Majesty's letter, which is very strong and equally studied. (fn. 6) Their Excellencies were scandalised, not with the ambassador but with the king, amazed that he should intervene for this friar to please the Spaniards. Carleton also left the office in writing, but the deputies did not want it to get into everyone's hands so as not to expose so great a king to criticism of the common people. It is doubtful what will become of this religious and very unlikely that he will escape with his life.
The Hague, the 15th May, 1623.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 15.
Cinque Savii alla Mercanzia, Risposte. Venetian Archives.
22. The Senate having charged us to reply upon the letter of Andrea Moresini, Proveditore at Cephalonia of the 14th January last, suggesting an increase of 12,000 ducats and more in the duty of the new impost at that island and Zante, we recognise that if the deposits for payment of the duty on raisins were made in ryals at lire 6 each instead of in the customary gazette and grossetti, as the Proveditore recommends, the duty would profit by the increase from 6 to 8 lire at which the ryal is usually current in those islands. This is now turned by the islanders themselves to their own advantage, as they receive ryals at lire 6 from the merchants and change them into gazette and grossetti at lire 8 to pay the duty. The public service might profit by this advantage of an increase of 2 lire on each ryal without infringing the decrees of the Senate, but we leave the matter to the singular prudence of your Excellencies.
Marc Antonio di PriuliSavii.
Lorenzo Valier Savii.
Zorzi Corner
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 For the marriage of the pope's nephew, Nicolo Ludovisio, to the Princess of Venosa.
2 Toby Matthew.
3 Ophauen, prior of the Dominicans at Antwerp, imprisoned at the Hague on the charge of plotting to betray Heusden and three other places to the Spaniards. Carleton to Trumbull the 11/21 April, 1623.—State Papers. Foreign. Holland.
4 Colonel Gray. See Surian's despatch of the 1st May, No. 2 at page 1 above.
5 George Gage. See the preceding volume of this Calendar, page 481.
6 James's letter in favour of Ophauen is dated the 16th April.—State Papers, Foreign, Holland.


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