Venice
September 1623, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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102-113

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'Venice: September 1623, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 18: 1623-1625 (1912), pp. 102-113. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=88894 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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September 1623

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
130. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The story about the ships starting is being renewed; it is constantly announced but never done. The provisions are completed, the orders to go on board are issued, the admiral or general, the Earl of Rutland, is already there, and report says they will certainly leave, but their movement corresponds with that of the other parts of this body. The prince will by now have received his state robes for the marriage. The Spaniards promise this with asseveration, and the preparations have been made on their side also, but it may all be illusory. The most recent arrivals from Spain assure his Majesty and others that it is certain, but a person deceived is the best instrument for deceiving others.
The prince and Buckingham are scattering gifts of jewels about that Court to the value of many thousands of crowns. The Ambassador Bristol, however, continues to write in letters which I have read myself that the coming of the prince has greatly prejudiced the issue of the affair, adding that if he has not the glory of arranging he will escape the blame for delay. The king, I am assured, has now voluntarily given up the dowry and takes instead the Palatinate for his son-in-law. But it is easy to give what cannot be obtained; God grant that he do not give up the Palatinate as well as the dowry.
Here the building of the chapel progresses slowly. They have done nothing so far to carry out the articles sworn to, although they have had discussions on the subject. The Catholics, as represented by the Spanish ambassador, desire a proclamation granting liberty of conscience. This is discountenanced because it would certainly make much noise and might prove dangerous, but they make the excuse that it would not carry absolute safety. They propose instead a special licence for each Catholic under the great seal, saying that this will prove a defence against every eventuality. It would cost about 10 ducats, and for the poor they promise one to cover many. But this does not satisfy the Catholics, not so much on account of the expense as because of the slight regard in which the great seal is now held; and much more because to receive a pardon would be confessing a crime, and asking for a licence would afford them a clear catalogue of all the Catholics, a thing they have always avoided when previously attempted by the Protestants. Accordingly, with these differences, nothing has yet been decided. For the rest the consequences are slight of such a remarkable step as that oath, permitting a religion previously detested, breaking the coronation oath and upsetting the fundamental laws of the realm. Such things, even taken separately, would suffice to upset any state.
Among the articles the one considered most pernicious is that allowing the bishop or vicar alone to judge the crimes of the Infanta's servants, as it looks like a licence to commit any excess without any deterrent fear. But now the king holds his realm practically despotically and does what he pleases without taking counsel of any one, all remaining quiet. Accordingly I steadily refuse to believe that any of the councillors have constantly refused to sign the oath.
So far one of the chief results is the open declaration by many who before were only secret Catholics, and it is reckoned that since the prince left about a hundred families have declared themselves, noted down by his Majesty himself. As regards those newly converted from Protestantism. I do not know how to reconcile two utterly contradictory opinions. Some religious maintain that they are numerous, while the Protestants deny this utterly. Of leading Catholics there are none, with the doubtful exception of Lord Wotton, brother of the ambassador with your Serenity, who remains in the country. It is true that the more prudent are very reserved in declaring themselves, as they do not yet trust in the marriage, because if this should fall through the Catholics will be exposed to a very bitter persecution. Certainly the crowds are so great at the Protestant churches that they are hardly large enough and the preachers refrain with difficulty from the customary invectives against the pope. As regards the oath, one of the leading councillors said to me that they had only permitted what was done before without permission, and he hoped that with this permission the number of Catholics would diminish, because it was always nitimur in petitum. I also know for certain that the king said he was aware of the equivocation practised by the Jesuits over oaths. A strong Protestant, in speaking with me on the same subject the other day, did not hesitate to say that if they could break the first oath, they could break the second.
A titular bishop has arrived from Rome; he is an Englishman, and his sympathies are thought to be more French than Spanish. (fn. 1) He was strongly opposed by the Jesuits. He will be the chief of the religious here, who increase in numbers daily. They need him greatly both to restrain their licence and to regulate their excessive zeal. There was an instance of this the other day, when a priest, being called upon by the magistrate to take the oath in some civil matter, was handed the English translation of the Bible. He threw it down and violently trampled it under foot, to the no small scandal of good men at such excessive contempt for a book to be revered in any language, and with great risk of exciting a riot and exasperating minds already too embittered against the Catholics. Certainly such an action is calculated to arouse the fury which naturally lies dormant in this race. It is noticeable, and probably is not the case with any other, that all their frequent changes of religion have taken place without the shedding of a drop of blood. The reason may be their indifference to it, their great obedience to the king, or the excellent policing. It is true that a people slow to rise in revolt, when once it does move, rises at a slight incident, just as a small spark makes a great fire in dry matter. Most is to be feared from the Jesuits, who generally show themselves violent ministers, although at present I hear that they live here with great moderation. It is to be hoped they will continue so. I hear from Scotland of a rising among the people, but this is not sufficiently authenticated. Certainly the king must always fear the nature and disposition of those subjects.
London, the 1st September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Misc.
Cod. No. 2.
Venetian
Archives.
131. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The congress at Cologne has been postponed for two months, so they write from Brussels; they hope that in the interval not only the Palatine but Mansfeld, unless he is defeated, will sign the armistice, which England is urgently pressing.
Vienna, the 2nd September, 1623.
[Italian: copy.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
132. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
With the news of the conclusion of the marriage between Spain and England, their Highnesses here are preparing to send a rich present to the Infanta with the arms of England and Spain upon the tapestry hangings.
The English Earl of Warwick complains bitterly of the Spaniards because in the marriage treaty they have done nothing to protect the interests and persons of the English Catholics outside the kingdom. He says he will ask for the protection of the Most Christian King and renounce all claim to his estates. This Warwick also told me that an offensive and defensive alliance had also been concluded between England and Spain with this marriage; and that instead of paying a sum of money to the prince as dowry the Spaniards ceded to him their claims upon Holland. They intended in this way to provide grounds for an open estrangement between England and the States, which they would like to see followed by naval incursions by the English and other damage to the States.
Florence, the 2nd September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
133. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
There is some fear of Tilly capturing Emden, a famous port. If it fell into the hands of the Austrians it would greatly prejudice these Provinces and all Germany, as the Spaniards could then scour the whole coast of the Western Ocean, from the Strait of Gibraltar to the River Weser, especially now that they have not the English against them. This makes me marvel that the States do not decide to help Mansfeld.
The Hague, the 4th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
134. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The secretary of the King of Bohemia has just been to see me. He is going to the Prince of Wales in Spain to inform him of the birth of another son to his sister, which happened the day before yesterday. (fn. 2) The king sent immediately to inform me of this event, and I went to offer my congratulations. He took the opportunity to inform me that to his great regret he had been obliged at length to yield to the repeated instances of his father-in-law, made through the English ambassador, and had signed the paper for an armistice.
The Hague, the 4th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Collegio,
Notatorio.
Venetian
Archives.
135. Letters patent to all representatives, ministers and officials of the most serene republic to allow the goods of Sir [Henry] Wotton, ambassador of the King of Great Britain, who is returning home to his sovereign, together with those of his attendants and household, to pass freely without payment of duty, and in addition to provide them with every assistance and favour.
Ayes, 20.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
136. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Palatine has at last signed the truce arranged by the king. I enclose a copy of the letter whereby he consents. The form is prudent, and if the conditions are carried out one cannot say absolutely that the truce is bound to prove harmful. This act of obedience is in large measure the fruit of necessity owing to Brunswick's unhappy defeat and perhaps also to no small apprehension about Mansfeld, whose army is ill disciplined and worse paid, incapable of maintaining itself and too weak to take the field, unwelcome in the country and possibly suspect to others; in short, the States are in a difficult situation.
I hear on good authority that the Spaniards propose to cross the Iser, which would be a very important step, but one hopes that the approaching increase of the waters may aid forcible resistance to this.
The Dutch out of consideration for his Majesty sent a passport for the Dunkirk ship, but as it was addressed to Scotland it arrived after the vessel's departure with the royal ships, and hence the action reported in my last. However, they have shown their good-will, and they also apologise for the burning and promise to give up some men and a vessel seized heretofore. The king made a most courteous reply, assuring them of his inviolable good-will, but my original opinion is only confirmed that the king's friendliness to the States will consist in abstaining from harm, and so harm will ensue from neglecting the good. The Secretary Conway promises the Dutch great things. He maintains that the king is more and more irritated by Spanish perfidy, and once the prince is recovered he will take a generous resolution. This is very doubtful for this very conclusive reason among many others that if they show no resentment now when it is so necessary to bring their involved affairs to the wished for conclusion, they will show much less when this is attained. It is only too evident that the English are involved in their own nets and the very satisfactions employed by them to gain the inexorable mind of the Spaniards would themselves constitute hindrances to the speedy attainment of their designs. I sometimes cautiously express this idea, but it does no good. This Conway constantly follows his Majesty and grows in favour daily. But the Spaniards hate him extremely, refuse to recognise him and only negotiate with the other secretary Calvert.
Captain Best was ordered with his ship to Gravesend. He was summoned before the Council. He only offered slight excuses, which the States themselves recognised as such, but he will either not be punished or at most will lose his charge, as the government resents the blockade and burning and thinks they deserved this revenge. As a reward Best has received from the Spaniards a chain worth about 500 crowns. The Dunkirker also came to Gravesend where it was caulked and repaired. It is the best ship that the Spaniards have in these waters. It carries 35 pieces of bronze and held 100 men. It was constantly followed by a Dutchman even in the Thames, but without attack. The king has written asking the Ambassador Caron that this ship may have a passport as far as Dunkirk or Ostend, which provided that officials of his Majesty should be on board, and the ambassador should be escorted to one of those two ports by the Dutch themselves. The ambassador excused himself on the ground of the changes which had taken place since the passport was sent. The Spaniards adopt a high tone, and want to egg the king on to enforce the passage, but he fully recognises the Dutch power, as at present they are masters of the sea. They are hourly expecting orders on the subject from the Hague. The Dutch recently took some large masts sent from Denmark for seven ships being built by the Spaniards in Flanders. This is no small matter and it happened through the connivance of the person taking them.
Colonel Horace Vere has gone to his command in Holland. I hear that the Portuguese have slaughtered 400 Dutch in the Philippines. The Elector of Mayence is at Brussels asking for some place of the Palatinate that previously belonged to his bishopric. They may easily satisfy him, because if many share, the Palatine's dominions they will all readily take part against him.
Two days ago the ships for Spain finally left Portsmouth, but they may yet stop at Plymouth. As the king was not far away he was the first to see them. No news has yet come from Spain of Cottington's arrival.
The prince writes home that he is certain to return, although there he represents himself as so bound by love that he cannot tear himself away. For my part I believe this pretence of love is merely adopted by the prince as an excuse for his previous action, which otherwise was blameworthy and not becoming a prince. A fourth ship has arrived from the East Indies, also very rich. (fn. 3) The Spanish ambassadors importune the king with their claims. They were told that justice will be done after information has been taken. Meanwhile the merchants get their goods. Restitution would prove a mortal blow to this mart and certainly cause a revolt.
The consul is off to Algiers, and peace will be arranged between the English and those pirates. The latter undertake to give up 800 slaves and the former to release 40 who are in Spain and Sicily. The English ambassador at Constantinople began the negotiations. The king at first disliked this exceedingly and under Spanish pressure refused his assent, but has now agreed to allow it out of compassion for the slaves. They say that the pirates will gain more from trade than from piracy with the English; certainly without this peace the Levant trade was practically ruined. I think in consideration of this it would serve your Serenity's interests to intervene with tact against this compact with pirates as dishonourable and insecure. The movement in Scotland arose from a great number of poor beggars travelling towards England, owing to the famine recently prevalent there. The present year is plentiful in this kingdom.
I have received your Serenity's advices of the 26th July and the 5th August.
London, the 8th September, 1623.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
137. Copy of letter of FREDERICK, Elector Palatine, to the KING of ENGLAND.
Filial respect compels me to agree to sign the treaty presented to me by the Ambassador Carleton, but I hope you will allow me to express the reasons which have made me hesitate. Among other things calculated to create doubts is the communication to the electors and princes of the empire, in the emperor's name, of some other treaty dated at Brussels on the 1st March, differing from the one to which your Majesty agreed. I take this course out of obedience, accepting the interpretation of the articles given in your letter of the 31st July and rely upon the solemn promises which you have repeated to me to obtain the restitution of all my dominions and hereditary dignities without permitting any conditions prejudicial to my honour or conscience.
I therefore beg your Majesty, firstly, to obtain the complete restitution of my dominions and dignities without delay, not suffering anything contrary to my honour or calculated to endanger the safety of my person or of those belonging to me, and without countenancing the unjust transfer of the electorate.
Secondly, that a fundamental question in the negotiation shall be my said complete restitution, and until that is assured that you will not agree to any conditions for yourself or for me.
(3) If they wish to bind me to any points prejudicial to the constitution of the empire, the golden bull, or the pre-eminence of the electors, it shall not bind me.
(4) The same to apply if they wish to make me do anything against the Dutch or other old friends.
(5) That the Duke of Bavaria and his allies be specially included, so that if the emperor and the King of Spain are inclined to satisfy your Majesty, they may not create any obstacles.
(6) That your ambassador at the diet may be accompanied by some one on my behalf under a safe-conduct. As all Protestant powers are interested in my cause I am bound to look after our common interests.
The Hague, the 15–25th August, 1623.
Postscript.—I have represented to your Majesty how they persecute my poor subjects, not allowing them freedom of worship and putting heavy impositions upon them. Your Majesty has graciously promised to demand an explanation and to speak to the Spanish ambassador. I would especially desire my subjects to have liberty of religion and not to be despoiled of their goods during the truce. I beg you to stop all confiscation and extortion in my country and obtain the revocation of what has already been done. I beg you to obtain that my subjects may go and come freely and enjoy their goods without hindrance, and in case the opposing side refuse I shall be glad to know what your Majesty proposes to do.
[Italian.]
Sept. 9.
Collegio,
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
138. To the POPE.
The new doge notifies his election, in place of Antonio Priuli, deceased. (fn. 4)
The like to the following:
The emperor; the Kings of France, Spain, Great Britain, Poland, Bohemia; the Duke of Savoy; the Grand Duke of Tuscany; Leopold; the republic of Genoa; the States; Count Maurice; the Governor of Milan; the Dukes of Mantua, Modena, Parma, Urbino; the electors of the empire; the Dukes of Lorraine and Wirtemberg; the Viceroy of Naples.
[Latin.]
Sept. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
139. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
There are many rumours here, but I only write what is considered true, as they sometimes publish the most extravagant and unlikely reports. I understand that the differences with the King of England are adjusted which arose about the burning of the ships and apparently the States now enjoy excellent relations with that sovereign.
The Hague, the 11th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
140. LORENZO PARUTA, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English agent Wake is certainly a very worthy man, and he receives good information from various parts. Yesterday when I called upon him he told me that he heard on good authority that the Archduke Leopold was actively negotiating to marry the widowed Princess of Urbino, and that this alliance might easily take place, as the grand duchess dowager and the archduchess were very favourable. He further said he had heard from Milan that the governor had express orders from Spain to abandon negotiations for an alliance with the Valesani, purely in order to satisfy the Most Christian King, who had remonstrated strongly about it and about other attempts of Feria to the prejudice of his throne.
Turin, the 11th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 13.
Collegio.
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
141. The English Ambassador came into the Cabinet and said:
I have two offices to perform. Firstly, to congratulate the republic on the election of your Serenity. It hardly becomes us foreigners to dilate upon virtues which are so well known. I wish your Serenity long and prosperous years. My king will, I know, be delighted, because he preserves a happy recollection of your embassy. (fn. 5) Secondly, I have to take leave, but I hope I may have the opportunity of seeing your Serenity again. I shall do what I can to serve this nobility. My first duty on reaching London will be to go and pay my respects to Sig. Valaresso. I hope your Serenity will honour me with your commands of the way in which I may best cherish the good disposition of my king towards this republic. At my departure I recommend to your Serenity all those of our nation, no small number, who are engaged here, whether in trade or in serving the republic in arms, among the latter Colonel Peyton in particular, a brave and generous man, now suffering with fever. (fn. 6)
I leave an English gentleman of good birth and bearing (fn. 7) to take charge of the affairs of my king here, while my secretary will remain here for special affairs. I leave full of desire to serve the republic and ambitious for her good opinion. Although I have as yet received no favourable reply to my petitions in favour of Moretti, I rely upon the courtesy of the Senate. The Countess of Arundel also interceded warmly for him in this place. I will conclude my discourse like a French letter and remain while life endures your most devoted and obedient servant.
The doge replied, returning thanks for the congratulations. They regretted the departure of the ambassador was so near, but hoped to see him again before long; he would always be welcome. They would give him a reply to his Majesty's letter. They would always gladly receive the gentleman whom he is leaving, and would welcome every opportunity of showing favour to his countrymen. The delay in the matter of the looking-glass-maker arises not from any lack of good-will, but from the strictness of the laws; they hoped to content him before he left.
After the ambassador had replied courteously he introduced some English gentlemen, whom his Serenity received very graciously, and he then took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Sept. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
142. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador has been employed by the Palatine to ask France to pay his debts. The ministers here answered very copiously, and so the ambassador wrote to the Palatine that he may hope for the future from the French what they have not done in the past. This has increased his hopes, or at least has persuaded him that he may constantly apply to France, although she will do nothing more.
The same ambassador has declared that the King of Great Britain cannot and ought not to help the States. The ministers have declared that they will be the more bound to assist those Provinces. No reason has been given to me for this ill-timed office except the present simplicity of the English.
Poissy, the 14th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
143. That in gratification of the English ambassador at his departure, and at his repeated request, Antonio Moreto be released from the ban against him, he having paid 200 ducats and satisfied all the obligations of his condemnation, the Countess of Arundel also having petitioned for him at her departure. That this decision be conveyed to the ambassador by a notary of our chancery when the letter in reply to his Majesty is sent to him.
Ayes, 132.Noes, 9.Neutral, 10.
On the same day in the Collegio:
Ayes, 20.Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
144. ALVISE VALARESSO, Venetian Ambassador in England to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have recently been to call upon the Secretary Calvert, who has been for some days in progress with his Majesty. At present he bears the weight of affairs with the Spanish ambassadors. I excused the delay in performing the office on the grounds of his being away and his many occupations, and spoke of the necessity for the Board of Health to control packets from Constantinople. He approved the custom as a necessary one, but remarked more than once that he did not mean to infer the abolition of the practice, but its regulation, so that instead of tearing they may merely cut the packet, that being sufficient for sanitation, while the other damages the letters too much. I said what was necessary on the subject because I could not pass it over in silence after he had repeated the idea.
Afterwards I referred to the leavetaking of the Ambassador Wotton, commending his prudence and worth, our sorrow at the departure of so valued a minister and our joy at the prospect of having him back again before long. He endorsed my praises, especially remarking on Wotton's affection for your Serenity and our city, which he calls his second country. He said his Majesty could not employ a better minister there, but was very abrupt about his return or that of anyone else.
He told me that the King of Poland is asking for a levy of 8,000 men from these realms, their colonel to be Sir Stuart, a Scot and a servant of that king, who has lately arrived in London. They are meant to act against the Turk, though a difficulty is expected on the part of Denmark, who will stop them in the Strait of Denmark lest they be intended to act against Sweden, while to land them at Hamburg, as they are said to propose, would entail the inconvenience of a long march by land. Stuart has neither money nor letters of credit. The true object of the levy does not yet appear, but seeing the understanding between the Polish king and the house of Austria, one may easily surmise that the king readily granted this levy for the sake of ridding Great Britain of those most inclined to arms and least patient of poverty.
They are debating the way of carrying out the things sworn to for the benefit of the Catholics. A proclamation is entirely rejected, as Calvert also told me. They persist in a licence under the royal seal, and the only difference is over the manner of carrying it out. He suggested to me that the Spanish ambassadors would go to the king on this subject, as they did yesterday. The imprisoned priests have presented a petition to the ambassadors for their release, of which I enclose a copy. A Scottish priest saw Inoiosa yesterday, and spoke strongly to him about the ostentation and worldly aims of Spain, in benefiting the religion in London alone, without caring about the provinces and still less for Scotland, just as if they were bastards of the church.
Three days ago the ships for Spain were at the extremity of the kingdom, at Plymouth, and since then the wind has been unfavourable for them. Last Sunday his Majesty sent Grens (fn. 8) to the prince, with news of the state of the affair, so far as I can discover, and the permission of conscience inter parietes, not with the proclamation but under the seal. Some add, though I do not believe it, with express orders to the prince to return in any case, whether the marriage is made or no. I know for certain that the king has repented more than once of deciding upon the prince's journey.
This morning a gentleman of the prince's chamber named Glenham arrived from Spain and went straight to the king. From what some one who spoke to him reports he brings word of the prince's absolute determination to leave, even without the marriage, embarking upon the two royal ships which have been there so long, which will be escorted by the English merchant ships now on those coasts. The news of the intention is certain, but the carrying of it out is subject to the usual contradictions. I hear at least that they begin to admit the return without the bride, even the Hispanophiles, who constantly denied it here with effrontery, when they were speaking about it freely and openly in Spain.
In Inoiosa's house they have recently discussed a marriage between his son and a daughter of Buckingham, only two years old. Thus their arts constantly extend, and following the example of the negotiation about the prince they propose something similar between the ministers. A leading servant of Inoiosa told my informant that if he chose he could return as governor to Milan, and I know for certain that every day he buys very rich presents to send to the Countess of Olivares.
This mart grows constantly worse and is very short of gold. Many merchants are going bankrupt and not a few shops are closing. Every one complains and one hears evil voices.
London, the 15th September, 1623.
[Italian.]
Enclosed
in the
preceding
despatch.
145. Copy of PETITION of Catholic priests to the Ambassador Inoiosa.
Amplissime et Excellentissime Domine:
Placeat Excellentiæ Vestræ preces exaudire supplicum quorum nomina infrascripta corpora vero in carcere vulgo the Clinck (fn. 9) prope Londinum ob confessionem fidei Catholicæ et Apostolicæ Romanæ detenta sunt: et si forte in auribus Excellentiæ Vestræ sussaverit quis, quod voluntarie ibi maneamus, cum liberi esse possimus; pro certo sciat aliam e carceribus liberationem nunquam fuisse nobis oblatam, quam exilium a Patria et licentiam quandam pervagandi orbem terrarum nimis onerosam sonibus, cum longo major pars nostrum sexaginta annos superaverit, et coeteri jam jam sexagesimum aetatis annum acturi sint; aut certo ad illam, prope accedant. Pro certo insuper cognoscat Excellentia Vestra exilium illum, mortem scilicet civilem (quam aliquibus liberationem a carcere appellare placet) tanquam gratiam aliquam magnam ad instantiam Illustrissimorum Principum Catholicorum Legatorum concedi solita ea solummodo lege nobis propositam fuisse, ut qui hujus gratia participes fieri cupiebant, supplices nomina darent, quo facto tanquam Lesa Majestatis Rei, exulare sunt permissi, si vero Excellentia Vestra a Serenissimo Rege nostro, nomine desideratissimae Infantis Hispaniæ, obtinere potuerit ut vera libertate donemur, ita ut cum Catholicis et amicis nostris absque legum in contrarium latarum favore et periculo reliquum vitæ nostræ iam senes agere possimus; et rem gratissimam nobis faciet, et perpetua memoria dignum quid post se relinquet. Nos vero non solum pro clementissimi Regis nostri qui hanc gratiam concessurus est salute, summa expectationis Principis nostri Caroli prosperitate, atque serenissimæ mediatricis nostrae Mariae, in cujus gratiam hec concedenda fore speramus felicitate, sed etiam pro Excellentia Vestra qui piissimum hoc opus promovere studuerit incolumitate et supplices extendere manus et preces attentas D.O.M. offerre nunquam desinemus.

Footnotes

1 William Bishop, bishop of Calcedon. He was consecrated at Paris on the 4th June, and is said to have landed at Dover so early as the 31st July. Dict. Nat. Biog.
2 Louis, the fifth son and seventh child of the Palatine, according to Hüber (Genealogische Tabellen) he was born on the 21st August (? old style) and by a correspondent of Mead, on Thursday the 31st. August (Birch: Court and Times of James I., ii. page 417), a month before time, because of the queen receiving a fright.
3 The Palsgrave from Jacatra with pepper and cloves.—Cal. Colonial Papers, East Indies, 1622–4, pages 143, 144.
4 Priuli died on the 12th August. His successor, Francesco Contarini, was chosen on the 8th September. The event delayed Wotton's departure from Venice.
5 The doge Contarini was sent as ambassador extraordinary to England about the Apologia super juramento fidelitatis. He was in England from the end of January to the beginning of March, 1610. See Vol. XI. of this Calendar.
6 He died on the 13th October following.
7 Michael Branthwaite, a relation of Calvert.
8 Richard Grimes.—Cal. S.P. Dom., 1623–5, page 70.
9 The Clink prison near St. Mary Overy dock, in the parish of St. Saviour, Southwark. It belonged to the liberty of the Bishop of Winchester.—Stow: Survey of London, ed. Strype, 1755, vol. ii., page 29.