Venice
May 1626, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1913

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408-421

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'Venice: May 1626, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 19: 1625-1626 (1913), pp. 408-421. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89062 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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Contents

May 1626

May 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
572. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A most ample ratification of the last league with Denmark and these States has been sent to the English secretary here. I fancy there will be some small difference, as the English king binds himself, his successors and subjects, which is not expressed in the others. Accordingly they have sent back to England, but I believe it is all in order to gain time amid the quarrels between that crown and this country.
The English ambassadors and ministers always had a place in the Council of State here, by an arrangement made with Queen Elizabeth, when the ports of Flushing and Brill were pledged. In 1609 a defensive league was made between England and the States annulling all past compacts and providing that upon the payment of the portion remaining for the redemption of those towns the States might intimate by their minister that the English ambassador should no longer have a place in their Council. But as the States had not entirely paid off the debt up to the departure of the Ambassador Carleton, the intimation was not given, so that they might not have to make the payment, and the English had some reason on their side, as the arrangement was made by the late King James. Now, having no more debts and with a different king, the States have intimated to the Ambassador Chelegre that he will not have a place in the Council, and so his coming is postponed. The king does not want to lose his Jus, and the States are equally determined not to grant it.
From this it arose that the English secretary requested the return of the four English regiments paid by the king on the plea that he wants to use them for the public service and against the States' enemies. The States do not like this, and if the English persist, the agreement by which the king binds himself to maintain these regiments expires next September.
The Ambassador Joachim also sends word that parliament has some notion of starting a company for the West. They like this in one way, as if parliament does this the king will not be able to come to terms with Spain without its consent, and the Spaniards will never allow that navigation, as it is the most difficult point with the States. On the other hand they fear that considerations of gain may lead to quarrels such as occur in the East; and if the company is formed the fleet will have to go apart, but I do not think that they want companions in the dominion of the sea.
To the requests for ships for the fleet preparing in England their High Mightinesses have given orders for their portion, which will consist of some 15 or 16 ships. 80,000 florins have recently arrived from England for a month's pay for the four regiments aforesaid, who are creditors for much more.
The Hague, the 11th May, 1626.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
573. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity's commands of the 7th reached us here, and hasten our journey to London owing to the indisposition of the Ambassador Pesaro and the Secretary Rossi. We brought good weather with us from Venice, but not the good roads. We hear of very great difficulties about crossing the mountains, which prevented us taking the Grisons route, caused by the melting of the snow. We shall go to Belinzona and cross the St. Gothard, or if that is blocked, take the St. Bernard and Val di Musocco. We are anxiously awaiting passports from Milan, as we must cross a few miles of that State. We are assured that the ministers there will show every courtesy. We attribute the delay to the absence of Feria and the Vice-Governor at Alessandria and to the slowness of those ministers. We shall try to make up for this loss of time and hope in any case that Pesaro is better by now. We have nothing to add to the advices sent by the excellent representatives in these parts. The troops have a flourishing appearance at Verona, Bressa and Bergamo. The representatives have shown us every honour.
Bergamo, the 12th May, 1626.
Postscript.—The passports have just reached us, at the first hour of the night. We hope to continue our journey to-morrow morning.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
574. SIMON CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassadors when I saw them before their departure, though they always confided all their business to me, never told me that their king had taken away their powers to treat, which they did here until the very last moment, nor did they ever mention to me the question of titles between the two crowns, of which your Serenity tells me. Far away from the proper places unsubstantial and unsound things occasionally come.
Melun, the 12th May, 1626.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
575. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador told me that he had instructions to communicate some particulars, which are the same as they have told the Ambassador Pesaro. It amounts to this substantially, that seeing the oppression of Germany and the progress of the Spaniards, his Majesty for defence has entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark for the purpose of relieving the princes of Germany and humbling the House of Austria; and seeing the very hard case of the States since the loss of Breda and the death of the Prince of Orange, he had tried to induce Prince Gabor to move. Gabor had not only agreed, but through the efforts of the English ambassador at Constantinople they had obtained the Sultan's permission for this, though they feared the Spaniards would try to induce the Turks to withdraw this, and therefore his Majesty desired the support of the republic at the Porte in this matter. The ambassador added that as the cause was common he felt sure your Excellencies would consent readily. He also asked me to get your Serenity to direct the Bailo at Constantinople to try and destroy all treaties for peace between the Ottoman house and the Austrian, spending the money required, as their ambassador has orders to do the same. He said all this showed the zeal of his king for the public cause, as he thought of matters so far off when he had so many other important things near at hand.
I commended the generous resolutions of his Majesty and the prudence of his ministers. I reminded him also of all that your Excellencies had done. The ambassador afterwards made two requests, one that Sir John Vere, now in your pay, might have leave for a year to serve his Majesty, the other than an English gentleman condemned to the galleys for a simple question might be released.
He told me that parliament was continuing to the complete satisfaction of the king; at the outset there had been an outcry against the Duke of Buckingham, but the members had settled down in part on seeing his Majesty determined to support the duke, and they had already contributed 3 tenths and 3 fifteenths, amounting to three millions of gold, and they expected new declarations to pursue the undertakings begun. The fleets were ready and waiting their provision of food and other necessaries. They would wait for the decisions of the league and act accordingly. A courier who came from London in 11 days brought this news to the ambassador with power to treat and conclude whatever he might consider advantageous for that crown.
The day before yesterday the duke sent for me, while the English ambassador was talking with him. I think it was premeditated, because hardly had I entered the room when the ambassador began a long speech about the affairs of Germany and Italy, the present disadvantages of the Spaniards and the generous resolutions of his master. His Highness took up the tale, pointing out the danger of losing this opportunity, the little hope from France and so forth.
The ambassador then took up a card to refresh his memory and suggested the four articles following, to obtain a prompt reply from the duke and me, saying he wished to send the courier the following morning. The forces of his king were all ready; there was no time to lose or wait for answers, and he had orders to write yes or no.
The articles were these:—
(1) War or peace is certain between the leaguc and the Spaniards.
(2) If peace is arranged between the Catholic and the Most Christian by Farges, will the republic and his Highness sign that treaty ?
(3) If the republic and his Highness are not satisfied with the treaty, will they listen to the proposals made them by the King of Great Britain and join his Majesty and his friends against Spain and the House of Austria ?
(4) If it is decided to disarm in Italy, will the republic and the duke help the Margrave of Baden with forces adequate to his claims ?
To the first his Highness and I made a similar reply, pointing out the uncertainty of France, though I certainly endeavoured to show that French affairs were not so desperate. On the second point the duke said he would not separate himself from your Serenity, but he felt sure you would not sign the treaty. I spoke with less certainty, but said that probably his Majesty himself would not accept the treaty. To the third article, the duke simply said that he would abide by the decision of the republic, looking at me steadily, and would wait to hear from her.
The ambassador repeated several times that this was not a categorical reply and his king would not be satisfied with it. The duke and the prince repeated the same things, every one trying to say something if not binding at least of hope. However, I confined myself to generalities. As the ambassador broke out that his master was abandoned by those on whom he had counted most, I thought proper to answer him that if the King of England had moved against the Spaniards in concert with the republic, she would never have abandoned him, but the king had found the declaration necessary in his own interests and for the relief of his relations and friends, so he had no cause to find fault with the republic, which had done so much for the general liberty and for his own interests.
Every one agreed to this, and the ambassador abated his complaints and spoke in a laudatory way of your Serenity.
To the fourth article his Highness replied that he would give men in case of disarmament, but not money, because he had none. The prince thought there might be some difficulty about men, because their own needs were great, disarming was not so near and difficulties might arise, in fine he betrayed his intention to use those men.
Turin, the 12th May, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
576. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In the course of the discussion the duke said he did not mean to do anything that might offend the republic, he only wished to recover his own, and no one should object to that. The English ambassador was much encouraged by this, and said he would inform his Majesty. I shrugged my shoulders, and remarked that your Excellencies wished his Majesty every success, but in your opinion the right course was to await the reply from France.
Turin, the 12th May, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 13.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia,
Risposte 147.
Venetian
Archives.
577. After taking information as to the means for restoring the mart of Venice and increase the export duties, which amounted to 350,000 ducats when there were no marts at Leghorn, Genoa and elsewhere, and now only realise some 200,000 ducats, we consider it necessary to make the following provisions: Firstly, the most serious loss to our mart and the customs arises from western ships going to unlade all their goods at Leghorn and Genoa, where they are free from duties, and then proceeding with their consorts to the islands of Candia, Zante, Cephalonia and Corfu to lade malmsey, currants etc., and so they bring nothing to your Serenity's state, and take away from it what they require, which they cannot find elsewhere in the world except in those islands. We propose to meet this in the following way. The laws already provide that foreign ships which do not bring to this city at least two-thirds of their cargo shall not have leave to lade here for the west or elsewhere. This should be renewed with strict injunctions to the rectors of the islands not to permit foreign vessels to lade for the west unless they have a guarantee from the magistracy of the Five Savii that they have brought their entire cargo to this city, as in this way the English and Flemings, who require the malmsey, currants etc., which come from the said islands and nowhere else, will be compelled to give up going to Leghorn and Genoa. As regards the various goods which they take, it will be advisable to reduce somewhat the export duty on some of them, to encourage our subjects and foreigners who supply themselves at Leghorn, to come here and buy. We do not advise reducing the import duty on the goods the said vessels bring, except on salt fish, of which less is brought than used to be the case, and this year in particular herrings came by the mainland, brought here from Leghorn, and on these we think the heavy duty should be reduced by one-half. It will also be advisable to reduce the export duty to a half and not compel the goods to be given to the art of saltfishmongers. It will also be advisable to concede the free export of oil from the city by sea, as is allowed to all who take it by land, and make the like concession for mace, anise, almonds and the crops of Apulia, upon which the duty amounts to little or nothing, and also for malmsey, without export duty. With these advantages that trade should recover and the import duties should rise with the increased traffic.
Rice also should be exported free upon payment of the duty.
To encourage sailors to come with their ships, we propose the exemption of their goods to a certain amount determined by the character of their ships and their voyage and numbers, as was done anciently, but has been limited of late.
That such ships be released from the extortions of so many bodies, as we consider the anchorage charge enough. We also think that the export duties on pepper, cinnamon, cloves, logs, nuts, mace, indigo, sugar in powder and similar goods, from which only small sums are derived should be reduced, as Italy and even your Serenity's towns make use of Leghorn. We also advise the import without duty of burned wax. We further advise the renewal of the laws of 1503 compelling merchants of the mainland to supply themselves at this city.
We have come to these conclusions after gathering information from merchants, from customs officials and from ministers.
Andrea Contarini,Savii alla Mercanzia.
Antonio Donado,
Pietro Foscari,
Zuanne da Mula,
[Italian.]
May 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
578. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
The more we work for the weal of Italy the more frequently events happen to the common prejudice. The pope has refused to declare himself upon two articles of the treaty of Fargis, about taking the forts and sending his nuncio to the Grisons. The French ministers here, especially Bethune, say they have made strong representations to the Most Christian against the treaty. In France the ministers try to cloak their action, and despite all remonstrances they have kept them dark so far. There are various contradictory reports about the articles of the treaty. The Swiss, even the Catholics, have openly expressed their disagreement. Savoy, with clear disapproval, is collecting his French auxiliaries to move against the Genoese; the republic continues its activity in the Valtelline. Although the Spaniards announce the peace as signed they keep filling the Milanese with troops; nothing can be certain until the return of the secretary of Fargis from Spain, expected on the 20th inst.
We direct you to impart this information to whomsoever you think fit, insisting on the advantage to the common cause of steadfastness and vigour in those interested, so that the Austrians may attribute the difficulties put in the way of the treaty to our instances.
The like to the ambassador in England and the secretary at Zurich.
To England add:
We see that the delay in giving the gentlemen of Denmark a favourable despatch and in the other good resolutions of parliament is harmfully encouraged by the persistent report of the peace in Italy. Accordingly a statement of the truth will serve to undeceive them, especially when the connivances of the Spaniards at English ships leaving their ports, and the exhortations of Cardinal Spada to the queen for supporting the faith are evil seeds intended to encourage the quarrel between that country and France and render the marriage fruitless. You must consider these points in the discussions in which you engage.
To both add:
We have to state that our Captain of the Guard having recently gone to the Archipelago to protect our ships against pirates, accidentally took the galley of the Bey of Andros for a pirate and captured it; but he subsequently restored the vessel, and our Bailo gave an account of the matter at the Porte, so that we do not expect any evil consequences will result affecting our relations with that empire.
Ayes, 119.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
May 15.
Consiglio
di X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
579. In the Council of Ten.
That in conformity with the decision of the Council of the 5th June, 1613, 100 ducats be given to the representatives of Girolamo Agustini, who is going to serve as secretary to Alvise Contarini, ambassador to the King of Great Britain, to put himself in order, according to the custom.
Ayes, 14.Noes, 1.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
May 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
580. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Recriminations continue between the duke and Bristol. The latter was brought to parliament, and after much discussion whether he should be treated as a delinquent or as a peer of the realm, the king's proctor, (fn. 1) in his Majesty's name, accused him of treason. Though he came with the idea of justifying his actions and to accuse the duke, the Lord Keeper told him that he had come to be accused and not to accuse. So the earl had to stand at the bar and give up his sword. Nevertheless he accused the duke of high treason, including offences against divine and human Majesty. Before the duke himself he brought forward many charges in matters of state and religion, as well as his vicious pleasures, especially in Spain. The duke heard him quietly in complete silence and with self-command asked leave of the House to answer. He tried to persuade them of Bristol's ill-conduct, having perhaps spoken too boldly. He asked the House to punish the guilty, and if he were innocent to inflict a like punishment on the accuser. He excused his pleasures on the score of youth. He asked for silence as a distasteful matter, so as not to hurt his wife, saying that these things touched her and not others.
They debated which accusation should be proved first, it being the custom to take them in order, but as the king is accuser the case of Bristol is dealt with first. But the House resolved that even if Bristol was condemned the laws would not forbid him to accuse, and he could charge others. They debated about keeping these two personages prisoners. Bristol agreed to place himself in custody in a private house under guard. But the duke went free, owing to the king's support and having many partisans and the bishops, who side with him from their dependence on the king and who do not care about their privileges, because at death they give up their inheritance. Yet this partiality has caused resentment at seeing that the king may be both accuser and judge.
The duke's partisans think themselves sure of his safety, as they believe that Bristol's faults will constitute the duke's defence. But the issue is uncertain, because this lord is fighting with Bristol and with the members of the Lower House.
Meanwhile, Bristol has produced twelve charges against the duke and six against the Secretary Conway, for which he has not yet supplied the proofs, from having fallen sick. But a young son introduced in to the Lower House the same particulars, as affecting his own honour and his father's interests, and asking for justice not as a son of a peer, but as a commoner, for the purpose of upsetting the favouritism which the duke enjoys, by a union of the two Houses, if possible. (fn. 2) But in the opinion of the lawyers the Earl of Bristol will have to lay his defence before an ordinary magistracy, where all accused persons have to present themselves. These, they say, have to decide, if from the accusations brought forward a proper trial can be constituted. When the process is made, twelve sages (savii) decide whether the accusation is true or false. If true, the case is referred to the peers of the realm to inflict the penalties they see fit, but if not, the accused is absolved.
The Lower House, more zealous than ever about proving grievances, has adjudged twelve against the duke. They debated whether they should present them to the king or to the Upper House. The duke's partisans wanted them presented to his Majesty, but the House decided otherwise. They were disposed to appear before the lords, but with ever new grievances, and as they wished to deal with the matter seriatim, they postponed this for proving things better. They appointed eight persons with two assistants each, so that by dividing the grievances they might sustain their arguments and obtain justice from the Upper House.
The king on one hand allows the torrent to run against the duke, on the other he seems to do everything that can satisfy him. Thus he has absented from Court, but not forbidden parliament, not having the power, three servants, for having spoken loudly against the duke. The doctor who made an unfavourable deposition about the late king's death has been ordered to remain a prisoner in his house. (fn. 3) On the other hand, he has again sent a message to parliament to hasten supplies and to rest satisfied with the proceedings against the duke without looking for fresh grievances, this in order not to increase the flood; but in any case the king has authenticated the process. We are informed that the duke's partisans have recommended the cause with fervour and with tears, but without any effect on the parliamentarians, who have declared that the last subsidy shall be included with the three previous ones without further declaration, but they persist in desiring that the recognition of grievances shall precede the enactment, as they say here, that is the bill or order to collect.
A book has come from Flanders printed in English, which had been consigned to the king and the Lords of the Council, the work of the physician who attended the Marquis of Hamilton in his last moments. The author declares that the late king, the marquis himself, the Dukes of Richmond and Lennox and above all the Earl of Southampton, who died in the Netherlands, had perished from poison, abusing Buckingham and saying he had left England on account of his threats, induced by his having discovered the cause of the said Hamilton's death. (fn. 4) The king is incensed against the author of the book and the parliament against the accused. An Irishman, reputed a diviner, (fn. 5) has gone away because summoned by parliament to give account for a saying of his that the king will love the duke until he brings back certain characters (caratteri) which he gave him. And the chances are that the king will be murdered. Countless events are taking place, but I will avoid the tedium of describing the condition of this State by sending the accusations and charges with all particulars.
London, the 15th May, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
581. ZUANE PESARO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador left with the satisfaction reported and with promises of more mutual confidence on Blainville's part though fresh inclination and pretexts for offence are occurring. Of Blainville they complain that before leaving this realm he spoke ill of the Court, of its head and the government; and news has come from France declaring that he had written earlier to the Most Christian that if his embassy lasted a fortnight he was sure to make Buckingham lose his head. They make mutual reproaches for not keeping promises and about the peace of the Huguenots; and the satisfaction of the parliament remains doubtful because Buckingham told the Bishop of Mande that they could never change the laws of the realm for the advantage of the Catholics. The king has declared his absolute determination to dispose of the queen's household and attendants without reference to her or letting the French have the arrangement. The steps about the dowry on the part of the French for the assignment of control by the king to the queen have not been taken. The French think and aver that these pretexts have been raised to avoid giving the sideboard with plate promised to Blainville at his departure, and that the disturbances in France encourage this idea. Their inner feelings are very rabid and the outward show is constrained. (L'interno di quali e ulceratissimo et le apparenze sono forzate.) The representations made by the queen to the parliament have created a great stir. Accordingly they are trying to modify suspicion by various rumours, saying that the queen again offered her services to help the duke; but he declined, thanking her and declaring that the favours she bestowed upon him exceeded his merits.
In this state we hear from France that several ships of Soubise have entered la Rochelle with provisions. The French aver that three English ships with letters of marque reached that port, but Soubise and his ships have disappeared from these ports without his design being known, though there is some uncertainty about his having gone and of France not changing her ideas, the real plan was to seek a fresh pretext for besieging that place, and a leading French minister assured me that peace in France will only be secured by taking la Rochelle. At the same time I am advised that the deputies of la Rochelle at Paris complain that the peace is not carried out, that the Most Christian promises this if they do their part first. In the doubt that the English ships will be sent back in order to exonerate the duke, Carleton asserted in the Lower House the certainty of the promises. The French themselves told me there would be some delay because Admiral Montmorency first claims some payment and France wants to see the reprisals restored first. Nevertheless there is a general report that they have reached Portsmouth. Commissioners have been sent hither by the Council to see whether the news is merely to please parliament. The French will have other matters in hand since the news of the quarrel between the king there and his brother.
The Count of San Mauritio has taken leave. There has been some comment upon this. It is known for certain that he was not waiting for advices from Piedmont as announced, but because of hopes there. At his leave taking, the duke, Carlisle, Holland and Carleton, who had visited him frequently, told him that the king thanked him for waiting so patiently and gave him a diamond girdle worth 4,000 crowns. It is thought he has done little or nothing; his operations have been kept extraordinarily secret, but in general he was pressing for ships and proposing war against the wishes of the French and, owing to French ill-will, some say even designs against France. The French here suspect that Savoy was interested in the bargain discovered.
They have also promised the dispatch of Weimar's colonel. He is expected to leave with letters saying that it is impossible to give facilities for levies owing to the expense; they talked of giving him the companies in Holland and some money from pawning the jewels. The latter might happen, but the former is out of the question, and nothing can be accomplished without parliament. They show firmness about maintaining those affairs, but have not the means.
The gentleman who came recently for Mansfelt says that he could get 3,000 Scots, and with 2,500l. and two ships he would take them across. Merchants would provide the money upon assignment of the plunder from the Flanders ships, but he would not get it. A gentleman has come from the Landgrave of Hesse (fn. 6) to get a confirmation of the late king's promise for the restitution of his states. If the Germans at Court have other matters they will appear. They speak of the need for a diversion in Flanders and the danger of the States making a truce. They are detaining here the captains of every sort, even those whom the Dutch recall, threatening to dispose of these posts.
A proclamation has been issued to increase the force of the ships and the number of sailors. (fn. 7) To prevent desertion they have increased their pay from 14s. to 20s. a month, but as they are not paid according to custom till after their return, and they are not paid their present wages (ne soccorso il loro presente trattenimento), they value the increase little if they are not satisfied for the loss. Merchants are forbidden to offer a higher pay to the sailors except when they have to attract the men for long voyages, and those who trade in Muscovy and the East Indies. The king, as in the past, paid the ship owners for building a ship of over 200 butts, one crown a ton, so now he says he will pay a crown a ton for ships of over 400 butts burthen, to prevent small vessels and increase their strength, both public and private.
I hope to leave soon, please God, in the hope to see his Majesty and leave this room as soon as possible.
London, the 15th May, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
582. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Rector of Cattaro in a letter of the 17th ult. advises me of the arrival at Ragusa from Naples of a distinguished Spaniard sent to the Porte with the enclosed proposals. On receiving this news, though confined by the gout, I at once sent to inform the other ambassadors, suggesting that we should prevent this person coming here, as it was about the truce and would cause us expense and trouble. They agreed, and England said he would go straight to Ganiz Adé to get him to fulfil his promise. He did so and came afterwards to France and to me to tell us the promise of Ganiz Adé to obtain an order from the Sultan to the Caimecan to have a meeting of the principal ministers, Mufti and chief lawyers upon the matter, when they would certainly decide not to listen to any proposals for a truce and they would make the Spaniards go home. The ambassadors arranged together about the expenses necessary to secure this. France and I agreed, but the States' ambassador objected that he had no orders. However the English ambassador, who has been very active in the matter, said he would make this up and incur much greater expenses if necessary. The French ambassador, either because of fresh orders or from his usual rivalry with England, informed me that owing to his king's orders he could not spend as much as was required. He said he would go with the Dutch ambassador to the Caimecan to get the Spaniard sent back. He informed England also, who took it very ill, thinking that France wanted to take out of his hands an affair already begun by him. France and Flanders went together to the Caimecan and obtained a favourable reply. Great difficulties have arisen in the affair owing to the rivalry between France and England, which nearly ruined the whole business, as England would not suffer France to take the matter out of his hands. However I interposed and contrived to satisfy both, so I hope we shall obtain the desired end.
The Vigne of Pera, the 16th May, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
583. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has arrived that the King of Persia has crossed the arm of the Euphrates with 25,000 horse and is only a day's march from the Ottoman army, which seemed to have it at its mercy. (fn. 8) The castle is very well furnished with everything necessary, a garrison of 12,000 men and some very skilful English and Flemish gunners. Owing to this news they have lost all hope of taking the place, and fear a serious disaster to the army.
The Vigne of Pera, the 16th May, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
584. LUNARDO MORO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The first motion about the peace undoubtedly came from the French ambassador, encouraged by what Olivares said and from seeing how much they wanted it here. He approached the Queen and the Infanta of Flanders also acted. The quarrels with the King of England did much to dispose the French king to this accommodation and to send orders here to treat.
Madrid, the 17th May, 1626.
[Italian.]
May 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
585. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador sent to tell me that he had heard from Gabor. As the Most Christian did not think it necessary to include him in the league he agreed to the condition that no peace or truce should be made in Germany without including him, and he could not make peace without his Majesty's consent. He would accept 40,000 piastres a month to be paid by France, England, Venice and the States. They would send an ambassador to the assembly of confederate princes at the Hague to get the Palatine and his wife to stir up the King of England. The ambassador said he would tell England and the States, though they have no orders from their masters, but the King of France wrote that he believed the English ambassadors at his Court would speak about it, as the matter concerned the King of England much more than himself.
The Vigne of Pera, the 18th May, 1626.
[Italian, deciphered.]
May 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
586. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters from London announce the king's determination not to allow the Ambassador Chalegre to come before they have decided here to give him that pre-eminence in the Council of State which his predecessors have enjoyed. It is not certain what will happen, but if the king persists in having back the four regiments which he pays he may easily get his way about the ambassador, if not absolutely, upon certain conditions.
The Hague, the 18th May, 1626.
[Italian.]
May 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
587. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Savoyard ambassador writes that they are momentarily expecting news from England, in accordance with which he will act in writing and carrying out his orders from his Highness. He has full confidence (che tutto confida) in the Duke of Buckingham; by the last advices it seems the duke is again in danger, as the members of parliament have again risen against him with fresh accusations; so he was rather doubtful about his falling, in which case it was said that they would prevail with the negotiations of the Earl of Carlisle.
Turin, the 20th May, 1626.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Attorney General, Sir Robert Heath.
2 This was apparently Bristol's eldest son George. The Cambridge MS. diary of this parliament has the note (undated), "Petition of George Lord Digby of Sherborne that some course may be taken for the clearing of those aspersions." Cambridge University Library, MS. Dd. 12.20–2.
3 Mead mentions four persons, Sir Francis Steward, Sir Ralph Clare, Sir William Crofts, and David Ramsay. Birch: Court and Times of Charles I, vol. i, page 97. The physician was probably Dr. John Craig; see Burnet: Hist, of His Own Times, vol. i, page 20.
4 The book in question was entitled Prodromus Vindictae, published at Antwerp. The author was George Eglisham, a Scottish physician and poet, who had been physician to the late Marquis of Hamilton. Birch: Court and Times of Charles I, vol. i, pages 98, 99. Pearsall Smith: Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, vol. ii, pages 290–3.
5 Pierce Butler. Evidence was given against him in the House on the 25th April o.s. and a warrant for his apprehension was issued on the 29th. Cambridge University Library MS. Dd. 12.20–2. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1625, 6 pages.
6 Colonel Hill. Rusdorf: Memoires, vol. i, page 711. The Queen of Bohemia wrote a letter recommending him to her brother, on the 14th April, n.s. State Papers, Foreign, Germany (States).
7 Proclamation of the 24th April for better furnishing the navy and for the increase of shipping. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1625–6, page 318.
8 Referring to the siege of Bagdad, held by the Persians and invested by the Turks under Hafis Pasha. Von Hammer: Geschichte des Osmanischen Reiches, lit, xlvi.