Venice
June 1626, 2-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1913

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434-445

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'Venice: June 1626, 2-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 19: 1625-1626 (1913), pp. 434-445. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89064 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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Contents

June 1626

June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
604. SIMON CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Abbeville, who has returned from England, speaks daringly and to the disadvantage of the honour of that crown (sbatti il decoro di quella corona). He always disseminates fresh quarrels between the two crowns, in addition to the old one. The restoration of the merchants' goods is stopped, and in this matter they have the advantage here, and therefore hold their tongues.
Paris, the 2nd June, 1626.
[Italian.]
June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
605. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have heard from the Proveditore of Cattaro that the Spaniard who went from Naples to Ragusa, had a fall from his horse on his way to Constantinople and had to return. I informed the ambassadors and we decided to send to Ragusa to have this Spaniard sent back to Naples at once. To facilitate this we made a present to the Caimicam worth 1,400 thalers, all four sharing equally. The emperor's resident has done his utmost to have the Spaniard received, but in vain.
The Vigne of Pera, the 3rd June, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
606. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador sent word to me that his king had sent to tell Gabor that he did not think it fitting to enter the league with England and the other allied princes in these wars, as they would ultimately become wars of religion, and it would not become the Most Christian king to declare himself their chief. However, he would not fail to play his part; with England he had renewed the defensive league of 1610, and had promised every assistance to the Dutch.
The Vigne of Pera, the 3rd June, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
607. MARC' ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of Bavaria have arrived at Brussels. At that Court also they will put the finishing touches to the marriage negotiations between the Infanta and the king here. Owing to the breach between Spain and England, the general prosperity of the House of Austria, the hopes of a favourable peace and movements in France, the Spaniards consider themselves absolved from their promise to England about an accommodation with the Palatine especially about restoring the Lower Palatinate, and they intend to assign that state as dowry to the Infanta.
Vienna, the 3rd June, 1626.
[Italian; copy.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
608. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I had audience of the Duke yesterday. With his Highness I found the English ambassador, who is the natural enemy of the French, and for different reasons, of the Ambassador Marini here. When I arrived, the duke was enlarging on his wrongs, and took comfort from the approbation of the Englishman and his maledictions against France, into which I need not enter. As soon as the duke allowed him to speak the ambassador asked what the republic and his Highness meant to do now the replies had come from France and they could not expect anything from that quarter. The duke said he did not mean to separate himself in any way from your Excellencies and he would wait to hear what I had to say. I replied that in this serious and unlooked for situation I must wait to hear from the Senate which would be much perturbed by such news from France. The ambassador repeated that the matter did not admit of delay as Bassompierre would be here in a very few days and we must make up our minds and act before he comes and before he brings his quack medicines to heal incurable wounds. He offered to go to the Swiss and Grisons and kindle such a fire there that Bassompierre's coming could not do any harm. He promised to induce them not to accept the treaty of peace but take up arms and join those who had the defence of the public liberty at heart.
The idea pleased the duke highly, and looking steadily at me he seemed to expect my opinion. I asked what he proposed to do. He said if your Serenity refused to approve of the treaty he would enter the state of Milan with 4,000 horse and 20,000 foot and never lay aside his sword till you wished it. He asked no more than your Excellencies were bound to by the terms of the league. There he stopped and turning to the English ambassador he uttered a brief and simple protest about his pretensions, adding that some day he would speak on the matter at length.
Turin, the 4th June, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma,
Venetian
Archives.
609. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
You will have heard of the ratification of the treaty between the two crowns. The delay in publication was only a show, and the embassy to inform the allies is probably the same. We have one consolation, that we have done our duty and have had nothing to do with the negotiations. We have ordered vigilance on our frontiers, and we think all princes interested in the common liberty will act similarly. We direct you to insinuate this view to the States when informing them of the treaty. The Swiss and Grisons will probably be deeply moved, with the sole hope of seeing the conditions touching them improved. The Spaniards are surrounding us and pushing their troops towards Riva. There are several difficulties about carrying out the terms, and this all serves to keep every one determined. The republic has not failed and is keeping its forces in the valley, and we have even supplied more than we are required to do; we only wish others would act similarly.
The like to England.
Ayes, 136.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
June 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
610. To the Ambassador in England and the like to the other Courts and to the PROVEDITORI GENERAL.
After continued rumours the peace between the two crowns has at length been announced. It was ratified without the allies being informed; they refused the articles to our Ambassador Contarini, though he obtained them. They comprise the exclusion of the Spaniards from the pass and Valley, so they say; the exercise of the Catholic faith; the magistrates in the Valtelline and Grisons must be Catholics; the Valtelline must pay a yearly tribute; the Grisons must confirm the nominees of the Valtelline; the forts shall be handed to the Pope to be rased within four months and the guns and munitions also given to him. The two crowns are to decide difficulties, those touching religion being reserved to the pope. All extraordinary forces are withdrawn and they beg the allies to do the same. They give Savoy four months to arrange his differences with Genoa. They have decided to send ambassadors extraordinary to inform the allies and get them to ratify the treaty. We send this for information, and also that we have made up our accounts and find ourselves creditors for a certain sum. You will mention this fact.
Ayes, 136.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
June 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
611. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
There is a minister of the King of Denmark here named Sobl, burgomaster of Bremen. (fn. 1) He has obtained an assignment of 100,000 florins from the States for two months. He has commissions to raise a regiment. He will go on to England with the first wind, a man-of-war already has orders to take him over. There he is to make strong representations because, to tell the truth, his master builds greatly upon the word of the English and the promises of the league. Yet they have only paid for a single month though six have passed since the league was signed. What is more, Streff, the king's gentleman sent to that Court has never been able to get an answer or to leave. From England he will proceed to France to learn the decisions of the king there, but if they are not better than in the past I am much afraid for Germany.
The Hague, the 8th June, 1626.
[Italian.]
June 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
612. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Palatine has sued for pardon a third time through the Duke of Wirtemberg, promising all the submission and humiliation his Majesty can desire. They say they cannot give an answer and refer everything to the congress. They say here that the Palatine was induced to take this step by the Dutch and England, which they consider as a sign of weakness in that king, who can neither support or succour his brother in law, and thinks it better to sue for pardon. This only strengthens the intention of the Spaniards to give the Lower Palatinate as dowry to the Infanta. I understood that they wish to make this assignment because if the congress decided to give back the vote to the Palatine's son after Bavaria, and his state, on condition of his being brought up as a Catholic in this Court, they might then give him the second daughter here to wife, and with her consign the Lower Palatinate as dowry and assure that of the Infanta afterwards. But these ideas may meet with difficulties when they come to carry them out, although all the plans of the Spaniards generally succeed.
Vienna, the 10th June, 1626.
[Italian; copy.]
June 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Aleppo.
Venetian
Archives.
613. ALVISE DA CA DA PESARO, Venetian Consul at Aleppo, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Has written before of disputes with English consul about consulage upon goods coming in his countrymen's ships. The Flemish consul now makes similar claims. It will be difficult to win as he did with England especially as the doge has expressly ordered him not to go before the Cadi. The Flemish consul bases his claim upon the same grounds as for goods on Flemish ships, hired by Flemings and under the Flemish flag and because of a custom between the consuls of France, England and Flanders that when a Flemish ship leaves Marseilles under a Flemish flag laded by French merchants the latter must pay the consuls of France and Flanders, and similarly if a French ship comes from Amsterdam, the Flemings must pay double consulage. Pesaro claims that these arrangements do not affect Venetian merchants.
Aleppo, the 11th June, 1626.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
614. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
We have expressed our sentiments about the treaty, but we cannot be sure of what will happen before the arrival of the French ambassador extraordinary. The Duke of Savoy has declared that he will not submit his differences with the Genoese to the two kings. Some of the Swiss Cantons have remonstrated with the Most Christian about the treaty, and they may possibly move him. The Spaniards and clericals see this and are increasing their forces. All this impels us not to relax our diligence or expenditure, and it should impel other princes to act with greater vigour. You will speak to this effect to the prince and their lordships, and of the doubtful state of affairs in Italy; and you will also point out the recent revolt of the peasants in Upper Austria on religious grounds and how that might help to create risings elsewhere.
The like to Zurich.
The like to England, mutatis mutandis, adding:
The Ambassador Wake, who remains at Turin, has again urged the duke and our Ambassador Morosini for a reply to his past proposals. We cannot vary our answer that we must first wait to hear from France; the dissensions between the king and his parliament act as a drag on his generous ideas, and though Wake no doubt makes his proposals sincerely, yet he goes beyond what is warranted under the circumstances. This is for information only.
Ayes, 135.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
615. To the Proveditore of Cephalonia.
Order to keep the revenues to be sent to Candia all together. His permitting the export of currants which threatened to go bad, to lade them upon providing security, was doubtless due to zeal; but, as this concerns foreigners it will be better not to do it for the future, and he must allow no currants to be taken out except against an effective deposit in cash in the fiscal chamber.
Ayes, 100.Noes, 3.Neutral, 7.
June 12.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
616. To the Proveditore of Zante.
Like order to send all this money to Candia. The lading and taking away of currants in ships with sureties for the duty, not to be allowed on any pretext, but always against effective deposits in cash in the fiscal chamber for the entire amount of the custom.
Ayes, 100.Noes, 3.Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
617. To the Ambassador in France.
Our Bailo at Constantinople reports in letters of the 3rd ult. that the ambassadors of France and England have met on the question of the truce with Spain and have decided to use Giani Adi, late Cadileschier of Greece and induce the Mufti and other leading jurists to oppose the truce. The peace arranged last year in Hungary has not been approved either by the Porte or in Germany. Gabor said that if the emperor was not molested by the Turks he would not move against him, but if the Turks recover Babylon they may easily help him. Further particulars of Gabor's intentions are not known, as Jusuf Aga, whom the Vizier sent to him, has not yet returned to the Porte.
The like to the ambassadors in Spain, England and the Hague.
Ayes, 22.Noes, 1.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
618. ANDREA ROSSO, Venetian Secretary in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Although not in perfect health, the Ambassador Pesaro has left, loaded with honours and with the usual present from his Majesty. This was sent after him as he had already started for the coast. At Dover the Vice-Admiral (fn. 2) was awaiting him with orders from his Majesty to serve him. On the 9th inst. he embarked with the Vice-Admiral and his suite and sailed with a favourable wind for Dieppe, accompanied by three other ships of war. In this court he displayed the highest prudence and consummate ability, and all sorts of persons are sorry to lose him, while he has always worthily sustained the dignity of the republic. I am desolate at being left without his prudent advice, but he has left me all the public papers and such instructions as he thought fit. I will do my humble best in this charge until the arrival of the ordinary Ambassador Contarini, sending advices from time to time.
The Bishop of Mandé has treated at length with the duke and the other ministers. So far as I can gather he tells of the Most Christian's decision to attend to German affairs and to stir them up here to do the same. But the bishop himself told me that with the internal troubles of this Court he can extract no resolution. The ministers here complain about the French, and yet the Most Christian supports these interests almost alone. He recently sent to Mansfelt 50,000 francs to pay his troops. They are unwilling or incapable of understanding, he did not explain himself further. He complains that the concessions made to the Catholics are not fulfilled, indeed they proceed against them with greater harshness than in the past, having issued orders for a general search in all their houses for the object of finding things prohibited by the laws, condemn them and confiscate their goods. These proceedings were contrary to the promises. As there is a rumour by advices from Brussels that the pope, the Most Christian and the Catholic have entered into a defensive and offensive league, the bishop, provoked by me said that this rumour was in order to create alarm in England, but if the severe persecution of the Catholics continued they would have to take some steps.
In the present scarcity of money the English are trying to obtain the remainder of the queen's dowry. Apparently they intend to send to France for the purpose, but it is not thought that they will find them disposed to this payment as the French claim the settlement of the counter dowry which it was promised parliament would carry out. They have indeed sent a person to that Court to take part in events till the ordinary ambassador arrives.
They are waiting for news from Germany. Here they display a good intention to maintain those interests, but their necessities do not allow them to consent to the despatch of the gentleman sent from Denmark. Meanwhile it seems they are sending to that king a secretary of the Council of State for the reconciliation of the league concluded with that sovereign and the States. Mansfelt's gentleman presses for money for the transport of the Scottish levies. He told me that he had received an assignment of 3,000l. sterling for this upon the taxes of Scotland; the provision comes very late and so he is trying to obtain it with the greater speed.
The members of the lower house of parliament resolved to do no business, without the release of their colleague imprisoned in the Tower, as reported, claiming that his arrest is contrary to the privileges of their house. They pressed the king strongly for his release and it was granted. The day afterwards he entered parliament and repeated the things he said against the duke, adding more, speaking boldly, sedately and to the utmost satisfaction of the members.
The Earl of Bristol has answered the charges against him verbally and in writing, producing numerous papers showing that he acted according to instructions and is therefore innocent.
It is not known whether the king's proctor will reply again upon the charges against the earl, or if he will compel him to come immediately to the proofs. Meanwhile there has been an attempt to reconcile the earl with the duke, but the earl has steadfastly refused this, remaining firm in his desire to justify himself or lose his head.
The duke, to advance his interests in the parliament, has had three lords made, dependants of his, Sir [Dudley] Carleton, Grandison, an Irishman, and the eldest son of the president. (fn. 3) Through his Majesty's favour he makes written replies to the charges laid against him by the Lower House, to be afterwards presented to the Upper.
The latter body following the example of the Lower in recovering its prisoner, has been encouraged to approach the king again for the release of the earl of Arundel. His Majesty told them he was keeping the earl away for other matters which do not concern parliament, and which will soon be made public for the satisfaction of all of them. Not content with the answer, as they wanted a definite and resolute one, they repeated their request and were absolutely refused. Perceiving the prejudice they suffered by allowing the earl's absence they resolved not to transact any business before the earl returned. They say this is done so that he may be allowed to come to parliament, so as not to infringe its privileges, but after having taken part in it for a day or two he may ask leave to go to the country under some pretext. This is recognised as a device of the duke to rid himself of so powerful a nobleman, who opposes him in everything, but it is not thought that he will succeed.
The affairs of parliament remain in this condition. They adjourned for the Whitsuntide holidays until to-day, all the members undertaking to present themselves upon pain of paying 10l. sterling each if they failed, besides other penalties at the discretion of parliament.
Although the duke is blamed as the cause of the disorders, owing to the many appointments which he holds, yet there is a rumour that he is trying to become Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, vacant through the death of the Earl of Suffolk, which occurred some days ago. This is not of great utility but of great honour and importance because in parliament he could control the votes of the University and change her ministers at his pleasure. The Bishop of London was sent by the king to that place, they say in order to induce the leading men to nominate the duke. They expect his return with the decision. (fn. 4)
The rumour about the duke's going to Holland seems to have died out, though they have decided to send Carleton thither, with a report of his continuing his ordinary embassy.
The officers of the English companies serving the States who are here have been ordered to return to their posts but those who served in the fleet are at liberty to go or not.
The French sailors who brought back the ships lent to the Most Christian, have been sent back to France in the ships of war of the king here for their greater safety.
The Council of War has decided upon the prompt despatch of forty vessels, but they are not yet provided with anything and the season is too advanced for the provision of victuals. This step is therefore considered to have been taken to make a show to parliament of wanting to do something, and those who know this court feel certain that little or nothing can or will be done this year beyond some help to the States, because even if parliament supplied the money they could not be ready so soon.
I have received your Serenity's commands of the 7th ult. with the departure of the ambassadors extraordinary. I will serve their Excellencies as my duty commands and endeavour to secure for them the honours which befit the greatness of the most serene republic.
London, the 12th June, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
619. GABRIEL CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador when I called upon him told me that the Margrave of Baden had decided not to remain any longer in the dominions of his Highness, while negotiations are proceeding between the republic and the duke, and will go to his private estate not more than three leagues from Basel, to await the answers and carry out the plan more cautiously, as he thinks he can stay in that country in less danger than in the past. He had letters from the Margrave begging him to let him know as soon as possible the views of both parties about the proposals made by his son, so that he might know what to do with himself, and so soon as he had arrived in the place aforesaid to communicate other most important matters which it was not advisable to put on paper. The ambassador said he meant to ask audience of the duke about this but as his Highness had repeatedly told him that when the republic had sent its decision he would immediately declare his will, he had decided to wait until he could see the ambassador and get some light on the subject. He hoped his Excellency would soon be better and be able to attend to this affair as he was keeping a person here on purpose to send to the Margrave. He then remarked what a boon such a powerful diversion would be for all the princes interested in the common liberty, with the help requested and what friends and adherents promised in that part of Alsace.
The Count San Mauritio has arrived from England, whither the Prince of Piedmont sent him before he left Paris. He brings letters from the king there, to the duke expressing the desire to remain united with him, supply him with every assistance and so forth. The English ambassador has orders to give his Highness similar assurances. By letters from that Court he hears that though bitter complaints and accusations are made in parliament against the Duke of Buckingham, upon several heads and especially high treason, which will require time to settle, these are considered rather personal than public matters, although they are represented differently in France, and the parliament seeing the urgency of the case and anxious to settle the welfare of the state before private passion, had already voted liberal aids for the king, encouraging his generous plans, so that the supplies promised by his Majesty would duly reach the King of Denmark.
Turin, the 14th June, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
620. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador is to return home in September next. His successor is expected any day. The ambassador proposes to travel by sea as far as Zante and thence to Venice, if he may have a galley of your Serenity. When approached on the subject I could only say that as this was not the season for the gathering of our fleet in those parts, the commander could not part with any of his galleys but I assured him that your Serenity was anxious to oblige the representatives of his king and especially himself, owing to his good relations with me in the past, which is perfectly true.
The Vigne of Pera, the 15th June, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
621. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary designate to England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Our journey so far has been very fortunate, although the Spanish minister at Cleves examined our passports very carefully. We have only lost Corraro's interpreter, who died at Cologne. We saw troops levied for Caesar at Mayence. All the towns are well garrisoned, especially in Cleves, held partly by the Spaniards for Neuburg and partly by the States for Brandenburg where they are ready to do each other any hurt. Trade is entirely forbidden, causing great inconvenience to the people.
Here at the Hague we have received many honours. The Prince of Orange came to meet us and offered ships for our passage. We found them all ready owing to the vigilance of the resident Ambassador Contarini. We have gone on to embark to-day, in order not to lose the favourable wind. The ambassador has shown us every attention. The States have defrayed us, and we have received every honour from the prince, the King of Bohemia and everyone. We presented our letters in the Assembly of the States. They replied, expressing pleasure at our coming and their certainty of your Serenity's affection, and saying they would never fail to defend their liberties. They had to contend against the strongest power in Christendom, but they hoped for help from their allies and the most serene republic in particular. We assured them of your Serenity's undoubted resolution to keep up the alliance with them, and referred to all you had done for many years. With the Prince of Orange we exchanged offices which were more for confidence than affairs. The same happened with the King of Bohemia, who sent for the prince and two of his brothers who are studying at Leyden, and presented them to us, saying that he was having them taught knightly exercises as well as humane letters, in the hope that they would one day be able to serve the most serene republic. We thanked him cordially. We passed the same office with the queen his wife, as it was her idea to present her sons to us. She also expressed herself very graciously about us and said that she remembered me, Cornaro.
The States have pressed us to urge your Serenity to make a prompt payment of four monthly instalments, which they say are owing, by the terms of the league and referred to the heavy expenses they are bearing, which they say are for 70,000 men, besides their very large sea forces. They represented their danger now that Denmark is practically abandoned and forces are increasing all round for their destruction. We assured them of the excellent disposition of your Serenity, but pointed out the heavy expenses you have to bear and the pressing dangers you are in. We endeavoured to prevent them from despairing and tried to avoid committing ourselves to anything.
As we are quite at the end of the money granted to us for extraordinary expenses, we beg your Serenity to cause a further sum to be balloted for us.
The Hague, the 15th June, 1626.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
622. MARC ANTONIO CORRER and ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors Extraordinary designate to England, and ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The revolt in Friesland proceeds tranquilly. Count Ernest has arrived here by permission of the people of Lieuwarden, where he was detained. He is treating for the adjustment of the affair. A meeting for all the towns is delayed by the inconvenience of the place where they are to assemble. The deputies of the States have returned to avoid a rebuff.
The Marquis Spinola is going to Dunkirk. He wants to send the royal galleys to sea despite the rigorous blockade which the Dutch maintain. They keep building sloops and small boats for landing at Nieuport, Blankenberg and other coast towns. This looks as if the enemy had designs on that part, and here they are keeping their eyes open at Sluys and Cadzand. The Jew Palazzi is to go with the Marquis for the business of the prisons.
A single Dutch man-of-war has sufficed to defeat three of the enemy which were leaving Spain for Dunkirk, laden with salt and oil. One was captured, a second sunk, and the third fled. Many believe that they had money on board, as it has been reported that it was to be sent hither on similar vessels. In any case the incident is very useful to increase vigour and emulation among those who command at sea.
The States do not mean to suffer the progress of the Count of Isemburg in the March. They have reinforced their cavalry. Some companies of Rees and Emmerich took and afterwards abandoned a small town. The Count of Bergh's son has joined Isemburg with 1,000 horse, and 2,000 foot have been sent from the Palatinate. The States want to show their allies that they are not idle.
They keep enlisting troops for the emperor about Liege. The difficulty about food grows greater owing to the interruption of trade. Tilly remains in Hesse, showing his usual cruelty. Brunswick has drawn towards Denmark's army for greater safety, as he was in danger of Göttingen. Fux had a conference with the king near Tangermund. Brandenburg asks that the troops may be removed from his country. He is afraid of Wallenstein. The king promised to oblige him. Such is the result of Mansfelt's defeat, to whom France has sent no money. Filippo Calandrini asks for the repayment of money he has paid the Count on behalf of the most serene republic.
Buckingham's gentleman has returned to England with the jewels, of which he could not dispose, except to the amount of 300,000 or 400,000 florins. This will serve to pay the English regiments here. Nothing has been contributed to the King of Denmark not even on the credit which the Dutch have with England. Sobl, the Danish minister, has proceeded to that Court without conducting any further negotiations here. They are daily expecting Carleton here to arrange some compromise whereby the English ambassadors may retain their place in the Council of State. No difficulty will be raised against him, as the English maintain that he did not take leave when he went away with Buckingham, but that he is coming back to continue his charge. The pretext is transparent, but the Dutch will not look into it too closely, as the interests of both parties maintaining mutual correspondence are too great, while Carleton is personally popular and may be able to adjust the matter even for his successors.
Zorzi is approaching, to allow us, Correr and Contarini, to leave.
The Hague, the 15th of June, 1626.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 John Zobel; his letters of credence are dated the 13th May. State Papers, Foreign, Denmark.
2 Sir Henry Palmer, Admiral of the Narrow Seas. Calendar S.P. Dom., 1625–6, page 347.
3 Sir Dudley Carleton was created Baron Carleton of Imbercourt on the 26th May, o.s. Oliver St. John, Viscount Grandison, in the Irish peerage, was created Baron Tregoz of Highworth on the 21st May, o.s. Edward Montagu, eldest son of the Earl of Manchester, Lord President of the Council, was summoned to parliament in his father's barony as Lord Montagu of Kimbolton and took his seat on the 22nd May, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom., Add. 1625–49, page 128. G.E.C. Complete Peerage.
4 Buckingham was elected Chancellor of Cambridge University on Thursday the 11th June, new style. Suffolk died on the preceding Sunday. Birch: Court and Times of Charles I, vol i, pages 107–9.