Venice
November 1626, 2-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1914

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1-7

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'Venice: November 1626, 2-10', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 20: 1626-1628 (1914), pp. 1-7. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89106 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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November 1626

Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantionopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
1. ZORZI GIUSTINIAN, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
An English merchant galleon (fn. 1) at this port that had also been at La Vella, in order to show the Turks how little account they took of them, decided to leave at once and alone, a thing our ships would never have done, and the Captain Pasha remarked that the detention of the long barque was a piece of good fortune, as it would certainly have fallen a prey to them.
The Vigne of Pera, the 2nd November, 1626.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
2. SIMON CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king has ordered the governor of fort St. Louis and his other officials near La Rochelle, to show moderation towards that town. He wishes in this way to give them some apparent satisfaction, but they do not seem content, as when their ministers met in a synod at Castres in Languedoc, the king insisted on having a representative present and when he proposed that they should not keep up any union with others of their religion outside France, indicating the English, and the like, they complained bitterly and would not consent.
Paris, the 2nd November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
3. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Neither Vere nor Calandrini has appeared from England, to the no small mortification, of their High Mightinesses, who are to meet on the 4th without knowing what will happen; in their hearts they deeply resent the behaviour of the English Council and the irresolution they have displayed. The letters from that Court of the 17th ult. announced the king's decision that the men of the four regiments should be placed in towns near the ports so as to be easily embarked for Denmark. Other letters of the same date followed, saying they were to be employed in England or Ireland, others of the 18th repeat the first, and the last of the 20th return to the Ireland plan. Carleton has sent to England to represent the confusion caused by such behaviour. The States have to pay these four regiments, although they do not know how will be employed, while the Danish ambassador importunes them and threatens that his king will come to terms.
The government here is much perplexed, as although they see that England wants to force them to send veteran English troops to Denmark, because Joachim wrote that Buckingham and Conway spoke to him on the subject, offering to fill up the companies with Englishmen who could be drilled into form by the spring, yet they do not like the sound of it, and are not so fortunately placed as to want to weaken their own forces. The Prince of Orange dissents absolutely, while the enemy is well entrenched. He attends to everything. They are reduced to hoping that Calandrini will arrive before long, with something worthy of the King of England for the requirements of Denmark. In short they want to see a change of policy in that sovereign and even more in his ministers.
The Danish ambassador here is disenchanted about England and is waiting the end of this business with impatience.
The Hague, the 2nd November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
4. MARC ANTONIO MORESINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bassompierre has reached London, where he was ill received and worse treated. They complain bitterly of this in France. They say the King of England is behaving very imprudently, and involved as he is, without money, followers or friends, he ought to deal more suavely with France, especially as he gave offence first. They lay all the blame on Buckingham, as the enemy of the French, because he nurses old grievances in the king's mind. The French agents here complain that that king is trying to revive civil war in France through the Huguenots, from fear that France may make some attempt against him, an idea which they also entertain here. I do not know what has come over those princes, as they forget imminent present dangers and fear what are uncertain and deceptive.
Turin, the 2nd November, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
5. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
Commend conduct about Cassin's resignation. Will act with the other ambassadors. Provisions against pirates. In the matter of Pervis, to endeavour to settle it according to instructions given, as it may lead to trouble about armed ships. Will give orders about having a galley ready to take the English ambassador from Zante.
Ayes, 102.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
6. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They write from Brussels that since the defeat of their cavalry the Dutch are much inclined to a truce, by which they might arrive at a secret treaty, provided they can do so without the knowledge of France, England or their other allies. They incline to this the more because of their differences over the proposals made to them by England, that the Palatine shall command their forces. Many agree to this, but many others want the Prince of Orange to lead them.
Vienna, the 4th November, 1626.
[Italian; copy.]
Nov. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
7. GIROLAMO CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador, on his way to Coire, urged the Grisons strongly to send an embassy to the Most Christian; it is not known what they will decide to do.
Zurich, the 5th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
8. To the Ambassador in England.
You acted very prudently in urging the Ambassador Bassompierre to facilitate the union between the two crowns. You will continue such offices, taking care, however, not to excite the jealousy of Buckingham. You will keep on the alert to find out all you can about the proposal made by the Duke of Bavaria to France to stop the progress of the House of Austria in Germany. You will also carefully observe all negotiations that pass between Buckingham and the Duke of Savoy in the affairs of France, as this requires the most diligent attention. We send you an abstract of the advices received from Germany on the 21st Ult., which you will use as opportunities occur; it is especially noteworthy that the Duke of Neuburg is expected and they believe he is bringing material for peace with Denmark. Lorraine and Wirtemberg continue their usual offices for the Palatine.
Ayes, 106.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Nov. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
9. To the Ambassador at the Hague, and the like to England.
While the French ministers keep progressing with their treaty they have made two requests of us which are quite incompatible with it, namely, for fresh payments, while we are asking for a settlement of our debts, and for more troops. A week to-day we answered the Ambassador Allegri, as by the copy enclosed. You will not speak about this, as it is not our part to raise such doubts or to suggest differences between France and the republic. On the other hand if any sinister rumours are about and you are forced to put us right, you will do so in the terms of our deliberation, with the object of showing that these requests of the French are due to the discrepancies which they fear in the carrying out of their treaty, and we had warned them long before and therefore we cannot refuse them. The matter is grave and it needs to be represented with vigour and prudence, in order to justify the republic against the unjust charge brought against it, but rather to make clear its merits, to avoid creating bitterness in the other side, and not to lose the show of a good understanding with France, which it is useful to keep alive.
Ayes, 96.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
10. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bassompierre has not received a reply to the written proposals presented by him, but as they relate, as reported, in general terms to the stipulations of the marriage contract, I fancy the reply of the English government will contain general remonstrances against the misbehaviour of the French attendants, and the necessity for their actual expulsion. Of this I have some authentic notice and the French ambassador also expects as much from what some of his intimates have told him. For this reason I fancy, he adds, in a whisper, proper claims for the security of the queen's dowry, seeing that by the laws of the realm, unless parliament pass an act to the contrary, it is forfeited on the demise of the king. The marriage contract promised the necessary ratification of this by parliament. The English councillors do not deny this and say that the king will make an assignment of counter dower on sundry palaces and estates, under the great and privy seals, binding himself to have it confirmed hereafter by parliament, which, on the other hand, he does not intend to convoke until it suits him. As I have often said I clearly perceive that the affair is hopeless and although some exert themselves to keep it on foot, I doubt any good result, much as I desire it, for the suspicions of these two crowns and their misunderstandings will always serve them for pretexts to avoid giving the necessary assistance in Germany or elsewhere, and even were the queen's claims adjusted, I repeat that the two nations will never be united either by the ties of friendship or by political interests, as facts already show; for as the English keep seizing French ships it seems that in France they have lately sequestered all English property there, amounting to a considerable sum. The French intend to complain no more about the capture of ships, but to satisfy the claims of their merchants by such acts. This plan seems firmly rooted in France, for the ambassador says not a word either to the king or the ministers about these ships, but tells others that in France they will find means to recover their losses.
Here likewise they are proceeding suspiciously, having again desired M. de Soubise to come near the Court, as they think of giving him command of the twenty ships fitted out by the City of London, which have been ordered lately to the Downs. The pretext for this is his relationship to the king, and I understand that they only hesitate out of shame for having to employ Frenchmen in a profession so peculiarly suited to the English nation.
The new resolves to assist the King of Denmark with 6,000 men are confirmed. On Sunday therefore the Danish ambassador went to thank the king, and as the Dutch did the like I infer that his masters will not raise any difficulty on the subject. The object now is to obtain the money, and they are negotiating a loan with Burlamachi, not merely for arrears due to the troops, but for their passage money and two months' pay in advance, though one cannot expect much, with money so tight and difficult.
No order has yet been issued about the new levy in this kingdom in lieu of the troops which the Dutch are sending to Denmark, and possibly the matter may be procrastinated as usual, or enveloped in such pretexts as come to hand.
Last Saturday Gabor's ambassador had his first conference with the commissioners. He proposed what I reported, but perceiving the present poverty of the English government and the impossibility of its giving vigorous support to his prince he is now endeavouring to get a letter for him from hence, with promises and exhortations to advance boldly. To this the ambassador will readily consent, being boarded at the crown's expense, this being a sort of traffic and perquisite of the officials to the detriment of the public. It seems, however, that the commissioners are afraid of pledging the king too far, though in reality nothing can be settled, as the whole Council is occupied daily about the subscription for the subsidies, to which effect not only do they perambulate London, but the neighbouring villages also, hoping that the example of a good beginning may serve for the progress and close. With this opportunity they give daily banquets, the money for which might be better employed in forwarding the public business.
They have written fresh letters to the King of Sweden, congratulating him on his successes (fn. 2) and urging him not to suspend operations, allowing him, whenever he pleases, to raise 6,000 infantry in Great Britain for his army.
Commissioners have been appointed for the Margrave of Baden's gentleman, the very same as conferred with Gabor's ambassador. I understand that his proposals are the same as have been frequently made before, and that he was to go to Venice and Savoy for the same purpose, and he already congratulates himself upon assistance having been promised his master from both powers. This matter has been talked about at Court and also mentioned to me. The Dutch ambassador said something to me about it, in the course of conversation, in such form as not to require much reply, and having no cue from your Excellencies I gladly avoid discussing the subject, not do I agree to these opinions in any way, the republic's present occupations proving only too clearly her active good will towards the common cause.
The Marquis of Hamilton left London as I announced, the pretext being to look into his affairs, having now attained his majority. But really he is offended with the duke, who, among the Court pensions, which have been generally suspended, included his, which amounts to some 3, 000l. a year and was enjoyed by his father. It is said that he refuses to solemnise his marriage with the duke's niece, to whom he was affianced, that he demands an inquest upon his father's death, which is generally attributed to poison, and above all he resents the annexation I mentioned of Church property to the crown. It seems that fresh disturbances are breaking out owing to this, though it is not yet certain. Be that as it may, people in general blame the king for allowing so great a personage to depart while affairs are in their present state and discontent at its zenith.
The news of the return of the fleet was but too true, and indeed the Admiral Willoughby and Vice-Admiral the Earl of Denbigh were seen this morning at Court, it being supposed that they had quarrelled. The ships were only at sea for a very few days; some were damaged in the storm and the provisions were spoiled. There is talk of sending them out again, but for this year it is not credible, and thus two fleets, fitted out at great cost, have done but little service.
The Dutch have not made their appearance. I fancy they are occupied with the defence of their own seas. The account of the Spanish reinforcements for Dunkirk is confirmed, but the English are not afraid of their passing, both because all the naval forces of England are united in the channel and also, as the season has already become so boisterous that owing to the winds and storms no letters have arrived this week from any quarter.
London, the 6th November, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
11. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A gentleman of the English Ambassador Anstruther passed this way last Saturday without stopping. It is supposed he is going to ask for help.
The States have no letters of any kind from their ambassador in London, and here they have nothing since the 24th or 25th ult. The latter are to the queen here, and say that the king will send two of the English regiments to Denmark and the two others to Ireland; and he has asked the States to send two of the veteran English regiments in their service to Denmark, and he will send new troops to take their place and pay them.
This news is not confirmed and the States do not like it. The Danish ambassador is still very impatient and the States do not see how they can help Denmark, and they fear the worst.
After the 4th, the day fixed by the English king for the maintenance of the four English regiments, the States wanted young Carleton to promise that they should be paid in full. He would only repeat that the king would send to pay them. However, he succeeded in inducing the States to maintain them for three weeks longer up to the 25th, when they declare they will disband them. Calandrini's brother here will supply the funds with 20,000 florins which he has in hand on England's account.
The Princes Palatine are very dissatisfied at the way things are going in England, which only serve their own interests and ruin the benefits which should be expected for the public cause. They lament the position of the King of Denmark and condemn the way England has given him promises and assurances without carrying them out. The queen said this to me, showing intense feeling.
Gordon, Anstruther's secretary, was sent post to inform the King of Denmark of the decision to send the four regiments, and also to assure him that Venice and Savoy had decided to help the old Margrave of Baden. I know this is not true, said her Majesty, but it is done in order to keep up the hopes of the King of Denmark. I shrugged my shoulders and smiled, to show that I agreed with her.
The Hague, the 9th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
12. HIERONIMO LANDO, Podestà, and HIEROLAMO DALEZI, Captain of Padua, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador, who is staying in this city, has conveyed to our knowledge by a person in his confidence that the ambassadress, his wife, will be here next Wednesday. We have thought fit to send word because there is time to receive orders from your Excellencies, without which we shall do nothing.
Padua, the 9th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
13. SIMON CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bassompierre has recently sent a courier with an account of his negotiations. He says the king there appointed some of his councillors to treat with him and find some arrangement satisfactory to both parties. The king has written back telling him to go forward in order to make a satisfactory settlement of a matter of so much consequence.
Paris, the 10th November, 1626.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Sampson.
2 His victorious campaign against the Poles.