Venice
November 1626, 21-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1914

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26-37

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'Venice: November 1626, 21-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 20: 1626-1628 (1914), pp. 26-37. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89108 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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November 1626

Nov. 21.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
38. From the paper presented by the English and Flemish merchants dwelling in this city, engaged in the trade in salt fish, upon the grievances arising from the decision of this Council of the 25th September last, upon which the Five Savii alla Mercantia and the Procuratori alla Giustitia Vecchia, being consulted, are of opinion that the complaint is reasonable and the said grievances may hinder that trade:
That the presence of a member of the Art of Saltfishmongers at every sale of salt fish being unnecessary, the merchants shall be released from this obligation; and as regards supplying a note of the quality and quantity of the salt fish the merchants shall take to the office of the Procuratori alla Giustitia Vecchia the book of lading of the salt fish brought by their ships with the quality and quantity, and the book shall be received and kept at the said office with no expense to the merchants, who need give no other note. As regards giving a note of the sale, the broker is always obliged to give this as well as the purchaser, but when the transaction takes place between foreigners, only the broker need give the note, and the vendors are released from this obligation. The merchants shall also be released from the obligation imposed by the decision of the 25th September not to sell salt fish before it has been unladed and taken to their magazines or houses, and in the future they may sell and contract on the ship, in the market and anywhere else not forbidden by the laws, but upon condition that the sale shall not take effect until after the goods have actually been taken to the custom house and discharged, upon such penalties as the Procuratori alla Giustitia Vecchia may impose. In other respects the decision of the 25th September last shall remain in force.
Ayes, 131.Noes, 1.Neutral, 21.
[Italian.]
Senato,
Mar.
filza.
Venetian
Archives.
39. Copy of petition of the English and Flemish merchants.
We have previously made representations, which have mostly been attended to with excellent results, for example about not allowing currants to be taken away from Zante and Cephalonia except by vessels which have brought their cargoes here; for this it was necessary that ships should come here with Western salt fish; but this trade is now so limited that last year only a few sardines and herrings came, whereas they used to come in abundance with a number of large ships. They now go elsewhere. This is due to the burdens imposed upon that trade. We have pointed out how the trade in salt fish can be brought back to this city, bringing a quantity of ships and the value of hundreds of thousands of ducats, and entirely diverting that trade from foreign places. This would happen if your Serenity would allow salt fish to be sold and bought by every one without hindrance. It would benefit the customs and establish more firmly the trade in currants at Zante and Cephalonia. The matter was discussed before the Five Savii alla Mercantia and the Procuratori alla Giustitia Vecchia, and despite the opposition of the Art of the saltfishmongers, they were convinced of the advantage of every liberty in that trade, and we were informed that the Senate would be advised to grant free buying and selling for two years. But instead of granting full liberty the Senate imposed severe restrictions; we would represent that no advantages can arise from this manner of concession, as the disadvantages are almost greater than before, since no sale can take place unless the head of the saltfishmongers is present, whose only object will be to prevent sales to others, and get everything into their own hands, the disadvantage of which has appeared in the past; it is also most inconvenient to supply a note of the merchandise to the Giustitia Vecchia, as this leads to constant trouble, denunciation and litigation, as they want us to render account even for the herrings we have consumed for ourselves and kept for friends; the book of the ship's cargo would show how much was brought. Then again the condition that all the goods must be unladed and taken to magazines or houses in this city would involve the risk of heavy loss, owing to the time involved, not to speak of other expenses and losses without any advantage to the state. We therefore state that we cannot take up the said business unless your Serenity will grant a free market for buying and selling salt fish from the West, with liberty to take it away both by land and sea upon payment of the proper duties.
1626, the 5th October.
That the Five Savii alla Mercantia shall answer the said petition and give their opinion upon oath after first hearing the chiefs of the Art of Saltfishmongers. The Procuratori alla Giustitia Vecchia shall do the same.
Marc Antonio MocenigoCouncillors.
Antonio da Ponte
Francesco Molin
Marco Paruta
Reports of the said Five Savii and Procuratori, dated the 16th November, in favour of granting the said petition.
[Italian.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
40. LUNARDO MORO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The desired news has arrived of the safe arrival of the fleet in the port of San Lucar on the 17th inst. They say it brings 22 millions, and on the voyage they saw no hostile ships. They know nothing of the English galleons, except that forty-four have sailed, including some Dutch ones.
They say that seventy ships brought this treasure; the galleons were armed and they had an escort of 36 others, while others again went to meet them when they were sighted fifty leagues off Cape St. Vincent. They now have sixty armed ships lying idle in these waters, with 10,000 or 12,000 infantry on board, practically all veteran Spanish troops. There must be more than forty others in Biscay and Flanders, and from what I can gather the majority of them will lie in wait for the English fleet, of which they pretend to think nothing, and they may also have a plan to land somewhere.
A rumour is abroad that the feeling between the Most Christian and the King of England is more strained than ever, that English ships have arrested some French ones, and that Bassompierre hopes for little and is ill used.
Madrid, the 22nd November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
41. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Tuesday of last week a Scottish gentleman passed this way, who serves in the King of Denmark's army, going to Scotland. He had two patents of that monarch, one for Earl Morton, the other for a leading Scottish nobleman, to raise two regiments. He assured the Princes Palatine here of the good disposition and high courage of that king.
Since my last their High Mightinesses have received letters from their ambassador in London. They contain nothing but what I have already reported. Young Carleton hears that he and Calandrini are to ask the States to send their own troops to Denmark with the two English regiments. They also say that a large sum will be paid in London for the service of Denmark, and he will also be satisfied by means of the jewels which are at Amsterdam.
The Hague, the 23rd November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
42. MARC ANTONIO MOROSINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have your Serenity's letters of the 14th. I will keep a look out for the Englishman whose actions you wish me to observe, though no one is expected here from those parts. We hear that the relations between the two crowns are better. Buckingham has relaxed somewhat and Bassompierre's adroitness has met with success. In France they are ready to give that king every reasonable satisfaction.
Turin, the 23rd November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
43. To the Ambassadors in France and England and at the Hague.
The damage wrought by pirates to the subjects of friendly princes, mostly due to Cassin Pasha, sometime viceroy at Tunis, who shares the booty, has led the ambassadors of France, England the Hague and our republic to protest against the re-appointment of Cassin as Viceroy of Tunis, but without effect; so the said ambassadors have decided to write to their masters and get them to send letters of remonstrance to the Sultan, in the hope of obtaining Cassin's removal as well as some good effect about the pirates. We have sent you this information so that you may be on the alert to discover what decision his Majesty may take in the matter and send us word, in order to guide our own decision.
Enclose copy of letter of the Bailo at Constantinople about the fresh instances of Prince Gabor at the Porte about his move against the emperor, and the orders sent to the new Pasha of Buda on this subject, sent for information to use for the public service.
Ayes, 108.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
44. SIMON CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Advices arrive from Bassompierre that his business is in good train, with satisfaction for both crowns, and that they will send an embassador extraordinary here from England to confirm what has been arranged at London for the common service.
Paris, the 24th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
45. To the Ambassador in England and the like to the Hague
We have nothing to add about the Valtelline. We hear indeed from Turin that Marshal di Crichi, the king's new lieutenant in Dauphiné, has increased the frontier garrisons, while the Genoese have sent troops to occupy the pass of Brigue. The duke's soldiers attacked them and drove them back. The Governor of Milan is staying at Gravedona after inspecting at the posts there. They say 200 carts full of munitions of war have reached him. The Spaniards have decided to build a tower at Montagnola, near Riva. At Milan Don Gonzales has ordered the galley slaves, who are usually sent to Genoa, to go to Gravedona to serve on the lake.
Gabor is negotiating with the emperor. He has Colonel dal Maestro and the Count of Slich prisoners, both wounded; he has joined forces with the Turks and Mansfelt and makes frequent incursions into Moravia, where levies are being raised for Denmark. Wallenstein, from fear of attack, has gathered his army about Fraisten, being determined not to attack the enemy, because he cannot depend on his troops. The King and Prince of Poland are quarrelling, as the queen wants her first-born to be preferred in the succession. This will serve you for information.
Ayes, 114.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
46. To the Ambassadors in Spain, France and at the Hague.
We think it necessary to inform you of suspicions in England of an accommodation with the Spaniards. An express courier has been sent from London to a colonel of a regiment of the Infanta, arousing the suspicion that the person as a Scot in favour with the Infanta may make some overtures. Although the Dunkirkers are strongly fortified on the sea side, yet Buckingham has directed that the ships equipped by the city shall not leave port without further order. Other indications point to that all powerful minister being dispirited if not subdued. Possibly, seeing the attacks made upon his fortunes, he is preparing a refuge elsewhere. This information will help you to find out what is said at your Court on the subject. The Dutch ambassador at London had his suspicions. The quarrel with France, which grows worse, the difference between their promises and their actions as regards Denmark are indications worthy of remark. This week we hear that the Spaniards claim to have a peace with the English in hand, and although Bassompierre has been advised from France that there is no foundation for this report, we cannot ignore so many indications.
Ayes, 127.Noes, 2.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
47. That the gold chains given by the King of Great Britain to Christofforo Surian and Geronimo Querti, as secretaries to our ambassadors extraordinary, Correr and Contarini, to that sovereign, be freely conceded to them in the usual way.
Ayes, 127.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
On the same day in the Collegio:
Ayes, 19.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
48. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bassompierre having secured the first point about the queen's satisfaction, is now trying to make an advantageous arrangement for the Catholics of this realm. The obstacles are great owing to the mistrust of the Protestants, but nevertheless he may promise himself anything through the duke's favour, with whom he has had several lengthy and close conferences during the last few days, in such wise that this great confidence has created some suspicion. I hear on good authority that the duke confessed to him something of the great check his authority receives through the continuance of matters as they now are, enveloped in the want of money and the difficulty of finding any without parliament, which would be his ruin, independently of the general maxim of favourites, who, in troublous times, do not too clearly see the bottom of their own interests. In order to keep the duke well disposed, Bassompierre announced his intention, provided the English government make some previous advance to France, of aiding the business, so that the Most Christian will readily send an ambassador, perhaps Bassompierre himself, to the emperor about the Palatinate, with the hope of bringing matters to a good pass. The business proceeds in accordance with the indications, for the intention of France to adjust her foreign affairs and not openly declare herself against the House of Austria encourage it, as well as the duke's interests, by reason of current events in this kingdom.
Since these conferences they say that the duke will cross to France, led to that Court by a burning of the heart which has not yet subsided, and by the wish to share the glory of this adjustment. But all his intimate friends and those who hope for advantages with his help dissuade him from this to the utmost, so I dare not as yet vouch for the resolve. In consequence of this it is thought that Bassompierre's mission to the emperor may meet with impediments at the French Court, and that he artfully promises much more than he can perform, in order to benefit his present negotiations. At any rate the warnings cannot fail to be of use and I have sent word to the Ambassador Zorzi.
The affair of the sea remains as notified. The English require the embargo on their goods in France to be removed first of all, considering it a hostile act which does not correspond to the seizure of doubtful prizes. The French on the other hand maintain that the first aggressor must be the first to make reparation, and to such an extent that I understand the city of Rouen, as most interested in the matter, told the Most Christian plainly, that it was not proper his merchants should urge their claims for damages in England, when they can obtain justice without cost or trouble by seizing the English goods on the French marts.
This will always be the stumbling block, as I have often said, and one must add the increasing suspicions which England entertains of France. The Secretary Conway, whom I visited lately because he was slightly indisposed, spoke to me on the subject very resentfully and read me a letter addressed to the king on the 16th inst., announcing the great attention paid by Richelieu to maritime affairs, the ships expected from Holland and others off La Rochelle and in the ports of Britanny and Normandy, the arrangements made by the merchants for a company to trade in the East Indies, and above all the permission, signed by the Most Christian's own hand and conceded to M. Roses, for a levy of 4,000 foot and 1,500 horse, which will pass man by man in the direction of Mezières on the Luxemburg frontier, where the muster is to be made. This person is a German, and although he was a long while in the service of the King of Poland, for whom people say that the force has been raised, though everyone feels certain that these troops will enter the emperor's service. Secretary Conway complains to me that these negotiations show that French policy goes directly contrary to the common weal, and is not generally understood, though it creates suspicion. It corresponds, however, with the above-mentioned opinions of Bassompierre and with what I have often notified.
On this account Bassompierre is doing everything to free himself as soon as possible and return to France, leaving all the affairs imperfect, with the exception of the queen's, the fulfillment of which may still meet with obstacles.
Last evening her Majesty gave him a masque, which proved very elegant. To-morrow he proposes taking leave of the king, and a few days later, after doing the like by the Court, return to France. Here, on the contrary, they all do their utmost to procrastinate, especially under the pretence of giving him similar diversions. I do not find him inclined that way, but rather anxious to depart, to gain for himself the honour of this adjustment, without going further.
They say here that Fargis in Spain, continuing his pernicious devices, made some opening for an adjustment with England, and not meeting with the reciprocity he desired, he interested the papal nuncio in the matter, who, provided any advantage could accrue to the English Catholics, did not refuse the employment. I do not know the grounds for this statement.
I cannot discover on good authority that the overtures proceed from England, although she is much inclined to peace, to which the Spaniards, on the other hand, are averse, as neither by a deceptive peace nor active war can they bring greater destruction upon this kingdom than what it is inflicting on itself. Yet it would be incredible Fargis should speak without orders, were not his malicious projects already notorious. There is a secretary in England, formerly in Gondomar's service, Tiliars (fn. 1) by name, who it is said was commanded by the late King James to reside in his house and act as a spy upon him. I do not hear that he is negotiating, though on the other hand the duke has been seen holding a long colloquy with the son of the Archbishop of York, (fn. 2) an utter Spaniard, about whom I have written. The Dutch ambassador, being very suspicious, spoke about this to some of his confidants, who assured him that the negotiations as yet are only private and that the king will certainly take no step without the assent of the United Provinces.
London, the 27th November, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
49. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Danish ambassador has not yet left for the French Court, having been detained by the arrival of two couriers, who followed each other on two consecutive days with letters from his king. Owing to their contents he transacted business yesterday and to-day with the duke alone, without communicating with any other minister and with great secrecy, in such wise that the Court was not without suspicion of some opening of negotiations between his master and the emperor. From indications given him by the government at the Hague the Dutch ambassador shares this opinion. The unusual precaution of silence observed towards the foreign ministers confirms the doubt, full assurance being delayed solely by his continuing this journey and his negotiations for assistance from France, in which direction they say he will depart shortly. What people say on the subject hitherto is that the King of Denmark wishes for a levy of 6,000 Scots in case of need, under the command of the Earl of Murton, their countryman, and that besides the 6,000 English already commanded he may be allowed some military leaders, of whom since the last rout, he stands in most need. I also hear, in conformity with this, that they again propose to send Colonel Horace Vere; but he excuses himself as does Lord Willoughby, everybody declaring that on the present occasion they will have no opportunity for gaining honour, but rather toil and certain mortification, from the lack of money, and consequently from the confusion which accompanies it. Many indeed think the cost of this last succour wasted owing to the advanced season of the year, which may prevent those troops from making the passage, and should they cross there will be no opportunity for employing them; so that from feebleness of counsel everything is seen to proceed out of season.
The provincial people in Wales, who are the poorest, owing to the sterility of the soil, have represented the impossibility of their fortunes sufficing for the payment of the required subsidies. In many places in England the people refuse to subscribe, so they have decided to send three privy councillors at a time, in order not to abandon things here entirely, each to his own government, to try and obtain signatures.
What matters most is that all the judges and lawyers, especially in London, while readily offering to pay their quota, refuse positively on the other hand to give their signatures, declaring it contrary to the laws of the realm, for the maintenance of which they take a solemn oath on assuming office. The affair is of consequence by reason of the scruples it may generate in the minds of all the lower classes, and on this account the king has already removed the Lord Chief Justice, confining him to his country seat, because being the first judge who was asked for his assent he refused it. (fn. 3) To the others he allowed a short time for reflexion and the announcement of their intention. Meanwhile, the Council assembles daily to find suitable remedies, with the assistance of the Archbishop of Canterbury, who has never attended it since the last parliament, owing to strained relations with the duke (per male sodisfationi con il duca). The king is above all anxious about this, as it will serve hereafter to justify the proceeding and establish a new fundamental law, putting an end to parliaments, to which he attaches much more importance than the mere disbursements, so that his object is evident and he will do his utmost to obtain it.
A frigate from the plate fleet has reached these ports, having been brought in by a Dutch ship. The crew say they were separated from the main body in a storm, leaving it off the Cape Verde Islands, with a freight of 22 millions; and that they had also heard something about the galleons of Seville and Portugal, which had already been sent out to convoy them.
The ships of the United Provinces under Admiral Real have entered the channel. I do not believe that they will await the promised reinforcement of English vessels, both by reason of the usual dilatoriness, which impedes everything, and because choosing to take the chief command they might spoil Real's plans, he being undoubtedly a man of valour and experience. He will, I believe, cruise off the coast of Spain, and having only twelve good ships, should a fair opportunity present itself, he will throw himself into one of these harbours and burn and plunder all the vessels it may contain.
The English persist nevertheless in their being joined, not only by the ten ships fitted out by the city of London, as mentioned, but by four royal ships also, all being provisioned for six months, and I believe some impulse is given to this affair by the news of the plate fleet.
Five Dunkirk galleons passed between Calais and Dover on the 21st inst., shaping their course for Spain, and pursued by nine Dutchmen, part of the usual coast guard of Flanders. Some suppose them to be in quest of the vessels laden with this year's wines, which at this very season pass from Bordeaux to the Netherlands. Others that they may serve as convoy to some reinforcement already prepared in Spain. Three large ships have also gone from Dunkirk towards the Sound with other Dutchmen in pursuit.
The two commissioners from Hamburg who have been many months at the English Court, endeavouring to raise the English and Dutch blockade, which prevents their putting to sea, have departed without any conclusive or satisfactory reply, it being of vital importance to prevent the conveyance of naval stores to Spain, who receives them from Hamburg alone. I now understand that the commissioners have gone to Antwerp, under pretence of recovering merchandise and ships taken from them by the Dunkirkers, but really with the intention not only of confirming their leaning towards the House of Austria, but perhaps to invoke assistance from that quarter and remedy their grievance by force of arms.
The arranging of the ten regiments remains as before, the government not having been able to find money to pay arrears, though I understand that if reduced to four, as decreed, the duke will have one, the other three being given to noblemen of quality, his dependants and favourites.
I have received the ducal missives of the 30th October. The account of the affair of the Valtelline and other advices shall be imparted as ordered and I will use them when there is any hope of profit, though there is very little profit of this sort to be expected here. I do not find that the English ambassador at Constantinople prevents Gabor from receiving assistance; on the contrary I am assured that the intentions of the Privy Council and of his Majesty are quite the other way. Possibly Sir Thomas Roe is offended owing to the scanty love the duke has for him, who has had one Wyche (Veis) appointed his successor, a man pleasing to the merchants for his good character, though on the other hand they regret that the privilege of his nomination should thus be usurped by the king. Roe, nevertheless, will remain at that post another year. Adroitly and covertly I will see that he receives commands advancing the common cause, although when the English government writes five or six times in the course of a year to their ministers the feat is considered no slight one, especially when they are at a distance. Even the ambassador from Gabor himself is still here, his business not being despatched. He enjoys the king's board and lodging merrily and I fancy that he therefore acquiesces readily in the usual delays of this Court.
London, the 27th November, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
50. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Before communicating with your Serenity I chose to convince myself about the sufficiency of the interpreter employed here. (fn. 4) I have daily proof that he is not only very feeble, but also harmful. He has served the republic for twenty-five years, having assumed the post in the time of the Secretary Scaramelli, but his incapacity increasing with years and his strength diminishing, he has now become almost utterly useless.
I hesitated greatly to report this, since he has served so long, and I might have patience, but considering the service of the State, the long period I should have to employ him, his increasing decrepitude and the necessity for some one to break the ice, I have thought fit to represent the whole and await your commands. I will only say this much, he now proves insufficient either from his advanced years, from bad habits induced by idleness, by custom and perhaps by age itself. I do not particularise, but the service certainly suffers both from forgetfulness of orders, mistakes about visits and matters of decorum. Although, to prevent confusion, I employ him very rarely, yet times and circumstances are not always the same, while on certain occasions at conferences, when English alone is spoken, as happens occasionally and may happen in matters of importance, I cannot do without him.
He now has a salary of some 200 ducats, which you may continue to pay in full or in part in recompense for long service during the few years that remain to him. He might receive some apparent privileges, out of regard for the English nation, and at the same time be bound to frequent the embassy as before, to help his successor, who at any rate must receive his commands from your Excellencies together with such terms and salary as you may decide, without further interference on my part.
I foresee the necessity of procuring another person, who after becoming acquainted with this Court and his duties, his honesty being tried and himself conducted by this old servant, may advantageously fit himself to succeed the present occupant, even should his present incapacity and the requirements of the service not demand his retirement.
London, the 27th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Capitolare VIII.
Venetian
Archives.
51. That the cloves brought to this city from England and the Netherlands only shall pay 5 instead of 10 per cent. import duty and Venetians who bring them from the same parts shall pay 3 ducats 9 lire instead of 6 ducats 18 lire; and they shall pay 2 ducats 4 lire instead of 4 ducats 8 lire for export duty.
A like reduction shall be made for the stems and little heads of the said cloves.
There shall be a like reduction in the duties on musked goods (cose muschate), brought to this city from the said places; and also for mace.
There shall be a similar reduction in the duties on cinnamon, scavezzoni (fn. 5) , indigo, lead and tallow brought to this city from England and the Netherlands.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
52. CHRISTOFFORO SURIAN, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The lords of the government here are much perplexed, as the contrary winds prevent letters coming from England, while the French ambassador here has heard by way of Brussels that all four regiments are to go to Denmark. Young Carleton went to inform the States of this, for he also had letters, and that the money was ready to repay them for the upkeep of the troops, for taking them by sea to Denmark, for food and other necessaries, and that 2,500 English soldiers of the island would go to Denmark to make good the wastage in these regiments; all the commissions for the passage, command and discipline of these troops were already sealed.
This news has greatly relieved the States and released them from the difficulty of sending their own men. When the wind changes they hope Calandrini will come, as the men-of-war and everything else are ready for his passage.
The same letters inform the French ambassador of an accommodation between the Kings of France and England.
The Hague, the 30th November, 1626.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
53. MARC ANTONIO MORESINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The duke seems inclined to recall his ambassador from France, but does not quite know how to do it and to save his face. He told me that it occurred to him that he might send the ambassador on to England upon some specious pretext, which he could invent afterwards. But the French would not like that either, as owing to Scaglia's friendship with Buckingham and the English they would suspect him of kindling the present flames.
Turin, the 30th November, 1626.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 Henry Tailor.
2 Sir Tobie Matthew.
3 Sir Randal Crew was deprived on the 19th November. He had been appointed Chief Justice of the King's Bench on the 25th February, 1625.
4 Edward Watson. The Ambassador Lando complained about him in a letter written on the 6th August, 1621. See vol. xvii of this Calendar, pages 101, 102.
5 Roba scavezza, scavezzone: rottami, polvere, stracciature ed altri avanzi di materie fragili come le cannelle, la china, etc. Boerio: Dizionario del Dialetto Veneziano.