Venice
August 1627, 2-9

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1914

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307-319

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'Venice: August 1627, 2-9', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 20: 1626-1628 (1914), pp. 307-319. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89126 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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August 1627

Aug. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
381. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We hear of the arrival of Rubens, the Antwerp painter, who is supposed to have negotiated with Gerbier about an adjustment between England and Spain. He stayed here some days, but I do not think that any but Carleton, Scaglia and Gerbier conferred with him. The abbot said nothing of his coming until I spoke about it and then he confirmed the report that Rubens was at Amsterdam with Gerbier. He said he had come about some pretence of pictures and sculpture, but really there were matters of greater importance. I gathered that some overtures would be made for a peace or truce with the States. Although he told me no particulars of importance he asked me to keep silence, saying he had heard them as great secrets. He asked me especially to avoid speaking about it to Carleton, assuring me it was from him that he had learned what they were to negotiate.
In any case this cannot be arranged in weeks and more certain information with time. My indisposition prevents me being so active as I should desire.
The French ambassador came to see me yesterday and expressed great suspicions on the subject. He seemed to believe that they might conclude some treaty here, including England, without informing France. He thinks that the Prince of Orange taking the field with such a powerful force merely to attack Grol is a masquerade.
Montagu returned yesterday from London and will leave to-morrow for Turin. The abbot told me this morning that Montagu is taking to the duke the ratification of what has already been settled. He had been unable to do anything for an armistice, as he found the fleet gone on his arrival. This is the chief particular, which may lead to an irreparable rupture, as if the English had really desired to consider an accommodation they could have stopped the fleet even after it had sailed. I do not think that Savoy pressed this very much as the abbot evidently wants to see the French brought low, and his master presumably has the same ideas. But it is impossible to penetrate what the man is doing here. I think his commissions serve him very well, although he still says he has not received any and Carleton told me he thought he did not want them. Yet he has a hand in everything and not a day passes but he and Carleton are in close conference. What they negotiate cannot be learned as both are ministers and never say anything but what they want to be known, and if they are arranging an accommodation with Spain they will tell me the less.
We hear that the fleet as been at La Rochelle, where it left ten men-of-war, and with the rest the duke went to land at the island of Oleron, but we have no confirmation. Montagu says that at his departure from London they knew nothing. It is thought that they may coast along Spain, and in that case they might easily unite with the Dutch ships. In France they believe this has already occurred and Langarach writes that the cardinal remonstrated most strongly about them joining their enemies. Carleton has obtained permission to buy for the fleet 100,000lbs. of gunpowder which had been bespoken by the French ambassador for the ships at Amsterdam intended for his king. As the money was not ready the merchants got out of it and it seems that the ambassador could not complain, as he told me very freely.
The Hague, the 2nd August, 1627.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 3.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi,
Venetian
Archives.
382. The English ambassador came into the Collegio and said:
Before leaving, the Prince of Brandenburg expressly charged me to come and thank your Serenity for the honours, favours and presents he has received. He is especially beholden for his audience in the Collegio and for the galley granted for his passage. I assure your Serenity that he will never forget these favours. He gave me a paper about the business transacted, which was handed by him to your Serenity with the letters of the King of Denmark. It may be doubted whether you understood the requests, though your Serenity's prudence penetrates the least hint. I find that I have frequently spoken to your Serenity on this very subject, and I have recently had fresh orders from my king as well as from the King of Denmark, as if the interests of England were concerned.
I will first tell your Serenity of the condition of his Majesty's forces. After the defeat which happened about this time last year he devoted himself to gathering his shattered forces and fortifying the three important towns, Hamburg, Lubeck and Bremen, with the mouths of the rivers, whereby he greatly incommoded the enemy, who had no hope of attacking, and found himself confined and enfeebled in his circle of Saxony, so that from being victor he had hard work to avoid defeat. The king thus secured his rear and decided not to risk his own force but to wear down the enemy, in which he was bound to secure success. He now has the best captains in his army, the old Margrave of Baden, the Count della Torre, Morgan and others of experience and rank, by whose advice the king is guided. Thus he is well secured, having 18,000 soldiers of my king in his army, 6,000 English and 12,000 Scots, but as the cost will be considerable he has to ask for help from your Serenity, in your zeal for the public welfare.
I must also add that they are negotiating for a settlement of the affairs of Germany, to which the King of Denmark does not seem averse as he would willingly make peace, and if the republic promises help it may have all the credit and none of the burden, if peace is made, and if not it will be lending a hand to the common cause. They have written to Saxony about a settlement, a place of meeting is fixed and deputies of other princes will take part. If they come to an agreement satisfactory to the common interests, the results will appear. In any case the king intends to make the peace armed, risking nothing in case it does not ensue. Now, thank God, the expense for the Valtelline has ceased, the foreigners have left Italy and your Serenity is in great measure relieved of the weight of past expenditure and your soldiers in the emperor's service so that you can more easily give help in this other direction, and then if the republic is in difficulties, which God forfend, the King of Denmark and my master will give their help out of gratitude, without any alliance.
The doge replied: We are very glad at the satisfaction of the Prince of Brandenburg with what we were able to do. We should have done more had he not desired to remain incognito; we gladly gave him the galley. For the rest the Signors will answer the letters brought by the prince and the other offices. We rejoice at the prosperous state of the King of Denmark's affairs. The republic has incurred heavy expenses, and the diversion in this quarter wonderfully helped distant interests. Many charges continue still and we need some respite in order that we may afterwards be able to show our good will and zeal for the common service. Meanwhile, we return thanks for his Majesty's friendly expressions, and we shall try to afford constant testimony of our good will. We are very pleased that the Count della Torre has a leading command in the king's army, and that is why we gave him up, although we valued him highly, as we desire to gratify his Majesty in every possible way. With this the ambassador took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Aug. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
383. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The king does not expect to recover. Monsieur, who was so anxious to go against the English, is now awaiting the event. His Majesty has not yet heard anything of the landing of the English. He thinks they have seen that their attempt was vain, and this gives him some consolation in his pain. The cardinal, conscious that he is the cause of all this ruin, and fearing worse in the future, is so tormented and distressed that he resembles a ghost rather than a body formed of lines and colours. As Paris is deprived of news, I have come to Gravilla, a league from Villeroy.
Yesterday Don Diego Messia went to Court and had a long interview with the cardinal, to whom he confirmed the promise of the forty ships. He also proposed a league such as I wrote of several weeks ago. Richelieu made two objections that Giovanni di Riva must first come, and that he could not take any steps if the king did not get better. Shortly after this he made a great outburst (una grande sparata) against the Dutch ambassador. Langarach took him letters from the States offering their interposition for a reconciliation between the two kings. The cardinal told him that he desired this and thanked the States in the king's name. But while they offered advice to those in need of help they showed a lack of true friendship and made a poor response to what this kingdom had done for them in the past. The United Provinces ought to have sent the king a good number of their ships, whereby they would show him the sincerity of their good will. Langarach replied: Your Eminence knows that at present there is no alliance between France and Holland, while we have had an unbroken one with England for centuries, and, what is more important, the interests of that kingdom and our Provinces are so bound up together that one cannot be struck without the other feeling it. You want the help of my masters, but how would you reconcile our ships with those of Dunkirk. Be careful lest instead of improving the position you make it worse, as I can assure you that in every place and with every one soever, not only the King of England but anyone else, who fires his guns to the hurt of the Spaniards and Austria, we shall always stand united, and, believe my association with French ships will not render them safe from our fleet. Then, said Richelieu, would you show so little respect to a great king in France and in his own waters ? Would you wish to see France open the door to our enemy and put up with it, retorted the ambassador. I perceive, said Richelieu, that the goodness of the king has so raised the temerity of others that he will have to unite with Spain even against his will, and one day Holland may weep for this. Both Holland and France will weep together if they do not open their eyes, rejoined the ambassador. Messia had not yet reached the street before the whole of this noisy conversation was reported to him.
This week the Queen of England sent Germen, an English gentleman, to the queen mother upon the death of the Duchess of Orleans. (fn. 1) The cardinal thought he brought other business and saw him gladly, as he is determined on war in this kingdom and, from what they say, desires peace with England at any price. Whether this individual is a person to negotiate or introduce such a matter I hear various accounts. The truth is that although he has spoken of nothing since his office, yet the cardinal and others continue to cherish this belief.
Gravella, the 5th August, 1627.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
384. To the Ambassador in England.
We enclose copies of the exposition of the English ambassador and our reply for your information; you will speak in conformity, as your prudence dictates. We hear from Vienna of the breaking off of the peace with the Turks; this may balance the progress of Wallenstein in Silesia and what we hear from Rome of negotiations for peace with Denmark. We are sending these presents by Holland as well as the ordinary way, so that you will be certain to receive the confirmation of our satisfaction with your good service.
Ayes, 109.Noes, 4.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
385. That the English ambassador be summoned to the Collegio and that the following be read to him:
We are most gratified at what you have told us of the Prince of Brandenburg's pleasure at his visit here, as we highly esteem him and his house. We have replied to the letters he presented from the King of Denmark and communicated with our ambassador at the Hague. We notice that his Majesty has so ordered his arms and his negotiations that we cannot fail to be hopeful, and we thank you for the communication. In Italy the troubles of Savoy and Genoa continue, while the forces of Milan do not disband, and all help is far away. We have reduced our forces in accordance with the immediate occasion and many of our captains have gone to the king's army, where some of them still enjoy our pay, while others have gone with the Prince of Brandenburg, by our permission. Your Excellency will be able to convey our general good will and our desire for an adjustment between the two crowns, and we beg you to do so.
Ayes, 109.Noes, 4.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
386. To the Ambassador in England.
His Majesty's ambassador at the Porte has very confidential relations with our Bailo, and imparts to him all matters which he thinks concern the public cause; and the Bailo fully reciprocates this. The ambassador has recently informed the bailo of his treaty with the ambassadors of Gabor and the Ottoman ministers, touching war or peace with Caesar; although the latest news from Vienna shows that they have little hope of peace. We send you a copy of the Bailo's letters for your information.
Ayes, 104.Noes, 2.Neutral, 4.
The like to the Hague, mutatis mutandis.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
387. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have at last received five packets from Italy. I got the Signory's letters of the 5th and 25th June and 9th July and thank your Serenity for bearing with the delay and mischance of my letters, which have kept me in constant anxiety until they reached their destination.
As regards the important matter contained in the Bailo's letter about some junction of forces against the pirates, I am unable to obtain confirmation owing to the absence of the Court, which is so prejudicial. The utmost I could do was to elicit from Coke, the Secretary of State, under pretence of a visit, whether he knew anything about Sir [Thomas] Roe's letters. He gave me no account of anything whatever, and indeed it is not his business to attend to foreign affairs, all of which remain in the hands of Secretary Conway, who is 100 miles away with the king. When able to see him I will endeavour to execute my instructions, though I do not see any chance for weeks and perhaps months. Meanwhile, from what I observe I might almost assert that they think little or nothing about matters of this sort, and had they the will there is no way, owing to present emergencies, which absorb both the money and the Council, though both are inadequate. I may add that during my stay here I have not heard much complaint from the merchants about the pirates, with whom, although the English have no formal treaty like the Dutch, I fancy there exists an understanding not to molest each other, the inference being reasonable as the company alone trades with certain marts in the Levant and within the Strait, forming at stated seasons their fleet of 12 or 15 ships, more or less, prepared to resist and defend themselves. The private merchants also observe a similar system when necessary; they unite their ships by certain formulas which they call Admiralty, binding themselves to mutual defence. If one takes to flight it is held accountable for any loss sustained by the others. For the rest, they share all profits and losses from their encounters with the pirates or the enemy. Complaints are thus circumscribed and the pirates have rather reason to fear the English, who in this trade of piracy are quite as alert as themselves. Unless Sir [Thomas] Roe on his return from Constantinople suggest the advantage of this union communicated to the Bailo, I do not believe that any other person will accomplish it, indeed, I suspect that even he will meet with great difficulties, because the king will not incur the expense without the help of the merchants, who seem to care little about it. Roe himself is not sufficiently in the duke's favour. At least I will punctually obey orders as the mere rumour of an understanding may induce the Turks to apply the fitting remedies. In the rest I believe it to be no less difficult for any proposal to emanate from England at present than it would be to induce the English to second the proposals of others. Sir [Thomas] Roe having been so long absent from this Court is bound to suppose that reason and his sound opinions will be held in proper account by the government, but on his return he may find all the registers altered.
The French secretary, Moulins, has left. He writes to me from Dover about the release of his courier and the letters in his charge. I answered in general terms. I enclose copies of both letters. Among other topics I spoke cursorily of this affair to the Secretary Coke, when paying him a visit, without making any formal demand or using the name of your Excellencies. I merely remarked that these small sparks were apt to kindle great fires and the only effect they produced on current affairs was dissatisfaction and rancour, preventing conciliatory overtures and damaging more important business, encouraging the trials of those who wish to see these two kingdoms in ashes, with similar general ideas. In reply I gathered that the letters had been sent to the Court, where, owing to the distance it was impossible to negotiate, and the man was courier of the Most Christian, a contumacious Englishman, too inquisitive about the proceedings here and an intimate of Moulins. Without debating this matter, I showed myself totally unimpassioned, and without giving any umbrage here I endeavoured to divert suspicion on the part of the French, by securing for myself that central and independent position which I believe your Serenity wishes. Such affairs are very delicate and should the misunderstanding continue, I might through sincerity of heart or too great caution, excite suspicion in one quarter or the other, so I request you to prescribe your wishes, as I distrust myself and do not know if I have done right, though I hardly think I can have done harm by the middle course I have pursued. In my reply to Moulins I do not descend to particulars, to avoid a rejoinder before I have learned the state's wishes. To the French gentleman, M. Fobur, who delivered Moulin's letter to me, I hinted something about the difficulties elicited from Coke, which I did not think it well to commit to paper, and I have informed the Ambassador Zorzi of what took place so that he may be fully acquainted with the whole affair.
London, the 6th August, 1627.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
388. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
After more than a month since the fleet put to sea a gentleman at length arrived at the Court, sent by the duke. (fn. 2) His report is consigned to such strict silence that detriment and loss are supposd, for they speedily publish good news, the air itself spreading it in every quarter. His Majesty immediately gave orders for all the privy councillors who are scattered over the country, to assemble at the board, to hasten the 14 ships and 4,000 foot which are to reinforce the expedition. The chief point was to find money, which presents so many obstacles and so much confusion that after three long sittings, I do not think they made any progress, so the execution of the king's intention will certainly encounter some delay, perhaps to the detriment of the undertakings. Subsequently something was heard to the effect that the English, after being repulsed at the first attack, at length landed in the Isle of Rhe and established themselves, with a loss both of men and ships, an expensive and very sanguinary capture. If true it will be quite enough to send troops, even in unarmed ships, which can be done more quickly and I understand that they are pressing troops with the utmost rigour, to send them off immediately.
A letter with an order to withdraw was sent to the French secretary, Moulins, who hopes that it may justify him with his master. He left without awaiting further instructions and I understand he has already crossed the channel.
The Court has received despatches from Carleton, and there is a ship in the Thames with 1,400 tons of powder purchased at Amsterdam. Owing to the distance of the Court I dare not positively affirm the contents of the letters, but can only assert that the Dutch ambassador has received letters from his masters to present to the king, with orders to request his Majesty to condescend to certain particulars for the adjustment with the French, to be negotiated at the Hague or any other place agreeable to him. He sent his secretary to court to fix a day of audience, which was assigned him fourteen days later, a most unusual thing and much to his regret, owing to the nature of the business, though it is believed they did this for the purpose of hearing in the first place authentic news of the fleet.
When Montagu returned from Piedmont something was said to me about the Duke of Savoy wishing the king here to give him the title of king, so that in the heat of this great intimacy he may make charcoal for his own advantage from all sorts of wood. I did not report this, considering the attempt very vain and that this was not the tribunal to debate such a case and obtain an absolute award. But as the Ambassador Morosini confirmed the project I gathered further particulars. I find that Montagu threw out some roots at a distance. So far his Majesty has only given general replies, though the duke will use them to help him with others. I will keep on the watch, especially as to what Scaglia may bring; as after a free reference, which is generally considered to have exceeded the decorum of a great king, the second step also may be taken without looking further; although all those with whom I have spoken laugh at the duke's humour. Yet I bear in mind the sweet temper and unripe judgment and that the bent of the favourite draws with it the heart, will and deeds of the king without regard or distinction.
Meanwhile, it has been announced here, I know not on what grounds, that neither the French nor the Spaniards really wish for the adjustment between Savoy and Genoa, in order to divert the duke, the one from attempting innovation, suggesting disturbances to the malcontents and supporting Soissons, the others for their own ends and designs in the event of the Duke of Mantua's death, who is reported indisposed and is at any rate unlikely to live long.
The sermon which the Archbishop of Canterbury would not allow to be printed has been licensed since his disgrace by the Bishop of London and is sold publicly, causing many comments. The wisest believe that the Jesuits will use this example in Germany, where they maintain only to well that it is lawful to banish the natives, deprive them of their property, giving it to others and the like, as witnessed daily to the irretrievable subjection of the empire. Meanwhile, the prisons here grow daily fuller with those who declare against the subsidies. To prevent the meetings which they began to hold together the government has decided to separate them, placing the most factious leaders in the nearest prisons and the others at a distance from their own counties, to remain in confinement as far as possible from their adherents.
Six Dunkirk ships put to sea and were pursued by the whole Dutch squadron on that coast, lest they should join with some other Dunkirkers who are expected from Biscay with specie, together with some shallops, and lest the united force should prevent the herring fishery which is the chief resource of the poor in the United Provinces.
Burlamachi had orders to remit the pay for the four regiments to Holland, but I suspect that this new reinforcement will detain it, as necessity has no regard for change of thoughts and resolves.
London, the 6th August, 1627.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
389. Letter of De Moulins to Alvise Contarini.
On my arrival here I find that the courier sent to France three weeks ago, before the order to withdraw was delivered to me, has been imprisoned at Dover Castle, and the letters he brought sent to Secretary Coke, including those from the king and from the queen mother to her daughter. I therefore beg you to perform such offices as are necessary, so that I may not take back such bad news to France, as my courier went and returned under the public faith. I have requested M. Fobur, the bearer hereof, to take your advice and ask you to reflect upon the importance of this proceeding, as I suspect it will be taken amiss in France and produce much mischief. The interest taken by the republic in what little harmony survives between the two crowns will induce you to speak favourably of the matter. I trust you will excuse the liberty taken.
Dover, the 3rd August, 1627.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in
the preceding
despatch.
390. Reply of Alvise Contarini to De Moulins.
I assure you that whatever office may serve you to revive mutual affection between the two kings, instead of the present rancour, will have my earnest attention. I consider this necessary for the service of their Majesties, the general advantage and the independent sincerity of the most serene republic, interested on both sides and linked to both by affection. I have said so much to M. Fobur, adding what else I have heard and done in the matter. I feel sure you will make all your statements with such address for the sake of the advantage that all good men desire.
London, the 5th August, 1627.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
391. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters reached the cardinal on the 3rd inst. from Marigliach, marshal of the camp, the particulars of which have not yet been divulged, so it is concluded that matters are not prospering with the French in the island. On the sea side there the English have built a regular fort to serve as a magazine, a place of repair and for arms. They have set down before Fort St. Martin and begun to batter it. Angoulême has informed the Court that if he has not pay soon he will probably be left without troops, and as he has no boats or ships he cannot send any help to Toras. With stilts (zoppoli) at a place called the shore of the wild men, where the water is too shallow for barques, twenty adventurous youths have got into the fort by ones and twos. They hope, now the way has been shown, to introduce men and munitions in this manner, though the risk is apparent.
Cardinal Richelieu has sent Vignoles to the camp, with authority over the simple marshals. Although he is easily the best captain here, yet he thinks of nothing but his own interests and has encountered many difficulties.
From many letters intercepted in various parts of the realm the ministers feel sure that on the 15th of this month the Huguenots will take up arms and enter the field; but many believe this is only a trick of the cardinal to justify his making war on that party, invented by Father Berulle, who informed Cardinal Spada about it.
As the Duke of Guise refuses to command the fleet unless it is fully furnished, the cardinal has sent his nephew, the Bishop of Mande to superintend the six ships ready at Havre de Grace. He has instructions to provide rope and tackle for the rest. Meanwhile, it is not known whether a great quantity of munitions which was taken to Tilbuf for this purpose was burnt by accident or design.
Information has reached the Court that Montagu has again passed to Piedmont through Lorraine and Switzerland. This has greatly increased the cardinal's distress, who is possessed by the idea that Buckingham could not have set foot in France without an understanding with the Huguenots and others. He also believes that any movement of Soissons or others in any part of the realm may be encouraged by the arms of Savoy, things brought about by the intrigues of the Abbot Scaglia and his ill will to this realm.
There is great activity among the Huguenots in Poitou. The Rochellese are scouring the neighbourhood with 400 horse.
Gravelle, the 6th August, 1627.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
392. MARC ANTONIO MORESINI, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The news of the English landing in the Isle of Re has been received here with great manifestations of joy and occasioned outbursts against Cardinal Richelieu. The prince discussed the news at length with me and concluded that France would not now listen to proposals for a reconciliation, as it would not suit his honour to do so with the enemy in her house. He therefore thought of writing to the Abbot Scaglia not to go on to England, as was arranged, but to remain in Holland until further order. He added some further news and assured me that the English would never come to terms with France unless the duke intervened, Richelieu was excluded from the negotiations and the French did not undertake to continue the policy they followed when I was minister there, namely, helping Germany, the Palatine and their allies in Italy, in short, making war on the Spaniards. The duke has said the same to me on several occasions.
The Count of Moreta will leave for Paris in two days, with condolences on the death of Monsieur's wife. (fn. 3) The duke has closed his mouth and he is not to meddle in any business.
Turin, the 6th August, 1627.
[Italian.]
Aug. 9.
Senato,
Secreta,
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
393. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Montagu left for Piedmont on Friday. He will travel by way of Brussels, Luxemburg and Lorraine, and will not touch France. He devotes himself to pleasure here. Scaglia catechised him and imbued him with his principles, which are far from serviceable to the common cause. Everything consists in distracting the French, but not too violently.
Rubens, after his stay here and long discussions with the abbot, has gone to the camp to see the prince, they say in order to introduce negotiations with the Infanta. She and the States are ready, and they will open the way to some accommodation with the English. But so far everything is kept close. It is also said that he has come to negotiate for the opening of the passes.
If the English embrace or suggest an accommodation with Spain it certainly will not be done without the participation and co-operation of this country. Scaglia himself confirmed this, saying that the English are willing for an accommodation and if he goes to England he will press for a decision. I believe, however, that he will stay on here some days, as he sent away the English ship which brought Montagu and had orders to fetch him. He told me it suited his plans better to stay here some days longer, probably in order to be nearer the proposals which may come from Brussels.
Of the fleet we hear that they have landed and that Buckingham's first intention is to batter fort St. Louis, and he has already begun; 500 French and 300 English fell in the first action. The abbot seemed very pleased at this news, from which one may judge his feelings and how far the French will appreciate the intervention of his master for a reconciliation. No reply has come to the offices of the States on the subject and there is no news of the arrival of the despatches. I do not think the French will listen to any proposals until they see what the fleet does, and the success of that would seem to remove all hope of anything good.
Three days ago the French ambassador went to Amsterdam to urge the delivery of the king's three ships. It seems he wished to wait until the fleet had gone. Even in this matter the abbot betrays his prejudice, saying that they might deceive themselves, as there might be other English ships on the watch. Nothing is more astonishing than the confidential relations between Scaglia and this ambassador.
The Commissioner Catz has returned from England. He reports an excellent disposition in the king there towards their interests here and brings a formula for the security of the marine. He says the Ambassador Joachim will receive satisfaction for the portion of the goods taken which are intact, the rest will suffer by passage of time. He negotiated nothing about Amboyna, the principal matter, as Carleton is to treat about it here, and he has worked hard at it of late, as it is essentially a very thorny business, as here some want delay while the English require despatch. The assembly separated without any resolution, but on the very day of the dissolution Carleton presented a paper and spoke strongly, declaring that they ought not to use such devices with the ministers of a great king. As the assembly could not continue they have arranged that each of the deputies of the provinces who belonged to it shall have a copy of this paper and send his opinion to the States General, who will give Carleton their decision.
The Hague, the 9th August, 1627.
Postscript.—Since I wrote the above I hear that Scaglia is beginning to treat with the leading ministers here, and to-day he has seen the il Duc and had a long and confidential interview. I have not been able to discover what they discussed, but I am afraid that they are beginning to make overtures to him either for a truce or a peace, acting in concert with the English.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 9.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
394. The English ambassador came into the Collegio, and after the deliberation of the Senate of the 6th inst. had been read to him, he said in a few words that he thanked his Serenity for the reply and asked that the secretary might read it to him again, so that he might make a faithful report to his Majesty. He gathered the meaning of the reply was to help and favour the common cause if occasion demanded. He presented a memorial of two English soldiers who served on the mainland, asking that their business might be despatched. The doge told the ambassador that during his long stay in that charge they always felt sure of his affection and that he always represented matters in the most favourable manner to their Majesties. They would try and give every satisfaction about the memorial. At this the ambassador took leave and went with the secretary into the antechamber, where he took notes of the reply. At the passage about captains of the republic in Denmark's army, paid by her, he seemed struck and said he had not known this before. Where the reply speaks of the desire for an adjustment of the crowns, he said that he had been summoned to a new audience upon this question, to relate what was passing and the case from England's point of view, so that they might form their own opinion as his king always valued the opinion of the Senate very highly.
Memorial to Sir Isaac Wake.
The undersigned have recourse to your Excellency to intercede with his Serenity for their despatch. Since the return of the General Erizzo we have always been here to receive his Serenity's commands, and as we find no one to tell us of the State's intentions, we are living at our charges awaiting the Senate's decision. We therefore beg your Excellency to say a word to his Serenity in our favour, and to try and obtain that one may have leave for such time and in such manner as his Serenity may decide, and the other may be despatched conformably to the decision already taken in the Collegio.
THOMAS LATHUM.
HUMPHREY CHEMPT.
[Italian.]
Aug. 9.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Risposte,
vol. 147.
395. In reply to the petition of Dimitri Rucani upon imputations on his character and to be admitted to control the new impost at Zante: We reply that in consideration of his merits, in bringing in 36,000 ducats by that duty to your Serenity in three years, and by his industry increased it to 64,000 ducats, we consider him worthy of the munificence of the State, and we would desire your Serenity to expedite the hearing of the case against him so that he may be free to engage in such an important service as soon as possible.
Dona Moresini,Savii.
Paulo Basadonna,
Agostin Bembo,
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Maria de Bourbon, wife of Gaston, duke of Orleans the king's brother.
2 Captain Richard Graham or Grimes.
3 Maria de Bourbon, daughter of the Duke of Montpensier, whom Gaston married on the 6th August, 1626, died on the 4th of June, six days after the birth of a daughter.