Venice
August 1628, 21-25

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1916

Pages

237-248

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: August 1628, 21-25', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 237-248. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89193 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

August 1628

Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
308. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The enclosed letters arrived from England five days ago, and prove Contarini's ability and zeal. I spoke expressly to the Prince of Orange last Saturday about the negotiations of England with the Spaniards, in order to see what instructions the States will give their ambassadors in France about the overtures of the King of Great Britain for an accommodation. The prince told me practically the same as Contarini advises. He seemed to fear that the business was far advanced. He said the Agent Carleton had told him that nothing was concluded and would not be without the friends and allies of the Crown having a share. The prince told him that he did not know what to believe, as the agent said one thing and the king another. He reminded Carleton that he had been to tell him in his Majesty's name about the proposals for the accommodation, and subsequently the king had declared that he knew nothing about it. The prince said that Carleton was almost beside himself with confusion and said: I swear that the king knows it full well and that I spoke to your Excellency by his order. It was easy to believe that he would not meddle in such matters without instructions. The prince remarked: It seems to me that this is a childish game. I have never heard of matters of such great importance being treated with such, shall I say stratagems, or levity. I swear I believe the poor king knows nothing about it, as the favourite has held the reins for a long while and drives him where he pleases. I repeated what I said last week about the king not getting what he wanted from the Spaniards. He told me that the ambassadors had discovered that the Spaniards had really made the first overtures, but they declared that if any progress was to be made they would not depart from the old peace, showing that they did not wish to include the friends and allies of the Crown; all this to exclude the Palatine, the States and Denmark, although they may agree to an accommodation with the last.
With regard to the suggestion to send ambassadors and commissioners to a neutral place to treat for peace, he said the ambassadors had sent to Calais, and those of France had received the news. But he did not think the French would listen before they saw the result of the fleet. As I had asked him to send on some letters which came from London for Zorzi, he said he could not do so before the advices arrived from the French ambassadors. I asked him if they would go to the king and cardinal. He said no, but they would approach the queen mother, if she was in Paris, and with the deputies nominated by the king. But as I have said before he expects nothing whatever unless La Rochelle falls into the king's hands or is relieved so that he loses all hope of taking it. He remarked that even if the French responded to England's declarations, and both sides named commissioners, they would not listen to negotiations about La Rochelle or the Huguenots in general. I replied that we ought to get them named, and once they met these difficulties could be eased by interposition. He assured me that the Dutch ambassadors would work hard to prevent these first overtures from falling through, but there would be great difficulties. I told him that your Serenity's minister would try to get France to make at least an equal advance, and not leave all the glory to England. I am not sorry that they are anxious here, as it will stimulate their offices.
I spoke to the Palatine about England, and as he was without letters or news I gave him such particulars as I thought would help the common cause and excite him to contribute his efforts to destroy these pernicious proceedings. He said: If there is any faith in the world, and if one may believe the word of a king and brother, I am bound to believe that the King of England will not abandon me, because his last letters to my wife are most explicit, without a trace of equivocation. He added: But I know that the favourite may play tricks with everything.
The Hague, the 21st August, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
309. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The eldest prince arrived here on Tuesday and went to see the Earl of Carlisle. He has stayed on here some days longer in order to see his Highness, although he might have taken leave before he came. He may have heard from the prince what he was expecting from the duke, accordingly he starts to-morrow and is travelling by land. I know that he sent to Casale for a passport from the Casalese, as he feared some outrage from that garrison, as enemies of the king, if he entered the states of Mantua travelling by the Po. He obtained this passport but I hear he thinks it better to go by land, as Guron is in Casale in command of the forces, who is a minister of the king and a dependant of Cardinal Richelieu. However, the earl told me he decided to go by land because Wake had left Venice and gone to Brescia, where he is waiting for him, and so he was obliged to go to Brescia to meet Wake, confer with him and go on with him to Venice.
He had a long conference with the prince yesterday, and he has had many audiences in days past. He has never told me anything about his business. In speaking to me he has not shown himself a friend of the French or of the Spaniards. He certainly hinted at the desire shown by the Spaniards for reunion with England, remembering, he said, the saying of Charles V that the King of Spain must keep friendly with England and then they can make war on all the world. But he has always spoken about the advantages of the Austrian monarchy and the desire of his king that France should recognise the wrong it is doing to its own people, in outraging those who are under the protection of the King of Great Britain, whom the King of France's predecessors promised to leave at liberty. Such is La Rochelle, which he does not consider as belonging to the King of France, but as a hostage and security to the Rochellese for the exercise of their faith.
I fear, however, it is only too true there may be some arrangements to attack France, as the English are so interested in diverting the siege of La Rochelle, and it is important for the duke to keep France busy until the Mantua affair is settled. But I think both England and Savoy rather desire a change of ministers in France and their principles than to reinforce the Austrians to attack that kingdom. So these proceedings may in a way help the common cause. I have frequently heard on good authority that the English are more anxious to make France uneasy than to attack her, because in that way they would lose all their friends, and great kings do not wish to maintain friendly relations with those who deceive them in the interests of others and to aggrandise the Spaniards.
Carlisle has sent a gentleman post to England and says he expects one to be sent thence. He only proposes to remain ten days at Venice and then return here for two or three months. This is an indication that his business is begun but not digested, and things will proceed according to the issue of events at La Rochelle and against the duke. I must also add that he remarked to me to-day: The emperor cannot maintain such great forces in Germany, and a diet will be held in which they will tell Cœsar that Germany cannot suffer the ruin of war any longer, and so they think peace will ensue in Germany.
I am sorry that my remarks to Marini about Carlisle's negotiations are of little use.
Turin, the 21st August, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
310. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I had a favourable opportunity of talking with the Ambassador Marini about the negotiations of the Earl of Carlisle, and the pre-occupation that it should cause to France if the business of peace between Denmark and the emperor and the union of England with the Spaniards are true. I found him fully alive to the importance of the matter, and he decided to send with all speed to La Rochelle the ordinary from Venice, who was only going to Lyons, telling the king this news, with many considerations upon what it imports. He is well intentioned and not one whit Spanish, but I do not think his voice will penetrate.
Turin, the 21st August, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 21.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
311. The French ambassador was sent for and the deliberation of the Senate of the 19th was read to him; he said:
I will report the reply to my king. I am sure of the prudence of the Senate, but as the plunder of our ship was done treacherously, off the islands and in the jurisdiction of the republic, I felt sure that the subjects of France and their goods would be assured by the Senate. However, it is my business to make representations, report the replies and leave the decision to my king.
The Senior Councillor Basadonna replied that if the incident had occurred in the waters or under the fortresses of the republic, proper steps would have been taken, as the Senate had already issued strict orders on the subject even before the first offices of the ambassador; but all their information agreed that the action took place in the open sea, and it would be too much if the republic was answerable for everything that occurred there.
The ambassador replied: I should not have asked for the arrest if it had not happened in your Serenity's jurisdiction. We can produce irrefragable testimony to this. Even the Turks, because of an attack by the English on our ships at Alexandretta, forthwith put their consul in prison. For that occasion we are much indebted to the republic for defending our ships. Justice cannot now be obtained, because while the Signory was discussing the matters the English ship left these ports on the eve of our Lady, in contempt of the state and of the seals of the magistrates.
Basadonna replied that they had no knowledge of this flight. It must have occurred at night without the permission or knowledge of the admiralty. The Alexandretta incident occurred in the port, and therefore was a very different matter from the other, which happened in the open sea. There was no doubt about the intentions of the republic if such things occurred within its jurisdiction.
In the hall of the Pregadi the ambassador expressed his opinion to me, the secretary, that the republic would not meddle in the matter of the ships for fear of offending one of the sovereigns.
Antonio Antelmi, secretary.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
312. The English ambassador was summoned to the Collegio and the deliberation of the Senate of the 19th inst. was read to him, he spoke as follows:
I constantly remark the zeal which the republic shows for the interests of his Majesty and his subjects, which is now confirmed in the case of the ship William and Ralph in gratifying my requests thereupon, recognising my king's patents against his enemies in the open sea. As regards your Serenity's jurisdiction his Majesty has approved of the steps I took, and all ships arriving at Leghorn or other places where I sent these orders will certainly obey them. As regards the fresh emergencies to which the deliberation refers, I can say nothing precise, but in any case a person of greater skill and authority will deal with it and all other matters, namely the Earl of Carlisle. I told him of the office read to me in the name of the Senate about his coming. He returns thanks and will give full particulars of his mission on his arrival, presenting his credentials from the king. Meanwhile, what I have said about his mission may suffice. The reason why the Ambassador Contarini did not send word about him was because of his absence from Court owing to the offence he had taken.
In the absence of the doge the Senior Councillor Basadonna replied: The republic is always eager to gratify the wishes of his Majesty and his subjects, especially when presented with the prudence and discretion your Excellency always shows, and therefore the Senate freely ordered the release of the William and Ralph. It is true on the other hand that the recent exploits of certain pirates in the waters and jurisdiction of the republic gave us just reason to make our original representations, which we now repeat to your Excellency, as it is clear how much it will harm trade, and every prince would naturally resent such a disturbance of his jurisdiction and lack of respect for his posts and fortresses. We therefore hear with satisfaction of the steps taken by his Majesty, confirmed by you, and expect good results. The republic rejoices at the coming of the Earl of Carlisle, and the Senate has decreed for him a state welcome with the honours customary for the representatives of great and friendly kings such as his Majesty.
The ambassador said: I thank you on the earl's behalf until he can do so for himself, which should be soon. I expect the he will come by the Po, as he sent his secretary to ask leave of the governor of Casale to pass that way, or he may come by land; I do not know, but expect news any moment. As regards our ships I must insist that their attacks on the enemies of the Crown are not piracy, as my king does not patronise pirates, but hates them as much as any other prince; his letters of marque to the ship captains, his subjects, are given to some against the French, to some against the Spaniards. Pirates dare not approach his shores as they would pay the penalty with their heads.
Councillor Basadonna replied: There are two sorts of pirates, the open ones, who are not in question, and those who under cover of letters of marque attack friends as well as enemies, and as much in the waters and ports of princes as in the open sea. I referred to these, about whom we have had only too much information of late in the waters of the republic and against our own ships. The ambassador remarked that those who exceeded the orders of the king's letters would be punished on their return if this was proved, and so he took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
Aug. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
313. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
My despatch for France has not gone yet. I give the reasons, and send the following advices. The Ambassador Scaglia is leaving to-day with all his followers. He may take a look at the Hague and then proceed to Brussels, where he will remain some days, not intending to be at Turin until towards November. He is also accompanied by Morgan, who has letters of credit and commissions to take with him, as succour to Denmark, the troops went out of Stade and may be on the way here. Dulbier is also going back with letters of credit, to keep the cavalry on foot until the end of October and to urge the States to give them every convenience for their money, making use of them in case of need.
A little book printed in German in the Netherlands has appeared, abusing the duke in earnest, as for instance that he wants to make himself king, to change the religion and similar civilities. The duke has resented this greatly and the Dutch ambassadors tried to appease him and sent an express to their High Mightinesses to have it suppressed.
It is said that the Huguenots have remitted considerable sums hither as a subsidy for this relief. They have some twenty ships with six hundred men, both soldiers and sailors, to second it, and they are also providing supplies of victuals, to follow immediately when the fleet has opened a passage. I am told that some agreement has been made whereby the English will keep the channel free for a certain time, until the city is provisioned for many years.
A decree already published in favour of the Catholics has been annulled and in its stead they have issued another re-establishing the laws against them. (fn. 1) For this reason and because to duke is resigning his charges, it is inferred that parliament will be reassembled at the appointed time. We shall see. The king remains hunting, 50 miles away, (fn. 2) and the queen is drinking mineral waters to facilitate child bearing, which is desirable and necessary. (fn. 3)
The Indiamen have not yet been restored to the Dutch. They will do it when the duke joins the king at Portsmouth, where the ships are, undergoing repair. The shareholders of the English East India Company clamour about the restitution of these ships, and murmur at the presents, nor do they expect redress. Eleven men-of-war came off this coast some time ago to convoy them and the Ambassador Joachim will go himself to accompany them. He has availed himself of this pretext to absent himself three or four months, for his private affairs, he says; others believe it is because he is offended at the coming of the ambassadors extraordinary. He is a most able minister, of admirable views, and single handed did better than the junta does now. The two ambassadors extraordinary have quarrelled about domestic matters, and are living in separate houses. He is thoroughly acquainted with this Court. His report at the Hague will be unfavourable and serve to discourage the truce, rather than facilitate it, as he has been strongly opposed to the measure.
London, the 22nd August, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.314. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to his colleague, ZORZI ZORZI, at the Most Christian Court.
The Secretary Augustini had set off for France with my despatch and all he needed, when the duke sent me word that I was to detain him, as he was awaiting the king's reply on this important matter on the morrow. His Majesty's answer arrived on the following day with an order for the duke to go and meet him, so that he might know all that had passed with me. The duke went post and is expected to-morrow. On his return the secretary will leave, or some fresh occasion may arise for negotiating and on more solid foundations. In the meantime I will not lose the opportunity of a ship, which is setting sail for Holland, to send duplicates and keep you well informed, so that you can act without committing yourself. I shall await your advice with great eagerness. I may add that the deputies from Rochelle oppose the measure, fearing lest negotiation delay the course of hostilities. The duke acquainted them with these overtures contrary to my advice, and then subsequently said something to the Dutch ambassadors, who were apparently rather piqued at seeing themselves behindhand in a business which is the basis of their commission. I have rid them of any bad impression, and indeed communicated many particulars to them, in confirmation of the confidential relations between us. The duke also got Carleton to tell them the like, adding that they must not take offence at being left in the rear in this business, as their colleagues in France were not at Court and they could not treat with the cardinal. I am sorry for this, but it must be borne patiently, as passions and personal bias will always have their share.
Meanwhile the deputy from Rochelle has brought me a paper, he says of his own accord, but the duke may have seen it. It contains the following reasons for persuading the Most Christian. Firstly, even if Rochelle is taken, the English will be compelled to play double, chiefly by furthering the treaty with Spain, for which both sides are so inclined that peace with France alone can prevent it. If it is impossible to relieve Rochelle, Spain will help Rohan and give him the means to make others rebel, who have so far been quiet. Good foundations for this have already been laid. If the Most Christian incline to negotiation, watch must be kept lest it prove a pretext for gaining time, and La Rochelle lost in the interval. A passport might be obtained for one of the Rochellese deputies here, and for one of the duke's gentlemen, one being sent to England and the other to meet the fleet, in case it has sailed. During the negotiations a truce should be observed, the besieged receiving, on payment, a daily supply of victuals, as a pledge of the sincerity of the French. As Rohan and the other Huguenot towns will not have time to send deputies, a settlement might be made with the Rochellese embracing all the others, while they bound themselves to send their deputies to his Majesty's fleet, for pardon and to represent their just demands, as if they had to wait for the consent of all, the provisions of the fleet would be spoiled. In case of fear that Rohan and others might raise fresh difficulties, the Rochellese might promise, as all the Huguenots will doubtless follow their lead. The deputy, M. Vincent, offers every assistance to the furtherance of a good peace, he being the only one to accompany the fleet. If you could arrange for the duke to go as ambassador, it would be of great use, as love is one of the principal causes of war, as you know.
London, the 22nd August, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
315. PIER ANTONIO MARIONI, Venetian Secretary at Milan, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Casalese made a sortie yesterday in the direction of the Po, to secure the entry into the town of fourteen Frenchmen, who came, no one knows whence. It is thought that they had approached the fortress because the Ambassador Carlisle was expected there; making free with the name of English to whom a passport is granted in every direction. However, the ambassador has not yet appeared in these parts. Yesterday evening and Sunday also the governor went with four coaches and many horses to the Po to receive him and invite him to land, but he never came, and so it is thought that he has gone to Casale. The truth must come out very soon, but it is not known yet.
The royal camp under Casal, the 22nd August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
316. To the Proveditore of the Fleet.
One Captain Digby, with five English vessels of war, about the 21st of last June, reached the port of Alexandretta, in which were two galeasses under Captain Capello, and our galleons, with four saiques belonging to French merchants. This captain, a very audacious and impertinent fellow, on making the harbour, wrote to ours that he by no means intended to injure the republic's subjects, but he meant to take the ships of those Frenchmen, who had been declared the enemies of his king, whose commission he had to pursue, chastise and capture them, in all places where-soever he should fall in with them. Capello replied that in a port of the Ottoman empire, free to all merchants and especially to ours, who had used it for centuries, he could not permit injury to be done to these caiques, the property of subjects of a friendly power, whilst under the shadow of the republic's banner. There-upon the Englishman, without further reply, with colours flying, trumpets sounding and firing a few shots, with all the circumstance of war, began to try and get the weather gauge. In this he was baulked by the quickness and skill of Captain Capello, who also thwarted his designs by firing frequently.
Shots were exchanged from the 10th hour until the evening, when the English withdrew. The two squadrons watched each other without anything further taking place. This much has come to our notice, not from Capello's letters, for he had no leisure to write, but from the consul at Aleppo, by way of Constantinople. He tells us that the Pasha there, pleased at our valour and angered by the want of respect and audacity of the Englishman, had imprisoned the consul and laid an embargo on the property of the English merchants, for a considerable amount, and so, by the imprudence of this squadron, they are exposed to great danger.
We have heard nothing more, and await a full account from Capello himself. From his great valour and prudence, of which we have had proof before, and which is confirmed in this case, we promise ourselves that the result will be equally satisfactory and successful.
This Digby is the same man who, with the same ships, had the audacity to betake himself with French prizes to Argostoli in Cephalonia, where he seized the harbour, guarded its mouth and disposed of his prizes ashore, despite the injunctions of the Board of Health, and the prohibitions of the Proveditore there, corrupting our subjects of the island to make them serve on his ships, and employing arms and compulsion against two armed boats of that garrison. Some of their crews were killed in these affrays, and he could not have used less ceremony if he had been in a port of which he was absolutely master. Owing to the absence of our fleet he remained there a few days entirely at his ease. He then went over to Zante, where he committed further audacities, browbeating our Proveditore in reply to his remonstrances. He even went the length of using the signals which it is customary to make to the city from the hill, when ships approach in sight of the islands. He went out to meet and inspect them, seizing such as were French. Thus he made use of the means devised by us for the safety of our subjects in order to thwart our service, and enable him to exercise an absolute dominion in those waters, to the contempt of our repute and jurisdiction, pursuing and attacking indiscriminately all vessels that passed. It so happened that among those who abandoned their ships or fled for safety, some of our own subjects were wrecked and perished miserably in the act of escaping.
We have remonstrated with the English ambassador here and to the king himself. While awaiting the punishment that Digby merits, the promise whereof led us to delay giving the necessary orders to our naval commanders to repress the insolence of this fellow, we now learn, contrary to all our expectation, that with yet greater audacity, he has gone of his own accord to receive what he so richly deserves at the hands of Captain Capello. We have chosen to communicate all this to you for every good end, and especially that you may be on the watch to protect our subjects and interests against any attempts he may make to take vengeance for what has happened. We feel sure that we may rely on your prudence and ability to carry these orders out as we desire.
The like to:
The Captain of the Great Galleys, Cornaro.
The Captain of the Gulf.
The Rectors of Corfu, Zante and Cephalonia.
The Proveditori General in Candia, and in Dalmatia and Albania.
Ayes, 147.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Aug. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
317. That if the secretary of England or the ambassador makes any motion in the Collegio about the house at S. Antonio destined by this Council as the lodging of the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador extraordinary of England, the doge shall make the following reply:
It is always the custom to select empty houses when three are any for the ambassadors extraordinary of kings. This was done with Coure, Preo and others. At present it is not possible to find one more adequate for the purpose, and it is considerably larger than those last employed, and one of the noblest palaces of the city, especially from being the property of the State and inhabited for some time by leading senators of the republic, situate in a free and open place. Therefore the Senate hoped that the earl would be fully satisfied as well as by the honourable reception accorded to him. In this way the doge will try to show that the decision of the State cannot and ought not to be changed at present.
Ayes, 139.Noes, 1.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
318. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
We very gladly received your despatches of the 18th ult. about the action at Alexandretta. In order that this conspicuous service to the Porte may not be obscured, we wish you, in addition to the offices you have doubtless performed, to tell the Lieutenant Pasha and anyone else you think advisable that we feel sure this action in defence of such an important port as Alexandretta will have pleased his Majesty, pointing out that our ships exposed themselves in defence of free trade against those who wished to disturb it, conferring a greater benefit than ever before on his dominions, his subjects and their trade, since the English, under the guise of friendship, are going about plundering with powerful armed ships, to the detriment of traders. You will add that despite all difficulties we shall continue this line of action. You may have an opportunity to speak from the representations of the Pasha of Aleppo, who thanked our commanders effusively, saying they had defended his Majesty's honour. We therefore expect their gratitude, and you will report their reply.
Some office will be necessary with the French ambassador, especially as he is chary of recognising the service rendered to his countrymen, as the French would have suffered great losses but for our ships. You will act prudently, expressing to everyone our esteem for the Most Christian. We enclose a copy of what his ambassador recently said in our Collegio.
We do not think that the English ambassador will venture to refer, to the matter, but, if he does say anything, you must know that this Digby audaciously attacked the port of Alexandretta and also attacked ships under our islands of Zante and Cephalonia, abusing the courtesy shown to the English, at a time when no armed ships of ours were near, so that he deserves the severest punishment. Our Commander Capello therefore acted perfectly correctly, and rendered vain the efforts of that insolent man. These are the true reasons to advance to close the mouths of those who would diminish the glory of that action. You will advance them when and where you think it necessary.
Ayes, 145.Noes, 0.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
319. To the Consul Pesaro in Syria and in his absence to the Vice Consul Salamon.
We were glad to hear from you of the glorious action of our ships at Alexandretta, who saved the French galleys without considering the risks. We are sure the Turkish ministers will have appreciated the service rendered. Wherever you have an opportunity you will show how this action benefited the Porte, as it assures the trade of the Turks with friendly nations and proves the sincerity of the republic, whose ministers seize every opportunity of showing goodwill to that empire.
If the General Vizier of the Ottoman army or the Pasha, Governor of Syria, happens to be at Aleppo, you will pass some office with each of them in our name in the form you consider best, expressing our pleasure at the action as affording an opportunity of showing our friendship. You will assure them of our affection and esteem for the Sultan.
Ayes, 145.Noes, 0.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
320. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
For your information, and in case the matter is represented differently, we enclose what we have written to our captains at sea and other representatives of the state about the temerity and insolence of a certain Captain Digby, an Englishman, who has overstepped the limits of justice and honour, and failed to respect the jurisdiction of others. You will use this information with prudence, and only if you hear the matter discussed, and especially if it is misrepresented, as it may easily be by those who are not well informed, or whose passions tempt them to pervert the truth. We shall wait to hear what you learn on the subject.
Ayes, 163.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives
321. To the Ambassador in England.
Since our reply to the Ambassador Wake about the coming of the Earl of Carlisle, and the confirmation from Turin that he is sent as ambassador extraordinary from his king, we have decided to defray him in the name of the state, provide him with a house, make him presents and do everything else usual at the reception of ambassadors extraordinary of crowned heads. We selected the house of the Procuratia in San Antonio for him, owing to its size, its situation and its general distinction, as you know, and because, being empty, it could be quickly fitted up. Wake's secretary, it seems, expressed dissatisfaction about it, as you will see by the enclosed copy. Although, when they have reflected, we shall probably hear no more about it. We have provided the doge in advance with arguments for rebutting any motion made by the secretary or the ambassador himself, if any more is said, and to convince them of the truth. We send you a copy of the arguments so that you may make use of them in case of need, if anyone speaks about it, but not otherwise, showing that the earl has, if anything, been better treated than others, and he will receive all the other demonstrations of honour befitting the representative of a king so much loved and esteemed by us.
With regard to the combat in which our galeasses were called of necessity to engage with some ships of the Englishman Digby, we have no more as yet than what we advised you last Saturday by way of France, with the letters of Aleppo, of which we enclose the duplicate. We add what we are writing to the Proveditore of the Fleet, for your further instruction, to uphold the necessity and honesty of the actions of our representatives in such an occasion.
Ayes, 163.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
322. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In letters of the 6th which I have seen the Nuncio Bagni writes that a storm lasting two days submerged the mole some five feet and damaged it in places, while the ships of the guard were driven on to it, to their great hurt. The Count of Tillières had departed unexpectedly without his destination being known, but as he had been a long time in England and the English thought well of him, it was thought it might be about the reunion of France and England.
All these particulars agree with Marini's advices, except the damage done to the mole. One sees from this that the hopes of the speedy fall of La Rochelle, which this minister has encouraged, and which have so often proved fallacious, must destroy his credit, and those who are expecting help after the capture of La Rochelle may find that it comes too late.
There is some news about an intrigue of the English against Calais, but it was discovered and prevented.
Turin, the 25th August, 1628.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Proclamation of the 3rd August, o.s., for putting the laws against Jesuits, priests and Popish recusants in due execution. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1628–9, page 244.
2 At Beaulieu.
3 At Wellingborough.