Venice
August 1628, 26-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1916

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248-258

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'Venice: August 1628, 26-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 248-258. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89194 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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August 1628

Aug. 26.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
323. To the Rectors of Brescia, Verona, Vicenza and Padua.
Orders were issued for the reception of the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador extraordinary of England, and his lodging at Chioggia. We now hear from Turin that he has changed his route and is travelling by land. You will use all diligence to receive the earl at the public cost with all possible decorum. In arming the walls and other shows of honour you will follow what has been done with other ambassadors extraordinary of crowned heads, notably M. de Preo. As the shortness of time may prevent due provision you will explain to him the wishes of the republic and that our preparations were made in the expectation that he would take another route. You will send an account of your expenses.
To Padua add:
The officials of the Rason Vecchie will send you sweetmeats and other provisions, in order to render the hospitality more decorous and make good what has been lacking at other towns owing to the shortness of the time.
[Italian.]
Aug. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
324. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
At my audience yesterday I told the pope what I was instructed to say about the negotiations for peace between England and Spain, and Denmark and the emperor. He thanked me and said it was only too true. The Spaniards merely aimed at settling matters according to their own heart in order to predominate everywhere; but they had their own difficulties, and thereupon he assured me with much warmth that the game was not so easy for them in Italy as they pretended. In Spain Olivares was very melancholy, and in Germany the emperor had no control over Wallenstein. France would send great forces, especially if La Rochelle fell. A courier who arrived the day before yesterday brought word that it could not hold out beyond the end of August.
Rome, the 26th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
325. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bethune told me that he had heard nothing from Flanders this week of the negotiations between Spain and England, or Denmark and the emperor. He repeated that it was a sham, promulgated by the Dutch for their own purposes. All the same, he was very anxious to know about the negotiations with the Earl of Carlisle.
Rome, the 26th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
326. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Their hopes increase here daily of seeing France fully occupied and harassed in her own realms by the forces of England and of the Huguenots. They do not despair of foreseeing some confidential relations with the English such as will ensure them against a rupture. They are determined to avoid being at war alone against that king, and they are equally anxious to see the French obliged to desire the help of their forces, so that they may enjoy the complete arbitrament in peace negotiations or the advantage in waging war. For this reason they do not wish to employ so many land forces in Flanders for the future, considering that to go on as they have done means the ruin of their Crown. The Dutch are so strong that they despair of subduing them in that way. They mean to afford the emperor every possible support in order to make themselves masters of the trade of those waters and harass the trade of the Hanse towns, which will not accept their dictation.
Madrid, the 26th August, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 26.
Cinque
Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Risposte.
Venetian
Archives.
327. In response to the petition of Giovanni Rans and Abram Ermans for leave to send to Zante and Cephalonia three ships which came to this city with a cargo of salt of Iviza to take currants for the west, at the customary duty of 10 per thousand, we find that the State permits the lading at the customary payment of 10 per thousand to those vessels from the west, that is from beyond the Strait, that come with their entire cargo to this city or to the islands, and in order to draw them as much as possible away from the mart of Leghorn; but if they first put in at that port to unlade and then come to this city, we do not think that they should be covered by the laws, although they come from the west. We leave it to your Serenity whether it is good for salt of Iviza to come or not.
There is nothing against these ships going to take currants at Zante and Cephalonia, but upon payment of 5 per thousand in addition for the new impost.
The 26th August, 1628.
Nicolo ContariniSavii.
Vettor Pisani
Iseppo Ciuran
Bertucci Valier
[Italian.]
Aug. 27.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
328. To the Rectors of Padua.
We have just heard from the Proveditore General in Terra Ferma that the Ambassador Carlisle with fourteen coaches reached Verona yesterday, and will probably leave early this morning for Padua, where he may arrive to-morrow. We send you the news by courier so that you may make every effort to be ready to receive him, and for this purpose the ministers and goods sent by the Rason Vecchie are leaving at this moment.
[Italian.]
Aug. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
329. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The hopes of the Rochellese depend not so much on the disorders of the camp, now reduced by sickness and desertion to 6,000 or 7,000 men at most, but on the English fleet, which they are expecting. The longer it tarries the more powerful they say it will be. They expect the destruction of the mole from the fury of the sea in the winter. The damage done by the last spring tide has not yet been repaired.
Niort, the 27th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
330. The RECTORS OF PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
Yesterday at the first hour of the night your Serenity's orders arrived about receiving the Earl of Carlisle. We at once sent to Vicenza and Verona for news of him and the number of his train, and set to work to make such preparations as the brief time allowed. We now hear from Vicenza that their messenger met the ambassador to-day on the road between Verona and Vicenza, with a company of twelve coaches. So the ambassador will be here to-morrow. With time so very short we shall make every effort to carry out your Serenity's commands, and we are sorry that we cannot do all that we should desire. We have sent this news in haste, so that your Serenity may anticipate your orders to the office of the Rason Vecchie.
Padua, the 27th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Verona.
Venetian
Archives.
331. The RECTORS OF VERONA to the DOGE and SENATE.
The public letters only arrived at the 13th hour yesterday, when the Earl of Carlisle had been gone quite three hours. Thus we can only send them with the advice that at the first table yesterday there were ten, at the second fourteen, and the rest, numbering fifty, in confusion. We have advised the Rectors of Padua and Vicenza of this and that the orders reached us too late. His Excellency lodged at the inn della Torre here. He arrived so unexpectedly that we had not the least notice beforehand, as the report was that he would go by Chioggia. The General sent his nephew, his secretary and others of his household to pay his respects. We did not perform any office, as we informed his Excellency that we had no instructions.
Verona, the 27th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
332. To the Rectors of Padua.
We have your letters about your dispositions for the reception of the Earl of Carlisle, and are fully satisfied. As it will be necessary to make arrangements for his journey by the Brenta, you will make provision on the road, either in the small boats or in one of the palaces between Dolo and Stra, which you think best. We leave the decision to you.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
333. THADIO VICO, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Wednesday the Abbot Scaglia arrived unexpectedly at the Hague from London. He brought the enclosed letters from the Ambassador Contarini. He only stayed two days, and apparently merely paid his respects to the Prince and Princess Palatine and the Prince of Orange. He continued his journey home on Saturday, going by Brussels. From this one may conclude that he will continue his pernicious negotiations for an accommodation between England and Spain, giving an impetus to what Carlisle may have already done with the Infanta, and with the Duke of Lorraine also, to whom the abbot is to go, although an influential personage declares that the duke did not pay much attention to Carlisle's proposals and declared he would not make any trouble with the Most Christian for the sake of the King of England and the Duke of Savoy.
In the ship that brought Scaglia came the painter Gerbier, his great friend and a creature of Buckingham. He seems to have left for Brussels the day before the Abbot, and they say he will meet Rubens about pictures. Porter, a gentleman of the king's chamber, who is said to be going to Spain, also crossed with Scaglia. He paid his respects to the Prince and Princess Palatine, but said nothing to them about his commissions, although they learned from another gentleman who is going with him that in all the negotiations carried on by Carlisle, Scaglia and others for England with Spain, they will always consider their interests and advantage. Porter has also gone to the Court of Brussels in great haste, and I hear that he will go on post to Lorraine and then to Turin, to stop the Earl of Carlisle there, with orders from his Majesty not to proceed to Venice before his return from the Court of the Catholic. We know no further particulars of his commissions as yet, or of those which Gerbier may have or what Scaglia may be after. They are apprehensive here and the prince is afraid that some day we shall see a sudden adjustment.
The Hague, the 28th August, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
334. The RECTORS OF PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
This evening at the 23rd hour the Earl of Carlisle arrived here with the ordinary ambassador, who went to meet him at Vicenza. I the captain went a good way out to meet him, with a number of coaches, although the present season and the short notice were against a more numerous cortege. I brought up two companies of cuirassiers and one of Capelletti, (fn. 1) with the Stradiot infantry and gunners. We sent four leading men of the city well accompanied, several miles on, to pay our respects, and his Excellency was highly pleased. I met them at the gate, where the walls were lined with troops, and took them in the coach to the Captain's palace, which was fitted up as well as the time allowed. Then I, the Podestà, descended the stairs to welcome his Excellency. We told him that preparations had been made on the supposition that he would travel another way. We accompanied both ambassadors to the apartments appointed, observing the method followed with M. de Preo. His Excellency made a very courteous response to our offices. After resting awhile he sat down at table, the banquet being already prepared. Although we had but a few hours' notice we hope that the entertainment of the ambassadors was worthy of the dignity of the state. Seventeen sat down at the first table, and sixty-five at the others, and there was an abundant supply of beds. His Excellency proposes to dine before he leaves to-morrow morning. This will relieve us of the trouble of making preparations for the journey, as we have already got the boats ready. We understand that the ambassador intends to leave his ten coaches here for eight or ten days. We shall be glad to know the wishes of the state about this expense.
Padua, the 28th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 29.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Lettere.
Venetian
Archives.
335. To the Rectors of Padua.
Orders to bear the expenses of the coaches of the English ambassador extraordinary, which will be left at Padua during the few days of his stay.
[Italian.]
Aug. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
336. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They write to me from Messina that a Neapolitan ship of war, il Pignon a Genoese master, has been taken off the lighthouse by several bertons of England. (fn. 2) Thus encouraged and in greater numbers their incursions will become more and more troublesome.
Naples, the 29th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
337. The RECTORS OF PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
This morning the English ambassador, after receiving the best treatment possible in the time, was accompanied by us to the postern with a noble cortege of nobles, carriages and troops. He set off for Venice about the 17th hour in three large boats prepared for him and other barques, with the ordinary ambassador. He thanked us warmly and expressed his full appreciation of the courtesies and honours received and he has shown his satisfaction by his manner. We did all in our power to please him in execution of our orders. We will send particulars of our expenses, and for the coaches left here by the ambassador we shall wait to hear from your Serenity.
Padua, the 29th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Brescia.
Venetian
Archives.
338. DOMENICO RUZINI, Podestà, and ZORZI BADOER, Captain of Brescia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
When I, the Captain, as instructed, had got ready a company of Capelletti to serve as escort for the English Ambassador Wake when he should arrive, we heard on the morning of the 25th that he had descended at the inn of la Posta here, and that the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador extraordinary of that Crown, was also coming this way. This has prevented us from carrying out the instructions of your Excellencies as we had intended.
Brescia, the 30th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Candia.
Proveditore.
Venetian
Archives.
339. FRANCESCO MOLIN, Proveditore of Crete, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I shall stay here until the Proveditore of the Fleet sends me galleys to take me to Crete, as these seas are full of foreign ships, both galleys and round ships. From the enclosed your Serenity will see the operations of an English ship against a saettia of Sancta Maura. It is the same one that robbed a Sciot ship, also in these waters, taking 20,000 ducats. I have just heard from the master of the Marciliana Mula, which arrived yesterday in this port, that the same ship descended upon him off Cephalonia that same day, and on a saetta, with a cargo of oil from Crete, master Francesco de Franceschi, with intent to rob them. They escaped to the channel of Viscardo, and the Englishman, being unable to strike, took the other way, and arrived here yesterday evening. After staying two hours he sailed, cruising about these channels. I think he was warned by the merchants here or by other ships of the country that steps might be taken against him. We thus see that this nation, thinking that they surpass all others at sea, trouble every one indifferently, not only the French and Spaniards, against whom they began.
I have spoken to the Proveditore here, suggesting that as there was not sufficient force here to keep them in order, he should send for the English merchants here and warn them to be careful, or more rigorous measures would be taken.
The captain of an English ship which arrived here from Leghorn two days ago reports that when passing near Malta he heard a lot of firing and supposed there was a fight between one of his ships and the galleys of Malta or Messina.
Zante, the 30th August, 1628.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.340. William Drivarta, (fn. 3) captain of the English ship Zuanne Bonaventura, reports:
Left Leghorn twenty days ago with ship empty. On the 11th old style, about 12 miles from Malta towards Sicily, heard much firing with heavy guns. Supposes it began before he heard it. Heard the noise from mid-day and it lasted to sunset. Supposes it was a fight between the English ship Sanson and the galleys of Malta or Messina. When at Leghorn heard that the galleys of Messina and Naples were on the watch and expecting that ship from Constantinople, bringing the ambassador on his way home to England. Saw the smoke as well as heard the guns. Had no occasion to go in anywhere to hear what happened.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.341. Honorato Selone, an inhabitant of Malta, who reached this port on the 1st September:
Eleven days ago a frigate of Malta arrived at Messina, bringing word that in the channel of Malta it had seen a large English ship fighting four galleys of the religion. Thinks it was English, and the cause of the conflict because it had taken two Maltese tartane going from Malta to Messina. When the ship sighted the galleys it set fire to the tartane, one of which sank. The galleys rescued the other. The fight lasted more than half a day. They fired more than 400 shots. Does not know result of the fight, but saw quantity of wood in the sea. Does not know exact day of fight.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.342. On the 28th August, statement of Zorzi Michaelici of Santa Maura.
Came here from Corfu to unlade wine and take part to Lepanto. Left here last Thursday. On Saturday, on the way to Santa Maura, five or six miles from Petala, sighted large ship. This ship at once made for him and intercepted his course to Petala. They began to lower two armed boats. Ran to the sands, and all threw themselves into the water, reaching land safely, the boats being close behind. They boarded the saetta and towed it to the ship. Observed from land the large ship turning to sea and the saetta with all its sails up. Supposed they might be honest men after all. Took the boat out and boarded the saetta. Found no one on board, but it was completely stripped. Took the saetta to the fish ponds (peschiere) and came on here this morning. Thought the ship English because it had a gallery (giardino) at the poop and muskets on the masts in the English fashion. It was armed and the port holes of the guns were open with the pieces out, but he could not count how many, still less how many men were on board, but they seemed numerous. When the boats were approaching the saetta some of his men heard them speak English.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
343. In conformity with my instructions I, Antonio Antelmi, called on the Earl of Carlisle, who arrived yesterday evening, at the house of the ordinary English ambassador. I opened by saying that the Senate wished to enquire after his health, and I was charged to express the gratification of the republic at his coming. Your Serenity much regretted owing to contradictory news about his route that orders about his reception had not reached the more remote towns in time. To compensate for this your Serenity desired that the earl would proceed to-morrow to the quarters appointed for him by the republic, without waiting for the day of his public entry, and I wished to consult his convenience about arranging the day for his public appearance.
The earl replied in French, I find it hard to express adequately my thanks for the honours and courtesies shown to me. I was obliged to change my route; I did so gladly to enjoy the beauty of the state and the ample forces of the republic. In Padua especially I received enough honours and to spare, and I might have avoided that place if I had expected to cause so much trouble. But I know this is proper to the greatness of the republic and is due to regard for the great king whom I have the honour to represent, to whom I will report everything. As soon as I am breathed from my journey I will come to thank his Serenity humbly. Meanwhile I beg you to assure him that no one more devoted to this republic has ever set foot in it than myself. This arises from a natural instinct, cherished by the report of its glories and by seeing it as one of the stoutest bulwarks of the public liberty.
After I had replied and seeing that the earl said nothing about accepting the public quarters, I repeated the invitation. The ambassadors exchanged some words in English, after which Wake asked me if it was customary for extraordinary ambassadors to receive public lodgings before making their public entry. I said it was not at all usual, but your Serenity wished to afford the earl this special token of affection and make up for what had been lacking in the provincial towns through not knowing his route. Both seemed to appreciate this, and the earl said, I am between two streams, the courteous hospitality of my colleague here and the honour shown me by the republic; but I must first of all obey his Serenity's commands, and while I will continue to enjoy Mr. Wake's courtesy to-day, I will go to-morrow to enjoy the honour of the most serene republic. I told the Ambassador Wake aside that the Signori of Rason Vecchie would send gondolas to-morrow to fetch the earl and his train. After the ambassadors had spoken in high terms of each other I took leave and departed, paying compliments to each. After dinner a present of confections, chickens etc. to the sum of 100 ducats was sent to the earl by order of the Collegio.
In the evening the secretary of the ordinary ambassador came to arrange the time for the earl to proceed to his public quarters on the following day. He suggested that as he knew the house was still in disorder owing to the shortness of the time, that they might wait another day for greater convenience. I said that the house would certainly be ready as the Signori of the Rason Vecchie had worked hard, day and night, and one of them had been with his father in the embassy of England. Accordingly yesterday, the 31st ult., at the appointed hour, the 22nd, Signori Giustinian and Barbarigo, of the Rason Vecchie, with a number of gondolas, went to the house of the Ambassador Wake. He met them on the stairs and they were introduced to the earl and taken to a room in which were Mr. Wake's wife, the Duchess of Rohan and many other ladies. Sig. Giustinian, as the elder, told the earl that they had come by order of his Serenity to attend him to the quarters prepared for him, as they wished in this way to make up for what had been lacking in the distant towns. They wished they had had more time to show more clearly the gratification of the republic in welcoming his Excellency. Both he and Sig. Barbarigo placed themselves at the earl's disposition throughout the time of his stay. The earl returned thanks warmly. After some conversation they took leave of the ladies; they entered the gondolas, the earl and ordinary ambassador with the two Signori of the Rason Vecchie, while the other gentlemen and the suite followed in other gondolas. They passed along the Grand Canal to S. Antonio, the earl dilating in praise of the city and its architecture, especially the Cornaro palace. He seemed curious to see the Arsenal, for which every facility will be afforded him. On reaching his quarters they ascended the stairs and the Signori of the Rason Vecchie attended him to his apartments. The earl's followers were amazed to see that quite thirty bedrooms had been prepared for gentlemen in so short a time, those of the seminary being added to the house, and the ambassadors seemed very pleased. As the evening was approaching, the Signori of the Rason Vecchie bade farewell to leave the ambassadors at liberty, and despite their reluctance both Wake and the earl accompanied them downstairs to the entrance.
To-day, the 1st September, Wake's secretary came to the doors of the Collegio to express the earl's thanks. He told me that they could arrange next Monday for the public entry, if that suited his Serenity. I reported this to the Collegio, who directed me to fix the entry for Monday. Accordingly his Serenity nominated the Most Illustrious Cavalier Lando as Cavalier, and sixty members of the Senate were chosen to go to San Spirito to meet the ambassador extraordinary at the 22nd hour, as is customary upon such occasions.
On the 23rd.
The Signori of the Rason Vecchie have reported to the Collegio that the Secretary of England, meeting Pessina, one of their officials told him that the ambassador, hearing that his Serenity had appointed a house at San Antonio for the Earl of Carlisle, considered it so far off that it must prove most inconvenient to the earl. It was near a hospital and practically separated from the city by a long stretch of fondamente, unsafe for foreigners, especially those of the earl's train, who would wear valuable jewels and chains. Accordingly the earl could not stay there and the ambassador would rather receive him in his own house, where although confined he would not incur such perils. Pessina explained that he could only serve and obey. With this the Secretary ended the conversation, intimating that if the quarters were not changed the ambassador thought of going to the Collegio.
[Italian.]
Aug. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
344. The RECTORS OF PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
In accordance with the orders of your Serenity and as there is no one in charge, we have informed the coachmen of the English ambassador extraordinary that they will be entertained at the public charge.
We are told that the ambassador has left here his nephew, Mr. John Alinton, indisposed in the house of Count Antonio Calla of this city, where he was located because the palace of me, the Captain, was not large enough to accommodate all. We hear that this young man is dangerously ill with small pox. As the ambassador let it be understood that he would pass this way again on his return in about ten days from now, we thought it best to postpone dismantling the palace of me, the Captain, in order not to multiply expenses. We shall wait a hint from your Serenity.
Padua, the 31st August, 1628.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Light cavalry enlisted from Christians of the Levant, so called from the little red leather helmets they wore. Guglielmotti: Vocabolario.
2 Is this the "caramisale" captured by Sir Kenelm Digby on the 7th? It was accompanied by four galiots of war, which he supposed to be of Messina. Journal of a Voyage in the Mediterranean (Camden Soc.), page 50.
3 William Driver of the John Bonaventure of London, of 300 tons. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1628–9, page 302.