Venice
September 1628, 1-5

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1916

Pages

258-269

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: September 1628, 1-5', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 258-269. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89195 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

September 1628

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
345. To the Ambassador in England.
The Earl of Carlisle arrived two days ago in this city. Contrary to his expressed intention, he came by land instead of by the Po, so the orders to our Rectors did not arrive in time, although we sent them by couriers. He has been thoroughly well entertained at Padua, and here we shall do something beyond the ordinary, as you will gather from the account of what has taken place up to the present. It will be advisable for you to make use of all this and to do so with the more despatch, because of what has happened.
We have no letters from you this week. We have nothing of importance from this end except the withdrawal of the French troops, which renders the affairs of this province more precarious and emphasises the hurt done to the public cause by the long endurance of the quarrel between the two crowns.
Ayes, 157.Noes, 0.Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
346. To the Proveditore of the Fleet.
We think it advisable, in view of the encounter with the English in the port of Scanderoon, that the Captain of the Great Galleys, Cornaro, with his squadron, shall immediately unite with the two galleys of Captain Capello and the two galleons, to guard the return route as far as Zante and Corfu. We reckon that these galleys and galleons will have left Syria for Cyprus about the end of last month, so that Cornaro may find them there; but if not he must go and find them, wherever they may be. We therefore order you to lade biscuit at Zante and enough powder and shot to supply the galleys and galleons and make up for what they consume in the fight. If there is not enough, the deficiency must be supplied from Corfu, notwithstanding any order to the contrary. You will also supply Cornaro with money to pay his crews. You will do all this with the speed that is necessary, as otherwise we shall not achieve the results we desire, which is most necessary.
Ayes, 129.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
347. To the Captain of the Great Galleys, Cornaro.
Send copy of the letter to the Proveditore of the Fleet. He will obey what concerns him punctually, as the need is urgent and very important. He will sail to Cyprus in company with the Captain of the Guard, Grimani and his two consorts commanded by the Proveditore General Molino for the sake of safety. They shall concert together for the proper and speedy execution of this important service.
Ayes, 129.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
348. Whereas Giovanni Soranzo is to be sent as ambassador to the King of Great Britain: that 1,200 gold ducats be given to his agents for his expenses for four months in advance, for which he need not render account. That 200 ducats of 6 lire 4 grossi each be given him for horses, trappings and chests and 1,000 gold ducats as a present. That 160 crowns of 7 lire each be given him for his expenses for four months in advance, for which he need not render account. That 100 ducats be given to the secretary to equip himself and 20 ducats to each of the two couriers who accompany him. That 186 and 200 ducats be paid him for the salaries of his chaplain and interpreter, respectively, for a year in advance.
Ayes, 128.Noes, 1.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Senato,
Terra.
Venetian
Archives.
349. That the Proveditore of the Mint be directed to provide the money required by the lords of the Rason Vecchie for the service of the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador extraordinary of the King of Great Britain, making the notes which are necessary and customary on such occasions.
Ayes, 132.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
350. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Everything seems to be going to ruin. The king and cardinal remain away from the camp. The troops diminish daily and food is scarce. I feel sure that by the end of this month there will be no army whatever. There is neither powder nor shot in the camp and the guns mostly lie dismounted in the fields, and the works are falling into decay. God grant that the English do not come now, as they could succour the place without the slightest difficulty; they could force the king to dislodge, capture his guns and perhaps push further forward without hindrance.
I spoke the other day to a leading man, a favourite of the king. He declared that present circumstances required no greater provision. The English fleet could not be ready to appear before 5,000 or 6,000 gentlemen rejoined the army. Though scattered about the country they could be back in less than four hours. He told me something much more important, that an impression had grown up in the king's mind that wherever the cardinal set his hand things turned out ill. His Majesty referred to the last war of La Rochelle, which ended as the English pleased; the peace of Monzon; the English marriage, which led to the war between the two kingdoms, and this last siege. If this be true the cardinal is in a sorry case.
Niort, the 1st September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
351. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Three days after the despatch of my last Buckingham returned to London. He immediately informed me through Carleton that the king wished the despatch of my secretary to be delayed lest, being so much in advance of the fleet, it might dishearten the Rochellese and render the French vainglorious. Meanwhile he would speak with Carleton, who left for Court two days later with the duke. I was warned that Soubise strongly opposed this negotiation, bringing over to his view two of the deputies of La Rochelle, while the third believes in the advantage of the treaty. I would not allow the passions of a private person to prevail against so great a benefit for the common cause, and in order to confute him I moved towards the Court. I did so the more readily because the Danish and Dutch ambassadors had already gone, the former to take leave, possibly being piqued at the coming of the new ambassador extraordinary, Rosencranz, who is expected daily; the others to get back to their Indiamen, which are already under sail, and to accompany the king to Scotland. This will probably be deferred, owing to Buckingham's death, of which more anon.
Hearing that I was in the neighbourhood, his Majesty immediately gave orders that I was to be lodged, as owing to the fitting out of the fleet the soldiers are billeted in the neighbouring villages and all the houses in Portsmouth itself are occupied. This was in a private gentleman's house, five miles from the Court, where I still am, at double cost, and completely equipped either to follow the king to Scotland or elsewhere, according to what the other ambassadors do. I pray for some support, as I do my duty regardless of the cost. If I could bear it I would not complain.
Next day I went to Portsmouth, where the duke kept me to dine with him. He made them take me over his flagship and showed me extraordinary marks of courtesy. We spoke together in Carleton's presence, and I found the difficulties to consist in two points, one that the despatch of the secretary should again be delayed for a few days in order not to discourage the Huguenots, the other in order not to give time to the cardinal to transmit these proposals to Spain, as he did at the time of the peace of Monzon, availing himself of the offers of England and other friends, in order to make the union with the Spaniards the closer. He also told me that he was not to be trusted, he always deceived and so forth. I tried to dissipate the objections, saying that the Rochellese themselves desired the peace. They could not be disheartened, as the disposition of England for peace coincided with the preparations for war. It was already announced that replies would not be awaited here, but were to be addressed to the fleet. This important business required time for its adjustment, and it did not become a minister of the republic, the friend of both kings, to be hurried and hampered. He could not negotiate with a dagger at his throat, as he would appear an offender rather than a mediator. The cardinal originated nothing, the negotiations came from us ministers, to whom the opportunity seemed favourable. I argued that therefore there could be no suspicion of deceit, especially as the preparations and forces were not delayed. If state policy was to be regulated by the suspicions of a private person, war would be inevitable.
The duke was perfectly satisfied and that evening he went to see the king to speak to him about this business. Carleton gave me hopes of a favourable result, and settled that I should have audience of his Majesty to-day. The king, besides presenting me with a stag, killed with his own hands, sent me word, in reply to my request to avoid inconveniencing my host, that he would provide me with a lodging elsewhere, and expressed pleasure at my being at hand He also held out hopes about the negotiations. Although ill pleased at so many delays, I am convinced of these difficulties. The king also admits that the business proceeds at a good pace, and that they were not inventions to facilitate the negotiations with Spain, as I had been warned, it being always better to believe little rather than much, especially where sudden and important changes occur.
While I was on the road to audience, one of my attendants, whom I had sent to Court in advance, returned with the news that last night the sailors at Portsmouth mutinied, shouting, Death to the duke, whose gentlemen wounded some of them. They captured one of the gang, who was hanged immediately, so for the moment the riot was quelled. This morning at ten, while the duke was taking leave of a gentleman who had spoken to him, another of low origin, Felton by name, son of a catchpoll, a violent Puritan, approached him with a knife concealed under his hat, which he held in his hand. He seized the advantage of the act of civility performed by the duke when he bowed, and took his life with a single thrust to the heart. The duke did not utter a single word, except in the act of drawing out the knife, when he said, Ha traitor, thou hast slain me (Ha traditore tu mi hai ammazzato).
This person, immediately the duke expired, without being in the least discomposed, called the gentlemen in the chamber and told them that they ought to thank him for having rid the king and kingdom of so great a pest. He may have hoped to be killed in that frantic tumult. But being kept alive, he has been put in prison, where he says freely that if he had not done it he would do it again, and should his body be racked, his soul will triumph, as he knows that prayers will be made for him in all churches of the realm. After reading the remonstrance made by parliament to the king against so many disorders, domestic and foreign, all attributed to the duke, he determined to kill him, and every day with tears in his eyes prayed to God to help him to complete this holy work. It must also be borne in mind that he was lieutenant of a company of infantry, and when his captain died the duke, instead of giving it to him, bestowed it on another. This enraged the fellow. He said nothing at the time, but demanded his discharge, being unable to hold a post which was such a reproach to him. Accordingly he left Portsmouth, and after remaining some days in London, returned post yesterday, and introduced himself under pretence of having good news from La Rochelle to communicate. It is also suspected, though very slightly, that he may have been sent by some discontented person, as now when in prison he says that while he desires to die for the deed he prays God to give him fortitude to bear the tortures to which he may be subjected, but the truth of this will appear in time, as he has not yet been examined. Thus in one moment is this great Colossus overthrown, and the greatest and most remarkable favourite whom the world has seen for many centuries dies instantaneously, as the precipice is always close to great eminences.
The king felt the blow bitterly, as your Excellencies may imagine, for he loved him heartily, and he was omnipotent. When the news reached his Majesty he was performing his usual prayers. He continued his prayers and evinced great mental distress (compontione) and compassion. He desired the duke's widow to withdraw immediately from Portsmouth, whither she had gone to witness her husband's departure, to a village near here, where she sighs and mourns and with reason.
The Earl of Pembroke apologised for delaying my audience on account of the catastrophe, so I came back to write and send off this despatch as speedily as possible because of the importance of the event, at a moment when the ports are closed and the king in distress.
The village of Bethampton, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
352. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The death of the duke has not yet caused any visible alteration in his Majesty's plans, though a change will doubtless follow, as he ruled everything single handed, nor were his politics in accordance with the views of the entire ministry.
One of the chief causes which delays the departure of the fleet is the lack of money, whereon all the disorders depend. The duke was greatly detested universally, and consequently many followed him against their will, so I have very little hope of a good result. At the present moment, to tell the truth, many rejoice, and my belief is that the departure of the fleet will be the more ardently followed up, as the king must now hear the Council, a thing he did not do previously. As the majority of its members are Puritans, they will be disposed to hasten this effort.
The whole of this day the king has been at the Council Board, with a few of the ministers, to provide for the special emergence of this catastrophe, rather than settle anything about public affairs in general. I hear that Soubise and the deputies from Rochelle do not regret the event, as in the midst of so many delays and pretexts they had doubts of the duke's sincerity, for in truth he rather favoured the Catholic party. I can aver that no one will succeed to the authority he possessed, which can only be expressed by the evidence of past events. The person who seems to be chief favourite is the Earl of Holland, a great friend of the duke, a man of some forty years old and beloved by the king. He is more given to amours than politics, but only time can show what he is.
I shall continue to follow the king, as my being near is not disagreeable to him, and after this great change I should have come if I had not been here, in all haste for the public service. In due time I shall continue my negotiation in the hope of pursuing it in conformity with the public need. I have already sent to Zorzi, and in a few days I hope to receive such intelligence as may serve to facilitate it, though in truth, in regard to this particular business, I regret the duke's death, as he was already well persuaded, and I had contrived to direct the affair according to his views, which were not to make this voyage willingly.
For the rest I am sure that the Spanish negotiation will proceed more slowly or be abandoned, as it passed through his hands exclusively. All the other ministers were very much opposed to it, and inclined instead to succour the King of Denmark, so I hope that its conclusion will not prove so easy and that after so much foul weather we may at last have a clear sky.
With regard to France, if this relief cannot be prevented from proceeding to the last extremity, which will prove sanguinary and dangerous whichever side is victorious, I shall do my utmost to divert it. At the worst I hope that the opening to an adjustment will be easier, as, putting aside the Huguenots, the war was fomented solely by the quarrels of the two favourites. The Most Christian must also think of internal peace, as without it England and everybody else is of opinion that the common cause cannot draw breath, and without it there will never be peace with this kingdom. If the French will not have mediators with their subjects let them mediate themselves, as no one will prevent it, but will be glad.
The main body of the fleet is at Portsmouth, five miles hence, and it is in good condition. It will number about a hundred sail, including more than 60 men of war. The other 50 sail, including 20 Rochellese, are at Plymouth. The military are billeted here in the neighbourhood. The 14 regiments of which they now consist will be reduced to two, consisting of about 4,000 men.
Under pretence of an affront from the Court a person made his escape hither from France. He is found to be an abbot, who promises at the risk of his head to pilot the relief into Rochelle. He says he had a hand in raising the works, but was badly paid. The English do not trust him and he is kept prisoner from suspicion of being a double spy. (fn. 1) I shall acquaint Zorzi with everything at the first opportunity. My last despatch from the Signory was dated the 7th July.
The village of Bethampton, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
353. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I sent my secretary yesterday morning to Bethune to learn what news he had from France. He said his latest news was of the 7th ult. from the camp. The king complained bitterly of the pope, and Bethune had been to audience of his Holiness that very day to carry out his instructions. He told the pope that his feebleness and timorousness passed all bounds, and his king washed his hands of this province and especially of the pontiff's interests. He complained in particular of the action of the nunicos Scappi and Gallo, who said all the ill they could of France. Scappi had stated at Casale that peace was made between England and Spain, in order to throw the people there into confusion and alarm. Gallo had gone so far as to treat with the Earl of Carlisle, the ambassador of a prince hostile to the Church, and had given him letters to the legate of Ferrara so that he might be received and well treated in that city.
He said he heard from Marini at Turin that various meetings had taken place between the Earl of Carlisle and the Prince of Piedmont, and couriers had been sent to Spain and England. So far as he could gather in so short a time, in general they had designs against France. Bethune added, with great confidence, that Carlisle would reach Venice and thence they would know more and obtain more detailed advices.
Rome, the 22nd September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
354. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A report has been circulated throughout the Court that the English fleet has been lost in a storm in the English Channel, that many ships were driven on the French coast and that some have been seized at St. Malo by order of the Most Christian. We have not heard any further particulars. The rest was brought by the steward of the Ambassador of Lorraine, who is coming to the Court. The French ambassador speaks of it as certain.
Madrid, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
355. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The recall of the French ambassador is displeasing to the Count of Olivares. When I called upon his Excellency he told me about the English fleet, which had lost as many as 75 ships. If this was true the English could not recover from it, La Rochelle would fall, peace would ensue between the two crowns, and the king would go to Italy with a powerful army.
Advices from Seville state that orders have arrived to suspend the immediate despatch of the ships of war, namely the Gran Capitana of Naples and six others. This seems to indicate that they are very sure of the peace with England, as in the other ports the ships of war lack their tackle and provision to arm them. This may be true, but it is also certain that this year they are powerless to get together any fleet worthy of the name, as they lack all the material, being short of funds.
Madrid, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
356. AGOSTINO VIANUOL, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear from Leghorn that all the English ships have left for the voyages reported. No new ones have come. The galleys of Toulon have had a fierce fight with an English ship, which was very roughly handled, though the result is not known. My friend tells me that the patents which these English have from their king, and which they have shown, give them power to attack the French and Spaniards even under the fortresses of any one soever.
Florence, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
357. The RECTORS OF PADUA to the DOGE and SENATE.
To-day the English ambassador extraordinary has thanked us for paying in your Serenity's name the expenses of the coaches and coachmen that he left here, and at the same time expressed his desire for the coaches to be sent away. Accordingly we have done this, and beg to inform your Serenity.
Padua, the 2nd September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
358. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE
I have just received letters from the Ambassadors Contarini and Soranzo. Contarini has been fortunate in making progress with the peace between the two crowns. If France was not tyrannised over by rebellious and hostile spirits I do not see how they could let slip such a favourable opportunity. But here they only think of procrastinating, and they do not believe that the English either can or will come. However, I will do my utmost. If my offices had been of any use the world would already be rejoicing over the results. That France and England can come to agreement when their maxims are diametrically opposed is incredible. One of the chief reasons why France hangs back is because England shows herself willing, and because when the latter inclines to peace the former disdains it. It is really excessive self confidence, which would not stand the test and a contempt for all the other powers on earth. I will go on this business to Fontane, whither the cardinal has betaken himself, and I pray God that my goodwill may encounter good fortune. It is of no use to think of negotiating with the king for the moment, because he has gone to Lower Poitou. They say he has gone to inspect some dangerous points including Talmon and Begambech. At the latter there is a promontory where the Garonne and Dordogne unite, where even the largest ships can moor, and they are afraid that Rohan may have some arrangement to unite there with his brother Soubise and the English. They propose to make some trenches or defence there; but there are difficulties, either from the shortness of time or because they fear that the enemy himself might profit by these works, as if they once got possession, with their abundant naval resources, they could not only control the navigation of both rivers, but could pass from one side to the other at will and harass the whole province.
At the return of the English we shall see if the nobles come back to the camp. For my part I do not believe it, as the majority left highly disgusted, and the others considered that they had done their duty. This much is certain, with every effort they cannot put 6,000 infantry into line. The other day I went to Etre and observed various regiments reduced to one half by sickness and desertion. A great disaster is inevitable if the English should come.
On Thursday night through a cloud burst, which did not last more than 20 minutes, thirty more paces of the mole were thrown down, three ships of the chain were driven into La Rochelle and two of the most powerful ships were wrecked on the rocks.
Estre, the 3rd September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
359. THADIO VICO, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States and the Prince and Princess Palatine perform constant offices through their ministers in London and in France to avert any conclusion that may arise from the relations between England and Spain, although we learn from a person who arrived two days ago from Brussels that they are progressing through the Infanta sending Rubens to Spain. They say he is taking to that Court an account of Carlisle's dealings with her Highness, together with the full views of herself and her Council. The same person also says that there may also be something about the truce with the States. If this is true it is probable that Gerbier, who possibly had some commission for the Duke of Buckingham to work in harmony with Rubens, will find some excuse for following him; but the Abbot Scaglia keeps him at his side, and by his advice and the special knowledge which he claims to have of Buckingham's intentions he may regulate Gerbier's movements with a special view to the interests of the Duke of Savoy, his master, before he leaves Brussels, where he will have arrived by now.
A gentleman who arrived from London the day before yesterday reports that the Ambassador Joachim is hastening the despatch of the Indiamen promised by that king, so that he may come to Holland with them, but apparently some delay has occurred owing to the offence taken by the Duke of Buckingham at a letter printed here, which has now been completely suppressed. He adds that he does not know if they will be sent so soon. This has caused much rancour, especially against Joachim, who claimed the honour of their recovery. He would not care to come without them, although he has obtained temporary leave to return.
The same person brought fresh remittances for Dulbier for the support of the English cavalry now in Friesland. He brings letters asking the States to support the burden of these troops until Martinmas next, when they will be either paid off or employed usefully for the States or Denmark. He says nothing about the departure of the English fleet, and meanwhile La Rochelle is said to be in straits.
The Ambassador Rosengran is still at Flushing waiting for a favourable wind to take him to England, where he is eagerly awaited by his colleagues, who do not dare to continue important negotiations before he arrives with more precise instructions from their master. He also has some despatches for the Ambassador Contarini. Apparently the wind is beginning to change, so that Rosengran may not have to wait much longer.
The Hague, the 4th September, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 4.
Cons. di X
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
360. In the Council of Ten.
That the 20 pistols, 8 foresails taken by the armed barques of the guard of Cephalonia on the English ship, and presented in the office of the chiefs by Marin Mudazzo, with his letters of the 20th July last, be placed in the halls of the arms of this Council and arranged in a suitable place there, befitting their character, according to the opinion of the Proveditore of those halls.
Ayes, 17.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[talian.]
Sept. 4.
Cl. vii
Cod 1927.
Bibl. S. Marco.
361. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to ALVISE CONTARINI, his colleague in England.
The cardinal has arranged to go to Les Sables d'Olona in order to rase to the ground a deserted castle, which is opposite that port and commands it. His suspicions of the English may have led to this decision, so that they may not fortify themselves there if they land.
Niort, the 4th September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
362. The Earl of Carlisle, Knight of the Garter, ambassador extraordinary of the King of England, came into the Collegio accompanied by Mr. Wake, the ordinary ambassador, in public audience, and handed in the king's letter for his Serenity, entered below.
After this was read the earl, speaking French in a very low voice, said: Among the principal documents left to his Majesty by the late King James, his father, he charged him to maintain cordial relations with the most serene republic, and especially to admire the prudence of this government and always abide by your Serenity's sound advice. My king punctually follows this, not only to keep his father's commands, but from natural inclination and recognising the republic as one of the safest pillars of the public liberty. I cannot adequately express my sovereign's cordial affection for this state. He wished to show it more clearly by this embassy, and he could not send anyone more devoted to the republic than myself. My principal instructions are to testify to your Serenity that my king wishes the republic every possible prosperity, and that he will neglect no opportunity of standing united with her, and desires and expects the like from your Serenity. I also wish to return thanks for the honours shown to me.
The doge replied, We are very glad to see your Excellency as the representative of his Majesty. Our satisfaction is increased by the confirmation of his Majesty's friendship and goodwill. This increases our affection and esteem for your Excellency, and we regret that our orders for your entertainment did not reach the rectors of the distant towns in time. We desire that you shall receive every facility and honour here, for which all the Signori are anxious. The earl responded with warm thanks for the doge's courteous reply, and both ambassadors took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
363. Carolus Dei Gratia Magnae Britanniae, Franciae et Hiberniae Rex, fidei defensor etc. Serenissimo Principi Domino Johanni Cornelio, Duci Venetiarum Amico nostro charissimo, salutem:
Serenissime Princeps: Propter publicam communis Cause salutem qua nobis nihil esse potest antiquius Illustrem virum fidelem Nostrum et praedilectum, consanguineum comitem Carlioli a Consiliis et Cubiculo nostris intimis at que nostrum Legatum extraordinarium ad aliquos orbis Christiani Princeps et Status amandavimus. Igitur cum inter illos Vestrae Serenitati et Sermae Reipublicae nominem preferamus erga quem majori teneamur ipsi affectu et amore eidem etiam ut et vos accederet et de nostri in vos animi constantiae redderet certiores in mandatis dedimus istud et quicquid praeterea dictus noster Legatus a nobis accepit expositurus ut amice praebeantur aures atque integre omnibus ejus quae nostro nomine faciet verbis adhibeatur fides summopere petimus a Vra. Serte. Cui ut Sermae. Reipub. faustos precamur rerum successus.
Dabantur in nostro palatio Westmonasterii, die x Aprilis Anno partum Virginis MDCXXVIII Regni nostri IV.
Vestra Serenitatis Amicus Carissimus.
CAROLUS R.
Sept. 5.
Cinque
Savii
alla
Mercanzia.
Busta 81.
Venetian
Archives.
364. With respect to salt fish from the west, it is resolved that for the next two years English and Flemish merchants may bring them free of the present obligation to leave one half in this city, and once it is unladed they can contract with anyone, after paying the usual duties by land, and one half of the present duties by sea, the casks being stamped as usual, but no one must buy any before it is unladed and taken to the storehouses. The foreign merchants shall supply a note of all they have brought to the Giustizia Vechia in the presence of the chief of the salt fishmongers.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Chevalier de Bremont. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1628–9, pages 368, 449; Birch: Court and Times of Charles I, vol. i, page 384.