Venice
September 1628, 16-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1916

Pages

292-302

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'Venice: September 1628, 16-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 292-302. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89198 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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September 1628

Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
393. To the Ambassador in England.
We wish first to commend your efforts towards a reconciliation with France. Your letters of the 14th, 20th and 22nd give us a very clear account of this, and have arrived in time for us to stop an express we were sending to Zorzi in France, to add the enclosed, so that he may act with caution, after your instructions. We enclose the exposition made by the Earl of Carlisle and the ordinary ambassador at the first private audience, together with our reply. We took the opportunity to express our views and wishes.
We recommend to you the same caution which we have enjoined upon Zorzi. We are waiting to hear about the king's approval of your arrangement with Buckingham.
Ayes, 149.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
394. To the Ambassador in France.
Despatches from England of the 14th and 22nd ult. reached us as we were sending off the courier. We do not know what difficulties the peace overtures may encounter, though general conditions are favourable. You will assure the king and cardinal of the zeal of the republic, and tell them the particulars sent you from London. We consider two cautions necessary: firstly, to set forth the proposals exactly as you have them from London, so that we may not be blamed for any discrepancies, and the other to put forth the proposals as from this source, not as from us, so that the republic may not be implicated. You will say that his Majesty acquired glory in arms by his victory last year, and now he will acquire merit with all Christendom by facilitating negotiations, as in such contests the victor ultimately shares the losses of the conquered. You may add that in this way his Majesty can put a stop to the idea of union between the Spaniards and English. There is also the question of stopping the truce with the Dutch as well as the most urgent question of Italy.
The sending of Porter to the Spanish Court, the return of Scaglia by way of Brussels, the orders to Carlisle to delay coming to us, the offers of the Spaniards to help Savoy against Geneva, will supply you with abundant materials for your replies. You will let slip no opportunity in order to win success, which is so highly important.
Ayes, 149.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
395. To the Ambassador in Savoy.
The reception of Carlisle and his offices. Have since heard of Porter's mission to Madrid and the orders to Carlisle to suspend his visit to Venice. The earl was suffering from fever and has expressed the desire to go to Padua. Do not know if this is in order to avoid business until advices arrive from Porter and Scaglia, especially as the earl, through Wake, spoke very strongly against the French ministers. Something may be said on the subject at Turin, and the ambassador must keep his ears open.
Ayes, 149.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
396. To the Ambassador in Spain.
Confirmation of the negotiations between Spain and England. The mission of Porter and Scaglia and the stopping of Carlisle. The audience of Carlisle and the answer given to him. This for information and to find out all about the treaty of peace.
Ayes, 148.Noes, 2.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
397. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are expecting from Leghorn an English ship which went there a few months ago, with goods from here. I hear it has been hired by Jews and other merchants, Turkish subjects, for Venice. I shall not accept it, as it would be a great prejudice to our merchants if people could take goods to our city with greater advantage by leaving them out of the question, but I cannot forbid it. I will do all I can to prevent the agreement. It is true that the goods they wish to send to Venice may be again taken to Leghorn in the same ship, with even greater prejudice; if they must make use of the English it would be necessary to divert them from that most harmful mart. It will be advisable for the Savii alla Mercanzia to discuss this. I have thought it right to send the news without delay, in order to receive instructions, without which I shall not consent to the hire of the English ships for Venice or of any others.
Ortacchivi, the 16th September, 1628, on the banks of the Channel of the Black Sea.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
398. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
After the despatch of my letters the day before yesterday I received five packets from Italy, including three ducal missives dated the 8th July and the 3rd and 11th August. First of all I thank your Excellencies for your appreciation and your regard for my dilapidated fortune. I reported having approached the Court in order to continue negotiating the very important business, which really was rather impeded by the duke's death, by flattering whose passions I had devised an excellent opportunity. But I do not despair if the French help. If they do not they will lose a fine opportunity for having a great share in this kingdom, as everybody hopes, if the peace takes place, that the queen will have great influence, if she knows how to conduct herself. With this idea I propose going to see her one of these days, and hope for good assistance. One can speak to her freely, and she does the same with the king. She knew that my journey to the Court was for the peace, and expressed great satisfaction. I shall now continue my journey, as it pleases the king and obeys orders. Owing to the duke's death the journey to Scotland is postponed until the spring. As I have incurred the cost I should like to go.
Your Excellencies will have the king's decision to refer the matter of the English ships to Wake, with orders to satisfy the republic. If it is true, as I am told, that Digby by this time is out of the Mediterranean, I hope you will be quite rid of that unjustifiable molestation.
The English gentleman is returning, whom Carlisle sent with the news of the French defeat in Savoy. I have not yet discovered positively whether he is the bearer of any commissions of importance, though some tell me that he is allowed to come back, taking his leave civilly. I believe he will do so gladly as with these changes at Court it does not suit him to be away, with his wife seriously ill, and in great danger, if not dead. If this be true, I should hope that Porter, Gerbier and others, who went abroad for the affairs of Spain, will do the like. This would be a good indication whether they mean to continue the negotiations or not, so I keep an eye on the matter. I know that Cottington, who was to have gone with the duke on the fleet and thence proceed to Spain, has not started yet. I also know that the king told the Dutch ambassadors at audience that as they had complained bitterly to him about the overtures made by his agent at the Hague concerning Spain, when there was nothing of importance, it was now his turn to complain to them of the negotiations of their deputies, who had assembled at Rosendal with those of the Infanta, for the exchange of prisoners, and by his Majesty's advices from Spain they knew that Spinola was merely awaiting the assent of the Court to proclaim a truce in the Netherlands. The ambassadors thanked him for this confidential intimation and assured him that the deputies at Rosendal had negotiated solely about the prisoners, and were expressly forbidden to discuss or listen to any other business, especially about a truce. There was nothing at all on their side with the Marquis Spinola. They promised that nothing would ever be done to the prejudice of their alliance, and they would not treat covertly. The king replied: I am satisfied with your assurances, and in return I assure you that there is no treaty between me and the King of Spain. I promise that I will not begin to treat without your assent and advice. I see clearly that this is the declaration about which I wrote in my last, and they may have repented of the alarm given to all their friends, without foundation, through the overtures made at the Hague, based, so far as I can gather, on the mere compliments of the favourites. I hope this will now be at an end, through Buckingham's death, as I do not see anybody about the king who encourages that idea, while many are the servants of the Countess Palatine. If her interests are brought forward so soon, they will not be disposed of at once.
The Danish Ambassador Rosencranz has arrived in London. He has not yet seen the king. He will doubtless perform the same offices as he did at the Hague, saying that to gratify the princes of Germany his master is willing to treat with the emperor by commissioners, but the demands of the two parties are very far asunder, and in the meantime he asks for help. I hope that this affair will now be more difficult, owing to the success of Denmark at Stralsund, the union of Sweden, the disposition of England to help him, and because it is easier to do so, and from the hope of peace with France. Then the king in union with his subjects will have money, but I will keep on the watch. I do not find that the negotiations with Spain, whether of England alone or the others, can be so speedily adjusted, unless the Spaniards make great offers, as they may do if they are really enamoured of Italy.
I have seen the instructions about Carlisle's visit to Venice, and understand that they attribute what they call your Serenity's retreat to your displeasure at his having gone first to Turin. But I will give satisfaction to everybody and quiet them. I still believe, contrary to the general opinion, that his journey was undertaken for private interests, to render France suspicious, especially by making a bargain of it at Turin, and in order to see Italy, as from Venice he may have gone on to Florence and Rome. You will learn the truth from his statements. I also believe that he passed through Brussels solely to pay a compliment, to make the French jealous and to humour the duke, as he personally has always been hostile to the Spaniards, and it was he who made the French marriage and did other things for the common cause.
It has transpired that the duke, having received a present of 40,000 crowns, permitted certain merchants to trade freely from these realms in Spain, and other secret practices are expected to come to light daily. I believe that the king has already begun to be aware of them. Yet his Majesty has requested the Dutch ambassadors to prevent the sale at Amsterdam of some pearls which Buckingham had pledged, and that the merchants shall agree to keep them some time longer on receiving interest. His Majesty has declared that he will pay all his debts, which are said to amount to two millions of florins, and assume the protection of the whole family. He sent the corpse to London, accompanied by gentlemen of his chamber. He is making the whole Court go into mourning, an unusual and perhaps excessive mark of honour. He also had the culprit taken to London to the Tower, in order to torture him better, but now at last feels himself master, and perhaps begins to enjoy it (ma pero conosce hormai d'esser padrone e forse principia a goderne).
The Count of Lavalle, a scion of the Tremouille family, has come hither from Holland to pass into Rochelle with the succour. (fn. 1) He says that when the English fleet approaches France many of the inhabitants will rebel, who have hitherto kept quiet from doubt of this assistance. It is true that the greater the straits of Rochelle the more that faction is exasperated, so if it is not relieved trouble may be expected. The French are tired of that war. Condé is beaten, Epernon and Montmorency do nothing and the same may be said of the others.
The Scotch Earl of Argyle has come, after having been in disgrace at this Court for many years. For a long while he served the Infanta. He has now been reinstated. I do not know if he has come on any business, but I rather think not, from the information I have received. He came by Holland.
The States have sent an express to their ambassadors to obtain the release of their Guinea ships, over fifteen of which are in various English harbours, owing to the general embargo, as fourteen Dunkirkers have put to sea to destroy the herring fishery, which concerns them greatly. As this is so just, I believe it will be granted.
I ask your Excellencies to have money voted me for couriers and postage of letters, as I have no longer any funds for those expenses.
Bethampton, the 16th September, 1628.
Postscript.—One of my attendants who has come from Portsmouth tells me that the fleet has just set sail, with a fair wind, so your Excellencies may hear of its achievements before your learn of its departure.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.399. Copy of letter written in concert with the Duke of Buckingham to the Ambassador Zorzi in France.
I have your letters expressing the hope of a favourable issue to the peace negotiations, especially now the issue depends on the fortunes of war, and victory cannot fail to be hurtful on whichever side it may fall. I note that the point of the Rochellese is the one that may upset everything. I remarked to Carleton that as the King here claims nothing in France, while the Rochellese do not wish to treat without the consent of this crown, and the French say their king cannot deal with other princes about his own subjects, it might be well to inform the Rochellese and Huguenots that if they find some way of making peace with their king, his Majesty of Great Britain will be glad. The duke replied that he had powers from his king in this affair to dispose of war and of peace according to circumstances, and when he arrived before La Rochelle with the fleet he would be better pleased to hear that the Rochellese had received satisfaction from the Most Christian than to succour them. The king here would always approve provided their safety was assured.
We then discussed how to let the Rochellese know, and they proposed to send a gentleman of the duke to your Excellency or one of the deputies of La Rochelle. However, it was considered that you should act as you consider best, stating that his Majesty will agree, and if this is not obtained, get a passport for a gentleman of the duke who will come to ratify it and with other instructions which you may advise. If the time is too short, as the fleet will start soon, we agreed that you shall either confer with Buckingham when he arrives off the coast, or send someone in order to arrive at some adjustment before they proceed to the last extremity.
The present business turns on three points. The first and most important is that of the Rochellese and the Huguenot party. If negotiations can be introduced between the king and them I think an adjustment will be easy. The second is the peace between the two crowns. If this can be referred to commissioners at a neutral place, or better still, if the duke can confer personally with the cardinal, they will soon settle matters to the glory of both. The third point is that if the peace is made, the English fleet will be employed for the public cause, and so the French also should assist Italy or Germany.
I must warn you, however, that the peace with those of the religion must go in unison with the one between the two crowns, as for good reasons of state, they do not want the one without the other here; and it will also be a great advantage to add the third point. I may add that they have no intention here to delay the sailing of the fleet because of these negotiations, and if the duke has sailed before your answer arrives you can treat with him for a final conclusion, as he is very sensible of the prejudice the cause may suffer. God grant it may take place before blood is shed, for the effusion will be very great as the duke is most determined. He has collected a great force by his authority, and his honour is pledged, though he will always prefer an honourable peace to the doubtful issue of war, especially when victory cannot fail to be harmful.
[Italian; deciphered; copy.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
400. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In the conference between the cardinal and the Rochellese deputies they asked his opinion on three points. They asked leave to send to England to inform the king there upon current affairs; that Rohan, Soubise and their mother should be restored to favour; and that they might send out of the town a certain number of wretched folk who had nothing to live on. The cardinal told them that the first request was merely an aggravation of their treason and rendered them unworthy of the royal clemency, seeing that they wished to apply to a foreign prince with whom they had nothing to do.
Almost at the moment when I sent off my despatch by the courier of Mantua a report circulated of the death of the Duke of Buckingham. This was accepted as true without further confirmation, so easy is it to believe what one wishes, and the same day a printed account was issued, with a speech added, made by him before he expired. Nothing is really known beyond what a French servant of the Queen of England brought to the cardinal. He says that he himself saw the duke dead on the 23rd ult. He reports that the duke had wounded a Scottish captain, who refused to embark on the fleet without pay, and his lieutenant had thereupon plunged his sword into the duke's side. They believe this firmly here and ascribe the fatal event to the grace of Heaven, seconding the pious intentions of the king and punishing the contumacious Rochelle. That it may be pure imagination is strongly confirmed by the fact that since this man arrived no letters or persons have come to confirm so extraordinary an event.
Niort, the 16th September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
401. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The French ambassador remarked by my secretary that he was advised from Flanders that a person calling himself the squire of the Earl of Carlisle had gone thence, accompanied by the painter Rubens, who is known to have been the first mover with Buckingham of some treaty of composition between the English and Spaniards. He left a report that he was going with all diligence to Venice, where they were to conclude the peace between his king and the Catholic. They would invite the most serene republic to join, giving her a guarantee against invasion. He took this opportunity to press me about what Carlisle was really negotiating there. The secretary replied that he had represented the state of affairs of his king, and your Serenity in reply had pointed out that the proper remedy was a reconciliation with France, and that speedily, as it would stop further acquisitions by the Spaniards. The answer pleased Bethune greatly and he was equally glad to find out what he so much desired. He remarked that if the King of England made peace with the Most Christian he would lose nothing in state or reputation, whereas by making one with the Catholic both would suffer severely with the interests of the Palatine and Denmark.
Rome, the 16th September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
402. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I saw the French ambassador two days ago. He said he knew his king would persuade the States not to enter upon negotiations with the Spaniards, as they always held out valiantly against the enemy even when England and Denmark were not at war with the Spaniards, and even if England and Denmark should make peace they ought not to relax their determination. He said the English fleet had returned home, and although less damaged than was at first reported, yet it was practically shattered and the troops had been landed. They could only be assembled again with much time and trouble. He thinks it impossible for them to sail again this season. The king, his master, hopes to have La Rochelle very soon.
Madrid, the 16th September, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
403. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Fernandina with his galleys fell in with six English and Dutch ships off Valenza and captured them all. These are considered useful for the service of the royal fleet, but besides the advantage of slaves the capture is of little use.
Madrid, the 16th September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
404. The ordinary ambassador of England came into the Collegio and spoke as follows:
The Earl of Carlisle's indisposition has been relieved by the prudent reply of the Senate, which he cannot praise sufficiently. He has drawn up this paper which he asks you to read. The earl's secretary then handed in the paper entered below. After it had been read the doge said, We are extremely sorry for the earl's indisposition, and we have sent to offer him medical help. We have attentively listened to the paper and although we are persuaded that his Majesty would never give ear to union and negotiation with one who has such different aims from his own, yet we welcome the assurances of the earl and your Excellency. The republic will rejoice at any openings for a union between the crowns of England and France. The ambassador remarked that the earl would receive much consolation from his Serenity. The quiet and air of Padua would soon restore his health, and he asked for a house there to which he might withdraw privately and thus relieve the ministers of the state from the inconvenience of their present lodgings, the earl's sickness having lasted longer than was expected.
The doge replied: We desire nothing so much as the earl's speedy recovery; our ministers in serving him are only fulfilling their orders, and they suffer no inconvenience, so that the earl need not wish to change his quarters on that account. However, these Signors will deliberate upon what you have said, as they desire to give him every satisfaction. The ambassador expressed his thanks and repeated the request, saying that the ambassador did not wish to cause so much trouble. With that he departed.
Most Serene Prince:
We are much rejoiced by the Senate's reply in response to his Majesty's worthy sentiments. It will serve to confirm his Majesty's resolution to co-operate for the salvation of the remains of the common liberty. We are still more gratified to observe that in spite of rumours your Serenity remains certain of his Majesty's zeal for the common cause. It is pleasant to see that the tricks of some and the weakness of others have not produced the effects expected. We agree with your Serenity in deploring the common misfortunes and we pray God to open the eyes of those to whose perversity all these evils are due. Presumably the heart of the Most Christian has something answering to the title of Just attached to him almost from his cradle, and as we must believe his intentions to be right we must deplore the perversity of his ministers about carrying out his wishes. Charles the Great, our king, by his alliance and friendship with that Crown, hoped to stem the torrent of oppression that was flooding the general liberty, but instead of help and co-operation, he experienced from the rulers of France such insidious malice that he had to guard himself more against feigned friends than professed enemies. The affronts and injuries inflicted upon his Majesty are known to all the world, but with wonderful patience he hid from the world a great part of his private wrongs, until the most malignant enemies could do no worse, salvo quod non totum telum corpore acceperit. We unwillingly recall past events with that crown, whose ministers have supplied catalogues of perfidy and malice, the recital whereof would offend your Serenity's ears and our modesty. We may say this much, the spring of the marriage with the Most Christian's sister was the autumn of friendship between the crowns, and the nuptial festivities preceded affronts to England, the French ministers having forestalled the birth of fraternal love, expected from the matrimonial knot, killing it ere it was born.
The French alliance was built upon two bases, the principal being an alliance with a view to the general welfare, the accessory a blood alliance to consolidate the union necessary for the common interests. Two commissioners were given to the royal ministers corresponding to these designs. The proposals were received in France as voices from Heaven, with full acceptance of the substance but some slight difference in the manner of proceeding. The ministers thought that it would be selling the daughter of France if the state should at the same time buy the help of that Crown against the common enemies. The inclination was to arrange both treaties, announcing the marriage first, while the articles of the marriage and alliance should be signed together. After the marriage was arranged they adduced giving offence to the pope, from whom the dispensation was expected. On this point French perfidy triumphed, because his Majesty offered the Most Christian to pay his quota up to 50,000 men while giving him all the glory, so that he might do his duty. The French agreed, and his Majesty waived a written obligation, expecting to see the promises fulfilled.
At the very moment when the marriage was arranged they upset the treaty with Mansfeld, and the queen had no sooner reached England than Spanish ships began to appear on the French coasts, designed, as appears from papers in our hands, against his Majesty and his best friends, orders being issued to supply them with whatever they needed for this purpose. The French ministers practised such perfidy when the union between the two kings was quite young and your Serenity has heard with what constancy they persevered in these malicious practices until an open rupture.
The confidence due to your Serenity obliges us to cite perhaps the most atrocious incident, although the most impertinent of all. During the bad relations between the crowns (although our master was always passive and suffered more than can be expressed), to remove all hope of reconciliation they sent a letter intimating to his Majesty that he must send no more ambassadors, agents or messengers to France, and must not write or speak of reconciliation. By involving his Majesty with Spain they expected to have matters their own way, but they miscalculated, kindling great wrath in our king's generous heart, which made him demand a hearing with cannon and vindicate his honour.
We say this, not to justify the royal arms, as the king's justice and sincerity require no apology, but to satisfy your Serenity who in reply to our first query quid agendum, suggested a reconciliation with France as the sole remedy for every ill. In this we recognise your prudence and zeal for the public weal, and we should subscribe without difficulty if you would tell us quomodo agendum. The door was shut by the French ministers and it rests with them to open it.
Your Serenity will have perceived the invincible necessity which forced his Majesty to a rupture and how impossible it is for him to do more than lend an ear to the expressions of desire of the good. In case the French ministers, hardened in their perversity, would rather ruin that kingdom than save the general, your Serenity may consider what those princes and states which remain free can do together, and to prescribe how the public ship may be saved from the common shipwreck without France.
CARLISLE.
WAKE.
By command of their Excellencies,
BOSWELL.
[Italian.]
Sept. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
405. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are anxiously awaiting the return of the Earl of Carlisle. I fancy they are also expecting the Count of Monterey, who is going as ambassador for the Catholic to Rome, though this is not the direct way. Thus his coming will suggest a mystery, and if he treats here with the Earl of Carlisle it will do much to support the belief that they want to make France uneasy and it may be work seriously for the reunion of England and Spain.
Turin, the 17th September, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
406. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Count of Gazzoldo, who was to have gone to England to pay his respects to the king in the name of the Duke of Mantua, has never done so, indeed the cardinal detained him here. It now seems that he thinks of letting the count complete his embassy, and that Penandi, the resident of his Highness, will also cross the sea. As I see no reason for this, I believe that the cardinal intends to respond by this to the peace overtures made by Contarini and the other ambassadors, allowing the count to let slip a word about the goodwill of France, and then he may add as if from himself, the cardinal's views against the Spaniards, which are held in suspense so long as La Rochelle holds out. In order to profit in negotiation and to lull the English to sleep I think they will set about preparing this mission here, though it is not yet decided.
Etre, the 18th September, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
407. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I send the confirmation of Buckingham's death. The news comes from the Dutch embassy at London, though the ambassadors were away with the king. A person of this household sent a messenger who left Dover with a contrary wind, which still blows. The deed took place on the 8th in the duke's own apartments, in the presence of Soubise, the Count of La Valle and other personages. An Englishman did it, and although he might have escaped, after striking two blows, when the duke's dependants began to cry: This is a French stroke, so that the said cavaliers and others of that nation were in danger, he answered in a loud voice in English: It is not a French stroke; I have done it and am English. These may be embroideries, but the tragedy itself is true. So far the comments are all prejudiced. Those who loved the duke assert that this will mean the ruin of the Rochellese; those who hated him consider it a gain for the state. Men of judgment are certain that if this blow proves to have come from France it will inflame an implacable dispute between the two kings, but if it is merely a matter of private passion it may facilitate an accommodation.
So far nothing has been heard here of Digby's performances, though with the prince away and the Palatine and his wife hunting, the Court is deserted and so we are in the dark about many particulars.
The Hague, the 18th September, 1628.
[Italian.]
Sept. 20.
Cons. Di X
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
408. In the Council of Ten.
That leave be given to Marc Antonio Correr to visit the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador of the King of Great Britain, whom he knew when he was ambassador for our republic at that Court, and that he may also receive the earl in his own house, but once only in each case.
The like for the Savii Giustinian, Pesaro and Moresini.
Ayes, 15.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 He arrived on the 26th August, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1628–9, page 270.