Venice
October 1628, 11-20

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1916

Pages

343-354

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: October 1628, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 343-354. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89202 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

October 1628

Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Brescia.
Venetian
Archives.
479. FRANCESCO ZEN, Podestà, and ZORZI BADOER, Captain of Brescia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Although we only heard two days ago of the departure of the Earl of Carlisle from Venice, and his proposed journey this way to Turin in the company of Mr. Wake, we have made the dispositions necessary for their reception, though avoiding unnecessary expense, according to the custom observed with ambassadors extraordinary, and following the example of other towns, with which we understand Carlisle was pleased. We are in difficulties as we are without news of when he should arrive here. We heard last night from Peschiera that he should be there this morning and at Desenzano in the evening. We have therefore sent coaches to meet them. We have also sent gentlemen to prepare quarters and food, so far as the nature of the place and the short notice allow, and to avoid undue expense and the cost of such a numerous company dining in the country, we have thought it best to bring them on here by to-morrow evening. Meanwhile we are preparing a meal for Friday morning at Palazzolo from whence they will go in the evening to Bergamo, where we have advised the Rectors to make preparation. We will send particulars of the expenses and of all that happens.
Brescia, the 11th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Verona.
Venetian
Archives.
480. The RECTORS OF VERONA to the DOGE and SENATE.
Only on Saturday last, the 7th inst., did we receive the orders to entertain the English ambassadors, and we were in great trouble, seeing that they were to arrive at Padua that same evening and at Vicenza on Sunday. The violent hurry has increased the expense, but as they did not arrive until Tuesday we were able to fit up some of the rooms of the palace and make preparations befitting the reputation of the republic. We sent two of the cavaliers here to the Torre with some coaches and a company of capelletti on horse to meet them. I, the captain, waited for them at the gate with some coaches, and I, the podestaà, received them at the palace of the Capitaneato, meeting them at the bottom of the stairs. The walls were lined with troops where they entered, and the streets also, with a squadron in the piazza. As they arrived at the second hour of the night, the Castle of S. Pietro was illuminated with pitch needles, and the piazza also was illuminated. Soon afterwards they sat down to table and were regaled as well as possible. The best rooms of me, the captain, were assigned to the ambassador extraordinary; the guest chambers overlooking the piazza to the ambassador returning from Constantinople, his wife and her two damsels; the guest chambers of me, the podestà, to the ambassador in ordinary, and the others were divided among the other rooms, so that all were comfortable. In the morning they expressed their great obligations to your Serenity for such demonstrations of your friendship for the Crown of England. We discovered their plans for the following day, having hinted to them that dinner was prepared for them at Peschiera and learning that they proposed to reach Desenzano or Lonigo afterwards. We sent word in haste to the Rectors of Bergamo and the Proveditore of Salo, and we also informed the Proveditore of Peschiera. This morning, thinking that they would like a collation before starting, we had one prepared, and finding that they would like to go from Peschiera to Desenzano by boat, we sent on word of this, urging the officials to advise the Rectors of Bergamo, as the ambassadors proposed to go that way. They left at the 17th hour, accompanied by both of us to the gate, and by me, the captain, for two miles with the cavalry. The ambassadors extraordinary and ordinary were in the best places in the coach with us two opposite, and the ambassador from Constantinople in another coach with his wife. I, the captain, lent them my travelling coach as far as Brescia, the Rectors of Vicenza having lent them another to this city. We will send the account of the expenses as soon as it is drawn up.
Verona, the 11th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
481. To the Ambassador Contarini in England.
You will express to his Majesty our satisfaction at the visit of so distinguished a person as the Earl of Carlisle, and how we tried to receive him as his merits deserve. You will again express our esteem for his Majesty, coupled with our desire for his complete satisfaction. We have no letters from your parts or from the Hague this week. Buckingham's death may make some change in matters depending on that government. We shall await your advices, especially about the state in which the negotiations pending with France were left, and all that has happened since.
They write from Spain of negotiations for peace with England. You will try and find out about it. In Italy the Spaniards insist more and more on having Casale, refusing all negotiations, with their high ambitions and designs on Genoa and their plan to get the Grisons to renounce their claims to the Valtelline, and their aspirations to dominion over this province, which means every where else afterwards.
We enclose letters from our Proveditore General of the 14th September as to what ensued from English ships chasing some French ones near Crete, the English going so far as to follow the men of one of the ships on to this island. This is for your information and to use for those offices which we direct you to make purposely with the king and ministers, remonstrating about such ill behaviour on the part of the English, as your prudence may suggest and as the nature of the incident requires.
Ayes, 96.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Capitanio
delle Galeazze.
Venetian
Archives.
482. LUCA PESARO, Governor of the Convict Galleys, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English bertons of war recently betook themselves to the port S. Pantaleone, near here, to careen, but hearing that I was coming to these waters, they hurried on with the work, in order not to be caught when heeled over. They have gone to Patrasso to wait, so they say, until the merchant ships have finished lading currants and to escort them safely. But I fancy they intend to dispose in some manner of the goods they have plundered, in order to lighten their ships and make money.
Their captain was highly delighted with the port in question, which is certainly very convenient for ships in every respect. He dealt kindly with the Turks, who were won by his courtesy, and yesterday sang his praises to me, and their delight at making his acquaintance. As this might lead to familiarity and possibly intercourse between them I made remarks calculated to move the Turks to mistrust if not fear, saying that after his behaviour at Scanderoon he might show but little respect to other ports of the Sultan, especially those which are remote and unprotected. Your Serenity's galleys could not always be on the spot. Respect for these alone kept them within bounds, and veiled under a false appearance of kindness their real audacity, which always inclined to every barbarity, with more to the same purpose, in order to excite jealousy and fear of the English and also gratitude and good will towards us on the part of the Turks.
This captain is very angry with Captain Capello, and his ceaseless complaints only throw into relief that officer's merits. He says he would like to fight a duel with him when he has laid down his charge. He pretends that his king is offended. He keeps increasing in strength and in audacity, and makes himself very much at home in these waters. He is not unwelcome to your Serenity's own subjects, either because the currant trade inclines them to his countrymen, or from more occult hopes of gain, owing to the wealth of his ships. The Rectors of Zante and Cephalonia are on the alert about this, and I will do all I can at sea to upset their transactions.
The galley at Dragomestre, the 13th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
483. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador left here for Smyrna in June, so that I was not able to perform the office with which your Excellencies charged me. Owing to the plague I have not seen the present ambassador since the first visits. I will not fail to make the most both with him and with the others, as I have done hitherto when the occasion required it, about what happened at Alexandretta, about which I have copious information from the Consul Secaro, and the captains of the galeasses and galleons, as well as of what that Englishman attempted at Zante and at Cephalonia.
Ortacchivi, on the channel of the Black Sea, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
484. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The plundering of the ship of Cosmo Orlandini proves to be true. The interested parties have appeared here. They first had recourse to the English ambassador. He spoke them fair and offered to write them letters for Zante, so that when the ship that robbed them arrived there they should be compensated for their losses. They wanted him to bind himself and the whole nation, but he would not agree to that on any account. They have received the letters and have sent them to Scios, where Orlandini's ship is. It is thought that they will first try to obtain compensation by mild means, and if that does not succeed they will appeal to the state. In that case the English nation will not escape trouble and expense. (fn. 1)
I have granted leave for the English ship, (fn. 2) which recently brought hither the wife of the ambassador, to be hired and to lade the goods from the wreck at Gallipoli, in conformity with the state's instructions. The cottimo alone will be paid here, although the master of the ship answers for the English one, but not the merchants. The other one is lading for Venice, not only goods for Turks, Jews and Greeks, but for Englishmen also, according to the information supplied to me.
Ortacchivi on the shores of the channel of the Black Sea, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
485. ANZOLO CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Bethune has word that Carlisle has left Venice and is going to Turin for a short stay, and will then return in haste to England, being summoned by the king after Buckingham's death, which is no longer in doubt. Thus the ambassador is greatly relieved with respect to his suspicion of the negotiations of this minister for a union between his king and the Spaniards. He remarked that now the favourite was dead, who smoothed the way for it, ways and means for establishing it would be cut away.
Rome, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
486. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They are somewhat anxious about the fleet since they heard from Corunna that 50 or 60 sail had been sighted. These are believed to be English, though it is not known for certain in which direction they were going. It is thought to be La Rochelle, but they cannot help fearing some other plan.
Madrid, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
487. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
General Tilly writes that he suspects, and there are some indications, that if the English fleet cannot arrive in time for the September spring tides, and as it is difficult to make a diversion in any other part of France, which is all in arms, it will go to succour Denmark and Sweden. Accordingly he will keep on the alert, keeping up a good understanding with General Wallenstein, who also is showing his usual diligence for the good defence of the positions on the coast.
Glustat holds out valiantly, and the defenders inflict loss on the imperialists by frequent sallies. The capture of the place becomes more and more difficult, as it is very well garrisoned and provisioned, and they cannot cut off relief from the sea.
Vienna, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian; copy.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri,
Venetian
Archives.
488. GIROLAMO CAVAZZA, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Count of Gazolo, who went to pay the respects of the Duke of Mantua to France and England, was stopped by the Most Christian on the ground that it is not becoming for a prince to send an embassy to one with whom he is at open enmity. It now seems that France is willing for him to fulfil his mission, and that the duke shall send him orders to co-operate with your Serenity's ambassador to bring about a reconciliation between the two crowns, at the same time representing the need of his Highness for assistance.
Zurich, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Brescia.
Venetian
Archives.
489. FRANCESCO ZEN, Podestà, and ZORZI BADOER, Captain of Brescia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On Wednesday evening at the second hour the Earl of Carlisle arrived at Desenzano with two other English ambassadors. They were well lodged there by two gentlemen appointed by us, in the houses of D. Geronimo Moronato and D. Giosef Andreis, who readily consented. The rest of the suite went to the inns. They stayed to dinner on Thursday in the same place and arrived here late. I, the captain, received them at the gate, with a good escort of cavalry and a number of coaches, while I, the podestà, received them at the foot of the palace staircase, assisted by leading citizens. The leading men were divided among our rooms, the rest sleeping in the house of the Marquis Ghirardo Martinengo and some in the bishop's palace. The common people had their food and lodging at an inn, upon terms more favourable than could be managed in any other way. On their arrival the tables were prepared and food ready in the captain's palace; so the ambassadors sat down at the sixth hour of the night with six others at the first table; twelve sitting at the second at the same time, and those who had served us at the first, at the third. In the rooms of me, the podestà, ate the wife of the ambassador returning from Constantinople, Carlisle's son and four others, and his two damsels apart. They ate for about three hours, being abundantly supplied with exquisite and delicate food. They then withdrew to their rooms and spent the whole night, one may say, over good fires, with tobacco and wines, which they asked for and received in abundance. Thus yesterday morning before dawn they asked for and received muscat wine and other.
At the 13th hour, accompanied by both of us to the gate, and by two leading cavaliers beyond, they proceeded with six coaches to Palazzolo, where we had arranged for their board and lodging in the house of Sig. Duranti for the first tables and at an inn for the others. They went on to Bergamo, where we have advised the Rectors.
The numbers of the company were 120. The ambassadors, jointly and severally, declared that they had received more than they could desire in accommodation and honours and declared they would proclaim everywhere the treatment they had enjoyed throughout the republic's dominions. Considering the shortness of the notice, we left nothing undone to afford them satisfaction, though within the limits of our instructions. We will send the account of the expenses. Everything was done by trustworthy persons and so every possible saving was made consonant with the dignity of the state.
Brescia, the 14th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
490. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Fargis reached the camp from Spain the day before yesterday. A single interview which he has had with the cardinal has effected more than all the remonstrances of the foreign ministers. He did no more than recount his last interview with Olivares, in which the count broke out into open protests and threats against France. They had not been wanting in the slightest in what had been arranged for assisting France with a certain number of ships against the Rochellese, and in collecting a fleet for a joint attack with her against England or Ireland, but he found that France had changed her principles and no longer wished for their help against the English, but wanted to meddle in Italy, where they had no concern whatever. Accordingly Spain had reconsidered the position and would make peace with England, as she had the power to do, while she would make France feel the mischief which she had in her vitals.
This way of speaking made the cardinal's blood boil, and he forthwith decided to put the Marshal of Coure at the head of a force for Italy.
Niort, the 15th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
491. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Contarini has drawn up nine articles for the peace with England, so my courier reports, who returned from England four days ago. If I had more confidence in the cardinal I should expect some good, and should look for the conclusion soon, but as it is I do not know what to expect. The cardinal and I have agreed on practically all the articles. There is only one in which there is any discrepancy from what they want in England, because it is not possible to do otherwise, and so I feel sure that Contarini will overcome this difficulty. I have brought the cardinal so far that I am only afraid that he will cut off something that he has granted, more than I hope for further advance. The difficulty is over the queen's household, which by the marriage agreement should consist of 200 French. Bassompierre in his treaty reduced this large number to a small one, arguing like a wise man that so many foreigners of an alien faith could not be welcome in a Court where they claimed a thousand liberties. Bassompierre's treaty, approved in England, was rejected here. This was not because it was not advantageous to France, but because the cardinal considered his private passions more than interests of state and did all in his power that the treaty should get no commendation and its author no recognition. The cardinal being thus committed before the king and the world, by refusing that treaty because he wanted a better one, what more reasonable offer could be made than to agree that the number arranged by Bassompierre should be increased by six persons only? If the English object to this we must believe that they care little for the peace or for what is right and proper, as their contention is invalid that there are no French serving their princesses in Spain or Piedmont, because those marriages were made without that condition, the difference being because of religion. If they say that war breaks treaties, we may retort that peace restores them. If this point is overcome all the rest is settled; as although there are some further claims on both sides I feel sure that a successful issue will be reached if both move with willing feet in this affair. England wants the internal peace of France to follow the other. France also desires this and will certainly secure it, provided this amounts to no more than a pious wish and friendly counsel, and that Rohan and the Huguenots seek it and behave in a proper manner towards their sovereign. When La Rochelle has fallen the king will not want to alter the affairs of the religion, or make any move against Montauban and their other towns, provided they abstain from their usual attitude of rebellion. The cardinal told me that he desired an accommodation with Rohan. I do not know what to believe and dare not promise myself that this is not one of his usual tricks, possibly in order to make me insist the more, when I write to England, on their good disposition here. He has too many subtleties and the light of truth in his mouth is subordinate to a thousand mists and shadows.
In spite of this I seized the opportunity and told him that once this business of La Rochelle is settled, which cannot last very long, the king should publish an edict of general amnesty. He liked the idea and spoke very favourably to me. I fancy, however, that for the satisfaction of the queen mother, who seems jealous about it, he keenly desires the reunion of the two crowns, so that before matters have gone too far the parties may be more sure of each other by the intervention of the proper means. This, besides the article, is the difficulty caused by the English. The French on their side insist on two points, which seem reasonable: First, immediate peace, and, second, that England shall be the first to speak of it, by sending some one here on purpose, as she was the first to attack. Moreover, if England is now sending to Spain for peace, why should she not do the same with France, from whom alone she can hope for some reparation for the numerous offences received from the Austrians. Accordingly they would like, under the pretext of the queen there sending to her mother, the English should send some one of mediocre condition. The French would immediately respond, and thus should have full powers to treat and conclude, but so that while they arranged essential matters, the pomp and show should be reserved for ambassadors extraordinary from both sides, to be persons of high rank, for greater decorum. The French are also right in wanting peace immediately. They contend that while England, either by chance or art, is treating this affair in two places they do not want the Spaniards and English to injure their interests by delay, as one side may relax its rigour towards the other in order to prevent the union of these two crowns, from which they know how much they have to fear, or the English may make peace with Spain in the middle of the negotiations, leaving France deluded, a risk they are unwilling to run here.
If then, the cardinal concludes, the English are as well disposed as they seem, the French may always expect a response for the completion of the affair, which has now got so far that it requires no more consultations but to put in practice what has been discussed. We are practically agreed upon the merits, we are now only considering the procedure. That the Queen of England shall send to her mother, with whom there is no occasion to stand upon punctilio; that I promise this, that 24 hours afterwards we send some one of ours, and thus this last will be in a position, if he wishes, to come back with complete satisfaction.
As I was unwilling to see so great a good and Contarini's labours thrown away because of the vanity of this pretended precedence, and because I thought they might make more of it in England than the occasion warranted, I suggested another way to the cardinal which occurred to me at the moment, to which he finally agreed. That if the English did not think it proper to treat except with authority, then the queen should send one of her people to her mother, and in that case they should send from here some one suitable from their army, or should send full powers to one or more of the commanders there, and so France would show the world her excellent disposition towards an accommodation with England, and even with the armed enemy in sight of her king, she would agree to treat and conclude a good peace at once, as she did not desire delay. We left it at this. The greatest events often depend upon very small things, and this is one of them. We must hope for the best as reason tells me so. If the English object it will be because they do not recognise their own advantage or else do not want peace.
I have sent all this to Contarini in England, to whose abilities the completion of the work is commended.
Niort, the 16th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
492. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear with regret that the Dutch ambassadors are greatly piqued because of the negotiations carried on by Contarini and myself for the peace. If they come back to the camp for this business alone I will keep up the usual confidential relations and, provided the result is attained, others can have the glory. It is true that the cardinal told me frankly the other day that he did not want any foreign ministers but those of the republic to meddle in the matter. The progress of the negotiations for a truce between the United Provinces and Spain makes the cardinal anxious.
It seems now that the pope of these parts directs his efforts to three ends. France is to occupy a place in Piedmont to contain the Spaniards and the duke and to secure a permanent way into Italy. France must prevent the truce between the Spaniards and the Dutch, and once the peace between these two crowns is made France shall persuade England to send her forces, not to be wasted in Denmark, with little advantage to the others and no hurt to the Spaniards, but to strike Spain unexpectedly at the heart, a blow which would force them to collect their strength from every quarter.
Niort, the 16th October, 1628.
Postscript.—As I was closing the packet a gentleman of the Princess of Conti, sent by the king to the queen mother, has told me that Montagu, who was on the English fleet, came ashore yesterday with leave, under pretext of visiting the Duke of Chevreuse. Yesterday the duke had a long conversation with the cardinal about the peace. He could not give me any further particulars. It may be nothing but listening and reporting, especially as the commander of the fleet has no authority to treat or to conclude.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
493. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Scaglia said a great deal about English affairs and the proposals of the Venetian ambassadors for an adjustment. He said that before he left England Buckingham had mentioned it to him. He seems very anxious that his master shall bring about this reconciliation, so as to turn it to account. He said the King of England had declared that he did not wish it in other hands. From the abbot's conversation I gathered that he did not consider the adjustment impossible. He also pretended that the good union which the Duke of Savoy is making with France will interrupt the dealings between the English and the Spaniards, and remarked that although Porter had gone to Spain they might do some good.
Scaglia is very crafty and alert. He knows how to speak for his master's advantage. He is with the duke at all hours and his Highness seems very pleased with him.
Turin, the 16th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Ceffalonia.
Venetian
Archives.
494. FRANCESCO PIERO MALIPIERO, Venetian Proveditore of Cephalonia, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have kept the deposit of the 4,500 ryals of the English, to remain undisturbed until the cause is decided. In addition to this there are 20,247 ducats in the chamber, that sum not having yet come from the English ships, which usually comes for lading the currants. Only three have arrived, but we are daily expecting their fleet, and when it arrives it will supply a good sum of money for all public requirements.
Cephalonia, the 6th October, 1628, old style.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Cl. vii.
Cod. 1927.
Bibl. S.
Marco.
495. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to ALVISE CONTARINI, his colleague in England.
I send back my courier Giacomo Bibonetto with the enclosed. Things seem to have a good start and if the devil does not put his tail in I am hopeful, but we must act quickly and time is pressing. Bibonetto told me that he had been robbed when crossing the sea. My steward at Paris may send you a letter of the queen mother, as I have ordered him to go to the Louvre in passing to inform her and to see if she will answer the queen, her daughter.
I beg you to send me certain great books for the nuncio, which he wants for Cardinal Barberino. I also ask you as a favour to send me a dozen of the best spectacles made in London, for the age between 40 and 60, and a pair of the finest hose to be found, of the colour they call miniver, to match this silk.
Niort, the 16th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Napoli.
Venetian
Archives.
496. VALERIO ANTELMI, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spanish galleys at Evizza have taken four English and Dutch ships, which had gone there to lade salt.
Three English bertons in the waters of Crete have taken two French tartane laden with sugar, and the men have arrived at Naples from Messina.
Naples, the 17th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 19.
Senato,
Secreta,
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
497. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Earl of Carlisle arrived yesterday. The duke's coaches met him twelve miles out, a remarkable honour. He saw the duke this morning. This evening, as usual, he forestalled my visit, when I thought he was expecting visits from the princes, and intended to see him to-morrow. He entered the embassy unexpectedly with Sir [Isaac] Wake. They both expressed the earl's indebtedness to the republic, which had treated him like a king, their very words. He would speak of nothing but the munificence of the state, so I see he is grateful and in all his actions he shows great nobility. They are very anxious to hear about the fleet and apparently fear the fall of La Rochelle.
Turin, the 19th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
498. To the Ambassador Soranzo at the Hague, and the like to the Ambassador in England.
The Duke of Mantua, being hard pressed by arms on one side and by the imperial commissioner on the other, has expressed his agreement to the deposit, upon conditions. We also hear that the Spaniards have urged Savoy to do the same, and they also will deposit what they hold of the Monferrat in order to force the Duke of Mantua to an effective deposit of Casale and the rest, while they and Savoy will be able to do as they please, with the determination not to hand over anything on their side. This means stealing a greater advantage under cover of negotiation than by war itself, and reduces this province to a worse condition than ever.
Ayes, 74.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
499. To the Ambassador Contarini in England.
We have your letters of the 2nd to the 26th September in one batch. We desire to express the satisfaction of the Senate with your vigilance in finding out what is taking place, your opportune offices, your keeping Zorzi well informed and in overcoming the great difficulties in sending letters, to which we must postpone our reply until next week, as there has not been time to decipher them all. You were especially well advised to deal with the king, seeing the changes in management which may ensue, and your following his Majesty wherever he may go, especially to Scotland, although at great personal inconvenience. We shall see that you have a return for all this. We note your prudent insistence about Digby, who continues his evil courses, as you will see by the letters from Crete sent you last week, and as you will also see from the enclosed letters of our Proveditore General Molino. Strong steps are necessary to put a stop to such incidents once and for all. He even went so far as to anchor in the port of Zante, the armed ships with him, counting those already there, amounting to thirteen vessels, while eight others were at hand. Thus we see no results from the commissions sent to the Ambassador Wake. Our hopes are further prejudiced by his departure with the Earl of Carlisle.
We have voted 300 ducats to you for couriers and the carriage of letters, as you ask. They will be paid to your agents.
That 300 ducats of mint money be paid to the representatives of Alvise Contarini, ambassador in England, for couriers and the carrying of letters, for which he shall render account in the usual way.
Ayes, 74.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Wyche gives only a short account of this in his despatch of the 14th Nov. o.s. S.P. Foreign, Turkey.
2 The Elizabeth and Margaret. See pages 181, 229, above.