Venice
October 1628, 21-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1916

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354-368

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'Venice: October 1628, 21-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 21: 1628-1629 (1916), pp. 354-368. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89203 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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October 1628

Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
500. To the Ambassador Zorzi in France.
With regard to the negotiations between the two crowns, we consider it a good sign that the cardinal wants you near him. You will advise us as frequently as possible and in every despatch give us a clear account of the state of these negotiations. You must never let them drop, whatever may happen, either to La Rochelle or to the fleet.
Scaglia at Turin thinks that the union between Savoy and France will interrupt the dealings between England and the Spaniards, but he says that as Porter has gone to Spain he may do some good.
Ayes, 90.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
501. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
As I advised last week, Montagu came on shore from the English fleet, having obtained leave without difficulty. The Duke of Chevreuse has contrived to introduce him to the cardinal, who received him privately, but in very friendly fashion. One who was present told me the substance of the conversation. He desired to see the two crowns at peace again; he was equally indebted to both countries, and of his own accord, without the participation of his master, he wished to see if some middle term could not be reached. He could assure France that his king was most eager for peace in order to make war on the Austrians in Germany, without distractions elsewhere. If the Most Christian would leave La Rochelle at liberty and the Huguenots at quiet, they would immediately see the proofs of this, with great advantage to the public interests, not only from a good understanding between the two crowns, but from England declaring that she would always second the inclinations of this crown, so that they might obtain by favour what might not be due in strict justice. He would not speak of compacts and agreements, but only urge the cardinal to reflect upon the hurt done by the rupture and the benefits to be secured by peace and the blame the ministers of the two crowns would incur if such a necessary reunion was not arrived at through their fault.
I hear the cardinal told him that it was easy to establish a good peace as the parties were excellently disposed; they only had to settle what was proper and reasonable. He asked if it was reasonable that England should meddle with the Huguenots when the French did not interfere with the English Catholics. Something then slipped out about agreements and compacts, much more calculated to generate suspicion than to lead to the bringing of papers. The cardinal said that although France did not admit any obligation in this respect, yet if England presented any he would undertake to do his part and to appeal to the king. That the contest should be decided by words only would never be admitted in the market-place. They must do so in the ships at sea, where the wind and air might decide it. It was therefore decided that the English should come with papers to prove their claims; the only means of reconciling the two crowns was for them to think no more about La Rochelle, which was already taken, or of the Huguenots, who were also lost, if they did not keep within bounds. He added that the punishment of the town was not for religion but for rebellion. He also assured him that out of special regard for the King of England no other place or person of that party should suffer in person, goods or privileges, provided they did not abuse the royal favour and continue in their errors. Here Montagu, who had nothing to say in reply, took leave of the cardinal, first asking for an escort to take him safely to St. Malo, from whence he proposed to sail for England, not only to report to his king the real state of affairs, and the views here about the peace, but to perform all possible offices in order to convert past differences into friendship like lovers' quarrels. He assured the cardinal that he would return in a fortnight at latest with some not unfavourable solution, unless the sea hindered his passage. Accordingly the cardinal assigned la Rame, or Meos as they call him, for his guard, to take him to Britanny.
I have informed Contarini of all this, and through his efforts or this impulse here we may trust that this important affair will terminate speedily and happily.
Novaglie, the 21st October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
502. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A courier arrived yesterday from France. He went straight to the Escurial. They have published nothing, but I hear that a large fleet of the English has appeared off La Rochelle to attempt its relief. There is talk of some action, but not confirmed. From the silence it is probable that the English have been repulsed.
I hear that Don Antonio di Ochendo has sailed from Lisbon with a large number of vessels to meet the fleet, and that secret orders have been sent to him to be opened in a certain port. He may have instructions to attack the Dutch, who have set foot in India, although the weakness of the naval force makes this unlikely. It is more probable that they have some fear of the English, who in spite of their good disposition towards the Spaniards would not lose an opportunity of capturing the treasure fleet if one occurred.
Madrid, the 21st October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
503. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Saxony is treating for the peace with Denmark, and his deputies will soon be at Lubeck to meet those of Tilly and Wallenstein, and arrange the terms, although some are of opinion that if the English fleet really cannot arrive in time to relieve La Rochelle and goes to the assistance of that monarch, it might attempt to land forces on the mainland, through a good understanding with the King of Sweden. However, this would prove difficult at present, as all the emperor's armies are united and masters of all the positions which command the coast.
Vienna, the 21st October, 1628.
[Italian; copy.]
Oct. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
504. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We hear from France that the Count of Moretta left La Rochelle when the English fleet appeared. Apparently they did not want anyone there who might not be altogether friendly.
I have some indication that they are upset about the negotiations of the ambassadors of the republic for the reconciliation of France and England. His Highness gives frequent audiences to the English ambassadors.
Father Sansi of the Oratory is here. They say he wanted to introduce his order into Savoy. He also wished to have the position of confessor to Madame, but the English ambassadors told his Highness of his evil offices with the Queen of England and they have strongly persuaded the duke not to let him live at this Court.
Turin, the 22nd October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23. Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
505. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
This is the fifth week since the succour for Rochelle put to sea. On the 30th September last it arrived in sight of Plom, a village at a little distance from Fort St. Louis. Some ships are said to have taken possession of the lighthouse at the mouth of the Garonne, to have a good sea view. On the 12th October was the high tide of the full moon, which changed ten days ago, yet nothing is heard either of attemps or progress, which causes astonishment and alarm. Advices are expected every moment. The king is most anxious about this and keeps all other business in suspense. I imagine that you will know the issue before we do, as there does not seem to be so much punctuality about advices as the matter requires.
The courier whom I sent back to Zorzi will have arrived many days ago. The governor of Calais has answered my letters, making very great offers. This is not surprising, as this war diminishes his profits more than those of any other official, and he wishes for peace. I await the return with curiosity, in order to advance the negotiation, if the French desire it, and meanwhile I prepare the ground.
I mentioned that the Earl of Carlisle had been allowed to come home, and now an express has been sent to him with orders to do so. It is possible that he himself desired it, as during these changes in the Court it is not advantageous for him to be at a distance. The Dutch ambassadors tell me that he complained grievously to their colleague at Venice, because of the very serious complaints made by them and the States to the king by reason of his visits to the infanta, adding that he did not expect to be so ill treated by them or distrusted, while those offices had compelled the king to declare that what took place was contrary to his will and commissions disconcerting all his schemes on that journey. He may have been piqued by some reproof transmitted hence on that account. His being recalled before settling anything and the complaints of the Dutch prove very clearly that there was no business in view, the sole object being to cause suspicion and gratify private passions, as I have always said. I cannot bring myself to believe anything else, although I am still in the dark about his negotiations at Venice, as I have received no letters since those of the 7th September. From my observations I would almost venture to prophecy that he will have discoursed more than would have been beneficial for the common cause touching Denmark, the Northern League and similar things, about what is easy or possible to accomplish in the present state of affairs.
I believe I have discovered the truth about the treaties of Brussels and peace of Spain, namely, that negotiations have long been on foot through Rubens and Gerbier, to make either side speak about their inclination for peace. The Spaniards maintained that the one who first broke ought to make the first advances. Savoy offered himself as mediator for the adjustment, but the Spaniards always insisted that they must be approached. So Buckingham determined to send Porter, and Scaglia laboured, conjointly with him, to obtain the king's consent, and from this proceeded the declaration transmitted to the Hague. Olivares, on the other hand, assured Buckingham by letter that whoever went would be received willingly, with fair hope of adjustment. Thereupon Porter went, and we must wait for what he may bring back. Nothing is known since his departure from Brussels. Unless the Spaniards masticate the morsel for him, he is not the man to know how to swallow it for himself, and I no longer fear their deceiving him, as the Council at present will not be of Buckingham's humour. To comply with his interests it adapted itself to anything. Despite all this, reports of a long truce circulate among the merchants, with the opinion that the Spaniards will give England good satisfaction. In that case Italy must be prepared, as the whole game will be played on her chess-board. Meanwhile I can venture to assert that this is the true picture of the existing schemes. I will keep on the watch for further developments.
The king has prorogued the meeting of parliament from the 20th inst. to the 20th January, old style. The reasons are evident, as the payment of the last five subsidies will not be completed until next March, and it is not usual to make fresh demands until the preceding ones have been paid. So the king could hope for nothing during the interval from parliament, unless he wished to advance the prerogatives of the Crown, and he could do so now more easily, as owing to the duke's death affairs at home are in confusion and those abroad inspire doubt of what may ensue. On both heads there would be risk of the parliament advancing, to the prejudice of the royal authority, and I observe that the distrust between the king and the people is not entirely eradicated, and if it continues it will compel his Majesty to make peace abroad, both with France and with Spain, in order not to have need of money, and consequently of his subjects, especially as the country is very weary of the war, from the loss of trade, or rather from its total destruction.
The king continues to confer favours on Buckingham's family more than ever. To his sister he has confirmed a number of grants, increasing her profits. He visits the duke's widow constantly, to alleviate her sorrow, promising his assistance. He has sent to the Marquis of Hamilton in Scotland to come and marry Buckingham's niece, who was promised to him, but whom he detests, and it is not known what he will decide. To the attendants of the deceased he has assigned many thousands of pounds sterling for their discharge, and meanwhile he maintains them at his own charge. Nothing remains but to punish the assassin. Nothing more is said of him and he has been examined very seldom. This causes comment, but in the end he will be put to death as he deserves.
The gentleman from Lorraine has gone back and I do not hear of any fresh particulars about his negotiations. Every one assures me that they were only complimentary, and to investigate what is passing here since the duke's death. He was presented with a jewel.
The Viceroy of Ireland writes that he has detected a conspiracy formed by the natives with the Spaniards, and he has already imprisoned 140 of the ringleaders, and continues to do so. It is supposed that the Viceroy himself devised this invention in order to profit by the property of the culprits. Some evidence for this exists, and the king has sent an express ordering the Viceroy to cease the prosecution and that the process be made over to the Chancellor of Ireland. The affair is a delicate one, and the result must put either the viceroy or the people in bad odour. (fn. 1)
In Ireland also three richly laden ships from the Indies have arrived for the English, and twenty Dunkirk vessels are sailing towards those parts. The Indiamen will not put to sea without convoy, and this cannot be given until after the return of the fleet. Indeed, for the coast defence of these realms, which are quite defenceless, the Dutch have been asked to make their ships cruise off them, and to bring Morgan's troops towards Gluckstadt; the States have also been asked to help the English with their naval forces.
A Polish captain who went out of Crempe (fn. 2) has come hither through Holland, and returned immediately to re-enter that fortress. He was sent to learn what help the besieged can expect hence, and when. He stated positively that if help does not come before winter they will be compelled to surrender.
The Ambassador Rosencranz has come to Court and seen the king and the four commissioners appointed him. I only hear of 1,200 recruits to fill up Morgan's regiment in Holland. The men will soon be ready, but I do not know if it will be the same with the money for the transport, provisions and clothing. It is true they promise him all the men on board the fleet on its return, but God knows in what state and when they will arrive. He also sees the difficulty of doing any good before the winter, and so came to me in great distress, anticipating the loss of that fortress which he holds in great account, not only as the key to the capital fortress, which is only three miles away, but because in Crempe there is the depot of arms, cannon and military stores of the entire territory of Holstein, sufficient to keep 30,000 men in the field a whole year. If these supplies fall into the hands of the Imperialists it would be a most important acquisition for them. Rosencranz calculates that in Gluckstadt there is a garrison of 4,000 men, well paid with the contributions from the States. Owing to the convenience of the sea they have a constant supply of provisions. Six thousand men at least would be required to open communications with Crempe, and that before the winter, but I see it will be difficult to obtain them.
Things move slowly. Since the duke's death the king remains in suspense. One must suppose either that his head is not capable of business or is not inclined to it. He shows himself more confused than resolute (il re doppo la morte del Duca sta sospeso bisogna credere che la sua testa non sia o capace o inclinata al negocio. Si scuopri piu confuso che risoluto). I understand that in the last extremity the governor of Crempe has been advised to undermine the whole city with the abundant store of powder there, and blow it up, rather than let it fall into the hands of the enemy, the nearness of Gluckstadt enabling the garrison to save themselves. For the rest, as there is no treaty as yet between Denmark and the emperor, Wallenstein is doing his utmost to gain the Hanse towns, which after their diet sent him a solemn deputation, thinking they might make an agreement. That would be of very evil omen for Italy.
In this connection I add a circumstance of importance, of which I believe Wake has written, namely that the emperor, with very great secrecy, has either given or promised the Grand Duke the investiture of the dominions of the Duke of Urbino, in the event of the old duke's death and if the affair of Italy become embroiled. You will know better than I if it is true. At any rate, very intelligent persons here prognosticate it and think it prudent to anticipate it, because the minds of a young prince and of women are easily flattered by enlargement of their dominion, especially where there is some claim, and it serves the purpose of the Austrians to keep the Italian princes divided, for the better advancement of their own projects, which now seem all directed towards that province.
Kingston, the 23rd October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
506. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I blush that to make a second letter I must write of the third pretty Moorish dance (piacevole moresca) made by the English. This morning with a great clamour of drums and trumpets, at the usual hour, with wind and tide, they acted as usual, without doing any more than before. They fired quite 3,000 or 4,000 shots, without doing any harm. The six fire ships sent forward were made useless by the shallops, much to the delight of the spectators. I was unable to arrive in time myself, despite every effort. I am told that the small barques behaved admirably, and it was a marvel that all came off safe, as after they had rendered those machines innocuous they all formed in battle array and went within musket shot of the English fleet, and, although in a tempest of shot, they would not retire until the English had done the same. This night in a place near the sea well away from the others and some distance from the corps de garde, the English, or some say the French refugees, landed furtively and wantonly burned some houses where they kept grain for the cavalry. The damage done is insignificant, but from it the French conclude that if their courage is scanty their malevolence is great. They think it the more strange because it is the English who have asked for peace, through Montagu, and therefore they ought to be the more careful. They are not at all astonished at the behaviour of the English fleet this morning, but think it acted so feebly to encourage the Rochellese, who have grown suspicious about the negotiations, and may think of surrendering on that account, and so the English wished to give them to understand that they are nothing but discussions, and that they will not come to terms without them, and they are waiting for the return of Montagu with orders from their master.
I have not yet been able to speak to the king, in spite of all my efforts. I followed him to Sorgeres, but he sent me word to wait for him at Etre.
Nuaglie, the 23rd October, 1628.
Postscript.—Since writing the above, I hear on good authority that the French exiles in the English fleet have approached Bassompierre to obtain pardon for them, and he has gone to the king about it. They offer to go and serve where his Majesty wishes. They are men of no great quality, but excellent service; that Soubise and La Valle, eminent among them, apparently do not wish to separate themselves from the negotiations of the crowns.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati,
Venetian
Archives.
507. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters have arrived here from Basel relating that the courier of England sent to the Earl of Carlisle with the news of Buckingham's death found Scaglia, Porter and Rubens in that town. He told them the news, which they received with exclamations and tears, as they concluded that the loss of the duke involved the dropping of all the negotiations begun. It is confirmed that these were all directed towards an accommodation with the Spaniards.
The Hague, the 23rd October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
508. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Wake has paid me a special call. He seemed to have no news about their fleet. He told me he considered friendship between his king and France was impossible while the French only considered the interests of their own kingdom. He told me that Carlisle wanted to enter upon further particulars at Venice, but feeling that your Serenity found no other motive for good than the reconciliation of the crowns, to which they pretend that the French give no occasion, Carlisle thought he might show the Senate that possibly without France they might do something for the cause. He suggested this in the Collegio, but they would not listen, and so he could not go on. He added that Carlisle certainly has great authority in his negotiations and commissions from the king, but he will use them only for good. On starting he went to the States, in order to assure them that England would never do anything prejudicial to their friendship or without letting them know. He then went to the Duke of Lorraine, who was considered very friendly to England and his Majesty's friend. At Brussels he had no negotiations, and here in Savoy they only wanted to see the duke's present condition. When Carlisle left England it was not known who was a Spaniard and who was not.
He spoke to me confidentially, to all appearance, but I find nothing to support what he says about the negotiations. He further told me that the Secretary Conway, who is his father-in-law, had informed him of the negotiations of the Venetian ambassadors, but he did not find that the Ambassador Zorzi had any authority from the King of France.
Wake also spoke enthusiastically of the munificence of the republic, and showed an entire cordiality and friendliness towards your Serenity and your Excellencies, and his appreciation of the honour of serving in that embassy, saying that he was very happy at Venice. He asked me to remind you of his appeal for Count Gio. Battista Provaglio, about which he is very eager, saying that when he left you expressed your good intentions.
Turin, the 23rd October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
509. To the King of Great Britain.
The republic opens its heart to your Majesty and expresses its thanks for the confidence you have shown, showing your appreciation of the sincerity of our affection, by accepting the services of our Ambassador Contarini. The business is as great as the honour which we derive from it, and can only be rendered greater by a successful issue, for the public welfare and the satisfaction and prosperity of your Majesty.
Ayes, 87.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
510. To the Ambassador Contarini in England.
You have shown great ability and prudence in the most important affair of the peace between the two crowns. The appreciation of the Senate will uphold you. The affair could not be better managed or more to our satisfaction. While we appreciate the honour done to the republic and you by that monarch, we approve of your idea of writing to him. We send a copy of our letter, so that you may perform your offices in conformity. We leave the rest to your prudence to be guided by events, and what happens to the fleet and to La Rochelle, and according to the inclinations and overtures of the two crowns, in order to realise our hopes by success, since the public welfare is deeply interested and the business is the greatest which has been on hand in the world for a long time.
You will also perform suitable offices with the queen in our name. It was a most happy idea of yours to secure the advantage of her offices, and we attach the highest importance to the merry spirit and readiness with which she undertook to speak to the king, doing it in such an excellent way, obtaining a firm assurance from his Majesty that he will never break the promises made to her or to you, and in having also written letters to the queen mother, which in any case will serve as good capital for our Ambassador Zorzi.
We repeat that you must not relax your efforts in this work, so that the thread of the negotiations may not break or escape from your hands by some accident.
You will direct the Secretary Augustini to show where the copies of letters or papers which are sent are to be inserted, as this will facilitate the reading in the right order of these well managed negotiations.
Ayes, 87.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
511. To the Ambassador Contarini in England.
We have already written about Digby's ships, and that Wake has left with Carlisle, and they are now at the Court of Savoy. You have also heard of Digby's further operations. We desire you to obtain a repetition of the most vigorous orders possible, so that they may reach Wake on his return to this city, and have more effect than the last ones.
We approve of your diligence in finding out all about the negotiations with Spain. We need not urge you to persevere, as you know the importance of those proceedings. We hear from Spain that the ambassador extraordinary of Lorraine is going to negotiate peace between that Crown and England, although that ambassador said he was only going about the claims of the Duchess to Mantua and Monferrat, and her own offers to yield these to the Catholic King. We also hear from the same quarter that the Spaniards showed a readiness to conclude a treaty with England, but if they arrange a truce with the Dutch they will withdraw everything with the others. This will serve for information.
Meanwhile the troubles in Italy do not cease, owing to the declarations of Mantua to obey the emperor, since the Spaniards would not permit Cæsar's ensigns to enter Casale. Savoy also refuses to deposit what he holds of the Monferrat.
The Earl of Carlisle, on reaching Turin, Forestalled our Ambassador Corner, and called on him unexpectedly with Wake. He expressed his singular appreciation of the honours done to him by the republic, as you will see by the enclosed copy, which you will use, when you have an opportunity, in order to encourage the good opinion of our affection which exists in England.
Ayes, 87.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
512. To the Ambassador in France.
The courier Lorenzo Basso reached us on the 24th inst. with your letters from the 28th September to the 7th October. You will have heard from Contarini what he has done in the negotiations. You will continue to progress with them, profiting by the good will expressed by the cardinal and the declarations of the Most Christian in order to bring matters to the desired state, as England has already declared as fully as possible. You will try your hardest for this, no matter what happens to the fleet and La Rochelle, and you must not in any case a bandon the negotiations or despair of the peace, as if La Rochelle is succoured, peace will become more desirable to the French, and if it is not, or falls, the Most Christian should incline to peace, with greater reputation. Although their climate makes them change their minds easily, yet this must not make us despair in negotiating with them and we must even try to profit by their capriciousness by seizing on every opportunity as it may happen that they will desire to-morrow what they scorn to-day, and by seizing the opportunity we may strike the blow desired. You will aim at keeping them to a good point so that they may have no chance of unsaying it or withdrawing. We rely upon your prudence and ability, of which you have given such proof, and need only express the satisfaction of the republic with what you have already done in the matter. You will maintain a perfect understanding with the Ambassador Contarini in England, and keep us fully advised.
Ayes, 87.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
513. To the Ambassador Soranzo at the Hague.
There is some idea that the ambassador extraordinary of Lorraine may be negotiating a truce between the States and Spain. The Ambassador Fargis wrote to the Most Christian to induce him to thwart this. We also hear from England that the king there will make a fresh declaration to the Dutch ambassadors, so that they may not conclude anything on the strength of any declaration that might be made, possibly in order to alarm the French, while Buckingham was alive. In addition, besides the return of Porter's brother to England, Porter himself was going with a gentleman of the infanta to the Court of Spain. It is to be noted, however, that when Porter left Brussels he had not heard of Buckingham's death, so he was only going on the strength of his old commissions.
In a matter of so much importance you will continue to apply every diligence to find out the state of these negotiations since the duke's death.
Ayes, 87.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
514. To the Proveditore of Zante.
We regret the news you send about the damage done by corsairs and about armed ships entering the port in great numbers, but most of all the attacks on shipping. You acted prudently in speaking to the commanders so that they should abstain from hostile acts near ourislands. We hope the causes may be removed of the incidents which may occur if they remain longer in these waters. In any case we have decided to send to your castle 300 Italian infantry under two officers, who will be under your orders.
Ayes, 91.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
515. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The news is confirmed that the English have been repulsed by the French with the loss of some ships, and an attempt to land also ended in failure. Yet here they still cherish the hope that food may enter the place in some other way, with less noise, supplied by the French themselves.
I have discovered that the Secretary Cottington was to have come here by order of the King of England, and his passage was to have been at this very time when the fleet was off the coast of France. To this end they selected two or three ships to land the minister in a safe place. But the idea has died away since the death of the Duke of Buckingham. Don Antonio Porter, who is here, is waiting for instructions, and expects that new orders will reach him. Rubens continues his negotiations for a truce with the Dutch.
Madrid, the 26th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
516. GIACOMO BEMBO, Venetian Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We hear of no troubles in these waters at present; only that every one is afraid of being attacked by the English ships owing to their evil proceedings in claiming to overhaul every ship they meet and learn its cargo, causing no small terror and perturbation to the interested parties. I will take every step that I consider necessary for the service and satisfaction of your Serenity.
Zante, the 26th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
517. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The cardinal stopped me and said: Listen to me, I want you to know all so that you may write it to the republic. We will do everything possible with the pope. For the rest, once La Rochelle has fallen, which will be by to-morrow if not to-day, we are determined to succour the Duke of Mantua. I hope that through your manipulation we shall come to terms with the English. I shall be glad of this if only because their forces can be employed in Germany while France goes to Italy, and because we shall not have to guard ourselves on that side. We shall welcome peace, but we are not afraid of war; England cannot do us hurt enough to prevent us from carrying our arms elsewhere. Once these two points are settled and supposing that in consequence we are troubling the Spaniards in Milan and the English are doing the same in Denmark, it is also necessary to encourage the Dutch to war against them in Flanders. I have worked hard for this.
Niort, the 27th October, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
518. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In my audience of the Caimecam I said that the republic deserved well at their hands, and its ministers, as was well known, were working in the interests of this empire. I spoke of the incident in the port of Alexandretta, in opposing the violence of the English ships, which was so highly appreciated by the ministers at Aleppo, as was shown by the letters they wrote to our captains. He said that was the case and really seemed well impressed by all the actions of your Serenity's ministers.
The Vigne of Pera, the 28th October, 1628.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
519. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I went to audience of the duke yesterday. Among other things he said he only had old letters from the Count of Moretta, though he had some from Paris from his secretary Bianderat, who told him some of the English ships had suffered by the fire from the mole, but he had no news of any action at La Rochelle. He did not think any had taken place, because in that case the victorious party would have published the news. He said then that they might be in treaty for some accommodation between the two crowns. He said he understood that La Rochelle was on the point of falling.
The duke told me that he heard that the emperor's cavalry was being sent to Friuli towards Gradisca, and that the republic was strengthening itself on that frontier. I said that I had heard nothing about it. I believe this news was brought to him by the English ambassadors, who also told me that your Serenity had sent many infantry in that direction, as well as some guns.
Turin, the 29th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
520. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A special courier sent from Flanders by the Infanta Isabella has brought the king word that the Admiral of the English fleet has landed in France to treat with the ministers of the Most Christian about La Rochelle. This news is very distasteful to them here and they are afraid of what may be arranged. I fancy they have asked the king for the English who are in the place.
They are expecting the Abbot Scaglia at this Court. I have heard various opinions on the subject. Some say he will come with English ministers, others without them. Since Buckingham's death these reports have ceased, and others are heard, that severe laws have been promulgated against the Catholics in England, and they are dealing with them more rigorously. These last days they have held very long and serious consultations as to whether they should allow trade between the English and the Dutch and these realms in particular. It seems they agreed to a million or two of goods from those parts. This would amount to a tacit permission for any quantity. It has also been stated that this permission was obtained by a Jesuit, who received some 100,000 crowns for this.
Madrid, the 29th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
521. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
No change has been made in affairs connected with the English Court since the duke's death, and none can be expected with these or others, so long as the rupture between the two crowns lasts. Joachim is still here. He has not succeeded in obtaining his release from that charge, and so he will soon return to London.
Crempen is hard pressed and it is thought that it must have fallen by now. This will seriously prejudice the defence of Gluchstat, where Colonel Morgan is holding out with the few English who came out of Stadem and who certainly cannot number more than 800.
The Hague, the 30th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
522. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Letters of the 17th to the Ambassador Marini report the repulse of the English fleet at La Rochelle with the loss of many ships. They had suffered a severe defeat, but the remainder of the force had gathered at the Isle of Rè, possibly intending to land. The king's brother showed great gallantry. The rumour that the Duke of Rohan was going towards Bordeaux to assist an English landing proves false.
The English ambassadors here go about seeking information about their fleet and seem very sad at the news. I believe the Earl of Carlisle will soon leave for England, as he has sent away his horses. Gerbier is returning to England to-morrow by the posts, saying he is only going on his private affairs. They have had frequent audiences of the duke, but maintain the same reserve and secrecy, and nothing is said about their negotiations.
Turin, the 30th October, 1628.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
523. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear to-day on good authority that the Abbot Scaglia will soon proceed to Flanders to see the Infanta, and it is thought that he may go on to England. The reason for this journey would seem to be that if La Rochelle falls and the King of France makes some move against them here, the jealousy of the French may be roused again about a union with England and the duke with the Spaniards or else, if peace between France and England comes first, because the duke wishes to show that he had a share in it.
The English ambassadors here have remarked that their relations with France, with respect to peace or war, will depend upon circumstances, and I fully believe that their disasters may greatly change the course of events in the future.
Turin, the 30th October, 1628.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 31.
Cl. vii.
Cod. 1927.
Bibl. S. Marco.
524. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to ALVISE CONTARINI, his colleague in England.
The fall of La Rochelle may possibly balance the affairs of the world. His Majesty's guards entered yesterday. The English fleet saw the fall and has not moved from its original position; it is said to be waiting for Montagu.
The royal camp under La Rochelle, the 31st October, 1628.
Postscript.—We must not let Montagu prejudice the affair, and remember that our reputation is at stake. I hear that the Abbot Scaglia is very angry about this business, and he may try to persuade his Highness not to let the affair out of his hands and also perform evil offices in England. Now is the time for England to make the accommodation, without regard for their usual maxims, especially as the victory has been bloodless, and the refugees have been pardoned, to please their king.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 A reference to Lord Falkland's charges against the Sept of the Byrnes, which ultimately led to this deputy's recall in August, 1629. Cal. S.P. Ireland, 1625–32, pages xviii, 381, 382.
2 Colonel Thomas Ferens, who brought letters from the King of Denmark dated the 22nd August. S.P. Foreign, Denmark.