Venice
April 1629, 2-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1919

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1-15

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'Venice: April 1629, 2-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 1-15. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89247 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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April 1629

April 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
1. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Encloses the last of the two articles about the peace, sent by Contarini from England. Takes credit for success when a single false step with the cardinal would have upset everything and destroyed the work of many months. The cardinal will not consent to the renewal of the articles of marriage, but wants the word "observe," "maintain" or "confirm." This important business hangs on so slender a thread as this. The obstinacy of these nations has excluded reason, but Contarini's ability has secured a point which ought not to have been contested. Neither of them can do anything which the English do not instantly spoil. They are probably most eager for this peace, but they have already hindered it twice, first through Montagu's interference and then by suggesting to the cardinal the claims about Toiras's ship, which were already settled. The cardinal told him it was not right to make him lose this advantage if the English, in their impatience, have practically agreed to restore the ship by a secret article, the Danish ambassador, Tillieres, and a certain Friar Aston, (fn. 1) whom they sent here post, promising for them. Could anything more absurd be imagined. If he had allowed himself to be deceived, he would deserve punishment, but he ought not to be responsible for the faults of others. However, the matter is not utterly broken off, and he will not despair.
Susa, the 2nd April, 1629.
[Italian.]
April 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
2. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors extraordinary from England have reached the Hague. They made no progress with their business, as although liberal promises were given to help Denmark, the dissolution of parliament at their departure deprives them of all foundation. A recognition of their weakness there may induce the decisions that are feared here, seeing the strained relations with France.
Sir Henry Vane, sent from England to the Princess Palatine, has gone to find her, two days' journey away, where she is hunting. (fn. 2) These visits are acceptable, but supplies of money are more necessary. I gather he brings fresh assurances that they will not carry on the negotiations with Spain without letting her know and without providing for her interests. This is due to her recent remonstrances, which originated largely from my representations.
The Hague, the 2nd April, 1629.
[Italian.]
April 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
3. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
All the articles of the peace between France and England, are agreed, thank God, as I cannot think that everything will break down over a single word. The cardinal, who had more than one promise from the English about Toiras' ship, has at last agreed to keep his promise to me, after having kept me on tenterhooks three whole days.
I enclose two letters which I have written to England this evening. The first was written by arrangement with the cardinal, who may have feared that I might not urge Contarini to make fresh demands about the ship. The other was to remove difficulties. I cannot believe that the English will refuse the offer or withdraw from what they agreed to, which would show that they did not desire a reconciliation with France or care for the good of the world, allowing themselves to be deceived by the Spaniards with hopes of restoring the Palatine. We shall soon see what objections they have to make and if spots will appear in the sun.
Susa, the 3rd April, 1629.
Encloses copies of letters to England of the 3rd and 4th inst.
[Italian.]
April 3.
Bibl. S. Marco.
Cl. vii.
cod. 1927.
4. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to ALVISE CONTARINI, his colleague in England.
My illness prevented me from reaching the king before the 29th March, at Susa, and it also delayed my reply to you. I had audience of the cardinal on the last day of the month, and showed him the articles which you sent me recently. I was afraid that the great success France has enjoyed in these affairs would make him change his mind, but I found him quite moderate. Immediately he had read the articles, he said that although they were not all that could be desired, and England had many advantages, he would do all in his power to get the king to accept them. The day after he sent them back, saying that the assurance I gave about the sincerity of England had induced the king to accept the articles, in which he only found one word to change, not that France desires anything but what the English mean, but because the word does not signify in French what it is used for. The cardinal suggested entretenus, gardés, observés, instead of renouvelés in the third article. I proposed confirmés as better and meaning what the English intended. He apparently agreed, and I must say he seems to be acting sincerely and straight-forwardly. He told me that the king also desired the restitution of Toiras' ship, with what was in it at the time of its capture, and that the Scotch religious sent by the Earl of Nithsdale and the correspondent of the Danish ambassador had assured him that the English were agreed about it, but did not want an article inserted in the treaty on the subject, and France accepted this. I told him you would speak again about the restitution, but I could not give any assurance; however, the cardinal was so positive about the above that he has no doubts whatever.
I obtained a promise that on the 24th of this month they would put the articles of peace in my hands without any alterations except the word confirmés instead of renouvelés. I have obtained this promise upon the assurance which I have given, that on the same day your Excellency will receive the same articles signed by the King of England. Without this assurance it would have been impossible for me to bring the affair to its present position. I thought that if it was necessary to send to England, and then send back here before concluding anything, there would never be an end, and as the parties were agreed in substance, it was necessary to adopt this expedient, upon the consideration that the king has relieved Casale, driven the Spaniards out of the Montferrat, and concluded a satisfactory treaty with the Duke of Savoy, and that so, England and France by their union can put the affairs of Denmark in good train.
I said I knew nothing of any promise to restore Toiras' ship, but if such a promise had been made I felt sure it would be kept, and this has satisfied them. To tell the truth, this restitution ought not to stop England, and if she has not promised, she ought, in my opinion, to do so courteously.
The moment you receive this despatch, obtain assurances for the signing of the articles by the King of England by the 24th, and from the day that you have the articles the peace may be considered as made. I promise that at the same time they will begin to arrange about the ambassadors here, as you will do about yours. Advise me by this courier of a definite date upon which the peace between the two crowns can be published, and send me a speedy reply, so that we may consider at an early date what will be for the service of Germany.
Susa, the 3rd April, 1629.
[Italian.]
April 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
5. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Among the despatches from Spain for Italy seized by the Cavalier della Valletta, they found several letters of the Abbot Scaglia. The cardinal has had these deciphered, and they disclose not only the proceedings of that minister, but the designs of the Spaniards to hurt France. I gather that the Spaniards, through Scaglia's intrigues, meant to set on foot against France all the evil humours, both internal and external, and they especially thought of making up to England, offering promises which they did not intend to keep, and to negotiate a truce with the Dutch, while stirring up Rohan and Bouillon.
Susa, the 4th of April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
6. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke spoke to me about the peace between England and France, that Richelieu said it was nearly arranged, but Wake spoke differently, and the King of England wrote to him with different sentiments. This is utterly divergent from what I have heard from Wake's own lips and from Contarini. I am sure it is in order to introduce an element of confusion into the advantages which we might think the French would have. The duke also told me that Wake had asked him to interpose to secure this reconciliation.
Turin, the 4th April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 4.
Bibl. S. Marco.
Cl. vii.
Cod. 1927.
7. ZORZI ZORZI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to ALVISE CONTARINI, his colleague in England.
If the English wish, I send you the peace ready made. I can speak nothing but praise of the cardinal, as although he kept me on tenterhooks three days, he adhered to his promise. The blockheads here, aided by the Danish ambassador and Weston, nearly upset the business. Thank God all is well, for I cannot believe that the alteration of one word will stand in the way. I have to ask two things of you at the cardinal's request, that if they seem cool about signing, you will not seem eager and will not tell them what you have in hand, though they are as anxious for the peace here as some are in England; the other to obtain some promise for the restitution of Toiras' ship as an act of courtesy to the queen mother. In short, find some way of obtaining this generous act.
The first letters which I wrote to your Excellency were drawn up by the cardinal and myself in conjunction; it was his own wish that I should write in his own words, I imagine in order to stir you to make every effort in the matter of the ship in question. I was neither able nor willing to disoblige him, especially as I found him in a good humour, an unusual circumstance (le prime lettere ch'io scrivo a V, E, il cardinale et me l'habiamo formato d'acordo; ha egli voluto questo gusto che io scrivo a modo suo, penso per ecitar la di lei virtu nel particolare del sopradeto vascelo, et io non ho dovuto ne voluto scontentarlo et masime habendo ritrovato di buon humore, che incontra di rado). You will see the form, but a consideration of the substance shows that if their heads be not turned in England the peace will follow, without more ado, whether the ship be restored or no.
I am sending these post to Paris, and my steward will send them on. I wish the courier had wings. I can imagine the impatience my lateness in writing has caused you, but I beg you to weigh the difficulties I have had to surmount in this inconstant climate. I need say no more; if you want news I send it in my next. I will send the passports at the earliest opportunity, as I asked for them to-day.
Susa, the 4th April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
8. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Abbot Scaglia is cast down and utterly confused. He does not talk of leaving, and his hopes of negotiations with England have proved vain. He has not been able to obtain anything here. The farthest he got was to perform an office with the emperor for the provision of some territories in the empire for the Palatine's son, of whose unhappy fate we have heard here. He is waiting for fresh orders from his master, like the Bishop of Vintimiglia. The English might have known that the duke was so anxious to intervene with the two crowns in order to divert the forces of one of them, while he, in alliance with the Spaniards, made good his pretensions in the Monferrat and against the Genoese.
Madrid, the 5th April, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
9. That the secretary of England be summoned to the Collegio, and that the following be read to him. (fn. 3) :
The hope that the ships taken by Digby would be speedily restored somewhat tempered our resentment at his attacking ships provided with patents from us and laded for this mart, and we felt sure that he would receive the punishment he deserves for his numerous excesses the moment he arrived at that Court. We now learn with astonishment that he is not only coming off scot free, but that he claims a part of the goods, as a reward for his evil operations. The ship Giona was insured by our patents and laded at Alicante with goods for this city. The S. Michele Arcangelo was also laded for this city. We may say that the goods were in our own house, and were unlawfully attacked by Digby, who only had patents to attack ships hostile to his Majesty. He committed a grave error in attacking the ships of a friendly nation, and as he had no authority to do so, the ships ought to be restored and Digby punished for transgressing his orders, with offence to the good relations which have always existed between the republic and England. We cannot suffer our ships to be stopped, diverted from their voyage and taken elsewhere, with heavy loss. The goods they carry must not be touched, no matter for whom they may be, and still less in this case, when the bulk of them are for our merchants. Our Ambassador Contarini has made very proper representations by virtue of our orders, so that everything may be restored at once by the royal authority. This is a matter between prince and prince, and ought not to be submitted to an ordinary judge. If our confidence in his Majesty's upright intentions has restrained us from taking the steps we might in such a case, we hope that we shall not be deceived, but that he will speedily order the restitution of the ships and their cargo. We promise ourselves this from his Majesty's goodness and greatness. We believe that there will be no further delay in the restitution.
Ayes, 122.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
April 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
10. To the ambassador CONTARINI, and the like to the Ambassador SORANZO at the Hague.
On withdrawing from Casale, Don Gonzales tried to keep his hold on Monferrat. He fortified Nizza dalla Paglia, Ponzon and San Salvador. Hearing, however, that the Most Christian had decided to march on Casale and that the troops of Savoy were getting ready, he sent to Savoy promising to evacuate the Monferrat in two days. The action of the Most Christian, therefore, depends upon the advices he receives. We expect to hear at any moment. Meanwhile Don Gonzales keeps preparing for war, and troops are constantly arriving, notably from Germany. In spite of the expense, we are keeping our army in the field, ready to move when required. As M. della Saludie is here from the Most Christian, we are arranging a league with his Majesty, of which we will send you particulars. The Duke of Savoy may not object to sign it, in the hope of a closer union with France. You will, therefore, procure the final settlement of the peace with England, which you have managed with such skill. There will be no further delay, as Zorzi has arrived at the Court, and Soranzo will be there in a few days with all the necessary instructions.
Your last letters tell us what you have done about the ships taken by Digby. Our instructions about this will reach you from time to time, and Nelli will come from the merchants. We hope for a successful issue. You will hold out for dealing as between prince and prince, and object to the usual judges.
We rejoice at Scott's offers, as we have a lively recollection of his merits. You will inform him of the public satisfaction. As we cannot as yet decide upon the levy, you will not give him the word for spending, but you will keep him in hope.
We will send you our decisions about the ships when we have to make provision.
Ayes, 122.Noes, 0.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
April 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
11. To the Ambassador CORNER in Savoy.
We enclose copies of the exposition of the Secretary of England in our Collegio, and of our reply about the ships plundered by Digby. You will regulate your replies in conformity with them when you speak to the Ambassador Wake on the subject.
Ayes, 130.Noes, 0.Neutral, 6.
[Italian.]
April 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
12. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I have received the despatch of the 9th March. In conformity with instructions, I have spoken with some merchants of the Levant Company, about what is taking place in the Levant. All affairs there depend directly on that Company, which pays the ambassador at Constantinople, and the consuls at Aleppo and elsewhere. With one accord they all say that nothing can be worse for Christians than to subject themselves to Turkish courts of justice, as the judges aim solely at obtaining profit from all applicants, without any regard for right. Sir [Thomas] Roe told me that it had always been his principle to try that the foreign ministers should arrange disputes between foreign subjects among themselves, or through friends and arbiters, as no arrangement could be so unjust as submission to the Turks, with the risk of great trouble and cost. I admitted this, but remarked that their consul moved these stones. Both he and the Turkey Company ought to claim compensation from Digby, as the cause of all the mischief, and to inflict some exemplary punishment on him for the peril to which he exposed the whole nation. The best of them approve of the idea; others complain, although unjustly, that your Serenity's ministers were the first to appeal to Turkish law. So it is necessary to insinuate right with tact in a body with differing opinions. I think it would be superfluous to speak to the king or the ministers about these events, unless I am ordered to do so, as the Court will not take any steps without the knowledge of the Company.
I performed all the necessary compliments with the ambassador from Sweden. (fn. 4) He responded and declared that his master admires the zeal and prudence of your Excellencies with respect to the common cause. His personal opinions are excellent. I knew him a few years ago when he was Swedish agent at this Court. He spoke freely to the king in accordance with his views. He is the better acquainted with internal affairs here, as he is a Scot by birth. I do not know what profit he can expect beyond satisfying his own conscience; the chief ministers do not like the liberty he takes with the king. He will remain here about two months, to take certain troops to Sweden.
It is very hard to persuade the merchants to pay the duties; consequently trade is going to ruin. The usual quantity of cloth sold at the two weekly markets, ordinarily held in this city, amounted to 500 pieces. At present all the carts go back to the country full, as no one buys. This may produce a thousand other mischiefs, as a countless number of poor will die of hunger from being out of work. The Dutch, who came from France and elsewhere, do not dare to unload, for fear of some general massacre of all their countrymen. There is already a general murmur of this, and because there is no great love between them, as neighbours and from rivalry at sea, as well as from suspicion that they want to monopolise the English trade, not only by prompt payment of the duties, but by tendering the king money in his present straits. All these are falsehoods, but it is necessary to guard against popular panics. The king urged the Dutch ambassador to induce his countrymen to unlade and set a good example by paying the duties, but he hesitates, and the merchants also do not know what to decide, not because they are not perfectly willing to pay, but from dread of universal odium, so that those who are already here would rather depart than run the risk, and the others will not come until the storm lulls. Thus the king, who usually obtained 500l. sterling a day from the duties, has not got 30l. in the last three weeks. Even if all were to pay they would think it lawful to cheat, doing so with a clear conscience, as the king is taking by force what is not due to him legally. Owing to this, business of all sorts is very much impeded. The Council sits every day for three or four hours, the king always being present. Nothing else is thought of, as this matters most of all. People in general revive the idea of calling a fresh parliament, on the plea of necessity, which is indeed so great that it cannot be exaggerated. But I know that the chief favourites will not permit it, because they will run the risk of ruin, and because in this monarch's Court the interest of one single individual has much greater force than that of the public.
The question of the ships remains in suspense for six weeks, without giving security or anything else, according to the laws and custom. Carleton told me this, and also that the trial will proceed on the expiration of that term, which may serve to receive a reply from Italy. I have also heard that they have sent to the English secretary at Venice to invite the Venetians to transmit their claims hither, as no wrong will be done them. I firmly refused to consent, and when in company complain of the wrong done to Venetians, who show the English every courtesy. By the last despatch, the merchants of Venice wrote that they are sending all the references by a messenger express to stir up the business. It is quite certain that from the time of the capture to the award, amounting to more than five months, they will have had every convenience for sheltering one another, if they know how to do it. For other details of this Court, I refer to what I am writing to France, whence I am anxiously awaiting some reply about the negotiation, and news of what is happening which is so essential.
London, the 6th April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.13. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in England, to ZORZI ZORZI, his colleague in France.
By the last despatch from the Senate I have heard of the departure of the Procurator Soranzo for the French Court. I ask you to consider this common to both of you, as I hope the preceding one will have been. Daily events show the prejudice of delay to the peace negotiation. The king begins to declare openly that the French show contempt for him. He is also dissatisfied with us, for what was sheer necessity. From what he said to the Swedish ambassador, I see that my arguments will no longer be of any avail to excuse the delay. I suspect that even if favourable replies arrive he may retaliate by the same slowness.
It is reported that the adjustment has taken place in Italy. I believe that the queen has had some advice of it from her mother, for she wrote to her lately by express that Savoy will act as mediator to induce the emperor and the King of Spain to consent to it. That in the meantime Susa will remain as a cautionary place, Casale being provisioned and having a Swiss garrison. That the king has recrossed the Alps and is marching hot foot against the Huguenots. Barocio denies the whole openly, but only on the weak foundation of not having had letters from the duke, who will never be the friend of the French. If they deceive him by surprising Susa on the faith of the treaty, he will bide his time for revenge. Meanwhile he has frequent conferences with Soubise, and both suggest the ease of some diversion by sea. But they have neither credit nor hearers, from want of both will and the power. Carlisle still remains between the two stools. On the one hand he sees that the French have crossed the Alps, contrary to what he assured everybody, and Savoy has made terms with them. Many indeed assert that they were agreed before the advance to Susa, but the duke wishes to hide his breach of promise to the Spaniards under the ashes of a few dead men. On the other hand, Carlisle insists that the sole object of the French is utterly to extirpate the Huguenots, and on no account to break openly with the Spaniards. All men of sound judgment agree that the Spaniards will never be taken by surprise in Italy, but that has now happened, and never before have the French advanced victorious, resolute and without preoccupation, as at present. It is generally believed that this adjustment will merely serve to give the Austrians time to make better provision, and that there will be no lack of pretences to retaliate for this affront.
The whole of the North, Sweden, Denmark and the Dutch, which had again taken heart from the diversion of Italy, may now gradually lose it. I do not know how the peace with this kingdom will proceed, especially if the attack on the Huguenots prove true. Meanwhile, as I have no confirmation, and every one asks me about it, I point out that we must believe in the adjustment between France and Savoy. The one with the Austrians may not be true, as it is too speedy, as there has not been time for a reply from the Courts, or it may not be sure. By arguments of this sort I try to keep up their courage, until they are assured by the republic, or her ministers, who enjoy great esteem here, as they are seldom or never impassioned.
I do not hear of any progress in the affairs of Spain, until some reply comes from Holland about the despatch of Vane. Besides this there is the necessity for finding money, and the perils of civil strife, which usurp the best part of the time, and of the Cabinet Councils, and are very frequent, and matter more than a hundred treaties of peace.
On one and the same day the Swedish ambassador had public and private audience of the king. He spoke of the affection of his master for the common cause, as he not only performed offices with the nobility of Denmark to maintain it in the respect due to the king, but with the king himself, to save him from a servile and disgraceful peace, offering his army, ships, kingdom and life itself, without asking for anything in return, though it is true that the interests of the Baltic deeply affect both kings. It is therefore thought that the entire struggle of this year will be at sea, so that the imperialists may not get the upper hand. The ambassador added that the King of Sweden had concluded a six years' truce with the Poles in Livonia. He hoped to arrange another in Prussia, or else to obtain a great advantage over the army which the emperor is sending against him in that province, under the Margrave of Brandenburg. The ambassador plainly showed the advantages of the peace with France, and offering in his king's name to perform any office for its attainment. His Majesty said in reply that the French stood in the way; he had shown his affection for the common weal by the treaty sent by the Venetian ambassadors; the delay in the replies implied contempt. He said more to the same effect, which the ambassador communicated to me in confidence. He spoke very freely about the evils arising from the misunderstandings between his Majesty and the people, both for the welfare of the kingdom and the common cause. In the end he limited his demands to some naval assistance in the Baltic, and to a levy of three regiments, amounting to about 4,000 foot, for which he has brought remittances with him. It may be said that he has permission for the levies. They gave him fair words about the ships, as that depends on the turn internal affairs may take, rather than on the king's will, even if he is well disposed.
London, the 6th April, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered; copy.]
April 6.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
14. The secretary of England came into the Collegio and spoke substantially as follows:
By letters of the 26th February I have special instructions to pass an office with your Serenity. The Ambassador Contarini, in an extraordinary and special audience, has pressed strongly for the restitution of the two ships detained by Sir [Kenelm] Digby. My king is most anxious to satisfy the ministers of your Serenity whenever he is able to do so, and is eager to do it in this case. It is necessary, however, to proceed by the ordinary courses, and he has accordingly referred the matter to the Lords of the Admiralty. The ambassador has met them, and persists that everything must be restored. This is an unjust and injurious demand, because the interests of a third party are concerned, and they have offered to restore all that proves to belong to merchants, subjects of your Serenity. But if they belong to Spaniards, or other enemies of his Majesty, it is only right that Digby should remain in possession, otherwise there would be confusion about the claims of war and everything else. It would, however, be advisable for an agent to appear to represent the interested parties and treat of their claims. A suitable interval has been assigned for this, so that everything may be settled according to justice. At the outset, the ambassador handed in a paper with his claims. Subsequently, when asked to put his arguments in writing, he refused to do so, alleging that it is not customary for the ministers of the republic to do this, owing to the form of the Government. This renders the matter difficult, as he adheres to the simple demand that everything shall be restored without exception, and even hints that the goods of English merchants may be forfeited here, if this is not done. I do not believe this, because we are willing to restore what belongs to your Serenity's subjects, and we hope you will be satisfied with that.
The doge thanked his Majesty warmly for his good intentions. They hoped to receive all just satisfaction in the matter of the two ships. If there was anything to add, they would let the secretary know.
The secretary stated that he was commissioned by the ambassadress to say that the fine weather invited her to begin her journey, and she would leave soon. She pays her respects to the doge and their excellencies, and returns the warmest thanks for all the favours she has received, as she has no other way of repaying her obligations. She would like to have passports and letters to the representatives of the State for escorts and other matters that may arise. She will probably travel by Bassano.
The doge wished the ambassadress a pleasant journey, and promised the passports, sending her their compliments and expressing their desire to please her. The secretary promised to convey this at once, took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
April 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
15. To the Ambassador in Spain and the like to the other Courts.
The circumstances of the present time, with the coming of the Most Christian to Italy, for the tranquillity and security of this province, have led to a purely defensive league, between his Majesty, our republic and the Duke of Mantua, with the declaration of the Duke of Savoy for entering it, as other princes also may easily do. As this regards the upright intentions proper to good princes who wish to ensure their own safety, we wish this to serve for your information, and that you shall only set forth the truth in case the matter is spoken of or discussed at your Court, as your prudence will guide you. You will, at the same time, take special note of the comments with which this news is introduced by others, how it is received, and what effect it produces on his Majesty and his ministers, sending us full particulars.
You will be especially careful to state that the league is defensive, with the object of securing the public tranquillity, the republic always adhering to its well-known excellent intentions.
The like to:
Germany, Florence, Milan, Constantinople, Naples.
To England, the Hague and the Swiss, instead of the last paragraph.
If the ministry speak about it, you will point out the provisions in the league for friends, and that none but good results can ensue for the common cause. When the stipulations are completed, we will send you further particulars, for such offices as may be suitable.
Ayes, 81.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
16. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador is afraid that the forces will be turned against the Huguenots, and declares they will cause the breaking of the peace with England. He now announces that he did not wish to execute his king's orders to persuade the duke to a reconciliation with the French. He says that the Marquis of Porter is to attack Privas and Guise's force is to go to Languedoc. But I observe that all this is passion, either because he does not see any arrangement by France to make war in Italy or because the duke has learned some thing from the French about the prosperous state of that adjustment, through the efforts of the republic's ambassadors. I am afraid it is the latter, because he has asked what news I have of the peace, saying that no one seemed to speak to him about it, and he would turn everything upside down, shewing, however, that he had not an atom of news on the subject. By his passions and interests, this minister shows that his objects are very divergent from the good of the common cause.
Turin, the 7th April, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
17. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Sir [Henry] Vane has returned to the Hague, after spending some days at Rhenen with the Princess Palatine. It is thought that he had more important business with the States than was divulged. The Princess of Orange told me that he might remain as ambassador extraordinary. I gather from a third person that he gave the Princess Palatine an exact account of the home and foreign affairs of the Government, assuring her that in any case they would never pursue the negotiations with Spain without regard for her interests. This has consoled the princess, and if they keep their word it will make those negotiations difficult.
The Hague, the 9th April, 1629.
[Italian.]
April 9.
Consiglio di X.
Parti Comuni.
Venetian
Archives.
18. To the Ambassador SORANZO at the Hague.
It agrees with the convenience of the state to grant you Michael Zon for the English embassy; we have therefore informed the Captain of the Gulf, Zulian, with whom Zon has been so far, to give him every facility for making himself ready for the position of secretary to you in England.
That Michael Zon, despite the decision to the contrary, shall be allowed to go and serve our Ambassador Soranzo at the English Court.
Ayes, 14.Noes, 1.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 10.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
19. That 350 ducats of good money be paid to Michael Zon, extraordinary of the ducal chancery, who is going to serve as secretary to Giovanni Soranzo in his embassy to the King of Great Britain, for the expenses of his journey, couriers, guides and escorts, which in the present troublous times will be necessary for himself and his goods.
Ayes, 83.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
20. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador is still troubled because no one tells him anything about the peace between his king and France. He asked me definitely if Zorzi spoke to me about it. I told him, No. It seems clear to me that the duke has learned the state of affairs from the French, and this minister sees he will no longer be able to promise the duke that the peace shall not be made without advantage for his Highness or his acting as mediator.
Turin, the 10th April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
April 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
21. GIROLAMO SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador to France, and FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
His Highness said he heard that the peace between England and France was announced, and the Earl of Holland was going to the Most Christian to solemnize it. On the other hand, the letters of the King of England did not say so, and Wake did not affirm it. The King of Great Britain was very anxious for his Highness to be the mediator, and he thought he would not do anything unless the Duke of Rohan and the Huguenots were included. The French would not hear of any one interfering with their subjects.
Vigliano, the 12th April, 1629.
[Italian.]
April 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
22. To the Ambassador CORNER, at Turin.
The peace between France and England has been advanced to a satisfactory position by our ambassadors, as a single word constitutes the sole difficulty. If Wake speaks to you about it again, your reply will be in general terms, that the republic has always contributed friendly offers for the welfare of the two crowns and the benefit of the common cause. It has acted with zeal to procure peace and quiet between those sovereigns, who for ties of relationship and so many other reasons, should be united together. You consider that the negotiations have reached a satisfactory position. You will try and satisfy that minister in this way without saying more, with every show of maintaining confidential relations with him.
Ayes, 99.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
April 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
23. SEBASTIANO VENIERO, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Has obtained the release of four slaves. This is a great stroke for the reputation of the republic, as the Captain Pasha is inexorable on the subject of slaves with everyone. The English Ambassador Roe told him once that he had applied three times to him for the release of a countryman, but though the Pasha often promised it, the ambassador had to go without obtaining the man. Many similar instances might be cited.
The Vigne of Pera, the 14th April, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
24. SEBASTIANO VENIERO, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Vice-consul Salamon sends word of the death of the King of Persia. (fn. 5) I am advised that a certain friar, Father Tadeo, who was to go to Venice, has stated that the chief of his commissions from the old king was to negotiate for a trade in silk with Venice, in order to deprive the English and Dutch of the sea borne trade. The Senate will appreciate the importance of this. We have not heard whether he will come as he intended now the king is dead.
The Vigne of Pera, the 14th April, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
25. FRANCESCO CORNER, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador has sent a gentleman to Court. I am afraid it is in order to thwart the operations of Contarini and Zorzi, because he told me that the duke had sent him letters of the prince from Susa with the news of the peace between his king and France, but he knew it was not so. I gather that a gentleman of Rohan has accompanied him to London, taking letters from his master to the King of Great Britain. Wake declares that his king has persuaded Rohan to come to terms with the Most Christian, but he sees that the French do not want this, and so remains on the defensive.
I have spoken to the ambassador about the seizure of the ships by Digby.
I hear that the English ambassador complains that his plans for the port of Villefranche will prove useless, and he would not allow some corn ships which arrived there to unlade, because the merchants had not been paid for what had already come. He sent them to Genoa, and said he wanted to remove facilities for provisioning Casale, in order to keep the king employed in these parts, because he knows he will depart the moment that place is supplied, and would prefer to go against his friends, who are those of the Religion. This is his prejudice.
Turin, the 15th April, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 Called elsewhere Weston, and "a Scottish religious sent by the Earl of Nithsdale.
2 At Rhenen in the province of Utrecht.
3 There is a copy of this paper among S.P. Foreign, Venice.
4 Sir James Spence.
5 Abbas the Great, who died on the 27th January.


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