Venice
November 1629, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1919

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230-244

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'Venice: November 1629, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 230-244. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89263 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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November 1629

Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
284. To the Ambassadors SORANZO in England and GUSSONI at the Hague.
The resolute refusal of the Duke of Mantua to give up Porto or the gate of the city, as Collalto asked, in the hope of gaining some further advantage, did not break off the negotiations on the side of the Imperialists. Indeed, with the hope of an easy adjustment they mutually agreed to suspend hostilities for a few hours. But the Imperialists broke faith and suddenly attacked some fortifications on the Cereso side, which they captured, although with heavy loss, including some of their leaders. Colonel Durante, whom we sent to Mantua, fortified himself on that side in one night and defended it bravely, although the place is very small and cannot take many defenders.
The garrison has made several sorties, always driving back the Imperialists with no small loss, burning their gabions on the bridge. Durante has also made successful sorties. The duke hoped that the respect he showed to Cæsar would facilitate an adjustment. Now negotiations have fallen through, he is most resolute in the defence. L'Aldringher finding his battery on S. Giorgio of little use, proposed to move to Porto. Our Proveditore General had arranged to throw supplies and troops into the place. Although boats were not ready to receive them, as arranged, he introduced 1,000 picked men. On the way back he captured a great quantity of waggons and animals, with some loss to them, but only one poor peasant on our side. The Germans have frequently entered our state to plunder; the peasants resist bravely, inflicting losses on them and compelling them to retire. Count Ferdinando Scotto has also fallen upon them, driving them to their quarters, slaying many and taking prisoners.
Ayes, 79.Noes, 5.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
285. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In order to put the affair of the ship Golden Cock on a proper footing I took the enclosed memorial to the Secretary of State. His Majesty, through the Secretary, assured me that I should receive all the satisfaction that could come from him in such a matter, though, as a matter of fact, that cannot amount to much. I had already learned that the merchants of the Levant Company had had the ship and the goods sequestrated, and in examining them they had found some quantity of the goods from the saetia, of which I had not heard before, because the captain did not include them in his note to the customs. I have mentioned this to bring into greater relief, through this very considerable transgression, the groundlessness of the captain's claims. I urged upon the Secretary to have another sequestration made in addition to the one by the merchants, by his Majesty's order at my instance, and I also asked for justice against the captain himself and the entire cargo of the ship, although it belonged to other interested parties. He told me that such an order had already been issued at the instance of the merchants, and his Majesty would have directed the same for me, adding that the captain had been sent to prison that very day. I tried to find out through the judge, who is the same one who tried Digby's case, if the orders for the sequestration had been given in my name, and I learned that only to-day they were to sequestrate and it was necessary that some one should appear for me to make the demand. The judge showed himself very obliging, not only in what concerned his office, but for everything else also, I fancy with the idea that we should have recourse to his tribunal, as he would consider it an injury if we proceeded by any other way. I really do not think that I could find a very safe one, as it seems to me that the affair might benefit by being dealt with in this way, and in any other I should expect to encounter obstacles such as wrecked Digby's business. Accordingly, being pressed by time and driven by necessity to do something in order to prevent anything prejudicial happening, I shall take such measures and make such dispositions as I consider most suitable until such time as orders to the contrary reach me from your Serenity.
The Levant Company is taking a very keen interest because the Turks have already sequestrated a ship (fn. 1) at Scios, and they are afraid that worse may happen, so we see that those who deal roundly with this nation have a great advantage. From what I gather they intend to have the goods returned to the Turks. In that case it will be most necessary for your Excellencies to instruct me what I am to do, if you wish me to persist in demanding possession or to let things take their course, so that the Company restores what has been taken to the Turks, from whom your Excellencies can afterwards claim restitution. I will hold firmly to the sequestration and will gain as much time as possible without committing myself, until your Serenity's orders reach me. I must not forget to add that there is only a small quantity of those goods, but a good part has been sent to Leghorn and elsewhere about which I have not yet found out. It may be that some more will come here in a ship which at present is at the Isle of Wight. I will keep on the alert, but I need before everything instructions and papers with the foundation of the whole affair.
As this matter gave me occasion to see the Secretary of State I did not forget to take up the thread of my past offices to some extent. He told me that he had laid them before his Majesty, who had remarked that with respect to the essential point touching the interests of France it seemed that the Ambassador Preo ought to speak first, but yet if I would make this proposal in your Serenity's name, and with a public commission, he would give me audience and have the question discussed. But as he imagined that this arose from my personal zeal for the public service he commended my good intentions and assured me that you would always find their disposition to be of the best, but in this particular, as I had nothing certain to bring forward, he did not think it advisable to defer Cottington's departure, because that was decided even before the negotiations for peace with France were introduced, and he had wished to make this demonstration of affection towards the Most Christian, his brother, and his especial regard for the friends who interposed by having the conclusion of the peace put first, without causing any further delay for the affairs of Spain. At the present time he could not break his word, especially as all that I represented was that I thought they would find a good disposition in France. This was actually the limit to which I confined myself, because I could not commit myself further, and I believe that even if I had had enough latitude to make greater advances they would have found subterfuges, because they have neither the wish nor the power to involve themselves in occasions for spending. I must repeat, however, that the French ambassador has always behaved very coldly and I believe that if he had the commissions which he declared he would not have confined himself within such restricted limits. God grant that the French show themselves as ardent as the affairs of Italy require, because the hopes they betray of having a speedy conclusion of peace argue that they desire it, and I am afraid that they may embrace it with some disadvantage.
I have communicated to the French ambassador the advices received in your Serenity's letters of the 19th ult., which arrived the day before yesterday. I laid stress upon the objects and designs of the Spaniards and Imperialists and I tried to point out to him the necessity for prompt succour from his Majesty. He, on the other hand, hinted something about peace to me. I told him in reply that these were the customary devices of the Spaniards in order to delay the warlike preparations of others, and possibly with the special object of providing the pope with an excuse for intervening to take the matter up. When Spinola went to Germany about the Palatinate he always took this report about peace with him, and declared that he had no other intention, but when he arrived and found things badly managed for the Palatinate and favourable for him, he seized the opportunity and took possession of everything. All the same, I did not believe that the affairs of Italy were at such a pass, as your Serenity's forces were so numerous and I hoped that his Majesty's assistance would be powerful. He seemed to weigh these considerations and remarked: Assuredly if things go on it will be necessary for the king to make up his mind to go to Italy. With respect to the affair of Monsieur, to which he previously attached no great importance, he seemed to consider it seriously. I am sorry for this because I conclude that instead of disappearing it is gathering strength and from it may arise an important and most harmful diversion.
Frequent councils have been held latterly, many of them being devoted to the representations of the French ambassador about the regulation of navigation. No compromise has yet been found on this question and Preo complains about it, not only because the matter touches the cardinal and the whole nation nearly, but for private reasons, as he is bound to settle it before he returns home, a thing he is most anxious to do. But I can see even at a distance that they are unlikely to come to any decision here, since with the conclusion of the peace with Spain and the opening of trade, everything will be ended without the need for any action derogatory to decisions already taken, which are highly valued and are guarded with the utmost jealousy.
At the other meetings they dealt with a matter of the greatest importance, touching the liberty with which some of the leading men here have spoken and even written against the form of the present government. The result shows that their concern was great, because in these last two days they have confined the Earl of Cher, (fn. 2) father of one of the gentlemen imprisoned because of the parliamentary business, the Earl of Somerset, of the Order of the Garter, sometime a favourite of King James, the Earl of Bedford and Sir Robert Cotton; the first in the house of the Bishop of Winchester, the second in that of the Bishop of London, the other two in those of the two secretaries subordinate to the Secretary of State. This is the first step; the second will take them to prison. These extraordinary measures will excite more ill feeling, because it is all dependent upon the contest going on between the king and the people. Limits of time have prevented me from penetrating any further, especially as they proceed with special secrecy.
London, the 16th November, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.286. Copy of Memorial presented to his Majesty about the ship Golden Cock.
A few months ago a saetia laden with rich merchandise left Lisbon for Venice, unquestionably for Venetian merchants. Off Zante it fell in with a squadron of galleys into whose hands it fell. About the same time the English ship Golden Cock, master John Baruch, passed that way and took possession of the saetia, the galley in charge of it having taken flight. I heard of this some weeks ago, when I had instructions to apply to your Majesty for the saetia when that captain arrived here. I now hear that the captain has brought a considerable quantity of the stolen goods and says they are lawful plunder, as being taken from pirates. But the galleys which first made the capture belonged to the Porte, as shown by the Turks seizing an English ship at Scios as reprisals. If the saetia had remained in the Turks' hands it would undoubtedly have been recovered, owing to the friendly relations subsisting with our republic, and I feel sure that its having fallen into the hands of the English will not make its state any worse. While I am awaiting particulars from the interested parties I beg your Majesty to have the ship sequestrated with all the goods, so that no one may touch them or commit any fraud, and I also ask that cautions may be given to me upon the cargo brought by the ship.
[Italian.]
Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
287. GIROLAMO SORANZO and ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassadors in France, to VICENZO GUSSONI, their colleague at the Hague.
The English ambassador told us he had heard that the courier sent to the sister of the Prince of Orange advised that he brought some overtures that in case France wished to break openly with the Spaniards and make an offensive and defensive alliance with the States, not only would the negotiations for a truce vanish but they would have a force of 40,000 foot and 6,000 horse and attack any place France named, mentioning Antwerp.
Paris, the 16th November, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
288. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A certain Mr. Oliver, formerly secretary for England at Coire for a long while and afterwards at Zurich, being kept there by the English Ambassador Wake, arrived here to-day to act as ordinary, from what he said to me, with the title of resident with the Swiss for his Crown, after a journey to Berne and Geneva. He offered his devoted service to your Serenity and told me that at Basel he had met the Duke of Candalles, who charged him to tell me he was going to Turin by way of Geneva with the intention of proceeding as soon as possible to the Most Serene Dominion under the direction of the Ambassador Cornaro, with a passport through the Milanese which he will send to Spinola.
Farra outside Zurich, the 16th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
289. MARC ANTONIO PADAVIN, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I hear from Leghorn that several Flemish, English and other ships have arrived there, laden with various goods and grain, and I understand that many of these are being hired to take grain to Venice and elsewhere.
Florence, the 17th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
290. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
On the return of the Princes Palatine from Rhenez, I went to pay my respects. I spoke of the necessity of preventing the truce. The Palatine admitted it would be most prejudicial. The States could not do worse than listen to such proposals. He remarked that although Vane had not yet had his first audience in the assembly, he had come to see him and told him he had orders to upset the negotiations for a truce as much as possible. I keep my eyes and ears open to find out what is being done and to observe how Vane comports himself.
The Hague, the 20th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
291. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
News has reached Court of the arrival at Lisbon of Cottington in the capacity, they say, of English ambassador. On the same day a gentleman of his arrived here, by way of Flanders, accompanied by a courier. He is the one who went to Dunkirk and Brussels to announce the ambassador's start, so that Don Carlo Coloma might set out at the same time, as arranged. At the news the French ambassador was much perplexed and made many enquiries, being unacquainted with matters well known to everybody, as he has been away from Court and without correspondents here and has received no instructions since his appointment. To-morrow Abbot Scaglia also will be in Madrid, as I have learned from one of his servants. I spoke to the French ambassador about the news, pointing out how the Spaniards take advantage of time and how they hope to profit from peace with the Dutch. We might reasonably fear that the English also would facilitate this, in order to leave the burden on France and gain in this way from the Spaniards what they are hopeless of doing otherwise, although they ought to know the vanity and deceit of these promises. In spite of all they have sent this ambassador and no generous resolution can be hoped from the English, whose internal affairs are in serious disorder and they have no steadiness in their forces (consistenza di forze) or supplies of money. That king, by shutting his ears to negotiations with Spain, without expense of any kind, had occasioned no slight alarm and expense to the Spaniards merely by his ordinary men-of-war and the ships of his subjects, which was a great advantage to his friends. In this state of affairs it was necessary to take courage from the weakness of others and upset evil machinations by our own forces. He told me he had written to his Majesty that France ought to take some generous resolution.
Madrid, the 22nd November, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives
292. To the Ambassadors at the Hague and in England.
Nothing of great moment has happened since the introduction of our relief into Mantua. The Imperalists looked like moving, but were only changing quarters. Their guns are fired rarely, and there is fear of some mines or contrivances owing to their provision of ropes and chains. They are making trenches and at Porto they seized a convenient position by treachery. They hope to dry the ditch, though that is not considered possible. The Mantuans have driven the Imperialists from an inn at Porto, and the duke thought of attacking the quarters of the Duke of Sax. To-day we hear that the Imperialists on the 20th attacked the position of Goito, garrisoned by our troops, but after a long fight they had to retire, taking up their quarters near at hand to prevent communications and succour from us. Our general, however, promised help to Goito. It will be very difficult for the Imperialists to take this place without guns, though it is by no means strong. Their evil designs here are constantly encouraged by the pernicious resolutions of the Imperial Court, which is determined on war in Italy. We hear that Wallenstein declares that he does not want peace in this province, and he has issued patents for fresh regiments to reinforce Collalto.
Ayes, 83.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
293. FRANCESCO CASALE, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A secretary of the Ambassador Wake (fn. 3) arrived yesterday, who has been expected from London for a long while. He did not have a free passage, but will have to do quarantine like the rest. He did not bring his master any orders to leave here for France. He left Paris only six days ago. Wake announces that he brings word that Richelieu means to come to these frontiers and will start on the 8th prox., although I have no other confirmation.
Turin, the 23rd November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
294. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The new English minister has presented himself to the Council at Zurich with letters of credence from that sovereign. They announce him as resident with the Protestant Swiss and Genevese and offer friendship and assistance for all eventualities of religion or state. Some dispute arose as to whether, without a league and definite obligations, they should grant him a house in the city, and thus give fresh cause of offence to the House of Austria, which seemed offended already by the alliance with your Serenity. Some of them represented the benefits derived from that, and that they might expect the same from England. They decided very easily that the minister should be very welcome, and so every one accepts gladly all that is given, without scruple. The Englishman is going to Berne to-day to perform a similar office. So far I find no other object for his appointment than the favour of Wake and of the Earl of Carlisle, whom he served on his embassy last year.
Farra, outside Zurich, the 23rd November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
295. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Caimecan despises the French ambassador. Thus recently, when some merchants came for the English ambassador and us, he granted us the commands very readily, as, indeed, he does usually, but he refused them to the dragoman of the French ambassador. So nothing can be expected of that minister for the public cause here. Flanders has deeply offended the Caimecan over private affairs and England applies little or no attention to the cause and has other matters to think about. I alone do what I can.
The Vigne of Pera, the 24th November, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives
296. GIACOMO BEMBO, Venetian Proveditore at Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Many ships from Leghorn, Genoa and Malta have passed this way to the Archipelago for wheat. Many English ones, which came to this port for currants and were unable to obtain them at the price arranged between the English merchants, namely 20 ryals the thousand, have also left for the Archipelago, to lade wheat for Leghorn and Genoa. Your Serenity will reflect upon this news. I have informed the Proveditore of the Fleet so that he may take such action as he sees fit. This hanging back of the English is due to the new burden of a soldo the pound and the 5 ducats which the ships pay in addition when they have not brought a cargo to Venice. I merely state the facts and will only add that if the islanders here wish to keep up the price of currants to 40 ryals the thousand and over, at which they used to sell them in years past, they may have to throw them away, leaving themselves impoverished, to the detriment of the whole island. The duties will suffer and the money chest will be so exhausted that it will barely suffice for the requirements here, without sending any elsewhere. It will also be impossible to raise money for debtors, as no money will be coming in, and there are a thousand difficulties in the way of selling their goods. God knows that I use all vigilance. I rejoice that the duties of the current year, owing to my exceptional efforts, will exceed those of last by 4,392 ducats.
Zante, the 24th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
297. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Vane has not yet begun any negotiations. It is already whispered and some members of the government have remarked to me that they may get scant satisfaction from his offices here, as it is not about a virgin affair but one long on foot between England and Spain and now he comes after the fact to inform the States, when under the terms of the alliance Great Britain could not enter into negotiations without their previous knowledge and consent. Vane has been to see me and I expressed the republic's esteem for his king. He responded cordially. He did not enter into any particulars about his commissions, but he is very soon to meet the deputies, already chosen by the States to treat with him, in response to his request in the assembly.
The Swedish ambassador here declares that if France and England decide to help Sweden, as they seem to contemplate, his king will throw himself into some generous enterprise against the Austrians.
The Hague, the 26th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
298. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Those most in the Palatine's confidence let it be understood that it is vain to hope for anything by way of negotiation and he must recover his own by arms. I gather that the queen, the Palatine's wife, has already begun to speak to this effect to the English ambassador, and I shall try to encourage the same opinion in both.
The Hague, the 26th November, 1629.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
299. GIACOMO BEMBO, Venetian Proveditore of Zante, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Two English ships have arrived here, and five others after them, of their company, with Sig. Andrea Musso on board as supercargo, on their way to the Archipelago to lade wheat for the Magistracy of Grain at Venice. They will continue their voyage at the earliest opportunity, as they are in a great hurry.
Zante, the 27th November, 1629.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
300. To the Ambassadors SORANZO in England and GUSSONI at the Hague.
L'Aldringher took a stronger force against Goito, with guns. After a brave resistance a breach was made and the governor capitulated, the troops marching out with the honours of war. The Imperialists found there some supplies destined for Mantua, which could not be introduced for lack of boats. It seems they have designs on Castel Giufre. They are working hard to approach on the Porto side, but Colonel Durante resists stoutly and they cannot gain ground. They make no progress at S. Giorgio, but rather stand on the defensive. They suffer severe losses and many die daily from hardships and the accidents of war. If all the powers were as careful as they should be to prevent supplies from reaching them, the majority of them would have died of hunger by now. They are very short of all necessaries. The duke resists bravely and the republic gives him all possible help. We hope that the powerful diversion promised by France will soon make itself felt. It was expected that the king or Cardinal Richelieu would move in person at the news that Mantua was attacked. The Imperialists are not idle and hope to profit by negotiations, as heretofore. Mazzarini has gone to Rome and the Nuncio Pancirolo has come from the camp to the city. Collalto means to take Castel Giuffre as Aldringher did S. Giorgio, as he asks permission to introduce an imperial garrison, expressing the intention of an armistice, rather to refresh his exhausted troops than to give the duke breathing space. The duke has replied with prudence and courage, recognising that there is no sincerity or safety in such dealings.
To the Ambassador in England:
We have your letters of the 2nd inst., which give us occasion to praise your prudent offices. As regards the union of England with France, England could take no more generous course or one more beneficial to the common cause. You will adroitly advance this as much as possible. The true way is to make France declare openly against Spain, which is so desirable for England. You will advise the ambassadors in France of everything frequently for the proper direction of your own negotiations. We hear that M. de Preo is to go to Holland to try and prevent the truce. You will try and find out his commissions and advise us. You can point out that to prevent the States from hurrying into such an inopportune arrangement nothing could be more effective than the mere resolve of France and England to act vigorously in unison. If Cottington has left and Columna is coming to the Court, you will keep a sharp watch on his negotiations to regulate your offices and bring them to our notice.
Ayes, 114.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
301. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ducal missives of the 27th ult. and the 2nd inst. with advices have reached me these last days. In my office upon the advices I did not neglect to advance such considerations as I considered likely to make an impression and lead to results, while urging the king to vigorous resolution worthy of his spirit and necessary for the common need. Neither did I neglect to enlarge upon the recent hostilities at the island of St. Christopher. The confidence pleased the king. He remarked: Let the republic attend to the defence of Italy, while I with the Most Christian and the States will do what is proper for the affairs of Germany. As some report had arrived by way of France that the Imperialists had captured the city of Mantua, and that the duke had taken refuge at Venice, he questioned me very closely about these particulars. When I had assured him that I had no such news he went on to remark: Some tell me that the republic does not give the Duke of Mantua such help as is requisite, because up to the present she has kept her troops in her own state and behaves with too much circumspection. That will not avail her anything because the Spaniards and Imperialists are as incensed against her as much as they possibly can be.
I thought proper to reply categorically to these nations, which really aroused my resentment, not only because they detract from the merit of your Serenity, but because I think that reports of this kind originate in France, where they may be anxious to excuse their own slowness by baseless pretences. This induced me to relate again all that your Excellencies had done for your own defence and that of the duke, to whom you had supplied all the money, food, troops, munitions and arms that present and past circumstances required. Moreover, if your Serenity had not supplied him with the means of holding out the French would not have been in time to succour Casal. Your Excellencies keep the troops in your state, but they are in the field and ready for all emergencies, when they are assured of the intentions of the Most Christian, from whom the most vigorous and powerful action was expected in the past affairs. Until greater reinforcements arrived from France circumspection was most necessary so as not to be left alone to bear the burden of an offensive and defensive war.
The king replied that to defend oneself well it was sometimes necessary to attack. The Most Christian showed himself very resolute, because he had sent the Marshal de la Force with a strong army into La Bresse. I answered that your Excellencies' present object was to maintain the status quo; you firmly believed in the excellence of the Most Christian's resolutions, but so long as the troops in La Bresse do not push on, Italy cannot feel any benefit from those forces. After some further remarks in justification, I took my leave.
The king seemed to listen very attentively to what I had to say, but I felt somewhat bitter about this speech, and thought it advisable to see the Treasurer on the following day to learn if the Court had any more special information. I obtained no confirmation from him, indeed, he told me that he had never heard anyone who doubted the conscientiousness of the republic. Accordingly I think it likely that the French ambassador said something about it to the king in private, as by a courier from France he had received word of the treacherous attempt made upon the city of Mantua and of the duke's peril. I come to this conclusion because the ambassador of the States called and told me that he had just learned at Court from the Earl of Carlisle and the Treasurer that the French ambassador had said that Mantua was taken and that the duke had taken refuge at Venice. The news is evidently distorted as usual, because it has passed from one person to another. The Ambassador Preo confirmed to me that he had news of the attempt, not of the capture. For the rest he spoke in the usual way about the constancy of his king towards the affairs of Italy. I again represented to him the urgent need for immediate and vigorous help. He told me that M. de la Force was ready, but he could not pass without breaking with the Spaniards. They would come to this also, because things could not remain for long in this state. The rupture had been deferred with the consent of your Excellencies, because you never seemed inclined for an open war. I pointed out to him also that the principles of your Excellencies tend towards the defence. In the present case it was necessary to operate with great vigour because the war will always be considered defensive. He approved the idea, but added that in France they did not think it was good to kindle so great a fire in Christendom. I told him that the party provoked was always reasonable and it was natural to defend oneself.
Of the peace proposals I told him that they were a more formidable weapon than the sword and cannon, with which the Spaniards make great progress. For the rest I had always heard it said that the emperor had been stirred up by the Spaniards against the Duke of Nevers, both with respect to the Mantovano and to Monferrat. As I met him before going to audience I told him that I was going to see his Majesty in order to perform those offices that are necessary for present requirements, with the usual principles, which are certainly quite justified. He replied that no progress could be made in this quarter, because apart from their private interests they thought of nothing in the world, and that no incitement or representation could induce the king and the Treasurer to come to any decision. Although they talk of their intention to make large armaments if Cottington does not bring back from Spain the satisfaction which has been promised, yet all may vanish away. He told me he knew for certain that no more vigorous resolution was to be expected than the distribution of letters of marque, and they do not contemplate binding themselves by any union, because they want to attend to their own private affairs and not commit themselves to heavy expenses, because they believe that they cannot need anyone and that they are sufficiently safe in this island. With respect to the affairs of Italy he told me that they are so jealous of the glory of the Most Christian here that they would like everything to go to rack and ruin. In order to rouse them he had protested that if they let this opportunity slip, after his master and your Serenity had come to terms with Spain, even if they wished to make fresh proposals in France they would not be listened to. The Treasurer told me, however, that a powerful fleet will be prepared for the proper moment, but really even I can see the impossibility, and as I have written before, unless the king unites with the people it is useless to expect any assistance whatever from this quarter.
London, the 30th November, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
302. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
A most searching enquiry has been made against those lords who were put in confinement. Their crime was in having consulted together to draw up a reply to a certain book in manuscript which is claimed to have been found among the papers of the Duke of Buckingham. (fn. 4) In this he shows the king the way to keep parliament at a distance, make provision of money without them and to strengthen his position in the kingdom somewhat by building citadels in the principal towns, in order to safeguard himself against risings which happen very readily among this people. It is believed that there was some notion among them to print the one and the other, in order to publish it among the people, with danger of a great scandal. After the question of their guilt was cleared up they were sent back to their homes, but were bound by heavy securities to submit to the judgment of the Star Chamber, as they call it here, a tribunal which as a general rule only inflicts a pecuniary penalty on persons of this kind. As they are all very wealthy, it is thought that the king may obtain 100,000 ducats. The leader who undertook to make the reply, named St. John, has been put in the Tower and may come off badly.
After many uncertain advices we have heard for certain that the Spaniards have attacked the island of St. Christopher, to which they set fire, destroying it utterly. Of thirteen English vessels that were there, seven have fallen into their hands, with 130 guns and 2,000 prisoners, including many merchants, though the majority are soldiers. A certain number of them have been sent here, as a token, I cannot say whether of courtesy or contempt. They say the others are to serve to fight against the Dutch in those parts. The Earl of Carlisle is the hardest hit in this business, as he had a yearly income of 60,000 ducats from that place. He is deeply distressed, as he has also lost a daughter recently, a lady of the most noble qualities and greatly beloved by the queen here.
It is not known for certain when Don Carlo Coloma will come. The Treasurer told me he was advised that the ships which took Ven to Holland and were to fetch the Don here, had arrived at Dunkirk, and many of his people were there, but he had not yet left Brussels. By the last advices thence he heard that instead of Don Carlo they thought of sending the Marquis of Mirabel. Some, however, think that neither will come.
In the matter of the ship Golden Cock, I enclose copies of his Majesty's order for the sequestration and the note of the cargo of the saetia. The sequestration has already taken place, and because the parties interested claim to deliver the cargo of the ship I am trying to get sufficient sureties for everything that may be lacking. I gather that the Company of Levant Merchants pretends to want to indemnify the Turks, in order to escape the peril which might threaten them from that quarter. Accordingly I shall await instructions from your Excellencies as to what I must do. The courier of Antwerp has arrived to-day. He brings the letters from Italy. I expected the despatch of the 9th inst. The master of the posts, Antwerp, advises me that the courier was robbed in the neighbourhood of Trent. So I am without either public or private letters. I notice some delay in the receipt of my letters. I ask that the effects of time and accidents may not be ascribed to my shortcomings. I promise that I shall never be found wanting when opportunity supplies me with matter worthy of your knowledge.
London, the last day of November, 1629.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.303. At the Court of Whitehall, the 6th November, 1629.
Present the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council, to wit:
The Lord Chancellor.Viscount Dorchester.
The Lord Privy Seal.The Vice Chamberlain.
The Grand Marshal.The Secretary Cooke.
The Earl of Dorset.
Seeing that from information given by the Levant Company and letters from his Majesty's ambassador at Constantinople declaring that the merchants of that company were in danger of having their goods seized in those parts, a ship of theirs called the Rainbow having been seized at Siro because a ship had been taken by the Turkish galleys and retaken by an English ship, the Golden Cock, Captain Barker, the captured ship and part of the cargo being sold at Zante and the rest of the goods being brought to England in the Golden Cock or a certain barque of Plymouth, and the Levant merchants wish to have satisfaction for the damage already suffered and for what they may suffer by reason of this affair: the Lords of the Council ordained on the 30th ult. that the Admiralty Judge should give instructions for the immediate arrest of the goods brought to England and to have them kept safely until further order.
Further that the said judge should have the Golden Cock arrested and any other goods therein until the master and owners find security according to the direction of the Admiralty, up to the value of the claims made in that Court. The Venetian ambassador has now shown his Majesty that the goods laded in the said prize clearly belong to Venetian merchants, the proof whereof is daily expected from Venice, and the ambassador feels sure that the quality and condition of the ship will not be changed or alienated in so far as restitution of what has fallen into the hands of his Majesty's subjects is concerned.
It is therefore ordained by his Majesty's command that the arrest of the goods brought to England, taken out of the said prize, and any other goods sold before, as also the arrest of the Golden Cock and all the other goods laded thereon shall be continued until the master and owners give security up to the value of the claims made against them in the Admiralty Court on behalf of the Venetian merchants.
J. DICKINSON.
[Italian; translated from the English.]
Enclosure.304. Copy of the bill of lading of the saetia, master Paolo Roget, taken by the Admiralty.
Gio. Batta. Chizzali called Bonfadino laded for Bernadin Benzio 10 cases of sugar from Lisbon.
The same laded for Gioani and Zaccaria Castagna 10 cases of sugar.
Bernardin Pietro Galli laded 15 cases of sugar for Domenico Baldi.
Francesco Bressani laded three cases of sugar for Gioppo Palazzuoli.
Gio. Ant. Bonin laded one case of sugar for Gio. Batta. Retino.
Franc. Bressani laded three cases of sugar for the said Castagna.
Gio. Ant. Bonin laded one case of sugar for Bortolo Sagnini.
Gio. Batt. Chizzali laded 20 cases of sugar in a China ship, 22 bundles of canes for Gio. Chizzali.
The same laded 24 cases of sugar for Battista Nani.
The same laded six cases of sugar five bundles of canes for Gio. Maria Salvioni.
Gio. Hals laded five cases of sugar for Martin Vrian and Alvise Dubois.
The same laded five cases of sugar for the same.
The same laded 10 cases of sugar for the same.
Gaspar Roiz Villanial laded one packet of indigo for Piero Enriquez.
Piero Lopes laded a barrel of gumlac (laca) for Giacomo Cardoso.
Francesco Lopez laded six cases of sugar for Guanil and Francesco Debin.
Pietro de Baca laded 80 sacks of pimento for Guaniel and Camillo Pompeo.
Francesco Vias Villa Vitoza laded eight cases of sugar for Gabriel Lopes of Hamburg.
Valdauren laded a box of diamants lined with velvet for Stephen and Duarte Spence.
Rodrigo Luna of Oliverno laded 10 cases of sugar for Giacomo Salvatori.
[Italian.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
305. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ducal missives of the 13th ult. inform me of the decision about the release of those banished by the Council. I will make use of this as ordered.
London, the 30th November, 1629.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Rainbow. See Wyche's despatch of the 22nd Aug. S.P. Foreign, Turkey.
2 John Holles, Earl of Clare. Denzil Holles, member for Dorchester, was his second son.
3 Morton. Wake to Dorchester, the 1st Dec., n.s. S.P. Foreign, Savoy.
4 A pamphlet entitled "A Proposition for his Majesty's service to bridle the Impertinency of Parliaments." It is published by Rushworth, vol. i. App. 12. It had been sent to England by Sir Robert Dudley, Leicester's son, in 1614. The Earls of Bedford, Somerset and Clare, Sir Robert Cotton, John Selden and Gilbert Barrel were arraigned in the Star Chamber on account of it. Gardiner: History of England, vol. vii, pages 138–140. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1629–31, pages 95, 96.