Venice
August 1630, 16-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1919

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396-407

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'Venice: August 1630, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 396-407. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89274 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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August 1630

Aug. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
486. To the Ambassador in England.
Last week we sent you letters of exchange for 30,000 ducats. Herewith you will have the duplicates and we are sending 20,000 ducats in two portions, one straight by London, the other by Amsterdam. Up to the present we have provided 92,000 ducats. The loss is great at present over the exchange, but cannot be avoided. With every confidence in your ability we are expecting to hear about the levy and the choice of a colonel. Despatch in these matters will complete our satisfaction. We will supply the additional money required and the levy must not be delayed for this, as we are very eager for the troops. We enclose what we are writing to the Hague, for your information.
Ayes, 76.Noes, 2.Neutral, 16.
[Italian.]
Aug. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
487. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
My despatch of last week informed your Serenity of the great difficulty I encountered in arranging for the levy with Colonel Scoto. I am in the same position now, as I have utterly failed to bring him to the terms which your Excellencies have prescribed to me, although I have tried every means imaginable. He might have agreed to some modification, because I made him see that as he had already been in your Serenity's service he ought not now to claim conditions more disadvantageous for you than the Cavalier Suinton had done in Holland. I believe he would have agreed to give up the eleventh article. The gain would be by no means despicable, although I am not sure if I shall get it. The eighth is quite insuperable because he claims that the payments of the officers and men ought to begin from the time of the muster here. Although this condition is not actually expressed in the Dutch agreement he told me that anyone who knew what advantages the colonel had received therein would find that he had the means of satisfying his officers without it being expressed in the articles, because ships and provisions are much cheaper there than they are here, and it is also easier to enlist soldiers, because it was not likely that the officers had gone without their pay, a thing that had never been done. He told me roundly that he would not make a precedent to the injury of his countrymen because at a future date, when occasion arose to make a levy here, every one would be guided by his conditions. Again, even if he agreed to accept all the proposals, the king would object and he would lose credit with his Majesty. This is not a reason to despise, because from the enclosed letter of the Secretary Dorchester your Excellencies will see that his Majesty desires these men to have good treatment, although this is not the chief reason for the delay.
Seeing that I could get no further with Scoto, I treated also with Sergeant-major Wentwort, brother of the Earl of Cleveland, a person of whom I had an excellent account, especially from Colonel Morghen. He merely read the conditions, and when he saw that the pay and a time limit were excluded he immediately declared that he could not accept such disadvantageous terms and he would not even take time to consider the matter. I have not treated with the son of the President Conouel, because my information is not good. As a last resort I tried to arrange separate engagements, but so far I have not found anyone here willing to go away and enter the pay of Venice, losing all the time of the journey; besides this, I gather since I took up this matter that the king would raise great difficulties about agreeing to let these men go without a colonel.
In this state of affairs, while I am deeply distressed at this delay in the service of the state, I thank God that more explicit and clearer commissions have reached me these last days. Although the ducal missives of the 24th May did not expressly command me to act in accordance with their tenor, I should not have raised any difficulty about granting pay to the officers at the time of the muster here if I had not known that the commissions of the state must be punctually executed, and that ministers must not transgress them in any particular. I knew how much your Excellencies might need these men and that delay might keep putting things off until the winter arrived, and in spite of my instruction I might have allowed myself some latitude, but I could not venture to do so, although I might believe that my private fault would tend to the service of the state. In this connection I may say that this morning Richaut, the merchant, with whom I have treated about providing the ships, sent me word that the captains are pressing for a decision, and if nothing is decided within eight or ten days every one will take his departure. Also that while at present the transport can be done at less than 10l. sterling per head, which the colonel demanded, he considers it hopeless at 11l. if there is delay. This bears out what I advised last week, that this affair is subject to alteration, from one day to another, and that difficulties may constantly be arising, which cannot be overcome or modified while my powers are limited. But my present condition is such that even if I had full powers and found the people ready to take the employment, it is impossible to arrange anything while I have not the money ready here. It ought to be ready here to enable payment to be made on the very day when the contract is signed. otherwise it is impossible to conclude anything with the colonel or the sailors, so that one may say that this delay is not loss of time, because it would proceed from not having the necessary money ready if from nothing else. Therefore if your Excellencies decide to have the levy I beseech you to fix your eyes on the question of money before everything else, in the assurance that I cannot begin anything unless I have it all ready. To wait for it in instalments creates uncertainty, and during all this time, in which I have received several packets of letters giving me hopes of remittances I suppose these have been delayed, owing to the numerous occasions for expenditure. I beg you to excuse my zeal, which constrains me to represent all that I think may be for your service.
The ducal missives of the 26th ult. have reached me to-day. With them I receive the confirmation of the fall of Mantua, an event of the greatest importance. I propose to inform his Majesty and the confidential ministers about it, although so far I have been unable to discover anyone among them who deserves that title, whenever I have occasion to go to the Court, which is eighty miles away from here. (fn. 1) I should make more haste if the news were better, and if they had not heard it long before, because the news came in letters from Antwerp, and it was confirmed by way of France before to-day. I shall not fail to make the observations which you command. They are very much to the purpose and it would be a good thing if matters were so disposed here that they could make an impression.
In the matter of visits I have nothing to add, except that I have been sensible of all the distinctions made. I am not in a position to state whether this is an old or a new form of courtesy, but can merely say that the ministers have not shown to me any sign of respect for your Serenity. As a good example of this, the President of the Council only recently returned my visit, after I have been in this charge for a year and more, and then he came to recommend his son, so that it must be ascribed to self interest merely.
News of the death of the Duke of Savoy has arrived by way of France. (fn. 2) It is thought that this accident may change things somewhat. The French ambassador told me this morning that there were signs that Prince Tomaso might put himself on the king's side. They do not know what may be expected of the new duke, especially if the French mean to keep possession of what they have taken. The ambassador gave me an extract from his letters, of which I enclose a copy. I gather from his conversation that they have little hope of relieving Casale, although he asserts that the king is resolved not to desist, and that he is more determined than ever upon the defence of Italy. If I may state freely my own opinion, I think that if they propose to go on, they aim rather at securing what they have taken, because the road to Casale does not lead from Pinarolo to Saluzzo and from Saluzzo to Villafranca. However, the apologists for the king's withdrawal to Lyons say that it is in order not to risk his person in their decision to give battle to the Spaniards in Italy.
We hear nothing special said about the peace with Spain. I hear that a courier arrived to-day and went straight to the Court, but I do not know what he brings. From Ratisbon they have sent the first proposal made at the opening of the diet, to declare the Prince Palatine unworthy of receiving any favour from the emperor on the pretext that after the diet of Mulhausen he tried to trouble the empire through the King of Sweden and others. The king here seemed to feel this news keenly, but the Spanish ambassador, through Carlisle, Arundel and other partisans, goes about soothing his feelings and at the same time preparing them to descend to anything harmful.
Ven left as I wrote. Nothing is known of what he is to negotiate with the States. The Dutch ambassador told me two days ago that he had not communicated anything to him, but he thought his principal negotiations would be directed to obtain a promise from the States that they would not enter into a treaty without imparting it to him. Upon this he repeated what has so often been said about the bad behaviour of the ministers here, and the contemptuous way in which they have treated the close alliance the king here has with his masters.
News has come that the Polish army has been divided against itself, and that a sanguinary conflict has taken place between the rival factions of Cossacks and Poles into which it was divided, 6,000 of the former and 4,000 of the latter being slain.
London, the 16th August, 1630.
Postscript.—Since writing the above some captains who had heard of my intention to send separate companies have come to offer to serve upon somewhat better terms than I have been able to obtain so far from Scoto. I will continue the negotiations so far as the limits of my instructions permit me, and it may serve as a stimulus to Scoto himself. I therefore think it advisable in spite of these uncertainties, that your Excellencies should let me have the necessary remittances, so that if by chance I happen to arrange the levy in that way, a conclusion may not be lost or delayed through lack of money. In any case, even if it all falls through, your money will be promptly remitted without loss.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.488. Copy of advices sent to the French ambassador, sent by Sig. Gio. di Morienne on the 4th August, 1630.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.489. Copy of letter written by Lord Dorchester to the Ambassador.
According to my promise and your desires I have renewed my efforts for the republic's levy here. After I had related what you said to me both orally and by your secretary at Nonesuch, his Majesty gave orders to proceed with the levy. His Majesty considers it would be prejudicial to the republic and his subjects if the companies consisted of 200 men each, though this might suffice for garrison duty only. For other duties they should be smaller and have more officers. If you will divide the 2,000 men into 15 companies his Majesty will gladly find you experienced officers, and if that is too much, he will do the same for 12 companies. This is what I have to inform you on his Majesty's behalf, and I shall wait to hear your decision.
The Court at Bagshot, the 4th August, 1630.
Postscript.—His Majesty particularly recommends two good captains, Firret and Killegre, (fn. 3) who will present themselves at your first word of acceptance. I beg you to remember always my friend Captain Vroughton.
Copy of the Ambassador's reply to Lord Dorchester. (fn. 4)
I cannot thank you sufficiently for your courtesy about the levy. I cannot say anything at present about dividing the regiment into 15 or 12 companies, except that I shall always try to give his Majesty satisfaction in all that depends upon me. I may add that the limited commissions which I hold forbid me to take any new decision. However, as there may be some delay over the levy and I may be at Court in a few days I hope to find a way to satisfy his Majesty. In any case you shall always be advised before I come to any definite decision.
London, the 16th August, 1630.
[Italian.]
Aug. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
490. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The negotiations of the English ambassador are very advanced and many say the peace is nearly concluded; but his Excellency himself told me that the office of the Infanta of Flanders, employed with the art they desired here, have proved very advantageous, and it was already arranged that an ambassador of the King of England should take part in the diet, and commissioners of the Palatine should also receive passports for it. They would treat for the removal of the imperial ban, which would leave the Palatine a legitimate action over his dominions. Bavaria had written here saying he could not go personally to the diet, although I knew from other quarters that his Highness was already at Ratisbon with the emperor. The ambassador admitted this, but this makes me more anxious, and as a meeting took place at the house of the Count of Ognat, to which Scaglia and his Excellency were to be summoned, I dread some machination against France. He belongs to the Spanish party and I think he is ill affected to the French, apart from the bias of his nation. I will warn the French ambassador so that he may investigate the matter.
On Wednesday night they despatched a courier to Flanders with all speed with despatches for Germany, I am told, about the particulars brought by the agent of Friesland and about the affairs of England. The Spaniards rejoice at the advantages they enjoy from the distractions of the Dutch, and the count congratulates himself on their naval armaments which cost so much, as they have gone back this year without booty. They offered Pernambuco to the King of England, but they have no confidence whatever in that quarter, which is beginning to be really united with the Spaniards.
Madrid, the 17th August, 1630.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
491. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Three ambassadors have arrived from the Duke of Naiburgh. It is said they are sent to ask for the Lower Palatinate, an artful move to prevent the restoration of the Palatine to that state, which the English ambassador who is shortly expected will ask for. I hear, however, that the electors are very disposed to restore that prince to Cæsar's favour and to the possession of that part of the Palatinate, and the general opinion is that it may be possible to delay but not to prevent this.
Ratisbon, the 19th August, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Aug. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
492. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Sir [Harry] Ven has always tried to impress upon everyone that his king will never make any agreement with Spain without securing the interests of the Palatine. His assertions found little credit and as a matter of fact his operations since his return here point in quite a different direction. He negotiated first at secret conferences, and then with more open declarations. He is trying to induce the States to make an accommodation with Spain in conjunction with England. To the amazement of their High Mightinesses he has freely stated that if they will agree to this, his king already has sufficient powers in his hands from the Spaniards. I do what I can to encourage their objections here to so prejudicial and poisonous a business, as I know that the best opinion is naturally against it. I do my best to point out to the ministers the present advantageous circumstances, and I performed the offices imposed upon me at a special audience in the assembly. The President, the Count of Colemburgh, expressed their regret at the fall of Mantua and their satisfaction at the vigorous steps taken by your Serenity, and they would not fail to take the measures required by the situation.
I spoke about Mantua to the Prince of Orange, who called upon me yesterday. He confirmed the truth of the negotiations of the English ambassador, speaking very confidentially to me on the subject. He went on to complain that the King of England, not content with proceeding with his negotiations with Spain, without communicating their substance to the States, now with his own business practically concluded, wanted to act as agent for the King of Spain to induce these provinces to make a truce or peace. He said the English ambassador was practically acting as ambassador for Spain. He added that the States could trust the English the less because they showed no care for the interests of the Palatine, and although the Spaniards promised to restore to the Palatine what they held of his states, this was a mere show and would do but little good to the Palatine, as it was well known that the Spaniards only held six places in the Palatinate of which Franchendal was the most important and the others counted for little. I perceived that the prince, with an artifice unusual in him, was trying hard to give me to understand that the States would not let themselves be persuaded by the English, but I knew for a fact that the States have sent to collect the opinions of each of the Provinces upon the proposals of England.
I have succeeded in getting a copy of the exact proposals made by the ambassador, of which I enclose a translation. The prince told me that the English excused themselves for going so far with the Spaniards on the ground that the French would never declare themselves for an open alliance with the right party and would not come to an open rupture with the Spaniards. I maintained that the French had not abandoned the public cause, and spoke of the generous action of the King of Sweden, saying it was necessary to follow his example. I have written to Contarini in France to see if he can obtain some resolute declaration from the French, without which we may fear that the States may hurry into some accommodation, incited by the offers of Spain, the negotiations of England and the ardent solicitation of Vane.
When that minister came to see me recently he spoke of the French exactly as the Prince of Orange had done. While very reserved about everything else he declared that all the mischief proceeded from the reserve of the French, who would not come to an open breach with the Spaniards. If they had done this he said they would have had on their side not only England but all the other powers who were concerned. I said the Most Christian had done well for the cause and had gone too far to draw back, but I perceived from his talk that the English thought of nothing but an accommodation with the Spaniards, who aim at making a joint settlement with both England and these provinces. The English, in their desire to forward their own agreement, are trying to bring the States to the same state of mind, but opinions differ here, and if the French come to some vigorous resolution to break openly with the Spaniards they may decide here to make no peace or truce for themselves, except when the French choose.
The Hague, the 20th August, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.493. Proposals of the Ambassador of Great Britain upon the treaty with the Spaniards, handed to the Deputies of the States General on the 13th August, 1630. (fn. 5)
My king made an alliance with your lordships against the King of Spain on the 25th September, 1625. The basis of this was the restitution of the Palatinate and the liberty of these Provinces. For some time past the King of Spain has intimated to his Majesty his decision to satisfy him upon both points, expressing the desire that his Majesty should enter upon some treaty with him. My king has not neglected to inform your lordships of this from time to time. His Majesty has now charged me to inform you that he has decided to make proof of the King of Spain's offers upon the first point, and for the second that king has given him testimony of such good will that he has placed in his Majesty's hands powers to treat with your lordships for peace or a truce. As his Majesty has done nothing so far without informing you, he desires, before finally answering the King of Spain, to know if your lordships are inclined to accept such a treaty or no, and as things are already so well disposed that the loss of time may cause prejudice, his Majesty asks for a prompt and categorical reply, which I ask may be delivered in writing.
[Italian.]
Aug. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
494. To the Ambassador in England.
We have only received your letters of the 2nd to-day. We observe with satisfaction your zeal for our service. The advantage of the state truly consists in prompt succour. Time is so short that we can only mention the essential thing, namely our great desire to know that you have arranged the levy with Colonel Scot. We understand that you find him the most able and the least greedy and the most friendly. You have enough to bring the matter to a successful conclusion. Herewith you will have the second letters of exchange for 20,000 ducats, and new remittances for 20,000 will be added. We send a copy of what we are writing to the Hague for information to use for our service as opportunity arises.
Ayes, 128.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Aug. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
495. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
My negotiations with the captains whom I proposed to send out separately has ended without any results, because when we came to close quarters with the matter only one would accept the terms, the others excusing themselves and saying that they did not think that they were so disadvantageous. I do not consider this very unfortunate, because a levy of this kind cannot turn out such as is required and is subject to great disorders. I am therefore awaiting the instructions of your Excellencies about the capitulations of Colonel Scoto, and in the meantime I suffer constant distress at the delay which is so contrary to your interests on every account, as you require a prompt despatch, without counting the disadvantage of a more stormy season for the sea voyage and the greater difficulty of collecting the men. I have to accommodate myself to necessity and confine myself within the terms which have been prescribed to me.
I have received to-day the ducal missives of the 2nd inst. They certainly encourage me to regard your necessities more than my instructions; but my respect for these is so strong that I do not venture to depart from them. I note the orders to the ambassador at the Hague to increase the levies already begun and to try to induce other colonels to undertake the service upon the same terms. That might succeed there, with the example of Suinton to go upon, but I assure your Excellencies that no one would take such terms here, and if that ambassador has to arrange for new levies he certainly will not be able to make a bargain here for 10 ducats, as your Excellencies seem to wish. I feel sure that he will be able to serve you, because you have given him latitude about the conditions. I venture to say that if you had done the same with me I should by now have been in a position to despatch a good number of men, at least so far as the money I have received admitted. In this connection I may state that, owing to the delays that have interrupted the matter I have in hand, I have tried to put the money in deposit for a month, so that it may not remain fruitless. But owing to the shortness of the time I did not find any merchants who would take it, and I did not wish to engage it for longer, because I reckoned that almost exactly at the expiry of the month I should receive definite instructions from your Excellencies either to make the levy or to dispose of the money as you thought proper.
I have seen the French ambassador several times of late, but have gathered nothing more from him than I have reported. It becomes ever clearer that they have little hope of relieving Casale, while on the other hand they seem determined to continue their successes against the state of Savoy. In speaking of the loss of Mantua he said that they were not surprised, because the republic had not the number of troops required. I answered him as effectively as I could contrive, speaking of the succours which had so frequently been sent into Mantua.
The courier who recently came from Spain brought word of the rejoicings at that Court over the birth of the prince here, with a great show of a union of hearts and interests. The French ambassador told me that he brought ever greater hopes of the conclusion of the peace negotiations, because they have recently given up the point of restitution here, which they have always insisted upon, of the places in the Palatinate which were defended by English arms. Since the arrival of the ordinary from Antwerp it seems the news about the arrival of the fleet in Spain, which was thought to be authentic, is still uncertain, and the successes of the King of Sweden are said to be much more considerable than in the past, but as there is no minister of that king here, the particulars are not made public.
The Duke of Lorraine has sent a gentleman here with congratulations on the birth of the prince. He is a person of some standing and it was stated that he came in the capacity of an ambassador. As I wished to act in conjunction with the French ambassador in the matter of compliments, I learned from him how he proposed to treat him. He told me, however, that he is not an ambassador, and had not yet allowed him to see him. He did not think he wished to, because he had found out that under the colour of compliments his master had sent him here to foment the Austrian party.
London, the 23rd August, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 23.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
496. The papal nuncio came into the Collegio and said:
Some weeks ago I heard that there was preaching in the house of Daniel Nis. I did not believe it, but it has been confirmed. I have spoken before on similar subjects, but have always been open to reason. There is now preaching in four places, the Dutch embassy, the English embassy, where a merchant has the preaching done, the house of the Duke of Rohan and this of Nis. If this is allowed private merchants will follow his example, and there would soon be more of them than of Catholic preachers. I am sure the republic does not wish this. The doge replied that the republic yielded to no prince in its care for the Catholic faith. At the English embassy there was only a secretary, who was a Catholic, a poet whom they had brought for their service.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
497. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
They have nearly decided that the Cardinal Infant shall go as governor of the Netherlands, but they want to make sure of the union with England beforehand. Cottington does his utmost to foster the friendship begun between his Highness and the king, when Prince of Wales and staying here, to marry the Infanta. Thus Cottington says that his Majesty and the cardinal would then swear eternal friendship, and in the king's name he has invited him to proceed to that island, if he goes to Flanders. Thus are matters conducted. If the French are not careful they will find these things confirmed to their disadvantage.
They are devoting their attention to putting a considerable force at sea, and to facilitate this they have granted leave to many to arm ships and go privateering. Many Biscayans have come forward, but they will scour the route to the Indies and the north. Some Genoese are also arming ships. Their object may be to divert the wool trade from Venice and bring it all to Leghorn.
Madrid, the 24th August, 1630.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
498. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Duke of Neuburg will be leaving here soon for Brussels and then Ratisbon. He has exchanged frequent visits with the English ambassador. Their business has not yet transpired, although some say that their object has been to persuade these Provinces to enter upon negotiations for a truce, such as the English strongly desire. I have seen Ven again and he began of his own accord to speak of his king's negotiations with Spain. He attempted to excuse his sovereign, confessing that internal turmoil and certain interests of trade desired by his people led him to embrace proposals which might not suit others so well as England. He repeated the following phrase several times: Believe me, his Majesty has thoroughly thought things over, and those who advise him find that salus populi suprema lex est. He knew that I was well informed of his proposals in the assembly and went on to say that the king desired in one way or another to know the decision of their High Mightinesses about treating with the Spaniards. He hinted that the king cared little what it might be, perhaps wishing to infer that England and Spain had already arrived at a good understanding. With some shame at abandoning the Palatine he mumbled something about the offers of the Spaniards being so great that it was only right to make proof of them, but he could not deny that there was some doubt about the Spaniards restoring even the small part of the Palatinate which they hold. He went on to remark upon the extraordinary successful beginning of the King of Sweden. It was necessary to help and encourage him, and in spite of the negotiations with the Spaniards his king would willingly contribute some help. He had sent a despatch to England about this and expected a favourable reply soon. I saw through this, because I knew that in England they did not listen to the gentleman who recently went to get help for Sweden, and as I see that, as the Prince of Orange said, this English ambassador is acting here as ambassador for Spain, I confined myself to generalities, saying I hoped his king would find some middle way in the negotiations, that would prove less harmful to the public cause.
The Hague, the 26th August, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
499. VICENZO GUSSNI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Count of Farensbach has arrived at the Hague from Sweden. He says he is going to England in a few days to raise some fresh levies by his Majesty's order. From what he remarked to an intimate it seems that he also has some other secret commission. He recently came to see me. I find that in addition to the levies in England and Scotland he merely comes to try and induce some of the best soldiers here, secretly, to go to Sweden.
Colonel Suynton has informed me that the troops of the second fleet are ready to embark. I sent the Secretary Zonca to the Texel to make the muster and hasten their departure. I have never been able to get more than hopeful words from the colonel about increasing the present regiment.
The Hague, the 26th August, 1630.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
500. To the Ambassador in England.
We send a copy of what we are writing to the Hague. You will see our decision to send an ambassador extraordinary to the diet. If you are provoked, you will make use of the ideas expressed in these letters, as a reply would be superfluous.
Herewith we send you the second letters of exchange for 20,000 ducats. The king's permission and an agreement with the colonel must precede the levy, about which we are waiting to hear from you; it should be soon. We have no letters from you this week. We will send instructions according to what happens and we are fully satisfied with your diligence and ability in our service.
Ayes, 102.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
501. To the Ambassador in Spain.
You will keep up your visits to the English ambassador in order the better to observe his proceedings and you will continue your prudent reserve, upholding the uprightness of the republic and its desire for peace which it would prefer to the anxieties of war, because peace can do so much for every prince, and maintain any sort of state soever.
Ayes, 117.Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 A great exaggeration. The king was at Bagshot on the 14th August and at Farnham on the 18th and 19th.
2 Charles Emanuel I. died on the 26th July
3 See the petition of Capt. William Killigrew. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1629–31, page 300.
4 The original is preserved at the Public Record Office. S.P. Foreign, Venice.
5 There is a draft of these proposals in the S.P. Foreign, Holland, in English.