Venice
September 1630

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1919

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407-419

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'Venice: September 1630 ', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 407-419. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89275 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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September 1630

Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
502. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador arrived last Thursday and with him M. Rusdorf, the Palatine's councillor. He had audience of the emperor on the following day, who received him with great honour and courtesy. He asked for the pardon and restitution of the Palatine, and will make the same request of the electors in the diet, for whom he brings letters of credence from his king.
As soon as he arrived the Spanish ambassador went and had a long colloquy with him. It seems that the Spaniards want the King of England and the Palatine to recognise as coming from them whatever is granted by the electoral assembly, and yet they will give up what they cannot keep, because the electors and other princes of the empire are most determined that his Catholic Majesty shall abandon all the places he has occupied in Germany. However, we shall wait to see the issue of these negotiations, which can hardly fail to be favourable to the Palatine, although the emperor refused to see or hear his deputy, Rusdorf.
I paid his Excellency a complimentary visit, and he expressed a great regard for the republic. I will maintain the most confidential relations with him in order to penetrate more deeply into his very important negotiations.
Ratisbon, the 2nd September, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
503. To the Ambassador in England.
You performed an admirable office with the king about the levy. We hear of his Majesty's readiness in this matter with the utmost gratification. In thanking him you will confirm our ancient, well grounded affection and esteem and our desire to make a response. You made suitable answers to the ministers and to the king himself. You have reason to congratulate yourself because we know that under present circumstances your operations at that Court are subject to various accidents and contradictions. You will have heard from Gussoni that the English ambassador in Holland is agitating for a truce or peace between Spain and the States. It is astonishing that such offices should proceed from England, so contrary to ancient institutions, self interest and past action. You will try and find out about this, and if they still persist, for although it may help England to make peace with Spain, it may not be at all for their advantage for Spain to make peace with the Dutch. However, we live in times of great changes, and the bad advice of ministers may thwart right views. It is only possible to keep on the alert and observe these proceedings.
We note the extravagant claims about the levy. The eighth article cannot be allowed on any account. If you cannot arrange with Scot or some other colonel within the terms of our previous commissions, you must let the matter drop. Loose companies will be bodies without heads, and so it is useless to think of them. You will state your opinion to Gussoni so that he may carry out our orders in Holland, where they are more reasonable. You can remit the money sent, to Amsterdam, which will be an advantage, and it will remain ready for state affairs. This is the essence of what we have to say this week, besides expressing the complete satisfaction of the state.
Ayes, 111.Noes, 0.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
504. To the Ambassador at the Hague.
Owing to the difference in interests it is unlikely that the negotiations of England for a truce or peace between Spain and the States will have a better issue than similar operations in the past. But the slightest move in that direction may injure the common cause. You will continue to make use of your past instructions with the States and the Prince of Orange, but tactfully, so that the English ambassador shall not take offence, pointing out the proper course for the well being of those provinces.
Ayes, 111.Noes, 0.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
505. That in conformity with the paper presented in the Collegio by the Resident of England about the English merchants Obson and Grisbol, with a request to despatch their cause, the matter be referred to the Five Savii alla Mercanzia to decide after hearing the arguments, and the same magistracy shall decide upon the claims of F. Varen, with as much power as if it was done by this Council.
Ayes, 111.Noes, 1.Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
506. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Four days ago the ducal missives of the 9th ult. reached me, and to-day I receive those of the 16th. Both bring me letters of exchange, the former for 30,000 ducats and the latter for 20,000, the first arranged thus, 6,940 ducats 4 direct here, 10,000 by Amsterdam and 13,059 ducats 20 by Antwerp; the second, 8,132 ducats by London and 11,868 by Amsterdam, so that in all your Excellencies have so far remitted 82,000 ducats to me. I have not yet heard anything of the 10,000 which I imagined were to be sent me by the Ambassador Gussoni, but I fancy that as his Excellency has to provide for a larger number of troops, he will find it difficult to make me the remittance. I keep an exact account of the money I receive and of what is coming, and if I do not send the reckonings it is because owing to the differences in the monies on the various marts I cannot have complete information until all the money has arrived here, but I perceive that the loss will be considerable owing to the lowness of the exchange. I have sent the letters of the 9th to Bertollotti at Amsterdam, by arrangement with Richaut, his correspondent, and I will do the same with those of the 16th, so that he may accept them, and in the course of time I will send powers for him to collect the money and forward me the remittances. As the letters are made so as not to be payable at Amsterdam until two months after their date, I shall not be able to obtain the money until the 9th and 16th of November. Those for Antwerp are the same, and those for London likewise. However, as your Excellencies have given me power to make use of the money, taking it at exchange in case of need, I will avail myself of this and try to get the best terms possible. I have consigned the letters for Antwerp to Richaut, as the one to whom they are payable. As the letters are upon different places there is no doubt but that there will be some greater interest, because the provisions will have to correspond with other profits usual to the business. I will try to get the best terms in this also. I wish I had received the necessary orders to begin the levy because I am much distressed at waiting for them, since this delay cannot fail to be prejudicial. On this account I confess that I have frequently been tempted by my desire to serve well, to arrogate greater authority to myself and agree to grant pay to the officers from the day of the muster here, since your Excellencies have already left me free to arrange the question of time in the best way possible. My duty not to depart from my instructions has prevailed over every other consideration, and on their arrival I shall not fail to act with all zeal and diligence.
With the despatches I found copies of letters written to the Hague. I will use the advices as occasion requires. I note the instructions to Gussoni to get some valiant captain. I keep my attention fixed upon this, but it is difficult to find a person who can really be called suitable for the employment. As I know how necessary it is to have certain information about the quality of the person before presenting him to your Excellencies for your service, I observe great caution. Yet I do not fail to welcome all the offers that are made to me, without going any further, because all those who make offers are thinking of themselves while I am bound to think of the state.
The gentlemen who came here from the Most Christian and Monsieur, his brother, about the prince's birth, left some days ago. They received many jewels as presents and abundant honours, in response for what was done for Montagu, who took the news to France. The one who came here from the Duke of Lorraine, I know not whether by order of his master or through being led astray by the partisans of Spain, secretly visited the Ambassador Coloma. He wanted to see the French ambassador afterwards, but that minister was on his guard, and having found out about this slip, he refused to receive him, speaking of the error as it deserved. Before leaving the gentleman tried to find a way of appeasing the French ambassador, but there was no way of doing so, and thus he had to leave with the mortification of having acted ill and incautiously. As soon as he got here the Earl of Carlisle went to see him, although he had no capacity other than that of a simple gentleman, merely because of the report that his prince was not on good terms with France. From this Carlisle's declared ill will against France, which he shows upon the slightest occasions, is made more apparent than ever.
A Dutch vessel recently arrived in one of the ports here with booty taken off the coasts of Spain from a vessel laden with wood, found derelict, without a soul on board. It has been detained upon the claim of the governor of that place to have half the booty. The Dutch ambassador is very incensed about it and is to go to Court to make complaint to the king, as he is resolved not to suffer the prejudice which such a precedent would set up for cases of greater importance.
So far we have not heard of the replies of the States to the proposals made by the Ambassador Ven, who recently went back to Holland, whether their High Mightinesses mean to treat with the Spaniards in conjunction with the King of Great Britain. It is thought that they will not depart much from the views expressed in the past, and indeed there is reason to believe that they may express themselves even more strongly, because, as the ambassador remarked to me, this affair keeps becoming more embittered, because all the offices are performed at the wrong time, so that the States cannot feel content.
As yet the news of the successes of the King of Sweden remains uncertain. He recently preferred a request that the king here would be pleased to approve of his move by the announcement that he would help him, in order to give him a greater advantage with those of this faith, but the Dutch ambassador has told me that they would not even gratify him with this show, and this makes one believe that the Council is more inclined than ever to come to terms with Spain.
So far they have not published anything about the commissions given to Anstruther, the ambassador for protesting at the diet of Ratisbon. It may be that they have written to Holland for the satisfaction of the Princes Palatine there, although from what one learns here there is no reason to believe it. Some days ago it was said that a levy of 16,000 men was to be made in Scotland for the service of the King of Sweden, under the command of the Marquis of Hamilton, a Scottish cavalier of high lineage, who married the niece of the Duke of Buckingham. Very great dissatisfaction arose out of that marriage, and to set this right to some extent the duke himself resigned to Hamilton the office of master of the horse to the king. I will send your Excellencies full particulars of this affair when I have more light on the subject.
The latest letters from France report the capture of Carignano in Piedmont, but nothing is said about relieving Casale. Some report has come of an understanding of the Spaniards for the surprise of Calais, for which the serjeant major of that place has been arrested with several other Flemings who were concerned in the conspiracy. This attempt ought to strengthen their resolutions, and it is desirable and necessary to look for the consequences.
I keep up confidential relations with Sir Thomas Roe, such as circumstances and his interests require. At the present moment he has not much intercourse with ministers, as he is out of employment and enjoys no influence. However, he is esteemed a man of excellent sense, though that may be the more to his discredit, in view of the opinions which are on the carpet just now.
There is still some doubt about the arrival of the fleet in Spain. Those who were the most eager to publish the news have grown cool, but there are still some who maintain that it has certainly arrived.
London, the 6th September, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
507. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The diet has been thrown into confusion because the post of commander in chief of the empire was offered to Bavaria subject to such restrictions, that he refused it. This is the work of the Spaniards, who do not want Bavaria made more powerful. It has prevented the English ambassador from appearing in the diet to ask for the pardon and restitution of the Palatine. The Spanish ambassador makes a show of being very eager about this in order to make that sovereign and the Palatine believe that what they may obtain will be through his intercession. The matter is full of difficulties and of uncertain issue. With the promise of the restitution, confirmed by the ambassador of Flanders, they are also treating for a peace or truce with the Dutch. Many, however, are of opinion that they are encouraging the hopes of the English in order to gain time, so that the Prince of Orange may not take the field against the states of the Catholic, whose army is said to be much diminished.
Ratisbon, the 9th September, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
508. To the Ambassador in England.
We have your letters of the 23rd ult. We repeat what we said about letting the matter of the levies drop, and sending the remittances to Amsterdam. It is hardly necessary to trouble to answer the things put abroad by the French ambassador about Mantua, because the truth is sure to shine out in the end. Every one knows that when the Germans were at their strongest the republic sent repeated succours into Mantua. If the place fell through the laxity of the defenders or treason, after receiving a reinforcement of 400 of our troops, we can only lament our ill fortune, seeing that the enemy, with very weak forces, captured a position which was not defended by our troops, but by others, and ought to have been better guarded. If anything further is heard from that minister on the subject you will be able to confute his assertions by a recital of the facts, showing how fully the republic fulfilled her obligations under the terms of the alliance with France.
We send you a copy of what we are writing to the Hague, for your information upon current events.
Ayes, 134.Noes, 1.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
509. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I wished to see the cardinal before sending off my despatch. He spoke about the truce. With respect to the advantage of delay for the proposals of England in Holland the cardinal said, The peace between England and Spain is an assured fact. The proposal of the English ambassador is simply in order to abandon the States, with a show of reason, because they have bound themselves to the Spaniards to do this. They are a poor lot and ruin others as well as themselves (sono povera gente, rovinano se stessi e gl'altri).
I am informed from another quarter that the cardinal heaps favours upon the Dutch ambassador and told him that if the English withdrew their help, the king would double his.
Lyons, the 13th September, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
510. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador has had audience of the electors to whom he set forth his embassy for the pardon and restitution of the Palatine. The office was very ardent and effective and he has the help of the Spaniards. However, they gave him no reply, though the Englishman is trying to get a favourable one, in conformity with the promises of the King of Spain. The deputy of the Palatine's brother has also been here, to ask for the restitution of his portion, but he likewise has not been despatched.
Ratisbon, the 16th September, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
511. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Orange will have to return to the Hague sooner than was expected. The English ambassador came to see me before leaving to see the Palatine at Rhenes. He seemed very anxious about the prince's coming, hoping that the States here will take in hand the sooner the question of an accommodation with the Spaniards, which he had proposed. But those of sounder views assure me that the debate on the reply to be given to him will be delayed longer than he supposes, and they have already arranged that the instances of Sweden for help, presented by the Ambassador Camerarius, shall have precedence of everything else. I endeavour to encourage the good intentions I observe in many of the government.
Apparently Ven does not object to this point about Sweden coming before the answer to him. He professes that the King of Great Britain is ready to join in with any assistance although their High Mightinesses clearly perceive that nothing must be expected from England. They say that Ven's journey to see the Palatine at Rhenes is because of news from Ratisbon of overtures instituted by the Ambassador Anstruther and Rusdorf, the Palatine's agent, about his restitution to some part of his dominions. It seems that the Imperialists are willing to restore all that was taken away from his mother and brother.
The Hague, the 18th September, 1630.
Postscript.—Your Serenity's packet has just reached me. I will make use of the instructions there in order to check some sinister reports by which the English ambassador here is trying hard to further his negotiations at this Court for an accommodation between these provinces and Spain, because the Spaniards want to work it jointly with the one with the English. The peace with the latter is generally considered here as ready for the final touches.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
512. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The count complains of the way things are conducted at the diet of Ratisbon, and that the electors have only met to foment war in Italy. The English ambassador says that the Duke of Tursi replied to the electors that if peace was to be made in Italy it must also be made in the empire, restoring the Palatine's dominions and giving ear to his commissioners. By such relations the ambassador feeds his hopes, and stays on at this Court awaiting the issue of that diet.
Madrid, the 19th September, 1630.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
513. To the Ambassador in England.
We send you a copy of what we are writing to Gussoni this evening, for information, to use according to circumstances. We have nothing to add to what we wrote last week. We have just received your letters, which afford us further cause for delay. We are providing you with 300 ducats for carriage of letters and couriers.
Ayes, 71.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
514. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ducal missives of the 22nd ult. have reached me with the letters of exchange for 20,000 ducats in duplicate of those I received last week, and in nine remittances for 20,000 ducats more, distributed thus, 6,615 ducats 8 by Antwerp, 4,500 ducats by Amsterdam, 6,884 ducats 16 by London. The letters for Antwerp have been consigned to Richaut, being payable to him like the others. I will send those for Amsterdam to Bertolotti, so as to have the remittances here when the time comes. The Ambassador Gussoni writes to me from the Hague on the 24th ult. that in accordance with orders from your Serenity he will try and have the remittances made here of the 10,000 ducats at the time when the letters received by me are matured. From what his Excellency writes to me that will not be until after the 2nd prox. However, any failure due to delay is fully provided for in the authority which your Excellencies have given me to make use of the money in any case. Matters are now in the position that when the ordinary arrives, whom I expect in a week at latest, I shall have nothing to do but begin the levy, and I hope that it will very soon be ready. Certainly I will spare no effort to hasten it on. I only pray that God will give me strength, because just now I am much afflicted with my usual indisposition.
The report is confirmed that the Marquis of Hamilton is to undertake a levy for the King of Sweden. This nobleman offered himself to that king some time ago. The offer was accepted and the king has tried to lay the marquis under even greater obligations in order to profit by it. The Count of Feremsbec, who went to the Netherlands for another affair of a similar nature has come on here to make more sure of his good will and to try and obtain some assistance from this king. He called upon me and told me of the whole affair. It amounts substantially to this, that the marquis is to make a levy of 6,000 Scots, and Ferensbech will make another of 4,000 foot and 2,000 horse in the Netherlands on the frontiers of Germany, to be united under his command. From what I gather the plan is to enter some place in Germany to create a diversion. The marquis himself also called on me and informed me of his decision to go to the King of Sweden. He asked me whether your Serenity would be willing to contribute a sum of money to facilitate this, on the supposition that you would experience a great benefit from this step. Feremsbach also spoke to me to the same effect. In this matter of sharing the expense I answered them both in general terms, but I was particularly careful to point out that your Excellencies are operating for the public cause, and it was necessary to look elsewhere, notably to the King of Great Britain, who is so deeply interested in the affairs of Germany and who has no burden at present which can excuse him from taking a share and a very large one. They both assured me, independently, that the king will undertake some portion, and Sferemsbach stated specifically that he is now giving 20,000l. sterling, that is 100,000 ducats, and if the peace with Spain is not made they hope to have 300,000 crowns. My acquaintance with affairs here renders me utterly incredulous about this, and I think it was a stroke intended to smooth the way elsewhere. Accordingly when I saw the marquis I told him that I must know the entire course of this affair before I made any request to your Serenity; I wished to know the special grounds not only for this move, but of those who supported by their help. He promised to give me his proposal in writing, and that would also show me the readiness of his master. He said he hoped that the King of France would also join, and that your Excellencies would contribute. With respect to this he said that if I did not think it possible to obtain a prompt resolution, he would send letters expressly to Venice. I would not allow this, because if such a resolution is to be taken, it can always be carried out by me with less fuss, and that is what I fancy such an affair requires. I have tried to make enquiries in all directions, and from what I learn so far, the 20,000l. sterling which the king has paid down or has promised to pay are for lands of an equivalent value to be renounced by the marquis for a sum of 12,000 ducats of revenue, the money required by him to make the levy and other provisions, as he is obliged to take all these troops at his own expense as far as the rendezvous, although that will be made good to him. I learned from this that my calculations were not far wrong, and that he is not likely to obtain anything here.
So far as France is concerned, the marquis has treated with the ambassador and Ferensbec has pressed him, saying that some of the money which the Most Christian had decided to give to the king might be employed for this purpose, and that his Majesty would be very pleased about it. The ambassador actually promised to write. He remarked to me that this business ought to be negotiated with M. de Sciarnese, who is in Sweden. Feremsbec openly says that the States will participate, and he hinted to me that he hoped to have the troops who are now serving under Count William of Nassau. But from what the Ambassador Joachim said to me I see no grounds for this, as no overtures have yet been made to him, though he certainly told me that the States are now treating for the renewal of the alliance with the King of Sweden.
Feremsbec is returning to Holland, and will go on thence to the King of Sweden, returning afterwards for the conclusion of this business. If anything comes of it, it will be for next spring, so I shall await the orders of your Excellencies, if you think fit to give a more definite answer to the marquis. Meanwhile time will show what decisions will be most fitting, because if the King of Sweden continues to progress as successfully as he has begun, and if affairs in Italy remain in their present position, you might find it advantageous for your interests to join in to some extent, if this step is taken on good and solid foundations. I have already heard that the King of Sweden has sent all the powder and other munitions to Scotland, as if there was no doubt whatever about the matter.
A courier from Spain reached the Ambassador Coloma the day before yesterday. I have tried hard to find out some particulars, but without success owing to the secrecy with which they habitually proceed, a manifest sign of irregularity and mischief, which will ultimately come to light. The Dutch ambassador, who is deeply interested in this affair, went to see the treasurer to learn something. That minister excused himself, saying that he had not yet seen the letters, although more than a day and a half had passed since he received them, and it is known that he was unspeakably eager to have them. I gather one single little thing from several particulars, that there is no conclusion so far, and that everything depends upon the reply that the States will make to the last proposals of the Ambassador Ven. The Ambassador Joachim laid stress upon this to me, especially where Ven said that the Catholic had given the king a proxy to treat for a peace or a truce with the United Provinces. He thinks that if it is true that this proxy was given, peace will certainly be concluded, as it was unlikely that the Spaniard would give it when in a position of enmity. He added another consideration arising out of the first, that, if peace is concluded, it was not necessary for Ven to say that before giving the final reply to the King of Spain the king here wished to know the intentions of the States; so that he laughs at the whole affair. He told me that he did not know what answer the Provinces would give, but he knew full well that the proposal did not harmonise at all with the genius of his masters. I perceive that ill feeling is growing between that quarter and this, and if, as I expect, they conclude peace here, I feel equally sure that the States will have no part in it.
The advices which the Ambassador Mocenigo sent me from Spain state that Cottington announced that the States had offered Fernambuc to the king here, and that he made use of this to forward his designs, but he knew for certain that such a proposal had never been made. I thought I would make sure about this, and find that the announcement is utterly false, but it shows clearly with what aims he is proceeding.
I think that I have frequently remarked that owing to the bad advice that is given to the king, it was impossible to look for anything but mischief. If there was nothing else to indicate this, the proposal of Ven mentioned above tends to inflict a more notable injury upon the public cause than anything else that could be imagined. Possibly their chief motive is to thwart the intentions of France.
The Dutch ambassador has remonstrated with the ministers about the secret levies being raised here for the Infanta. They all professed ignorance of it, and the treasurer in particular remarked that if there had been any deception it should be put right, because even if peace ensues a good servant of his Majesty would not advise him to let his subjects go to serve the Spaniards. Thus all the satisfaction they give consists in words. Similarly with respect to the ship recently plundered, they expressed to me their intention to set it free, but nothing is done, although the strongest representations were made.
The ducal missives of the 30th ult. have just reached me with a 'copy of the letters to the Hague. I note the appointment of an ambassador extraordinary to the diet of Ratisbon, of which I have heard some talk here recently, and the Dutch ambassador in particular asked me about it. In other occasions, if I am provoked, I will answer as indicated. I have found the second letters of exchange for the 20,000 ducats received last week, and in the matter of the levy I am only waiting for orders, so as not to depart from the conditions prescribed.
London, the 20th September, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
515. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Wake, the English ambassador designate to this Court, where he is in very ill odour owing to what has occurred, wants to come to France to his charge. He has written to the cardinal to justify himself (fn. 1) and sent the proposals made by his king to the new Duke of Savoy for a reconciliation with France. The English agent has told me all. When he has the cardinal's reply he will send to England, so that the king may direct his movements. He is most anxious to leave Piedmont and escape the plague. The cardinal would not at first receive the letter because it was addressed Monsieur instead of Monsignor, but he afterwards took it and without reading it he told the agent that the King of England had the right to send anyone he pleased as ambassador, but neither the king nor the ministers wished to treat with Wake, who had performed so many ill offices. He did not give this as a formal reply because he wished to speak to the king first. Wake writes, as an indication of his good intentions, that your Excellencies, in the absence of your ambassador, make use of him with Savoy, which seems something new to me.
Lyons, the 20th September, 1630.
[Italian.]
Sept. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
516. To the Ambassador in Spain.
You made a prudent reply to the English ambassador. With the ancient habit of the republic of affectionate esteem for his Majesty, we shall always be the same, and while his ministers avoid occasions for innovation or arousing jealousy, the republic will leave nothing to be desired showing its sincere bias towards quiet and the common service.
Ayes, 121.Noes, 1.Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
517. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Ven has gone to Rhenes to confer with the Princes Palatine about their interests, and to make some arrangements about Rusdorf, who writes that they are trying at Ratisbon to separate his business from that of the English, and for that reason they refused to give him audience jointly with Anstruther as well as about some greater difficulties, which the Spaniards have raised of late about the small portion of the Palatinate which they seemed ready to restore.
Colonel Suynton has again repeated his promise to be ready with all his officers and men at the end of this week.
The Hague, the 22nd September, 1630.
[Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
518. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Orange detained me longer in conversation than usual. Among other things he remarked, I know that the Spaniards are playing with us. I referred to the insidious negotiations of the Spaniards, which they offer by means of the English. The prince promptly took me up and said that so far as he could see Ven would not obtain any satisfactory reply to his proposals made in the king's name, and that the States, while politely thanking the King of Great Britain, would finally dismiss the whole matter.
The Hague, the 23rd September, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
519. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Spaniards continue to give certain hope to the English ambassador that the Palatine will be pardoned and reinstated. Yet the business moves very slowly and the Duke of Bavaria will not restore the Upper Palatinate unless he is paid the 15 million florins down or is given Upper Austria in exchange, to which the emperor will never consent.
Ratisbon, the 23rd September, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
520. To the Ambassador in England.
You will send to Gussoni all the money, as instructed, with a full account. This decision is reasonable, because there are ceaseless difficulties at London making a levy of troops disadvantageous, while one has been arranged very easily and advantageously at the Hague.
Ayes, 109.Noes, 6.Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
521. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The cardinal has made no further reply to the English agent about Wake's coming. He merely told him that they would send orders to Fontane to treat about it with the king, and that in the meantime Wake should not leave Piedmont, because they do not consider him friendly. I have informed Soranzo of everything, because, although that kingdom is of no account (fuori d'ogni esistimatione) he may prevent any dissatisfaction, and I have added that so long as England persists that her ambassadors shall give the cardinal their hand, while he insists on his rank, there can be nothing but dissatisfaction, and so it would be better to keep on the Resident alone.
Lyons, the 29th September, 1630.
[Italian.]
Sept. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
522. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
At the repeated instances of the English ambassador they have deputed commissioners to treat with him about the pardon and restitution of the Palatine, and I fancy he will easily return to the emperor's favour and have that part of the Palatinate which is in the hands of the Spaniards, but Bavaria will not give up his share unless he has compensation.
Ratisbon, the 30th September, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]

Footnotes

1 A copy of this letter, dated from Rovigliasche, the 3rd September, 1630, is to be found in the Public Record Office, S.P. Foreign, Savoy.