Venice
October 1630

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1919

Pages

419-434

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: October 1630 ', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 419-434. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89276 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

October 1630

Oct. 2.
Senato,
Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
523. That at the request of the Resident of England leave be given for the export of some pictures and cases of glass (christalli) upon which the duty would amount to 40 ducats, free of that duty. (fn. 1)
Ayes, 83.Noes, 7.Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Venetian
Archives.
524. To the Ambassador in England.
You have 112,000 ducats remitted to you in various ways, and 10,000 ducats will have been paid you since by the agent of Bertolotti of Amsterdam. If you have not arranged any levy, you will already have carried out your instructions to send all the money to Gussoni at Amsterdam, and we are expecting to hear from you on the subject. We have nothing to add, as we have no letters from you this week.
Ayes, 73.Noes, 0.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
525. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ducal missives of the 6th and 13th ult. have reached me these last days. In the matter of the levy they bring me word that if I cannot arrange with Scott or someone else within the terms of my previous instructions, it will be necessary to let the matter fall through, and in that case I must advise the Ambassador Gussoni, and have the money transmitted to me sent to Amsterdam, taking note of what the credit of the merchants there may be, who make the letters of exchange, so that the money may remain in that mart, ready for the requirements of the state. The second direct me more decisively to let the negotiations fall through if I have not yet brought them to a term. Accordingly I find myself free from all responsibility and it only remains for me to see that the money gets to Amsterdam. The total amount remitted to me direct from Venice, through the medium of various marts comes to 102,000 ducats. Of this, 55,956 ducats 20 grossi are by this mart; 19,675 ducats 4 grossi by Antwerp, and 26,368 ducats by Amsterdam. The last should all come into the hands of Guglielmo Bertolotti, as from time to time I sent him the letters of exchange and the necessary provisions to raise the sum and forward it to me. I will now cancel that order and tell him to render account to the Ambassador Gussoni, to whom I will send full particulars so that he may superintend this. For the rest your Excellencies can give such orders as you consider necessary. With respect to those on Antwerp, which are in the name of Peter Richaut, I will treat with him so that the credit may be passed on to Amsterdam, always supposing that it is not necessary for the money to be sent here, upon which I have no information as yet. With respect to the money to be raised on this mart, that was done in two different ways. The first 32,000 are all ready, and I will have them transmitted to Amsterdam whenever I have a favourable opportunity. I will make arrangements about the others, which mature partly on the 9th, partly on the 16th and partly on the 23rd prox., until my instructions are fully carried out. For greater security and as a necessary precaution I will see that the letters are made payable to the Ambassador Gussoni. This week I have received from him one letter of credit of Bertolotti for the 10,000 ducats which your Excellencies ordered to be remitted to me. I will send them back, as there is no longer anything to be done with them here, and from time to time I will advise your Excellencies of the amount of money I have transmitted.
Enclosed with the missives of the 13th I found duplicates of some letters which have already reached me, and a copy of the letter to the Hague. The advices contained in that will serve me for purposes of comparison.
The Marquis of Hamilton has been to see me again, and brought me the enclosed paper. I thought it necessary to have it put in cipher, though I did not consider it advisable to have it translated from the Latin. He pressed me hard for a definite decision, so I shall wait to hear the good pleasure of your Excellencies in the matter. He told me something of the money which he has received from the king here. He assured me that it had been disbursed for this occasion solely, in spite of all that had been published to the contrary. The Count of Ferensbec is still here and seriously ill. If he should die I think that this business might undergo some change, because it is done under his direction.
To-day the king and the Ambassador Coloma have sent back couriers to Spain. The latter has recently met the Lords of the Council apart several times, although the Court has been a long way off. Recently when the king was staying here for a single day, they met to give him audience all together.
The day before yesterday I met the Ambassadors of France and Holland. At the bottom of this affair France said he had found out that the difficulties in the way of this accommodation all came from the side of the Spaniards, who now ask, not only for refuge in the ports of England, but that when their ships enter they shall be understood to be under the protection of the king here, who shall be bound to give them escort when they put to sea again, or promise them immunity from attack by the Dutch. This business could not possibly be concluded upon worse conditions. But from the proposals of Vane in Holland, which are supposed to be a pretext for separating themselves and from so many other things indicating the absence of confidential relations, it is only too clear how little they think here of cultivating sound principles, and I am afraid that they will continue to bear out more and more what I have represented so many times.
Yet there are some who believe that the peace will be concluded, as the object of the Spaniards has been to keep the negotiations alive in order to make the friends of the king here uneasy, and especially the Dutch, turning this to their own advantage with them. I have pointed this out to the Dutch ambassador, who is inclined to share my opinion.
The ministers here have expressed great resentment at the printing of Ven's proposals in Holland. They consider that it shows a lack of respect, because they do everything here in order to keep their operations with the Spaniards concealed. I observe that even the French do not hesitate to encourage to some extent the dissatisfaction of the States with them here, and perhaps they would like to see them altogether separated, with some idea of advantage should a fresh rupture occur. From what I see and hear every day the French are ill disposed towards the English, while the ill will of the English to the French could hardly be stronger. Accordingly the general opinion is that once the diversion of Italy is out of the way, the state of affairs will be worse than it was in the past, and it is thought that they deeply regret in France losing this opportunity, which could not be better, seeing the present absence here of counsel, money and everything else that would be essential in the case of another war (onde e l'opinione piu commune che levata la diversione d'Italia fin hora, le cose sarebberono a peggiori termini che non sono state per il passato, e si crede che molto increschi in Francia di perder la congiontura che non potrebbe migliore, trovandosi qui mancamento di consilio, di denaro e di tutte le altre cose che sarebbero piu necessarie se si venisse a nuova guerra).
Four days ago a nephew of the Secretary of State arrived here from Holland. Ven is supposed to have sent him, but the Ambassador Joachim has no advice. The States have made some fresh arrangements about English cloth exported to the Netherlands, and I fancy that by a severe prohibition of that trade on some pretence of fraud they have given occasion to the merchants to make loud lamentations. The ambassador told me about it, expressing some regret that this had occurred under present circumstances.
The last letters from France have brought news of the truce arranged under Casale. The Ambassador Fontane concealed so far as possible the condition for giving the town and citadel to the Spaniards, but in the end it has been published everywhere. I had the news from the Ambassador Contarini, and it is supposed that if the death of the Marquis Spinola which is thought to have taken place, (fn. 2) does not put a stop to their successes, the fortress will ultimately fall into the hands of the Spaniards. It would be impossible to portray the strong feeling of the majority of the Lords of the Council at the idea that things might turn out otherwise; and similarly, at the news of the serious illness of the marquis, one noticed a universal sorrow throughout the Court. If worse were to be expected it is impossible to imagine what they would look like.
London, the 4th October, 1630.
[Italian, the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.526. Memorandum of the MARQUIS OF HAMILTON to the VENETIAN AMBASSADOR.
Sex ego millia militum in Britania conscribere teneor, quibus armaturam omnem suppeditavit Ser. Rex Suediae, pulverem et perium et glandes feritormentarios exercitui sexdecem millium necessarios.
Idem Ser. Rex, ex promisso, tenetur quo et quando voluere exercitum ad me mittere peditum quatermillenorum, equitum duomilliumque; unius anni spacio allere.
Praeterea idem Ser. Rex duo Reggimenta in Germania Domini Ferimsbergi ductum seguitura conscribit, horum alterutrum duobus millibus constat. Ab eodem Ser. Rege quadraginta tormenta bellica ad me missa sunt, quorum duodecim murorum agerit; et demolendis menibus idonea sunt.
Idem Ser. Rex illud in me transfert quod Ser. Rex Galliae ipsi obtulit, nempe numorum aureorum millia annuatim trecentena.
Ser. Rex ac Dominus meus mihi quinquaginta millia librarum Anglicarum decernit, quorum viginti jam data accepi. Naves etiam ad militem transportandum concedit, fide regali, mihi obligata naves etiam se auxilium daturum quam fortasse fas mihi fuerit dicere.
Ad questa mea a Ser. Rege Gallorum responsum adhuc non accepi, de ejus autem ad hoc negotium animi propensions nullus dubita, cum tam magno illius comodo illud venturum sciam.
Ser. Bohemiae Rex quantum auxilii ab eo expectari potest spondet summamque argenti eo nomine mihi solvere dum decrevit.
Ab ordinibus inferioris Germaniae octo illa hominum millia quae sub Comite Gullielmo militant expecto.
Quicquid autem auxilii a florentissima Venetum Republica sperare possum gravissimo eorum consilio et propensa voluntati integrum relinquo. Scio enim eos hoc in negotio tam sibi ipsi quam aliis Europeae Principibus perutili spem etiam superaturos, ab illis tantum peto, ut quid facturi sunt intra trimestre spacium significent.
Oct. 7.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Germania. Venetian Archives.
527. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It now seems that they are making great difficulties about the restoration of the Palatine. They propose to the English ambassador that before he is freed from the imperial ban he shall agree that the Roman Catholic faith shall be received in all that state, and that all the goods, churches abbeys and other fees taken from Catholics shall be restored, and that the emperor shall appoint governors for the fortresses; such hard terms that they are unlikely to be accepted. This may be due to the Spaniards, who would be reluctant to abandon the Lower Palatinate, because of its communications with Flanders.
Ratisbon, the 7th October, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Oct. 8.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
528. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Ven redoubles his instances and offices for a reply to the proposals he made in his king's name. I fancy that in his private offices he expresses himself in a way calculated to make the States very uneasy, who fear that the English, in settling with Spain, if they cannot hope to be mediators with these Provinces, may possibly lead on to something very harmful, affording the Spaniards facilities for their land and sea forces, to the detriment of the States. Accordingly the members of the government are at present consulting together to arrange some form of reply which will save their interests here and keep them free from direction by England on the one hand, while avoiding offence or the idea of any separation from that king on the other.
Colonel Suynton and his troops have left the channel of Amsterdam and are now at the port of Texel. Some of the troops of Colonel Vanharten are also gathered there, and if they get a good ship they will go with Suynton. Secretary Zoncha is at the Texel for the muster of these troops. I will send the muster rolls next week.
The Hague, the 8th October, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 11.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
529. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
No letters have arrived from Italy this week, and the advices from other parts are so scanty that these present can bring but little worthy of the notice of your Serenity. My instructions to remit the money to Amsterdam oblige me to say something of what I have done up to the present. I have written to Bartolotti to render account of the 26,368. ducats which ought to reach his hands and to hold them at the disposition of the Ambassador Gussoni, ready to obey his orders. I have written to his Excellency, and enclose all the copies herewith in my own discharge.
Of the money which I have here, the 32,000 ducats which I received first are mature, amounting to 6,200l. sterling of their money here. I have done everything in my power to remit it to Amsterdam, and have made an arrangement for the entire sum, with Peter Richaut for 4,200l. and with Abraham Beek for 2,000l. as I negotiated with them to deal at the current rate of the mart, I sent the Secretary Zon to the exchange, which is the customary place of such business, to see what they were doing. I applied to Richaut, with whom I have dealt more particularly, because of his relations with Bentio at Venice and because he has had a large share in these remittances. He gave a note of current prices dated the 24th September, old style, where it appeared that for Amsterdam it was not done at more than 36. 3. 4. I took this in good faith as the firm is one of the soundest, and arranged at 36. 3 for the entire sum, and I had given orders to have letters of exchange, as a matter in which I had no reason to suspect any double dealing. But as I would not neglect any precautions I took steps to see other notes of exchange for the same date, and I found that all of them were higher, so that your Serenity would stand to lose more than 3 per cent. I was much annoyed at this very dishonourable behaviour, and repudiated the bargain. Richaut tried to excuse himself, declaring that he had been deceived by the broker, who is his own brother in law, who gave him the note of exchange, which was the only one in the whole market at that price. I accepted his excuses for what they were worth, and in spite of his bad behaviour, in order not to leave the business incomplete, I offered a fresh arrangement at the legitimate market price of 37. 2, even without the odd two. Neither he nor Beek would accept it. This showed me more clearly than ever that they did not mean to abide by the current rate, but to take advantage of my confidence to pillage me, because I really had great confidence in this Richaut, especially in a matter so accessible as the current rates of exchange, which are printed and issued to anyone who wants them. Accordingly I remonstrated the more sharply, because it would not have done him any harm to have acted straightforwardly, as he could always have made his profits in the usual way and could have held to the price which suited him best, without trying to deceive me with a false note.
The present state of the matter is as follows: he will only agree to 36. 3, which is very low and unreasonable, and I only agreed to it because I thought it was the real market rate. I find others who would undertake it at 37.2, the true current rate, a gain to your Excellencies of more than 3½ per cent. on the 36. 3, which is worth considering on a large sum; but as I am not acquainted with the individuals, although they have good credit on the mart, from what brokers, who must not be trusted too implicitly, tell me, I have not as yet been able to make up my mind to strike a bargain with anyone, especially as Richaut himself, before this irregularity occurred, sent me word that those who ask for money are dangerous when it is a question of giving them more than 1,000, two for each (questi che dimandavano danaro sono pericolosi quando si tratta di darle piu di che 1,000 due per uno). I am aware that there is competition between merchants, especially when this Richaut expected to have the entire advantage for himself. However, in such matters the smallest shadows require great consideration. I wish to serve you with safety and advantage, and I can assure you that I have never been so upset since I began my service, because money matters are ticklish, and besides there was this attempt at fraud on the part of the one who had the direction of the whole affair to add to my confusion. However, I have again tried to see what can be done with Richaut, and have sent to tell him that if he will not take the money at the market rate, I suggest sending it by other merchants and that he shall act as warrant for all; and I have offered him one-third per cent., which is the usual. He would not give me a definite answer to-day, but referred it to to-morrow. I will do everything in my power. Most assuredly, if I knew how to manage this business without having anything more to do with him, I would do so most gladly, because he has touched me more nearly than might appear at first sight, for if the original arrangement had been carried out, it would not have seemed either reasonable or proper at Venice when it appeared that the rates of exchange were so much higher than I had arranged for.
The money at Antwerp amounts to 19,675 ducats 4 except a small sum which was at fifteen days sight, and therefore I think it will come here. The rest will be sent on from there to Amsterdam, under the name of the Ambassador Gussoni, or in some safer way, according to the orders sent by Richaut to his agents, the Annoni. The account of everything should come here, and in due time your Serenity shall have the particulars. I can assure you that I am not without apprehension of some fraud similar to the one already attempted, because this Richaut is certainly the most grasping merchant in Europe, and he seeks a profit even where it is neither reasonable nor honest.
The French ambassador has sent his secretary to Lyons very unexpectedly, although no very urgent reason has transpired, beyond the interests of trade, which are not adjusted yet, after the peace. The restitution of the booty is disputed on both sides, especially in the case of Canada, to which the French attach great importance, while they care little about it here because they are in possession. When Castelnovo left it had been arranged that everything should be decided within three months, but the compact has not been kept. Perhaps there is some other motive for this despatch, such as the going of Wake to France, upon which they seem to insist here, although it is clear that that minister is by no means the person to encourage intimate relations between the two crowns. I will not enlarge upon this, because your Excellencies will have heard all the most relevant particulars on this subject from France. For my part I have taken advantage of this despatch to inform the ambassadors there of all that I have been able to find out.
Yesterday they sent another courier to Spain. It becomes more and more clear that the peace is arranged. I have been told that in order to remove difficulties upon certain points about trade, which delayed the conclusion, they have agreed that representatives from both sides shall meet at Antwerp to arrange some compromise. With respect to the subject of refuge in the ports I gather that the king does not wish anything to appear in the articles, but promises in good faith to give immunity in the ports, and with respect to the sea he does not wish any alteration to be made in the treaty of the king his father. It is impossible to find out anything authentic upon what has been decided about the interests of the Palatine. It is said that they have required that prince to give absolute full powers and free remission on all his claims to the king here. He had made some difficulties before conceding this, but finally a threat to abandon him made him give in, and he promised to accept gladly everything that the King of Great Britain might arrange in his interests.
They are waiting to hear from Ratisbon of the negotiations of the Ambassador Anstruther, and upon that all their resolutions depend. The Dutch ambassador told me that four days ago the king remarked to one who was deep in his confidence that if he did not have satisfaction in the matter of the Palatinate the peace would not be made. This is believed to be his intention, but it may not prove so easy to realise, and he may rest satisfied with what he can get, because they have impressed upon him that peace is absolutely necessary.
London, the 11th October, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 13.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
530. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Ambassador Ven, ill pleased at the delay in answering his proposals, continues his instances, though without success so far, as he could not even learn the time when the assembly of Holland will meet again, in which they are to discuss his proposals. So he talks, with some bitterness, of having to leave in six or eight weeks at most, for the service of his king.
The Prince Palatine came to see me at once on his return from Rhenes. He spoke about his affairs in negotiation at Ratisbon, and seemed not altogether without hope that by means of England the Spaniards might find some way of restoring his fallen fortunes. He complained bitterly of the Duke of Bavaria for claiming the title of elector from Anstruther and Rusdorf, a thing he declared to be unbearable and impossible. He said Bavaria was playing with the French in pretending he wished to enter a league with them against the House of Austria. I have good reason for thinking that the basis of the negotiations between Bavaria and the French is for the defence of the Palatinate in case the Spaniards come to terms with England and wish it to be restored, so I confined myself to generalities.
The States are ready to respond to Camerarius's demands for help for his master, but nothing has been decided. If England, as Ven asserts, encourages Sweden with some assistance, they say they will be the more ready to do their share. In that connection Ven informed the ministers here that his king had recently sent a gentleman express to Sweden to arrange some treaty about this. He also states that the people of England are at last disposed to grant the king five million florins, to be paid with the benefit of varying rates, but they do not believe here that without the consent of parliament the king will be able to find anything like the sum on which his ambassador descants.
The queen, the Palatine's wife, is approaching the birth of her twelfth child.
The Hague, the 13th October, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 14.
Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.
531. To the Ambassador in England.
Your last letters do not require a long answer, as your last advices which only arrived this evening, the courier of Augsburg not having arrived, leave us uncertain about the levy, whether it is arranged or abandoned, and if the money has been sent to Gussoni. What else we have to say is in the copy of the letter sent to him, which is for your information.
Ayes, 95..Noes, 0.Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
532. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Two ships are ready to sail with the troops. They have 528 soldiers on board, partly Suynton's and partly. Vanharten's. Col. Suynton is about 86 men short of his numbers, so I have insisted on his giving back the money for levying them. I have remonstrated, but he has pointed out the impossibility of doing more, alleging the desertion of many, who escaped from the ships after receiving money from him. I know as a fact that he is cleared out of money. He showed me that he had compromised his affairs greatly by the debts he had been obliged to contract to fulfil his bargain.
The Hague, the 14th October, 1630.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Germania. Venetian Archives.
533. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The negotiations of the English ambassador are not going smoothly, as the proposals made to him are very difficult to accept. The general opinion is that it is a device of the Spaniards to avoid giving up the fortresses. It is stated at Court, however, that all the fortune of that prince is made by the Duke of Bavaria, and once the diet is dissolved the Spaniards will try and have him put in possession by the emperor, as it is too important to conclude peace with the King of England, on whom also depends the establishment of the truce with the Dutch.
Ratisbon, the 14th October, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]
Oct. 15.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
534. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Secretary Zoncha has returned from the Texel after having embarked 508 soldiers with Colonel Suynton himself on the ships Stella and Cicogna. The colonel went on the former, one of the finest and most powerful ships in all Holland, well supplied with all necessaries and with a good number of sailors and a quantity of guns. Colonel Suynton chose it for himself and his officers, who number 145, persons of the best quality and far better, I hear, than those sent in the first fleets. The colonel wanted to keep the best troops with himself. Two hundred and ninety-one soldiers embarked on the Stella, 145 of Suynton and 156 of Vanharten, who has also sent fine troops.
The Hague, the 15th October, 1630.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
535. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The States have seized upon the departure of the Prince of Orange as an excuse for delaying the reply to the Ambassador Ven, alleging that they must await his return before they convoke the assembly of Holland in which his proposals will be discussed. With increasing disgust he thus sees the reply constantly postponed. Letters from Rusdorf and the English ambassador at Ratisbon to the Princes Palatine bring very hard proposals and very restricted offers for the settlement so much desired. The emperor claims that he shall renounce the title of elector and abjure all understanding with princes hostile to the House of Austria. If he then submits to the emperor they may restore to him some small part of his dominions. He is debating some reply to this. It is thought that in the end this unhappy prince will have to drink the cup to the dregs.
We hear by letters from Brussels that a gentleman has passed through that city sent by the Ambassador Colonna from London to Spain, leaving a report that he was taking the signature of the peace between the King of England and the Catholic.
The Hague, the 17th October, 1630.
[Italian.]
Oct. 19.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
536. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I am so distressed at the great loss the state has sustained that I can hardly hold my pen. Very early this morning the sad news spread at the Hague that poor Colonel Suynton with his officers and men were all drowned in a fearful storm. In the evening an ensign of the lieut.-colonel of Vanharnem arrived, (fn. 3) who told me that on the night of the 12th inst. about midnight Colonel Suynton's ship with 300 men were overtaken by a tempest and all drowned except one, who escaped on a piece of wood and was picked up by the other ship. The storm continued without abatement on the following day and even grew worse, bringing the ship in which he was into great peril. Reduced to desperation the men took to the boats, which were instantly swamped, and only 33 men, including this ensign, escaped, reaching the port of Texel as by a miracle.
The Hague, the 19th October, 1630.
[Italian.]
Oct. 25.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
537. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
These last days I have been without letters from Venice, but they arrived at last two days ago. With them came the ducal missives of the 20th and 27th ult. and a copy of the letters to the Ambassador Gussoni enclosed, as well as a copy of the decision about the lodging of ambassadors extraordinary. The repeated instructions to remit all the money I received to the Ambassador Gussoni have been carried out for the most part by now, because, as I have reported, Bartolotti has received orders to render account of the money which should come into his hands through the remittances sent to him by me, to be realised at Amsterdam, amounting to 26,368 ducats; and the Hanoni of Antwerp have also received instructions to remit to Amsterdam the 19,675 ducats 4. This will all be ready together. I have also overcome the difficulties and frauds of the merchants and have remitted to his Excellency 6,000l. sterling of the 6,200l. realised from the first 32,000 ducats. In this way I have discharged myself so far of 78,043 ducats 4. I enclose a note of the exchanges which I have made. I reserve the full account and all the particulars until such time as I have remitted the whole. In the meantime I have succeeded in making my arrangements with some advantage, as I have saved more than 1,000 ducats from what Richaut proposed to appropriate to himself in the first offers which he made. I required him to be the guarantor, although I really do not think it was absolutely necessary, and I should not have done so had not your Excellencies so commanded; any way the precaution will serve for greater security, and the interest will be one-third per cent., as is customary. I will remit the rest of the money, which is not mature yet, by instalments, as it matures, and everything will be ready by the 23rd prox. I need say no more upon this subject, except that I have not had the disposal of the 10,000 ducats which were to be remitted to me by the Ambassador Gussoni; because when instructions reached me to transmit all the money to his Excellency, I at once sent back the letters of credit which had been forwarded to me, as I expect he has informed your Serenity.
It is to be hoped that so great an outlay of money may be seconded by better fortune, because two vessels have perished in a storm at sea, which were taking the men of Suynton's regiment, and from what I can gather from the numerous soldiers who have arrived here, the colonel himself is drowned. They tell me that on the 8th inst. two vessels left the Texel, one called the Three Kings and the other the Swan. The storm rose on the 14th and the Three Kings was driven on to the Godwin Sands, between Calais and Dover, where it sank, without a single sailor escaping. They assure me that more than 400 soldiers and Colonel Suynton himself were on board that ship. The Swan, which is a smaller ship, was better able to extricate itself from those straits, and it reached Margate. From what I can gather all the soldiers ran away. They may number some 250. The majority of them have arrived here and have appealed to this embassy for assistance. I had to come to their aid, because remarks were being made among merchants and others which compelled me to do so, for public considerations. I wanted to take their depositions, but this proved impossible, because no one could so much as tell me the name of his captain. Some of them, however, told me that there was a Captain Valon on the Swan, the ship they were on, and from what I have heard from others quarters I believe he was serjeant-major. He has gone back to Holland in the same ship and will have given his account to the Ambassador Gussoni. He certainly did not show such diligence as he ought, because when the ship arrived safely in port he might have prevented the soldiers running away. When I reproved them for their fault they told me that the captain of the ship had compelled them to go on shore, which is not very likely. I understand that the Three Kings was a very large ship, and well armed with artillery, but very poorly manned, and this is the real reason why so many Dutch ships are lost.
The Duke of Soubise has recently been to treat with me for a levy of 4,000 English. He brought me letters of credence from the Duke of Rohan, his brother, of which I enclose a copy with the answers. He supposed that I had orders to assist him with money and other things for the same purpose. I told him that I had no orders and to some extent showed him that if his brother had bound himself to your Serenity the commissions had not reached me. For the rest, in case he needed offices, I expressed my readiness to help him, but there can be no need of this because he has already obtained the king's permission. Soubise availed himself of this occasion to tell me of his desire to enter the service of your Excellencies. He was most lavish in his expressions of regard, but did not explicitly state what his demands might be, though he let fall something which showed me that he aimed at the appointment which Don Luigi d'Este held. He made me promise to inform your Serenity of his desire, not as a definite demand for such an appointment, but in general terms, representing his readiness to serve you. I replied in the way I thought most suitable and for anything further referred him to your Excellencies' commands, which I would impart to him. I do not consider it necessary to describe his rank or capacity, because he has made himself well known in recent events, and I would not venture to interfere where the infallible prudence of your Excellencies abundantly suffices.
London, the 25th October, 1630.
Postscript.—M. de. Soubise also gave me a draft of articles for the levy. I do not send it because the terms are the same as those of Colonel Scott.
[Italian.]
Oct. 25.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.
538. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Herewith I enclose a copy of the articles of peace with Spain. I obtained it through the French ambassador, who assured me that it was exactly like the original. The Palatine is not mentioned, but it is thought that there is some separate document for him. Not much importance must be attached to this, however, because the Spaniards promise no more than to be mediators for the removal of the imperial ban, and that when this is obtained from the emperor they will immediately restore the five fortresses which they hold in the Palatinate. Some think that the zeal for the interests of that prince is not so great as it used to be, because the king sees the succession established, and hopes that it will constantly become more so, as the queen is pregnant once more. This respect, which destroys the great hopes the Princess Palatine might have entertained of an establishment for herself and her children in the event of her succession, ought really to make the king more eager to try and re-establish her in her dominions. But as, while there were no children, the people themselves clamoured for her, in the hope of having her one day as their mistress, that intercession has now ceased, and consequently those who do not wish to irritate them more are somewhat reserved, so she finds herself deprived of all support, that of the king not being so strong as it ought, because of the jealousies which have passed between them, which have corroded the bonds of kinship more than suits the interests of that house (questo rispetto che leva le speranze grande che poteva haver la Palatina di accomodar se stessa e li figlioli, se fosse venuto il caso della successone, dovrebbe senza dubio maggiormente incalorir il Re a procurar di rimetterla ne' suoi stati; ma perche fino che non vi sono stati figlioli il popolo medesimo riclamava per lei, con speranza di doverla haver un giorno per padrona, hora cessando questa intercessione e per conseguenza qualche riserva in quelli non ardivano irritarlo maggiormente, si trova essa priva d'ogni appogio, non essendo quello del Re cosi forte come dovrebbe, in riguardo delle gelosie che sono passate tra di loro, che hanno corroso li legami del sangue piu di quello ricercherebbe il servitio di quella casa).
The States will take note of the way in which they are mentioned. Their ambassador here told me that his masters are as far from thinking of making use of the King of England to gain the ear of the Spaniards as the French would be to listen to the proposals made to them. The King of England would find that he had obtained very scant benefit for them by his negotiations. He clearly shows that he is not pleased, but some such monster was always expected from this pestiferous parturition. Yet there are some who believe that the matter will not be concluded according to the terms of these articles, which agree with the copy drawn up here, because so far the Spaniards have declared most steadfastly that they will not permit trade freely in all parts of the Catholic's dominions, but they wish to renew their dominance in the Indies, without allowing the English to claim any share in the trade. Yet last Sunday all the Lords of the Council were summoned to the country place where the king was staying, (fn. 4) and the Secretary of State asked their opinion upon the position in which this affair then was. From this it is argued that no great change can take place. In addition to this they all discussed in the Council the means which had been employed up to that time for the restitution of the Palatinate. The secretary said he had instructions from his Majesty to remove the misgivings aroused by seeing that they were not pursuing any business with France, as there was a report that great offers had been made from that quarter for this same end. He therefore stated that M. de Castelnovo when here made some overtures, but he had not full powers to conclude anything. But owing to the anxiety he professed to carry the matter further, he promised that when he returned to France he would treat of this matter particularly and advise them here, for the establishment of some satisfactory concert. But since then he has not made a sign, and his successor, the Marquis of Fontane, has never proposed anything of note. He thus tried to give the whole Council the impression that France, being at present occupied with Italy, cannot think seriously of affairs elsewhere, and even if peace ensues there they are not likely to be so favourably disposed towards the affairs of Germany as is stated. In addition to this some notions were promulgated calculated to disabuse those lords of any good opinions they might have of that quarter. Accordingly, as a necessary consequence, they tried to bring about the treaty with Spain, and in order not to betray their propensity towards this accommodation they decided to send two ships to Spain to fetch away Cottington if the Spaniards raised fresh difficulties.
I am told that the Ambassador Anstruther writes from Ratisbon that he finds the electors well disposed about removing the imperial ban from the Palatine's sons, if means are found to ensure respect for the Catholic faith. But little can be discovered here about such transactions, and so far I have received no special advices from quarters which would throw more light on the subject. I should therefore be glad if your Excellencies would order me to be more punctually supplied.
These last days the king has performed the ceremony of the Knights of the Garter. He honoured the Marquis of Hamilton with the dignity, thus indicating more clearly his approval of that nobleman's decision to go the King of Sweden. The reports about that monarch are uncertain. The commonest rumours say that having kept the field for two months, as he undertook, to see what the other princes would do to help him, he has finally retired, as he did not have the support and assistance which were promised.
London, the 25th October, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.539. Copy of the Articles of the Peace with Spain.
[Italian; translated from the French; 23 pages.]
Oct. 27.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
540. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The Prince of Orange is still in Zeeland, but he is likely to return soon to the Hague. He is eagerly desired, especially by Ven, who moves every stone to obtain a reply. This has been postponed upon various pretexts, the States being unwilling to deal with the matter before they see how things will turn out in Germany and Italy. Moreover, even if they wished to give ear to the proposals for a composition with which the Spaniards are so pressing, they have no intention of putting their interests in the hands of the English, who offer their mediation in order to be able to bargain better with the Spaniards. The States are well aware of this, and Ven, being acquainted with this, has written to England that there is very little hope that the assembly will give him any conclusive answer. I know, however, on the best authority and from conversation with the ministers that they greatly fear a conclusion between the Spaniards and English here, which is whispered to be already established, not so much at being abandoned by that Crown, but because they strongly suspect that the English will obtain the advantages denied to them as mediators, by making terms with the Spaniards prejudicial to these provinces. There is some confirmation of this from Antwerp as well as London, as Rubens writes confirming the hasty despatch of the gentleman of Colona to Spain, not only with the final arrangements for the peace, but to settle the day and ceremonies for its announcement. This has made a great impression here and they are determined to keep their affairs separate from those of England, but they wish to do it so as not to give offence to that king or as little as possible. This is the point that they debate most frequently. They are therefore determined to delay as long as possible the declaration of their intentions to the King of Great Britain. Three days ago they sent an express to their Ambassador Joachim so that he might mollify the bitter feeling showed by Ven at the delay of the answer to his proposals. Meanwhile the Infanta, who pushes forward the truces as much as she can, spreads reports of an accommodation with England and in Italy as well, and that the French have brought matters at Ratisbon to the point of conclusion. Although all these things are not credited, as coming from a suspect quarter, yet they have caused a considerable stir.
The Hague, the 27th October, 1630.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 28.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Signori Stati. Venetian Archives.
541. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in the Netherlands, to the DOGE and SENATE.
I understand that the arms on the Cicogna will all be recovered, but I have no hope of those on the Stella, which sank in a place called le Duyne, the most dangerous part for shipwrecked vessels near England, where they say that not even the timbers of wrecks can be recovered. (fn. 5)
The Hague, the 28th October, 1630.
[Italian.]
Oct. 28.
Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Germania. Venetian Archives.
542. SEBASTIANO VENIER, Venetian Ambassador Extraordinary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassadors of England and Lorraine have been to call upon me. The English ambassador shows that he has little hope in his negotiations. He told me smilingly that the Spanish ambassador promises, when he has orders from his king, to perform the most weighty offices (di far gli ufficii muy poderose); these are his very words.
Ratisbon, the 28th October, 1630.
[Italian; copy.]

Footnotes

1 The purchases made by Charles in Italy of pictures and statues were sent home by the Roebuck, the London and the Peter Bonaventura. The second ship carried 30 chests of statues and four of pictures; 16 great statues were sent in the third. Rowlandson to Dorchester on the 11th and 25th Oct. S.P. Foreign, Venice.
2 He died on the 15th Sept. on the way from Casale to Genoa.
3 His name was Cornelius Manasses Vanderwille.
4 Hampton Court.
5 Sir Thomas Walsingham states that she sank on the 3/13 Oct. on the Kent coast, near the North Foreland, two miles from shore. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1629–31, page 366.