Venice
September 1631

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1919

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539-547

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'Venice: September 1631 ', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice: Volume 22, 1629-1632 (1919), pp. 539-547. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89287 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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September 1631

Sept. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
706. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
In order to prevent the English troops for the help of Sweden joining that army, of whom there is a report that they will land in the Netherlands, and march to join that king near Wesel, Tieffembach, who commands the imperial forces in Silesia, has orders to march promptly in that direction and to take every means to prevent the English advancing any further. However, more recent letters state that they will not take that route, but will land at Vuolgost in Pomerania, where many declare that they have already arrived.
Vienna, the 6th September, 1631.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
707. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
With respect to the relations with the English everything is referred to the meeting of the Court at Campiègne, with good hope of mutual satisfaction.
Paris, the 9th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
708. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Your Serenity's letters of the last of July have reached me recently. If any despatch was sent on the 25th I have not received it. With the others I have received what the Ambassador Veniero wrote about the Palatinate. This will serve to guide my offices with the ministers here. I have never failed to draw their attention to the proper considerations about that particular affair, in which his Majesty's reputation is so deeply pledged. In my last despatch I wrote how at the present time the hopes of those who manage affairs here have declined about obtaining any favourable issue, and no news has arrived since to change this. I notice the most just comments of your Excellencies about the tardy response to your own preciseness in the selection of an ambassador to this post. I have written before of the offices performed by me to induce them to send an ambassador to Venice, and with the arrival of Rolandson your Serenity will receive in his Majesty's own letters a very ample testimony to my constant representations. They have delayed sending one on the pretext of the plague out there, but now that God allows us to hope for some improvement, I am very sanguine that the expectations they gave me will be realised, which, as I have said above, his Majesty has confirmed to your Serenity.
I have received to-day the letters of the 8th and 14th ult. With the former I find the exposition of the Swedish ambassador and your Serenity's reply. In the other, besides the advices, I note commissions to confirm to the Ambassador Benavides, if he comes here, the satisfaction your Serenity received during the time of his residence with you. I will not fail to do this, since correspondence. with the Spanish ambassadors has been interrupted for a long while, because they have always claimed a pre-eminence. I will use caution so that the ambassador may rest satisfied, while the dignity of the state is maintained.
After the arrival of the queen mother at Brussels, they have in no wise altered their determination to have nothing to do with that affair. Some who would like to commit the king to some extent have proposed that at least a gentleman should be sent to visit her. This proposal having been rejected by his Majesty, it was suggested in the second place that the queen ought to send, out of filial duty. This has not been adopted either so far, and from the refusal of mere appearances it may readily be credited that they are still further form thinking of any more serious action. As yet no person has appeared, and no office has been performed which can have any connection with the proposals which the Spaniards declare ought to be made at Rome, in Savoy, and here for reinstating the queen. During these last days I have made such efforts as are possible, as the Court is still a long way off, to find out what views and resolutions they would be likely to take supposing such overtures were made here. I found evidence confirming their constant objection to have anything to do with the matter.
The ambassador of Poland has arrived, but he has not yet made his entry. He will be received with every demonstration of honour, and I think that they will even go beyond the usual arrangements, lodging him at the king's expense, in response to the treatment accorded to the ambassador of this king in Poland.
So far we do not hear that he has any other commissions except to express appreciation for the past interposition with the King of Sweden, although it is believed that he may prefer a request that the king here shall interpose once more for the continuation of the truce if not for the conclusion of peace. This should appear more clearly with the progress of his offices, and I shall not forget to inform your Excellencies of everything.
After judgment had been pending for a long time at the tribunal of the Admiralty, in a suit between the captain of a Dutch ship and some Spanish merchants about a ship taken by the former, of which the latter claimed restitution, a definite sentence has at last been delivered in favour of the Dutchman. The Spanish agent has claimed that this is wrong, and has obtained the suspension of the sentence, in spite of the strong opposition of the ambassador of the States. He is to go to-day to audience of the king about this. Yesterday, when I went to see him, he referred to the matter with great emotion, as a confirmation of other grievances of which he had spoken to me. He said the king allowed himself to be persuaded too readily to enable the Spaniards to do more and more in these matters of the Admiralty, contrary to the interests of the States. He told me he had spoken about it to the Lord Treasurer, by virtue of whose letter the sentence had been suspended, but he had only been able to get quite general expressions from him, which only helped to increase his dissatisfaction. Upon other occasions I have not failed to perform the best offices that I considered necessary, and I have always brought away the best intentions, but when their actions are the exact opposite I do not know what one can promise oneself for the future.
No news has arrived of the progress of the King of Sweden since the rout inflicted by him on Tilly's troops in the neighbourhood of Tangermond. Confirmation of this has arrived from various quarters, but there still remains some doubt about it. Meanwhile the Spaniards, in order not to allow any notion of injury to them to take root, publish that the loss was on the side of the Swede, and they find no difficulty in infecting many with their opinions.
London, the 12th September, 1631.
Postscript.—As I am about to close this despatch, the Master of the Ceremonies has intimated to me the arrival of the Abbot Scaglia at Rochester, twenty-five miles from here. I will not fail to bring to your Serenity's notice whatever else may happen.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
709. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
We hear from Poland that the Muscovite thinks of renewing the war with that kingdom, and has sent ambassadors to England, Holland and the King of Sweden, announcing his intention and asking for help.
Vienna, the 13th September, 1631.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
710. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
One Mazzerata, treasurer of the Cardinal of Savoy, has gone to England to direct the Abbot Scaglia to return to Piedmont. They are amazed that nothing has been heard of the abbot since he left Spain. Another gentleman from Savoy has gone to England with a present of armour for the king. With respect to the relations between England and France, the parliament of Rouen has had the goods taken in reprisals from the English sold for 300,000 francs. All Wake's indignation is turned against the Garde des Sceaux, who by a mixture of rigour and friendliness, assisted by a small party of the Queen of England, hopes to usurp the arbitrament between the two crowns. I hope that the matter will be satisfactory adjusted, if what Wake tells me is true, that he has sent to England, so that they may not proceed against the goods taken in reprisals there until they hear from him again, in order to avoid upsetting the relations between the two nations. It is evident that self interest and private passions always ruin the good of the state.
Verteri, the 15th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
711. ALVISE MOCENIGO, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the DOGE and SENATE.
It was the agent of the Catholic who sent about the queen mother. Nothing is known, except that the King of Great Britain does not seem inclined to act as mediator between the Most Christian and his mother, and the English reckon that they may obtain more credit with France than the Spaniards, who have had a hand in the machinations. The secretary of England has given them to understand this by his past offices with the ministers. It is true that the English are now on very confidential terms with this Crown, and may cause some uneasiness to the Most Christian and the cardinal. They say here that the French have given up collecting a fleet, because the King of England declared that he could not suffer it. We thus see England operating everywhere, but she does not seem to derive any profit from it.
Madrid, the 16th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Svizzeri.
Venetian
Archives.
712. MODERANTE SCARAMELLI, Venetian Secretary with the Swiss, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The passage this way of Thomas Rodlanson, the English secretary returning to reside with your Serenity, affords me the opportunity to send the enclosed packet, which reached me yesterday from France from the Ambassador Contarini by the ordinary of Geneva, who arrived two days later than usual.
Baden, the 16th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
713. GIOVANNI SORANZO, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Scaglia has not yet arrived at the Court. He is detained some miles away by a slight indisposition which has overtaken him. So far he has it stated that he wishes to make his entry privately, although he comes definitely as the ambassador of the Duke of Savoy. It is publicly stated that his business will be to try and procure the interposition of the king here with the States to facilitate the conclusion of the truces. Accordingly, the French ambassador and I, these last days, have performed the necessary offices with the ministers here, pointing out how little reason the King of Great Britain has to interest himself in such an affair, which is prejudicial to the public cause and to his own particular one as well, because if the States made the truces, the Spaniards, relieved of that great burden, would think the less about the restitution of the Palatinate. The French ambassador spoke very roundly to the Treasurer, and in general remarked to him that the Most Christian does not at present require anything from England except that she shall abstain from doing mischief, as she may not be in a position to benefit the public cause. As the first point, he excepted that of the truces; in the second place that of interposition between the emperor and Sweden, and finally he hinted that it would be taken very ill in France if he interfered in the affair of the queen mother and Monsieur. The ambassador communicated to me the replies he had received, which agree fairly well with what was said to me; namely, that with respect to the truces, they do not seem inclined to meddle; as regards interposition with Sweden they seem disposed to act in accordance with the issue of Anstruther's negotiations; Ven has been detained with this idea, and he has not started yet; with regard to the affairs of the queen mother and Monsieur, they turn their backs on them altogether.
The recent news which has arrived of the most important victory gained by the States in the neighbourhood of Bergonzon has greatly disheartened Scaglia. (fn. 1) The Spaniards had planned that undertaking a long time ahead, and had counted largely upon that conquest, which they considered certain, and Scaglia, to help his negotiations, had power to offer the restitution of all the conquests if the truce was concluded. The bottom has now fallen out of this, together with the infliction of so much injury, with the loss of so many troops, guns, munitions, money, the whole advantage rests with the States. They ought on every account to take this success as the most necessary and sound advice that could be given to them not to stay the course of their victories just now, against an enfeebled and dispirited enemy.
The same day that the Ambassador Joachim received this good news he came to tell me about it. He told me he considered the success was much more advantageous for them than the capture of Bolduch and Wesel had been. I did not miss this opening for pointing out to him with what advantage his masters might at present pursue their well laid plans, and let fall some words about this common talk about the truces. He took my hand and swore that his own private opinion was that they ought not to be made. He could also assure me that if his masters were assisted by the Most Christian and your Serenity they also would be very far from considering them. In reply, I pointed out to him what had been done up to the present for the public cause by the Most Christian and your Serenity, and remarked that this great victory would not have been so easy if the Spaniards had not had such considerab'e diversions in Italy. The States ought at present to make the most of their good fortune and believe that the princes, their friends, would always do for them the utmost in their power. At this point I spoke at great length of how your Serenity was burdened by the weight of past expenses, and by the desolation of your dominions by the plague, which had carried off the greater part of your subjects, and had consequently made the public revenues very scanty at present, and it would not be possible to make good these losses for a long time. He admitted the force of these arguments, but told me that it was not possible for the States to make war on the King of Spain single-handed.
There is news here just now that the queen mother has sent M. de Scian to the Hague to intimate to their High Mightinesses that her Majesty would like to withdraw to those Provinces. Many believe that it is because she is not entirely satisfied with the treatment she has received in Flanders. Others maintain that the move comes directly from the Spaniards, in order to receive two advantages therefrom; one to unburden themselves, if not altogether, at least in part, of the expense; the other to have a better pretext for sending freely advices and cautions to their supporters about this matter of the truce, for which they may also wish to make use of the queen herself. The Ambassador Fontane told me yesterday that it would be taken very ill in France if the States received her, so it is probable that they will not do so on that account.
Here they are expecting a gentleman, who should be the one sent by her. It is not really known with what instructions he will be coming here. There is no indication that it is to receive help, and there is no reason to hope for any, although the queen here seems very ardent. She has complained several times to the French ambassador that the Most Christian treats his mother so badly for the sake of Cardinal Richelieu. It seems that since this affair she has taken great offence and apparently she wishes to be altogether independent of France.
She has also spoken hotly to the ambassador about some circumstances which are connected with the carrying out of the last peace, and which concern the regulation of the religious whom she is to have in her service. After the arrival of the Grand Almoner here, she was to send back her confessor, who belongs to the Oratory, and Capuchins were to be put in his place. In France they have recently expressed themselves to Wake about it, and he having written here, the queen complained to the ambassador, and told him openly that she did not wish to be dependent on anything but her own good pleasure in what touched her household, and the Most Christian would gratify her by not meddling with it, with some other resentful expressions, so sharp that they will certainly compel the king, her brother, to take note of them and not to interest himself so much in her behalf, should occasion arise, as he has done in the past. Here they by no means regret that he should be to some extent estranged.
The ambassador of Poland made his entry last Saturday, being met by the royal coaches, and those of the ambassadors and of many lords. He had his public audience on Sunday in the royal hall. It was popular and crowded, as in response to what was done to the Ambassador Roe in Poland, they armed the burgesses of London, who were all drawn up in line in the large square near the palace during the time that the ambassador was at audience. He is lodged and defrayed at his Majesty's cost, although with some parsimony, which does not please him, and he is also offended because the queen has not put on mourning for the death of the Queen of Poland. (fn. 2) He has also found them very sparing of visits from the lords here and complains about it to every one very freely, saying that Roe was not treated in that way in Poland. The French ambassador has visited him, and I have done the same, and he returned both visits on the same day. His first offices were complimentary about the interposition for the truce with the King of Sweden; but because the Muscovite is about to make war on his master, supposing that this may be at the instigation of the King of Sweden, he is approaching the king here to interpose again and try to induce the Swede to cease from egging the other on, pointing out that such offices stand in the way of the conclusion of the truce, which otherwise ought to last four years.
When the Spanish agent arrived here he did not call upon the French ambassador; but he has been to visit the Polish one. The Ambassador Fontane has remarked to me upon this.
The ships which convoyed the Marquis of Hamilton have returned, and there are letters of his from Stettin, in which he asks that 2,000 recruits may be levied for him. The king granted this very promptly, and they are already beating the drum. The Lord Treasurer seems quite ardent about this business, and it is believed that he must certainly be thinking of getting ready for the possible meeting of parliament within a few months. By making use of the argument of this expedition he hopes not only to avoid persecution from them, but that he may be able to obtain for the king at least three subsidies. These would repay the expenses and might leave a considerable sum over. But this matter is not yet ripe, because between to be and not to be he may fear a fall, but hope to maintain himself (non e questo pero negotio matura, perche dall' esser al non esser puo lui temere di cader ma sperar di mantenersi).
London, the 19th September, 1631.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
714. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The ambassador of Denmark has arrived. His negotiations at present seem limited to finding some way of satisfying their High Mightinesses, who complain bitterly of the doubling of duties upon ships passing through the Sound. As this concerns England also, he seems anxious and hopeful that the Ambassador Ven will come to this Court, as was announced, although now there are various reports about his coming.
The Hague, the 22nd September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
715. To the Ambassador in England.
Advices. Receipt of his letters of 29th August. Satisfaction with his diligence. Enquiry shall be made about the Neli, with a desire to help them. Vote of 300 ducats for couriers and letters.
Ayes, 101.Noes, 0.Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
716. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
You did the right thing with the Sanjacco of Clissa to improve his good will to us. We also approve of your behaviour towards the English ambassador and the Caimecan about that saica which was taken from pirates by the English ship Golden Cock. You will continue to act in the same way, keeping on the alert for any designs which that ambassador may have upon the property of our subjects involved therein.
Ayes, 105.Noes, 1.Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
717. PIETRO VICO, Venetian Secretary in Germany, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The English ambassador, who cannot obtain any satisfaction or definite answer to his requests about the Palatinate, has sent a courier post to inform his king about it, and asks leave to return home. He declares that he cannot remain here any longer with reputation to that Crown.
Vienna, the 27th September, 1631.
[Italian; copy.]
Sept. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
718. ALVISE CONTARINI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
Owing to the absence of the king and the disorder of the Court, the English ambassador has not been able to make any progress in his affairs, and he complains bitterly, as does the Doctor Schenardi.
Troyes, the 28th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
719. GIOVANNI CAPPELLO, Venetian Ambassador at Constantinople, to the DOGE and SENATE.
The secretary of the English ambassador came to see me the day before yesterday about the saetia, bringing me a buiurdi of the Pasha about its restitution with its cargo, in spite of the Venetian claims. I think this was procured rather than a move of the Caimecan of himself. His indisposition prevents me from going to speak to him on the subject. The secretary spoke of a renewal of offices with the Pasha to overcome the point, and if they do not succeed, to wait for justice after the saetia has been sent to these parts.
The Vigne of Pera, the 29th September, 1631.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Signori
Stati.
Venetian
Archives.
720. VICENZO GUSSONI, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the DOGE and SENATE.
By the last letters from England Carleton is urged to return thither before the Abbot Scaglia leaves for France. From thence and from Germany comes news of a closer union between the Most Christian and Bavaria. This makes both England and these States uneasy, and Carleton suggests that it may further prejudice the interests of the Prince Palatine. The hopes of that prince are vanishing, as he hears of no progress or results achieved from the negotiations of Anstruther and Rusdorf.
The Hague, the 29th September, 1631.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 The remarkable action of Sept. 12th, on the Slaak near Tholen, in which the Dutch destroyed a naval expedition under Count John of Nassau, intended for the conquest of Zeeland.
2 Constance, second wife of Sigismund III, King of Poland. She died on the 10th July, 1631.